Skip to main content

Full text of "The American Jewish times outlook [serial]"

See other formats


THE LIBRARY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF 
NORTH CAROLINA 



THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 

ENDOWED BY 

JOHN SPRUNT HILL 

CLASS OF 1889 

FC296 
A£L 
v.29 
196U-6£ 



This book must not 
be taken from the 
Library building. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/americanjewishti1964unse 




5725 Kosh MashoHoh-September 1964 




Plantation style homes . . . built today by Lesco 

Move into the luxury of plantation living with a new Colonial 
Style Home by Lesco. Homes by Lesco are designed to give 
you the ultimate in comfort, convenience, and efficiency at a 
minimum cost. See coupon below. 



p"J^£2 J Color brochure on the all new 1964 
Lesco Homes, just fill out this coupon 
and mail today to - Lesco Homes, P. O. 
Box 751, Martinsville, Virginia. 



N 



ame 



Add 



ress 




LATE AGAIN? 

HOLD EVERYTHING 




Am 



JB fir 



in a Low-Temp Oven 



Husband late? Dinner can wait, kept table - warm in a 
Low-Temp oven. The new 140° temperature keeps food 
just right for hours with no danger of over- 
cooking. In the same oven, you'll find auto- 
matic timers you set and forget, and a meat 
thermometer for just-right roasts. This is the 
oven that thinks for itself — standard equip- 
ment on any Gold Star Gas range. 
NEW BUSINESS DIVISION • DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC UTILITIES. CITY OF RICHMOND 




What's Up Downtown? 




Your new First Federal building is up at Broad 
and Third. Watch for the grand opening. We're 
anxious to show it off to you. We think you'll like it. 

FIRST 
FEDERAL 

SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 
OF RICHMOND 




NATIONALLY ADVERTISED 



Cash in on what the 
Junior market saw 
in the February issue 
of Seventeen 

Turner Togs 

• New Styling 

• New Fabrics 

• New Color 
Combinations 

To Think Young 

Today 
Is To Think Big 



Headquarters in both Lynchburg, 
Virginia and Jackson, Mississippi. 

New York Showroom, 
1407 Broadway 




September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



3 




BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Joseph Barshay 

Wilsor. 
Jack Biller 

Greensboro 
Eli Bloom 

Greenville 
Herman Blumenthal 

Charlotte 
Chester a. Brown 

Greensboro 
Ben Clein 

Winston-Salem 
MontQ Cohen 

Winston-Salem 
Harry Diamond 

Charlotte 
Leon Eptein 

Rocky Mount 
E. J. Evans 

Durham 
Ellis Farber 

Weldon 
Murray Fitterman 

New Bern 
Sam Freedman 

Durham 
Noah Ginsberg 

Wallace 
Ben Goldberg 

Raleigh 
Louis Gordon 

Statesville 
S. W. Guyes 

Salisbury 
Maurice Honigman 

Gastonia 
Louis N. Howard 

New Bern 
Ira Julian 

Winston-Salem 
Stanley H. Kahn 

Raleigh 
Louis Kittner 

Weldon 

A. F. Klein 
Greensboro 

Sam Lavitt 

Hickory 
Morris Leder 

Goldsboro 
Sol Levin 

Burlington 
Albert Levine 

Raleigh 
Meyer Levinson 

Hendersonville 
Roberi G Liverman 

Roanoke Rapids 
Israel Mann 

Raeford 
Joe Mann 

Whiteville 
I. Margolis 

Williamston 
Phi! Michalove 

Winston-Salem 
Max I. Miller 

Greensboro 
Harold Needle 

Greensboro 
Charles Peal 

Greensboro 
Fred Pearlman 

Asheville 
Jack Peck 

Jacksonville 
Moses Richter 

Mt. Gilead 
Seymour Roth 

Roanoke Rapids 
Dr. JoseDh Schandler 

Asheville 

B. D. Schwartz 
Wilmington 

Sol Shapiro 

Charlitte 
Harrv Shor 

Raleigh 
M. Solomon 

Winston-Salem 
Morris Sosnik 

Win ston-Salem 
Harry Vatz 

New Bern 
Robert Weinstein 

Lumberton 
Jack Witten 

Gastonia 



Why You Should Identify With The 
North Carolina Association 
Of Jewish Men 

The North Carolina Association of Jewish Men is an unique organization in the Jewish Life of our 
country. There is no identical group in any other of the 49 states. 

The Association makes every effort to deepen the religious life, to stimulate Jewish affairs, to in- 
crease Jewish community activities, to administer funds for religious and charitable purposes — 
and to administer these programs. 

THE NORTH CAROLINA HOME FOR THE JEWISH AGED 

In cooperation with the North Carolina Association of Jewish Women. This home, on the spacious 
site in Winston-Salem, will fulfill a long-time dream and a great need. Now in the course of con- 
struction, this is the Association's most outstanding project. 

THE CIRCUIT RIDING RABBI PROJECT 

The Association has many outstanding achievements to its credit. Perhaps the first and foremost 
— and the one that gave it nation-wide publicity — is THE CIRCUIT RIDING RABBI PROJECT. 
In operation since 1954, this project has attained world-wide recognition and approval. It has serv- 
ed 14 different communities, with 325 families who have had no synagogue access. 

GOOD WILL AND INTER-FAITH PROGRAM 

This has been one of the most successful programs sponsored by this Association. A better know- 
ledge and greater understanding has emerged between the various faiths in our state, due to our 
educators lecturing and speaking at different churches and organizations and by teaching Hebrew 
at several N. C. Colleges as well as to a number of ministers enrolled especially for this course. 

THE JUDAICA LIBRARY 

This project is building up a collection of Hebraica at the University of North Carolina, making 
available to under-graduates and graduates a fund of Jewish history, philosophy and culture other- 
wise unavailable. This project may ultimately lead to the establishment of a Chair in Hebrew Letters 
at the University. 

THE NORTH CAROLINA ASSOCIATION OF TEWISH YOUTH 

In conjunction with The North Carolina Association of Women, this Association is sponsoring the 
work of our Jewish Youth in the State. 

THE STUDENT LOAN FUND 



This Fund, established in 1950, 
further their education. 



gives assistance to worthy students who are in need of help to 



You owe it to yourself, your family and your fellow Jews, to support the organization that is fur- 



thering the cause of Judaism in this State 



lorth Carolina Association of Jewish Men 



OFFICERS OF THE 
N. C. ASSOCIATION OF JEWISH MEN 

Chairman of the Board.. I. D. Blumenthal 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Executive Director Dr. William B. Furie 

Salisbury, N. C. 

President „ Philip Datnoff 

Hickory, N. C. 

President Elect Arthur Shane 

Lumberton, N. C. 

2nd Vice-President JJol Levine 

Charlotte, N. C. 

3rd Vice-President L William Schwartz 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Treasurer. Gerald B. Licker 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Secretary Marvin Zerdon 

Hickory, N. C. 



N. C. ASSOCIATION OF JEWISH MEN 
Lewis Bernstein, Membership Chairman 
1526 Scotland Avenue 
Charlotte, N. C. 



I am heartily in favor of this 10-Polnt 

Program, and I enclose $ to 

membership in the following category: 

MEMBER $ 10.00 

DONOR $ 25.00 

SPONSOR $ 50.00 

PATRON $100.00 

Name _.. 



(Minyan) 
cover mv 



Address 
City _. 



State 



4 



The American Jewish TIMES OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 




Mail saving hours are all the 
time! Remember it's regular sav- 
ing that accomplishes results 
and mail-saving is the perfect 
system to keep yourself on a 
program. 



4<Tc 



CURRENT RATE, PER ANNUM 
ON ANY ACCOUNT 

Security Federal Saving 
and Loan Association 



Sixth & Franklin Sts 



Richmond, Va. 





IANT 



FOOD STORES 
ARE THE BETTER 



EXTEND 



Best Wishes for a 
Happy Hew Tear 



BETTER FOODS 

FOR 
BETTER LIVING 




Much More in '64! 



STATE 
FAIR 



RICHMOND 

SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 3 



li linn mm - r * ^ 

ilMHMIlMwp^ ^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii'iifinnBi In i i 


• * 

■ I IE air j| 1 
tL%.. A A. A A A^ (p|fc^^S 


It.,- r ; » 





COLONIAL GROUP, Inc. 

4912 Augusta Ave. Richmond, Va. 

MORTGAGE LOANS — CONSTRUCTION LOANS 

FHA - VA - CONVENTIONAL 
Commercial and Residential 



• 7460 Tidewater Drive 
Norfolk, Virginia 

• 107-28 Street 
P. 0. Box 332 
Newport News, Va. 

• 224 Groveland Road 
Virginia Beach, Va. 



• 221 S. Church Street 
Charlotte, N. C. 

• 1511 K Street, N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 

• 30 Broad Street 
New York, N. Y. 



Consult Us for your Mortgage Needs 




mud* 



VOLUME XXIX • SEPTEMBER 19(51 



EDITORIALS 



NUMBER, 1 




Chester A. Brown, Editor 



Crises And Judaism In 5725 

Guest Editorial by Dr. William B. Furey, 
Executive Director, North Carolina Association 
of Jewish Men 

Days of Awe usher in the Jewish year 5725 as they have 
throughout the millenia of Jewish history. Following a period 
of intense personal preparation during the month of Elul, the 
Yomim Noraim, Rosh Hashonah, Yom Kippur and the inter 
vening Days of Repentance, signal a period of individual soul- 
searching, self-invenLory, cheshbon hanefesh. During this inter- 
val of psychological catharsis, man stands on the threshhold 
separating yesterday from tomorrow. Utilizing the imagery of 
the U-n'sah-neh Tokef, which epitomizes the central theme of 
the High Holy Days, man passes in judgment before his Maker 
as a sheep before its shepherd. During this judgment-passage, 
man's future is determined on the basis of past behavior, 
mitigated by resort to prayer, fasting and deeds of righteous- 
ness. These days bring man as close to God as present society 
allows. 

As man relates himself to Deity and contemplates his 
precarious position in the world, his significance becomes as 
a piece of dust. He becomes aware of the flight of time, as one 
year gives way to another; he begins to sense the vanity of 
material possessions, as he meditates over his frailty and the 
uncertainty of his life. In humility, as he permits his senses 
and intellect to guide him rather than passion and emotion, 
he is moved to acknowledge the Lord as the source of life and 
blessing, as did his forefathers throughout the ages. 

Contrary to popular opinion, these High Holy Days are 
not sad and gloomy; they are solemn and uplifting! They arc 
holy days, and in Judaism holy days are also holidays. Solem- 
nity and joy, in our faith, go hand in hand. We read in the 
Holy Writ that we must "rejoice with trembling." In acknow- 
ledging the supremacy of God, there is a spiritual exultation 
which transcends the physical trials. Thus, for instance, through 
fasting on the Day of Atonement, Jews endeavor to approxi- 
mate a complete spiritual life, to acquire an exalted mood 
which will continue throughout the year following to influence 
his thoughts and actions. True repentance can lead to new 
insights, to deeper happiness. The period of the Jewish New 
Year aims to help the Jew cast off the burden of a guilty con- 
science, which estranges him from God and his fellowmen, to 
extirpate hatred from his heart, to desire to express the best 
and noblest that is within him. Thus, if properly used, the 
Yomim Noraim can be days of spiritual uplift that will bring 
about inward changes in our life and contribute to a better 
society and true happiness! 

Here, as elsewhere in Judaism, the emphasis is essentially 
on the practice rather than the theory or abstraction. "Lo 
hamidrash ikar, elah hamaaseh— -Not the academic principle is 
primary, but rather the performance of the deed which is 



based on the principle," advocated our sages. A number of 
times in the course of the High Holy Day liturgy, for example, 
we recite a catalogue of sins, in the "Al chet." These are more 
than prayerful words to be uttered even in reverent mood, 
These represent a checklist of the potential errors of man - 
and, in their recital, the worshipper inventories himself, asks 
himself whether he has been guilty or innocent of each cata- 
logued sin. Where innocent, he pledges himself anew to such 
righteous behavior; and where guilty, he confesses the sin, 
tries to understand what motivated it, and then resolves to 
make every effort to avoid committing it in the days ahead. 

This annual stocktaking and resolution of more accep- 
table behavior in the eyes of God and man is central to Juda- 
ism. Mistakenly, many feel that attendance at synagogue and 
worship therein at this season clean one's slate for the future; 
but this is not so! Worship, fasting and repentance can atone 
Jewishly only for the sins man has committed directly against 
God. When man has sinned against his fellowman, he must 
first personally "make his peace" with his fellowman before 
taking his case to God. We recall with nostalgia our fathers 
making the rounds of those with whom they had dealings 
during the year ere they made their way to shul at this season. 

How relevant become these Holy Days in the autumn of 
1964! A country in the midst of revolution, a land which must 
choose a leader and a team of coworkers enveloped by passions 
and animosities, a world being torn with convulsions of anta- 
gonisms, a universe on the threshold of new discoveries and 
conquests — all of these throw down the gauntlet of a chal- 
lenge. As our late, martyred President, John Fitzgerald Ken- 
nedy so aptly put it, "Man holds in his mortal hands the 
power to abolish all forms of poverty and all forms of human 
life." Which shall it be? What role can we people of religion 
and faith play in the unfolding drama? When challenged. 
"Asked what you can do for your country," — and humanity, 
what will our answer be? 

Let us, therefore, take advantage of these High Holy 
Days. Let us throw ourselves into the penitential and human 
mood of our ancestors. Let us honestly take stock of ourselves; 
let us pray, reflect, meditate, confess and arise purified, re- 
solved to try to contribute to the reshaping of our society out 
of love and peacefully. Let us return to the sources where our 
fathers drew their strength and inspiration. Let us answer the 
trumpet summons "to bear the burden of a long twilight 
struggle year in and year out, rejoicing in hope, patient in 
tribulation, a struggle against the common enemies of man: 
tyranny, poverty, brotherly differences, disease and war itself." 
Let us, in sum, becoming co-partners with God these High 
Holy Days in helping Him establish His Perfect Kingdom of 
Peace on earth, "bim-hay-ro v'yomaynu — quickly in our 
time." 

Then, can we truly say, "Leshanah tovah tikasevu 
v'saychasaymu! May all be written and inscribed for a Happy 
New Year, 5725!" 



The American Jewish Times-Outlook, published monthly at 530 Southeastern Building. Greensboro. N. C. Chester A. Brown, Editor; David Bernstein, General Mtmager; 
Nathan Kessler, Manager, Virginia Office; Florence Byers, Virginia News Editor; Broad Grace Arcade, Richmond, Virginia. Member Seven Arts Feature Syndicate, Inc. $3.00 
per year payable in advance. Second-Class Postage paid at Greensboro, N. C. The views expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the publishers, but may bm 
published in the interest of ireedom of the press. The American Jewish Times-Outlook is owned and edited solely as an independent enterprise and is not a Jewish com- 
munity undertaking 



r, 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



PLAIN TALK By ALFRED SEGAL 



I Speak Up For a Holy Day 

My good papa . . . long, long, 
long ago when I was so young 
. . . would lead me aside to a 




ALFRED SEGAL 

corner of our living room ... to 
t -ill me how to live all through 
the year. It was a day or two be- 
fore Rosh Hashonah, and papa 
would say to me: "It's time for 
• ou to know how you should live 
next year." 

"Oh, I understand!" I exclaim- 
< d. "you mean Rosh Hashonah. 
We'll be going to schul that day 

. . you and me." 

And papa replied: "Oh, it's 
more than your going to schul. 
It is all about the way you'll live 
through the new year and through 
all the years afterward. Rosh 
Hashonah, is a season for getting 
ready to live better and better. So 
let us start now." 

I keep on remembering . . . 
even unto my ripe age . . . my 
papa's Rosh Hashonah philosophy 
. . . "Yes," he went on, "Rosh 
Hashonah has to do with being 
a decent person in the world and 
raring about our neighbors." 

He went on: "Well, there's our 
neighbor Johnson who isn't Jew- 
ish and so never is in schul. But 
we should care about him because 
he has been out of work for three 
months and needs our help. A 
good way for us to do about Rosh 
Hashonah is to help him and his 
familv with more to eat." 



But my poor young head ex- 
claimed: "Oh, papa, the Johnsons 
aren't Jewish and they don't be- 
long to Rosh Hashonah at all. So 
why should we celebrate our holi- 
day bv doing this for them?" 

And papa replied: "Sure, and 
we'll also do kindly for Jewish 
people who need to he helped, 
and there's that colored family 
up the street that's in need. We'll 
celebrate Rosh Hashonah by serv- 
ing them, even though we aren't 
at all right; but we are Jews who 
try to live up to God's teaching, 
and I hope you'll be living that 
way when you grow up . . . to 
be a righteous man in the xvorld." 

Yes, papa said this to me not 
only that one time of his life and 
of mine, but he spoke to me thus 
often through most of the years 
of his life . . . and on every Rosh 
Hashonah. 

To him Rosh Hashonah was a 
holy day not just for being regu- 
lar in schul; it had to do with 
every day of life, with serving 
God by righteousness, such as 
caring even about a neighbor of 
a darker skin than one's own. 
That was my papa whose main 
ambition was to bring up this son 
of his to go highly along with 
him. 

There was that Rosh Hashonah 
when we were walking slowly on 
the way home from the synagogue, 
and he was telling me: "Alfred, 
our being in schul wasn't enough 
for us. Really, it's more important 
for us to consider how we're go- 
ing to live through all the com- 
ing year which begins today. It's 
for you who are so young to think 
about through every day of your 
life which I hope is going to be 
a very long one, after I've gone 
from here." 

"Oh, papa" I exclaimed, "won't 
we go together all the way?" And 
he replied: "I'm sorry, boy, to tell 
you that some day in the future 
we'll be separated. I'll be going 
up to heaven, maybe, and I will 
be leaving you down here on the 
earth. But you can help me, your 
papa, to keep living down here 
by your being a good man in the 
world." 



Editorials _ - 5 

Plain Talk — Alfred Segal - - 6 

Portrait o ' A Generation — Dr. Solomon Grayzel 7 

Yiddlc And The Fiddle — William Ornstein — 9 

The Nature of Atonement — Ethel L. Levey 13 

The Significance of Brotherhood — Rabbi Burton L. Podoll 14 

The Shofar Echoes Through The Ages — Dr. H. Rabinowitz 15 

Yiddish Magic In A Serenade — Dr. Alfred A. Wenstein _ 17 

The Democratic Jews — Charles Liebman _ - 18 

A Mother In Israel — Anita Engle - — - 19 

"The Vanishing American Jew" — Rabbi Joseph H. Levine 21 

The "Old Time Religion" Goes Modern — ■ 

Israel Wohlgelernter 23 

The- Rabbi And The Community — Dr. Samuel Belkin 24 

Weitzmann's Legacy Bears Rich Fruit 25 

A People And Its Calendar — Dov Peretz Elkins 26 

The Night American Jewry Met Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson — 

Jean R. Herschaft 27 

Here Come The Girls — Ben G. Frank 28 

A Citizen of Israel — David Samuelson 29 

Your Guess Is As Good As Any — Joel Donner _. 30 

The Name's The Same — Charlotte Hyams 36 

Tomorrow — Philip Bak 37 

"A Good Old Age" — Philip Gillon - 39 

A New And Another Year — Ben Nathan _ 41 

More Hebrew In Reform Judaism — Ben Godol 43 

English — ■ Israel's Second Language — I. M. Green 44 

The Messiahs of Tel Aviv — David Samuelson 47 

Wha; About The Biblical Miracles? — Robert Appel ...... 52 

Center:; — Cigarettes and Health — Julian N. Jablin — 56 

Wouldn't It Really Be Lovely If They Embraced? — 

Harold J. Goodman _ — 72 

Art For The Torah Is Torah — Rabbi William M. Kramer 91 

Our Broken Promises — Rabbi Samuel Umen 95 



North Carolina 



Around. Greensboro - 8 

New Bern — Mrs. Lou Elden 8 

Durham 46 

Raleigh Beth Meyer Synagogue — Mrs. Oscar Legum 50 

Lumberton . 53 

Charlotte Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood _.. Mrs. H. N. Friedman .... 53 

Charlotte B'nai B'rith Women — Mrs. Stanley Greenspon 53 

Asheville — ■ Anita Goldstein ___ 58 

Winston-Salem — Mrs. Stanley Tulman 61 

Statesville — Mrs. Milton Steinberger 64 

Weldon-Roanoke Rapids — ■ Louise Farber ,. 65 

Wilmington — ■ Mrs. Daniel Retchin 66 

Fayetteville — Mrs. Alex Waitman 69 

Rocky Mount — Mrs. Arnold J. Kridel 70 

Williamston — Mrs. Irving M. Margolis „ 70. 



South Carolina 



Charleston 71 

Columbia — Mrs. Bernard Laden . 74 



Virginia 



Richmond 10 

Norfolk — Mrs. William Schwartz 10 



Yes, this was of my father's 
teaching to me at every Rosh 
Hashonah time. He kept telling 
me: "Yes, Rosh Hashonah isn't 
just for a day or two of the year. 
Its meaning is of every day of 
the year . . . toward being a worth- 
while Jewish person in the world 
... to care about living right . . . 
about being kind and just . . . 



about serving the neighbor what- 
ever his religion or the color of 
his face. Yes, as I see it, that's the 
meaning of Rosh Hashonah . . . 
every day of the year. Really, 
should Rosh Hashonah be only 
for one or two days of a whole 
year? I hope, Alfred, you'll under- 
stand this when you're grown up." 

(Please turn to Page 67) 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



7 




DR. SOLOMON GRAVZEL 

Seen on Rosh Hashana and Yom 
Kippur, the Jew o! the United 
States seems to be as good .1 de- 
scendant as his ancestois would 
have wished. The synagogues are 
crowded; discussions of Jewish 
problems are given a respectful 
hearing; appeals for funds are 
answered generously. It is a heart- 
warming spectacle. 

but does this picture represent 
a snapshot or a portrait? Does 
it catch the American Jewish 
community at a particular mo- 
ment and offer a mere external 
and superficial resemblance, or 
does it show the deep-seated char- 
acter of the community? More in- 
formation is necessary to answer 
this question than a glance limited 
in time and space. Yet the answer 
is especially important for us to- 
day, if we want to steer ourselves 
into some meaningful future rath- 
er than drift into emptiness and 
insignificance. The first rule in 
planning is that set down by Soc- 
rates: Know thyself! 

The Jewish Publication Society, 
therefore, undertook to look into 
the matter of the American Jew- 
ish personality: what are we really 
like? It entrusted the task to Pro- 
fessor Oscar I Janowsky, an ex- 
perienced investigator who is en- 
dowed with a combination of es- 
sential gifts. As a historian he has 
a sense of perspective. As author 
of a good many books, he knows 
how to organize his material in 
terms of presentation, interpreta- 
tion and emphasis. Having con- 
ducted several nation-wide sur- 
veys, he knows how to evaluate 
statements, facts and statistics. 

Above all Dr. Janowsky presided 
over the creation of a similar por- 
trait some thirty years ago. For 



Portrait of a generation 

By Dr. Solomon Grayzel 

Editor, The Jewish Publication Society of America 



that volume, too, he assigned 
various aspects of American Jew- 
ish life to men and women expert 
in their respective fields. The book 
which resulted from that effort en- 
titled The American Jew: A Com- 
posite Portrait, portrayed our com- 
munity in the 1930s. It proved 
very much worthwhile and it was 
widely discussed. 

The past thirty years, however, 
have witnessed some fundamental 
changes in the Jewish people, both 
in the United States and in the 
world in general. That first book 
was done before the European 
Jewish calamity and before the 
birth of Israel. At that time, about 
60 % of the American Jewish com- 
munity were native born as against 
the over 90^' today. Then one still 
had European, especially East- 
European, Jewry to set cultural 
standards for the Jews of the 
United States, whereas since then 
American Jewry has been thrown 
upon its own resources. Inevitably 
the picture has changed. 

This is why the new book has 
been called The American Jew: a 
Reappraisal. In compiling it, Dr. 
Janowsky used the same method: 
He asked men and women who 
know the American Jew to set 
down in clear terms the Jewish 
situation in those areas of Jewish 
life and culture in which they are 
thoughtful authorities. Beginning 
with a historical survey by Jacob 
R. Marcus to provide background, 
there follow essays in the econom- 
ic, philanthropic, cultural, organi- 
zational, religious, and every other 
important phase of Jewish life. 
They point out the facts, and also 
submit the resultant problems. 
They avoid the temptation to 
prophesy, but each essav encour- 



ages further discussion. The book 
concludes with an evaluative sum- 
mary by its editor. 

No doubt each reader will do 
his own evaluating over and above 
that of Dr. Janowsky, even as we 
propose to do here. What, for 
example, do the following facts 
mean for the future of American 
Jewry? Poverty among them hav- 
ing been reduced to insignificant 
proportions, American Jews can 
be classified as belonging to the 
middle class. This has already 



brought about a shift in political 
attitudes; but what will it mean 
to philanthropic attitudes and or- 
ganizations? Still largely business 
men, Jews have been turning to 
the professions and white-collar 
jobs which may not make for open- 
handed, philanthropy. What will 
this mean for the upbuilding of 
Jewish institutions in the not too 
distant future? 

Sixty per cent of the young 
American Jews go to college. 

(Please turn to Page 96) 



To the many friends we have al- 
ready made - to those whose friend- 
ship we have yet to earn -we 
extend our Greetings and Best 
Wishes for a 

Happy New Year 

GREENSBORO GOLISEON 

"America's Newest Attractions" 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 




Around Greensboro 




MR. AND MRS. ANDREW BERT CANTOR 



Anne Harriet Weinstein was 
married to Andrew Bert Cantor of 
Elkins Park, Pa., on the afternoon 
of August 1 at the home of the 
bride. Rabbi Joseph Asher of Tem- 
ple Emanuel officiated assisted by 
Rabbi Fred I. Rypins, rabbi emeri- 
tus of the Temple. 

The bride's mother, Mrs. Mil- 
ton Weinstein, received afterward 
at Greensboro Countv Club. The 
bride is a daughter of Mrs. Wein- 
stein and the late Milton Wein- 



stein. The bridegroom is a son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Ham A. Cantor of 
lilkins Park. 

After a trip to Bermuda the 
couple will live in Philadelphia. 

The bride graduated in 1963 
from Smith College, Northamp- 
ton, Mass.. with a degree in mathe- 
matics. She has been living in New 
York City, where she has been 
employed as a statistical analyst 
in market research for New Jer- 
sey Bell Telephone Co. 



The bridegroom graduated from 
Trinity College, Hartford, Conn., 
where he joined Theta XI Fra- 
ternity. He is a current graduate 
of the University of Pennsylvania 
Law School, where he was a mem- 
ber of the Hare Law Club. Fie is 
an attorney in Norristown, Pa. 

Given in marriage by her uncle, 
David Weinstein of Bristol, Tenn., 



the bride had her sister, Mrs. Jay 
Stanford Goodman of Nashville, 
Tenn., for attendant. 

The bridegroom was attended 
by his brother, Nick Cantor of 
Elkins Park, best man. 

Music was provided by the 
bride's aunt, Mrs. A. J. Cohen of 
Nashville. 



MEW BERN, N. C. 

MRS. LOU ELDEN, Correspondent 



Welcome home David Zacks 
after a 6 weeks tour of Europe. 
David is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
I. K. Zacks. 

Mrs. Bernard Michaels of Walt- 
ham, Mass. and son Bradley were 
visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
I. K. Zacks, for several weeks. 

Michael and Barrv Sanchnan, of 
Adelphi, Md. were guests of their 
»rand-parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lou 
El den. 



Mr. and Mrs. Irving Ertez and 
children Michael and Roberta of 
Bayside, N. Y. were visitors of 
Mr. Ertez's sister and brother-in- 
law, Mr. and Mrs. Lou Steinbeig. 

Congratulations to Mr. and 
Mrs. Alfred Gilman on the birth 
of a daughter, Cindy Michelle. 

The community extends its sin- 
cere sympathy to Leo Orringer 
and family on the death of his 
wife Ann, on July 11, in Wilming- 
ton, N. C. 



i)arttoell (garment Co. 

Manufacturers 

Men's and Boys' Work Clothing, 
Pants, Shirts, and Slacks 

BELLCRAFT 
Manufacturing Co. 

Manufacturers 

MEN'S BOYS' & JUNIORS' 
SPORT SHIRTS OF DISTINCTION & COMFORT 

OFFICES and PLANTS — HARTWELL, GEORGIA 

New York Office .... 1402 Empire State Building 

West Coast Office ... 411 E. 9th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-< l.J'l LOOK 



YIDDLE WITH THE FIDDLE 

BY WILLIAM ORNSTEIN 



Another year. Another Yom 
Kippur. 

Such is life and we have to face 
it, for as we add another year and 
another Yom Kippur a sudden 
mellowness takes hold. 

The mellowness usually brings 
on a feeling of reflection, to 1 look 
back over the wall of years, what 
has happened to us, and then a 
peek into a scrim above the wall 
into the future. 

As for the past we know what 
happened: but the future is a 
matter of imagination, perception 
for those who are wise and disap- 
pointment for those who feel they 
want to be left alone, continue as 
is, without one iota being changed, 
humble and resigned to whatever 
fate has stored up in time's vault 
of things to come. 

It is only during the past num- 
ber of years that I have objec tive- 
ly looked upon Yom Kippur as a 
day not only of pennance but for 
ferreting out my sins and resolv- 
ing to do more good upon the be- 
ginning of the New Year. 

And once this good has been 
established, it should continue 
throughout the year, for resolu- 
tions, they say, are made to be 
broken. Usually they are but will- 
power — that's the word — is the 
telling factor. 

For it is again on Yom Kippur 
that I, along with millions of my 
faith, forego two meals — abstain 
from touching water or food and 
observe fully the intent and pur- 
pose of the holiday. 

So, Yom Kippur is one day in 
the year I can always count on 
losing some weight: two or three 
pounds, al most. And it is also 
the day I lake it upon myself to 
sav to me I will continue to eat 
less and less from now on. I must 



lose weight. Not that I had been 
told. I'm active enough to keep 
the figure constant. But lor all 
the stories you hear and hear, it's 
better to take off five or ten 
pounds during the year. Who needs 
it? 

And, too, at the same time, to 
continue honorable intent of the 
occasion I do not carry any money. 
Hence, I figure it out I have saved 
on several things 1 usually could 
have bought and didn't. So I 
have saved something, the exact 
amount depending on what day 
Yom Kippur falls. 

All of this is a prelude to the 
story I want to tell of Yiddle With 
the Fiddle. 

The weight 1 have lost 1 cannot 
give to anyone. But the money I 
saved I can. 

There's where Yiddle With the 
Fiddle comes in. 

He is a man who undoubtedly 
saw better days. There is a certain 
tone to his wearied violin that 
makes me feel this nondescript at 
one time played first violin with 
a Philharmonic. 

1 1 could have been in New 
York, Philadelphia, Boston or 
wherever these line orchestras 
originate and perform. 

But, lacking details and not pre- 
suming to inquire, the sensation 
of realization that a musician, an 
artisan of the strings, must now 
rely on handouts, a charitable 
gesture, a weak moment from some 
spendthrift to subsist, is somewhat 
heartbreaking. 

Subsist. How unkind to use this 
word. But what else can it be? 

Subsist for all the years I have 
seen him gently pushing his bow 
back and forth at the entrance 
to the subway station each morn- 



ing as I embarked on my daily 
ride downtown to earn my daily 
bread. 

What I won hi do is place a one 
dollar bill in his weather-beaten 
black felt hat sitting atop his vio- 
lin case and he would nod apprecia- 
tion. When I started to descend 




WILLIAM ORNSTEIN 



the subway steps I thruthfully 
hoped another kind soul would 
see the bill and generously con- 
tribute to the well-being of man 
of music. 

If the holiday came out on 
Saturday or Sunday, I would place 

(Please turn to Page 90) 




HOLIDAY 
GREETINGS 

FROM 
P. LORILLARD 
COMPANY 

First with the finest cigarettes 
through Lorillard research 




10 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September^ 3964 







Simon Cohen of Newport News, mony at the John Marshall Hotel. 

Steven Davis Bloom and Russell Alter a wedding trip to Jamaica 

Cato of Emporia. the couple will make their home 

A reception followed the cere- in Richmond. 



NORFOLK, VA. 

MRS. WILLIAM SCHWARTZ. Correspondent 



Norfolk's Jewish Community 
Center concluded its fourteenth 
year of Day Camp activities and 
everyone agrees it was the health- 
iest, happiest camp season ever 
experienced. Two hundred and 
some children enjoyed and shar- 
ed a wonderful and varied pro- 
gram. The Israeli entertainers 
sponsored by National f.W.B. 



brought a funday at camp, of in- 
terest to all the age groups who 
participated in the camp activities. 
Water carnivals, horse-back riding, 
nature hikes were but a few of the 
high-lights. 

The Jewish Community Center 
welcomed two new staff mem- 
bers. Mr. Allen Feld, A.C.S.W. 

(Please turn to Page 106) 



MRS. BARI BENJAMIN NOVEY 

Photo by Wendell Powell Studios 



The marriage of Miss Joan Ar- 
leen Marks, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Adolph Hirsch Marks, to 
Eari Benjamin Novey, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Isadore Novey of Em- 
poria, took place Sunday, August 
2nd at 6 p.m. at Temple Beth 
Ahabah. 

Dr. Ariel L. Coldburg assisted 
by Rabbi Saul J. Rubin officiated. 

The bride, given in marriage 
by her father, wore a gown of 
ivory peau de soie and alencon 
lace. Her veil fell from a crown of 
alencon lace and seed pearls. She 
carried a Bible with orchids and 
stephanotis. 



Miss Susan Helen Grossman was 
maid of honor. Bridesmaids were 
Miss Sandra Elaine Marks, Miss 
Patricia Ann Novey, sister of the 
groom of Emporia, Miss Ruby 
Gail Schonfeld of Portsmouth, 
and Miss Susanne Clark of Nor- 
folk. Debra Helen Marks, sister 
of the bride, and Diane Henna 
Bloom of Emporia were junior 
bridesmaids. Kathryn Allen 
Marks and Jeffrey Paul Marks 
were flower girls and ringbearer. 

Mr. Novey was his sons best 
man. Ushers were Edward Lee 
Schneider, Edward Brent Maiks, 
brother of the bride, Charles Lee 
Geshekter of Baltimore, Edward 



THE NO. 1 NAME IN 



MILK 




COTTAGE 
O H E E S E 




ICE CREAM 




Sealtest Foods - Southern Division 



VIRGINIA 



COLLINSVTLLE 

DANVILLE 
HARRISONBURG 
NEWPORT NEWS 



NORFOLK 
PETERSBURG 
RICHMOND 
ROANOKE 



NORTH CAROLINA 



ALBEMARLE 
ASHEVILLE 
BREVARD 
BRYSON CITY 
CHARLOTTE 
DURHAM 
ELIZABETH CITY 
FA YETTE VILLE 
GREENSBORO 



JACKSONVILLE 
MOREHEAD CITY 
RALEIGH 
ROCKY MOUNT 
SALISBURY 
WHITEVILLE 
WILMINGTON 

WTLSON 
WINSTON -SALEM 



September. 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



11 



A. B. CARTER 



INCORPORATED 



GASTONIA, NORTH CAROLINA 



Opemting 



Carter Traveler Co. 
Ring Travelers 
Gastonia, N. C. 



Mill Devices Co. 
Boyce Weavers Knott er 
Gastonia, N. C. 



★ SAFE 

★ COURTEOUS 

★ DEPENDABLE 

33 Southern and Eastern Terminals and Agencies 
"Service Is Our Frame of Mind" 




PI LOT 




United Mills 
Corp. 

MT. GILEAD, N. C. 



New York Office — 1 80 Madison Avenue 



Manufacturers of 



Umpwik GILEAD LINGERIE 




SLIPS 



BRAS 



16,524,000 



Dollars that is! In round figures, that's how much the 



customers of the South Carolina Electric & Gas Com 



pany provided in State, Federal and Local taxes last 




^ year in their service bills. Shouldn't the customers of 
government-subsidized electric systems provide their 
§ share, too? What do you think? 

South Carolina 
Electric & Gas Co. 

"Friendly Service for Better Living" 



The American Jewish TIMES OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Greensboro flews and Keeord 



AMERICAN 
Furniture Co. 

Incorporated 
NORTH WILKESBORO, N. C. 

Manufacturers of 

Bed Room Furniture 
Modern and Traditional 

Permanent Displays 
HIGH POINT 

CHICAGO ATLANTA NEW YORK 




FURNITURE CO 



North Wilkesboro, N. C. 

BEDROOM and DINING ROOM FURNITURE 
For Your Young and Budget Conscious 




t > 







HARLEY MITCHAM & CO. 

MILL SUPPLIES 

Manufacturers of 

Textile Machine Parts — Chain Drives 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 
PLEASE SPECIFY YOUR MAKE OF MACHINERY 
P. 0. Box 271 Dial UN 5-8547 Gastonia, N. C. 




! \ If 



mm 



FAR, THE MOST 
POWERFUL 
SELLING INFLUENCE 
IN THE 

GREENSBORO AREA 



With Added Selling Influence 
in Over Half of North Carolina 



Greensboro flews and Keeord 

MORE than 100,000 Circulation Daily! 

MORE than 400,000 Readers Daily! 



Sticking Our Necks Out? 




Not when we stick 
to the facts. 
And the quality 
of Burlington 
fabrics is a fact. 



Burlington 

* — — C7 a. Lf y Arm* 



INDtf«TWB8, INC. 



■XBCUT1VB OFFICES: ORBBNSBORO. H. C 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES OUTLOOK 



13 



THE NATURE OF ATONEMENT 



By Ethel L. Levey 



In the rush oi preparation for 
the High Holydays, the exception- 
al amount of physical activity en- 
tailed for the homemaker at this 
time of year finds me entering the 
synagogue with muscles aching, 
nerves twanging like the strings 
-of an electric guitar, and a feeling 
of having left home without some 
possession. I wouldn't call it the 
proper frame of mind to approach 
the altar of God, seeking there a 
modicum of peace, a re-evaluation 
of self, an absolvence from the bur 
den of guilt that most of us have 
managed to hide in the dark re 
cess of our minds the rest of the 
year. 

Some years we are halfway 
through the service before I am 
able to orient myself, before the 
serenity of th? sanctuary takes 
hold. When I have ascertained 
that the entire family is prsent 
and accounted for, and discovered 
which fashionplate is wearing 
"THE HAT'' this year, when 1 
am about to relax into snug com 
placency — after all what could I 
possibly have done this year that 
might be classified as sin?— I am 
brought up short! 

There it stands on the printed 
page, ready and waiting for the 
wise woman and the foolish one; 
for the heroine and for her who 
plays it safe; for the gregarious 
gossip and her friend, the ruthless 
reporter; for the glamour girl, 
and people like me. Year after 
year, I am confused, bothered, and 
bewildered by that list of sins that 
we know as the "al hait." I am be- 
wildered that a prayer which had 
its origin in a remote centurv still 
fits unwilling humankind like a 






FTHEL L. LEVY 

second skin. 1 am bothered be- 
cause with the first reading, 1 
know that the specifications in 
that relentless and searching cata- 
logue were custom tailored to me. 
1 am confused because I am faced 
with an immediate question: "How 
did you let that happen to you. 
you pure and spotless soul?" 

There is nothing you or I can 
add to that inexorable index. Our 
frailties, our greeds, our equivoca- 
tions, there they stand, Shomrai 
Ha Emet, guardians of truth, meas- 
uring, measuring. But for my 
own good, and if you will forgive 
a small amout of public breast 
beating, I want to reinterpret a 
few. For instance, when and why 
did I commit the sin of becoming 
inactive as chief interpreter and 
guide to my children on that dif 
ficult journey we call living? 
Whatever made me think that I 
(Please turn to Page 60) 

Obey That Impulse! 
Buy an Israel Bond! 



LEDER BROS, Inc. 

Nine Complete Modern Department Stores 
Everything in Ready-to- Wear 

"Shop With Confidence, Wear With Pride" 



Whiteville, N. C. 
Clinton, N. C. 
Jacksonville, N. C. 
Smithfield, N. C. 



Rocky Mount N. C. 
Concord, N. C. 
Marion, S. C. 
Loris, S. C. 



Main Office: Whiteville, N. C. 




Department Store 

Dry Goods, Clothing, 
Notions, Shoes, 
Ready-to-Wear 

STATESVILLE, N. C. 



HI-STYLE 



IN WASH & WEAR 
SPORTSHIRTS 




SOUTHLAND 




Here's the greatest crop of 
handsome fall sportshirtit. 
Unbelievable value, style, 
comfort is tailored into 
each and every one. 
They're full-cut, and come 
in more colors, patterns, 
weaves than we've space 
to show. Choose from our 
huge array of styles in 
Small, Medium- Large, 
Extra Lc^Si 

Block Southland Sportswear, 
Inc. 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Empire State Building 
New York, N. Y. 



AROUND 




SXINGTON - FRAMKFOBT 
LOUISVILLE 



^MARIETTA 

4NNAH 

1 - XI rutin mn 

\ ASHLM " ^e.Bl" 
\ HUNTTNGTOH ' 




PEOPLE 
RELY ON 

PIEDMONT 

. . . for convenient, com- 
fortable flight service 
linking 68 cities. Sched- 
ules are tailor-made 
for business travel. 
Excellent service is also 
offered to many famous 
vacation and resort 
areas. 

Next time you take 
a trip along the Route 
of the Pacemakers, en- 
joy Piedmont's friend- 
ly service, convenient 
schedules and modern, 
comfort -conditioned 
planes. Join the people 
who rely and fly on 
Piedmont Airlines! 




\ 



PIEDMONT 
AIRLINES 

home office and operations base: 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 



14 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



STONEYILLE 
Furniture Co., Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

PLASTIC — CHROME 
BREAKFAST ROOM SUITES 
& KITCHEN CABINETS 

STONE VILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



Lenoir Pad & Paper Company, Inc. 




Furniture Packing Materials 






Cotton Batting 






LENOIR, NORTH CAROLINA 






MAXWELL 
ROYAL 

CHAIR COMPANY 

Hickory, North Carolina 



Makers of 
Early American 
and Traditional 
Furniture 




THE SIGNIFICANCE OF BROTHERHOOD 

By Rabbi Burton L. Podoll 

The following is an address made before the Knights of Columbus, 
Charleston, S. C. by Rabbi Burton L. Podoll, spiritual leader of K. K. Beth 
Elohim, in that City.— THE EDITOR. 

Reverend clergy, gentlemen — 
it's rather difficult to determine 
just what is most significant here 
in Charleston tonight — the oc- 
casion of Lincoln's birthday, the 
fact that this is the beginning of 
Lent or that a rabbi is addressing 
a meeting of the Knights of Co- 
lumbus! Although each factor de- 
serves an amount of our thought 
and consideration, I'm afraid that 
I must concentrate my attention, 
and direct your thoughts, to my 
presence here tonight — and it is 
an occasion that I view with a 
tremendous amount of pleasure, 
hope and challenge. 

I stand before this group tonight 
in an historic position, which 
may or may not have been known 
to your program chairman, Ken 
Johnson, when he invited me to 
speak to you. On this day, Febru- 
ary 12, 1964, as far as can be de- 
termined, we are witnessing the 
first time in Charleston history 
that a rabbi has been called upon 
to address a formal, representative 
group within the Catholic com- 
munity. And yet, as unusual and 
hopefully auspicious as this mo- 
ment then becomes, it is perhaps, 
most appropriate that it was I 
who received this unique invita- 
tion. Not I as Burton Podoll, but 
rather as the spiritual leader of 
Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim. 

I refer to this because on Hasell 
Street in downtown Charleston, 
nine years after this historic Jew- 
ish house of worship occupied its 
present site, the first Roman Cath- 



RABBI BCRTON L. PODOLL. 

die church in South Carolina, St. 
Mary's was erected across the street 
—and lor t he past 175 years these 

(Please turn to Page 80) 

Do Your Part! 
Contribute to the North 
Carolina Home for the 
Jewish Aged 





TROUTMAN 




CHAIR COMPANY 




Manufacturers of 
CHAIRS 






TROUTMAN, N. C. 





SCALES FURNITURE COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 
UPHOLSTERED CH\IRS 
CLAREMONT, NORTH CAROLINA 



BOLING CHAIR COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 
OFFICE CHAIRS — SCHOOL CHAIRS 

SILER CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 



STOUT CHAIR COMPANY, Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

CHArRS 
for the Office, Home and School 

LIBERTY, NORTH CAROLINA 



New York Representative: Harry Necha men, Pier 49, North River, New York, N.Y. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



15 



THE SHOFAR ECHOES THROUGH 
THE AGES 

By Dr. H. Rabinowicz 



Symbolism is woven, like a sil- 
vered thread, through the tapes- 
try of Jewish life, adding richness, 
color and depth to every day, and 
to the holy days in particular. 
Every festival, be it major or min- 
or, has its own significant sym- 
bols, its own meaningful cere- 
monies. Supreme symbol of Rosh 
Hashanah, New Year, is the Sho- 
far and as many as Meah Kolloth 
(one hundred sounds) are general- 
ly heard on that day. Rosh Hash- 
anah is known by five different 
names: the two names used in the 
Torah, Zikron Teruah (a memo- 
rial proclaimed with the blast of 
horns), and Yom Teruah (a day of 
blowing the horn) are both based 
on the Shofar. 

The sounding of the Shofar 
marks the climax of the impassion- 
ed Rosh Hashanah Service. This 
is the time when "even the fishes 
in the sea tremble with terror," 
the moment when the worshippers, 
tense and awed, rise as one man 
to their feet. Their eyes are on 
the Bimah where the Baal Tekeah 
{Sounder of the Shofar) and the 
Baal Makre (prompter) stand be- 
fore the congregation robed in the 
flowing folds of the traditional 
white garments. The greatness of 
the occasion rests upon them and 
gives them unwonted majesty in 
the eyes of the people. 



In ancient times the Shofar was 
widely used. It played a part in 
coronations, and when Absalom 
sent spies throughout all the 
tribes of Israel, they warned the 
people saying, "As soon as ye hear 
the sound of the horn, then ye 
shall say: Absalom is king in He- 
bron' ". The Bible records that 
when Solomon was crowned, 
"They blew the ram's horn; and 
all the people said: 'Long live 
king Solomon.'" 

The Shofar, like the siren, was 
also used as an alarm or danger 
signal, and the Prophet Amos asks 
the rhetorical question, "Shall the 
horn be blown in a city, and the 
people not tremble?" At the end 
of the 49 year cycle, on the Tenth 
of Tishri, a blast of the horn pro- 
claimed the Yovel (Jubilee), as 
commanded in the Torah, "Then 
shalt thou make proclamation 
with the blast of the horn on the 
tenth day of the seventh month; 
in the day of atonement shall ye 
make proclamation with the horn 
throughout all your land." 

The Shofar was also used in the 
service of God. David, musician- 
king of Israel, brought the Ark of 
the Lord to Jerusalem, "With 
shouting and with the sound of 
the horn" and in the Psalms he 
urges, "With trumpets and sound 
of the horn, shout ye before the 



HERMAN-SIPE & COMPANY, INC. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS BUILDING MATERIAL 

CONOVER, N. C. 



SEASON'S GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES 
FOR A VERY HAPPY NEW YEAR 

BURGAW VENEER COMPANY 

BURGAW, N. C. 



New Year Greetings From 

Le Brun Brothers, Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

Early American Bedroom Furniture 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



Morrison Furniture & Fixture Company 

Manufacturers and Designers of 

Bank, Store and Office Fixtures 

Phone: TRiangle 2-2444 Statesville, N. C. 



Hickory Foundry and Machine Co. 



OUR GREATEST ASSET - YOUR GOOD WILL 



26 - 10th St., S. W. HICKORY, N. C. Dial DA 2-4292 



A Sheet Metal Work Serving Textile Plants 

Gastonia Textile Sheet Metal Works 

INCORPORATED 
Manufacturers and Rebuilders of 
Spinning, Twister, Spooler and Quiller Cylinders 
Card Screens — Picker Screens — Condenser Screens 
Comber Tins — Waste Chutes — Lap Aprons 
Aspirators 

MORE PRODUCTION AT LOWER COSTS, WTH 
GASTONIA TEXTILE SHEET METAL PARTS 



An Essential Service to Combed Yarn Mills 

Gastonia Comber Needling Co. 

Experienced Specialists in Every Branch of 
Reneedling of All Makes 
Half Laps and Top Combs for Cotton Combing 

Gill Comb? — Faller Bars 



SERVING THE SOUTH SINCE 1914 



222 EAST LONG AVENUE TELEPHONE UN-7-6316 

GASTONIA, NORTH CAROLINA 



16 



The American Jewish I I MES-OU I LOOK 



September, 1964 



SE 4 SON'S GREETINGS 



LYICH 
HOSIERY MILL 

INC. 

Phone 273-3496 
P. 0. Box 6065 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



J 



Hosiery 

1013-15 W. Main St. 
Dial 587-6051 P.O. Box 1954 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 



HICKORY PAPER BOX COMPANY 

Incorporated 



Paper Box Manufacturers 



HICKORY, NORTH CAROLINA 



CRAWFORD HOSIERY CORP, 



Manufacturers of 



Misses' Mor-Pul Anklets 



Men's Cushion Sole Socks 



KERNERSVILLE, N. C. 



HILDEBRAN 

HOSIERY MILLS 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Men's Seamless Hosiery 



HILDEBRAN, N. C. 



living, ill- Lord." Man\ of ihe 
great events in Jewish history 
were associated with the Shofar. 
At the Revelation at Mounl Sinai, 
"All the people perceived the 
thunderings and the lightnings, 
and voice of the horn." The wails 
of [ericho fell miraculously alter 
they had been encompassed seven 
times by seven priests bearing 
seven rams horns, "And it shall 
be, that uhen they make a long 
blasl with the ram's horn, and 
when ye hear the sound of the 
lioni, all the people shall shout 
with a great shout; and the wall 
of the cit) shall tall down flat." 
Strategist Gideon used the Shofar 
in psychological warfare. "When I 
blow the horn, and all that are 
with me, then blow ye the horns 
also on every side of the camp, 
and. say: For the Lord and lor 
( . icleon!" 

The shofar was si ill in fairly 
common use during Talmudic and 
Mediaeval times. Whenever a ban 
of excommunication (Herein; was 
enacted, the formula was read, wax 
candles were lit and the shofai 
was sounded. It was used to herald 
the Sabbath and to announce a 
death. The Talmud records that 
R. Hammuna "chanced to lie in 
a town named Darn, suddenly he 
heard the note of the horn and 
he knew by this signal that some- 
one had just died." 

In the realm oi eschatologv, too, 
the Shofar is heard with literally 
epoch-making effect. At the end 
of days, the angel Michael sounds 
the trumpet with a mighty blast. 
Then Elijah the prophet brings 
forth the Messiah and the great 
Golden Era is inaugurated. As 
the Shofar sings out again and 
again, momentous events take 
place: the primeval light reap- 
pears, the dead arise, the Shechi- 



nah becomes visible and the tem- 
ple stands in all its perfection. 

P'hilo Judaeus, writer of Hellen- 
istic Judaism, is the forerunner of 
many scholars and philosophers 
who delve into the significance of 
1 he Shofar on Rosh Hashanah. In 
Talmudic times, the story of the 
Akedah (the Binding of Isaac) was 
closely associated with the Sholar. 
"Blow a ram's horn before me so 
that I may recall on your behalf 
iht binding of Isaac son of Abra- 
ham and shall count it to your 
credit as though you had bound 
yourselves before Me." 

Saadia Gaon (892-842) gives ten 
reasons for the blowing of the 
Shofar: the Creation ol the Uni- 
verse, the beginning of the Ten 
Days of Repentance, the Revela- 
tion at Sinai, the exhortation of 
the Prophets, the destruction of 
the Temple, the Sacrifice ol Isaac, 
cultivation of reverence and fear, 
reminder of the Day of Judgment, 
Messianic age and Resurrection. 
Two centuries later. Maimonides 
stresses the moral aspect of this 
Command. "Although the blow- 
ing of the Shofar on the New Year 
is a Scriptural decree, a suggestion 
is hidden (herein: that is to say 
"Awake ye sleepers from your 
sleep and ponder your deeds: re 
member your Creator, ye who 
have forgotten the truth by pre- 
occupying yourselves with the van- 
ities of the world and have ened 
all your years in vanity and empti- 
ness which neither profit nor suc- 
cour. Give heed to your souls, and 
mend your ways and deeds. l et 
everyone of you abandon his evil 
way and his wicked thoughts." 
(Please turn to Page 83) 

Do Your Part! 
Contribute to the North 
Carolina Home for the 
Jewish Aged 



SILVER KNIT HOSIERY MILLS 



Incorporated 



Manufacturers of 

Fine Hosiery 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 



September j 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK. 



YIDDISH MAGIC IN A SERENADE 

By Dr. Alfred A. Weinstein 



The tickets to the opera "Boris 
Godunov" (5th row center; were 
cheap— $1.80. The meal had been 
adequate at the Hotel Nationale: 
thick borsht (cabbage meat soup), 
the wine good, Kiev chicken, 
(tough) and armor plated with 
fried batter, excellent cheese, tasty 
black bread, creamy butter and 
watery compote. The plusses more 
than canceled out the minuses 
and my spirits were high. 

The taxi driver outside the ho- 
tel looked like a comic character 
out ot old Russia: a battered hat 
with visor, shiny black dusty suit, 
patched maroon colored tieless 
shirt, brown eyes full of laughter, 
and enormous Czar Nicholas II 
handlebar moustache fringed with 
gray. 



He said he didn't speak English. 
He said he didn't speak German. 

He was quite for a moment, 

studied me for some time in his 
rear mirror and said, "But I speak 
Yiddish. My name is Avrom (Abra- 
ham)." 

"My name also is Avrom," 1 re- 
plied in Yiddish. "How goes it 
with a Jew?" 

"How should it go with a Jew?" 
he said, characteristically answer- 
ing one question with another. 

"A shtickle broit shlepts zich." 
(If I have a crust of bread to 
gnaw on, it goes good with me.") 

1 he corners of his eyes crinkled 
and he laughed a long and joy- 

(Please turn to Page 104) 




Mrs. Max Schenk, Hadassah's national chairman for Youth Aliyah (left), 
watchen Mrs. Siegfried Kramarsky, national president of Hadassah, present 
a painting by Ruth Schloss — a Youth Aliyah graduate — to Belgium Am- 
bassador Andre Forthomme. 



ttran mid r\w 



CAROL-MAY FINISHING CO, 

INCORPORATED 



CONCORD, NORTH CAROLINA 



SPARTANBURG PAPER BOX CO, 

Manufacturers of 

SET-UP PAPER BOXES 



Dial 5-4803 SPARTANBURG, S. C. 



163 Central 



LORIMER HOSIERY MILLS 

INCORPORATED 
Manufacturers 

Men's High Grade 
HOSIERY 

BURLINGTON, N. C. 



ETTA PAPER BOX COMPANY, INC. 

Manufacturers of All Kinds of 

QUALITY FOLDING AND SET-UP BOXES 



MARION, N. C. 



DIAL 695-8261 



ARROW TRADE MARI 

INCORPORATED 



M anufaclurcrs of Hosiery Transfers 



Dial Dl 5-7173 or Dl 5-7174 

17th Street S. W. HICKORY, N. C. 



B. & L. HOSIERY MILL 

Men's, Women's and Children's Fine Iltrsiery 
BURLINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



MID-STATE PAPEE BOX CO., INC. 



Manufacturers of 
SET UP PAPER BOXES 
ASHEBORO. N. C. 



18 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



VIRGINIA-CRAFTS 

INCORPORATED 

Keysville, Va. 



For The Best In 
CHENILLE BATH MAT SETS 
AND SCATTER RUGS 



CROWN COLONY CHENILLES 

New York Sales Office 

WALTER AND ROSEN 
295 Fifth Avenue 
Murray Hill 6-6424 



THE DEMOCRATIC JEWS 



J. J. HAINES & COMPANY, INC. ESTABLISHED 

6A)mstrong 
FLOORS 

4800 E. MONUMENT ST. BALTIMORE, MD. 



BRANCHES 



Richmond, Va. 

4817 Bethlehem Road 

Roanoke, Va. 

1019 Campbell Ave., SE 

Norfolk, Va. 

847 West 45th St. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 

U.S. 117, By-Pass North 

Florence, S. C. 

336 West Front St. 

Bristol, Va. - Tenn. 

1320 Newton St. 




GREETINGS 



MARTINSVILLE 
Novelty Corporation 

Table Manufacturers 

Since 1929 
MARTINSVILLE, VIRGINIA 

New York Representative 
HOBEL BROS 
206 Lexington Avenue 

Permanent Exhibits 

New York Furniture American Furniture 

Exchange Mart 
New York Chicago, 111. 

Southern Furniture Exposition Building — High Point, N. C. 



By Charles 

As the quadrennial presidential 
election approaches, American 
Jews can be assured that once 
again they will be treated to a 
spate of articles on whether there 
is or is not a "Jewish vote." The 
fact that social science has in 
many respects resolved this prob- 
lem is as likely to be ignored in 
1964 as it was in previous elec- 
tions. 

Jews behave differently from 
other religious or ethnic groups, 
and this difference persists even 
when we hold constant for such 
factors as age, income, education, 
recency of immigration, etc. Fur- 
thermore, Jews not only behave 
differently with regard to issues 
or candidates where the Jewish 
question is overt (for example sup- 
port for Israel or when a Jevv T is 
running against a Gentile) but 
they behave differently with re- 
gard to most political questions 
and issues. There is, of course, no 
formal mechan ism thai organies 
the Jews to vote. 

What do we know specifically 
about their behavior? The follow- 
ing generalizations have been suf- 
ficiently documented to justify 
their wider dissemination. 

1. — Jews tend to support left of 
center parties. This means that 
in the United States they vote for 
the Democratic party and support 
its liberal wing. They are found 
in numbers far out of prop.)] lion 
to their percentage of the total 
population in such organizations 
as the Liberal Party of New York, 
the Americans for Democratic Ac- 
tion, the Reform Clubs of New 
York, the Democratic Clubs of 
California or the reform groups 
in Chicago. 

2. — With regard to political at- 
titudes, Jews tend to adopt a ' lib- 



Liebman 

erai" or permissive position with 
regard to civil liberties and with 
regard to public welfare issues 
(government intervention on be- 
half of economically disadvantaged 
groups) and foreign aid. Their lib- 
erality on all these issues disting- 
uishes them from most other 
groups. Union members and work- 
ing class groups in general, and 
this includes many American Cath- 
olics, tend to be as liberal as the 
Jews with respect to welfare is- 
sues but anti-civil liberatarian 
with respect to such issues as free- 
dom of speech, rights of minori- 
ties, etc. On the other hand, upper 
income and better educated groups 
tend to be civil-libertarian but are 
opposed to welfare state measures. 

3.— There is some tendency for 
Jews to support a candidate of 
the same religious or ethnic iden- 
tify but this tendency is much less 
pronounced among Jews than 
among any other religious minor- 
ity or ethnic group. 

Knowing how Jews behave is 
important. Understanding why 
they behave this way is a more 
critical question. Unfortunately 
our information here is quite 
limited. 

An obvious explanation for Jew- 
ish behavior is in terms of Jewish 
values. There are, as one writer 
(Lawrence Fuchs) maintains, tra- 
ditional Jewish values "which 
tend to make the Jews liberal in 
the context of American politics." 
According to Fuchs, the distinct- 
ive values of America's Jewish sub- 
lease turn to Page 102) 

Do Your Part! 
Contribute to the North 
Carolina Home for the 
Jewish Aged 



RC 



ROGER CLARKE, INC. 



— INSURANCE — 



Perry Eackles — Jimmy Simmons 

Reliable Coverage 

405 William Street Phone 373-4724 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



19 




A Mother 
In Israel 

By Anita Engle 



ANITA ENGLE 



When Billx Rose buys one pic- 
ture, it's news. When he buys 
seven at a time, that's a Seven 
Arts Feature story! 

The seven paintings are the 
work of one artist, Zvi Raphaeli, 
known as "The Painting Rabbi," 
since this deeply observant man 
is a teacher in a Yeshiva in Jeru- 
salem. According to Dov Safrai, 
manager of the Safrai Gallery, 
from which the purchase was 
made, these seven paintings are 
to replace the seven oils by Sal- 
vador Dali which Billy Rose sold 
to a friend as an incentive for a 



donation to the Be/alel Museum 
in Jerusalem. As they say in Yid- 
dish, a kosherer top mil a treifen 
leffel! 

li seems to me thai this story 
has some very intriguing under- 
currents, psychological and other- 
wise. Not the least intriguing side- 
light is the story behind the Safrai 
Gallery itself. 

You. walk through an inconspi- 
cuous doorway on Jerusalem's old 
Jaffa Road into the Turkish past; 
the beginnings of modern Jeru- 
salem; the beginnings of modern 
Israeli art — and its future. All 



these are contained in the roman- 
tically arched corridors of the 
Safrai Art Gallery, the oldest ex- 
isting art gallery in Israel. 

Asher Safrai (Bookbinder), its 
founder, was a lovable original, a 
true lover of everything beauti- 
ful. A very Americanized Ukrain- 
ian, Asher Safrai turned his quaint 
subteranean art shop in Jaffa 
Road into something akin to a 
Parisian boutique. Without any 
marked predilections, but with a 
sure feeling for quality, lie never 
hesitated to back his judgement 
with readv cash, and he was rare- 



ly wrong in his investments. 

Safrai's Gallery became the only 
place in Jerusalem, possibly the 
only one in the country, where 
an artist was always able to turn 
a little canvas or some drawings 
into sorely needed cash. Asher 
Safrai was a true friend of the 
artists, and most of the money he 
made selling souvenirs was spent 
in true art. 

In his modest way, the little 
man with the grey goatee did more 
to help along the painters of Jeru- 
salem than many institutions with 

(Please turn to Page 105) 




GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES TO OUR FRIENDS 
FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR 




BAG - CAMP PAPER CORPORATION 



4 



union 



camp 



BLEACHED PRODUCTS DIVISION 
Franklin, Va. 



fe^^ 

HlilMtl 

camp 



V'- 



:20 



The American Jewis 



September, 1964 



Dowr.tcwii FucfenM>»d: Broad at Second Street 




HAPPIEST 
NEW YEAR WISHES 

ScWarzscliild 

Brothers, Inc. 

JEWELERS SILVERSMITHS 

'Virginia's Leading Jewelers for over 50 Years' 




West End: 3124 W. Cary Street 



"It's 



...you bet ! " 




DAIRY DIVISION 





NEW YEAR G1EET9NG 

TO OUR 
MANY JEWISH FRIENDS 



720 W. Broad Richmond, Va. 



Where the Action Is 



MURRAY SERVICE 



(The best friend your 
car ever had! ) 




V 



Hungerford Coal and Oil Corporation 

1604 East Broad Street • Richmond 19, Virginia 

Installations — All Types Heating Equipment 
Air Conditioning Equipment 
24-Hour Burner Service — Dial MI 8-4703 



for Prompt and Courteous Service 

m OIL • COAL 

• AIR CONDITIONING 
© HEATING EQUIPMENT 



Mobil 



ilheatRi^s 11 * ' 8 " 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



•n 



"THE VANISHING AMERICA! 

By Rabbi Joseph H. Levme 



rr 



marry frequently stem from home 
environments where the parents 
have had a marginal Jewish af- 
filiation and desire on their own 



to blend in completely with upper 
middle class American life at the 
cost of Jewish identification. 

(Please turn to Page 30) 



This month 1 have been asked 
to comment on the article that 
appeared in LOOK magazine of 
May 5, 1964 entitled "The Van- 
ishing American Jew"; and to of- 
fer some suggestions on the trends 
on campus in interdating and in- 
lermarriage. 

First, 1 would suggest that in- 
terdating and intermarriage are 
parts ol a larger problem: ihe 
meaning of Jewish identity to the 
Jewish college student. The in- 
creased rate of interdating among 
our Jewish students all over the 
country is symptomatic of our 
failure to understand the basic 
changes taking place in college 
youth today; of our failure to 
adopt Jewish education to the 
(hanging times in which we live. 

Second, the campus is a pluralis- 
tic society, a microcosm of the 
changing American scene. ihe 
value of institutional religion and 
group affiliations within any re- 
ligion', heritage is being sharply 
challenged by our college youth. 
Jewish students live, think, study 
and act in accord with the gen- 
erally prevailing patterns of their 
Christian peers. Interdating is seen 
to be a social necessity, a logical 
outgrowth of equalitarianism and 
liberalism on the American scene. 
The individual is to be judged in 
his or her own right as an individ- 
ual, and the values a Jewish stu- 
dent shares in common with his 
Christian friends are more import- 
ant often than the values he 
shares in common with other Jews. 

Third, a rabbi or counsellor on 
campus has a difficult dilemma 
in coping with interdating. He is 
torn between his desire to be ol 
genuine help to the young people, 
his desire to accept them on their 
level; and his role as a custodian 
of the Jewish tradition and also 
as an authority figure who stands 
in. locus parenti, in place of the 
parents to reinforce Jewish allegi- 
ance and identification. 

These three factors suggest sev- 
eral tentative approaches to the 
problem: 

1) We must single out those 
features of Judaism that are most 
in keeping with the dynamic lib- 
eralism and philosophic universal- 




It A3BI JOSEPH H. LEVIN JE* 

ism sweeping the campus, so as to 
narrow the gulf between Jewish 
distinctiveness and the free and 
open society. 

2) Jewish parents have to ques- 
tion themselves as to whether or 
not their Jewish identity has pro- 
vided and will provide a healthy 
• 1 x' for the young people of to- 
day, whether the Jewish home life 
ihey have provided will foster the 
healthiest kind of acceptance of 
the Jewish tradition. Jewish stu- 
dents who interdate and inter- 




PRESCRIPTION 
SERVICE 

PROMPT DELIVERY 
IN WEST RICHMOND 



WESTWOOD 

Westwood Shopping Center 
5805 Patterson Ave. 

Dial AT 8-1933 



LAFAYETTE 

1011 Lafayette Street 

Dial EL 5-1777 



CRESTVIEW 

Crestview Shopping Center 
6516 Horsepen Road 

Dial AT 8-2831 



BEVERLY HILLS 

Beverly Hills Shopping Center 
Patterson Ave. at Ridge Road 

Dial AT 2-4231 



SUBURBAN 

Suburban Shopping Center 
2369 Staples Mill Road 

Dial EL 8-4929 



The only Gefilte Fish 
my mother recommends is 

Mother^ 

(Who should know better?) 




NEWI 

IN CANS 



Now you can get Mother's gefilte fish in cans— with that "special" 
homemade taste and texture. Mother's uses only the plumpest, 
juiciest, icy-lake fish . . . perfectly blended, subtly spiced and slowly 
simmered to the peak of old-fashioned goodness. Available also in 
glass jars, in three popular varieties, to please every taste. Jar or 
can, it's the favorite festive dish to serve for the High Holy Days. 

KOSHER ® PAREVE 

From the spot/ess kitchens of Mother's Food Products, Inc., Newark 5, New Jersey. 




22 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



"YOUR HOST FOR GRACIOUS HOSPITALITY" 

Battery Park Hotel 

GEORGE L. CHUMBLEY, JR. 
Manager 

Asheville's Finest 

225 Modern Rooms 
Air Conditioned 
Superb Cuisine 

For Reservations 

BATTLE SQUARE 

DIAL AL 2-821 1 asheville, n. c. 




JtfkevUk 

W y In America's 
Beautiful Southern 
Highlands 



NORTH CAROLINA 





WILLIAM D. TURNER, JR., Mgr. 



Zke (jwge Vanderbilt Motel 



RATES: 
SINGLES S4.SO UP^ 
DOUBLES S7.00 UP 



ASHEVILLE'S MOST 
POPULAR HOTEL 



Delightful Buffet Suppers Every Thursday 
Wonderful Food In Our New, Air-Conditioned Colonial Room 



where there's 
NO smoke 
there's NO fire! 



FLAMELESS 
ELECTRIC 
HEAT 




w 



S3! 



Safe . . Clean 

CAROLINA 
POWER & LIGHT 
COMPANY 

An investor-owned, 
tax-paying, public utility company 



§ 

§ 



§ 

§ 




Fine Fabrics Since 1813 



J. P. Stevens & Co., inc. 



! 



SYNTHETICS DIVISION 



EXECUTIVE OFFICES: GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Serving the Southeast for 38 Years 



STRUCTURAL STEEL 



DESIGNERS • FABRICATORS • ERECTORS 





j4 




KLINE 



IRON & STEEL CO, 



Plain and Fabricated Structural Steel and Metal Products 
for Buildings 

1225-85 Huger St. Columbia, S. C. Dial AL 4-0301 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



23 



The "Old Time Religion" Goes Modern 

By Israel Wohlgelernter 



Postwar America has experienc- 
ed a new wave of religion. All as- 
spects of American life — social, 
political, academic — have respond- 
ed to it. The inhibitions of the 
twenties and thirties regarding re- 
ligion no longer prevail. As sex 
became proper parlor conversation 
after the First World War, so re- 
ligion is now spoken of without 
embarrassment or apology in the 
best of society. 

Surburban society, we know, is 
in a large measure religiously or- 
ganized. A politician must now 
identify himself with some denom- 
ination and be prepared publicly 
to bare has religious heart. Re- 
ligion has also been readmitted 
to the groves of academe after an 
extended leave of absence. Divin- 
ity schools are well-endowed; de- 
partments of religion are flourish- 
ing; and religious issues receive a 
hearing, drawing attentive audi- 
ences. Religion has also profited 
by the paperback revolution where 
religious titles are displayed prom- 
inently in campus bookstores. 

Manx forces have contributed 
to this upsurge of religion. We 
will direct our attention to Juda- 
ism, the third great American re- 
ligion, in specific terms of Ortho- 
doxy. 

Wie es christelt sich so yidelt 
says a perceptive Yiddish proverb 
ov "As the Joneses go, so go the 
Coens and Cowans." Second and 
third generation American Jews 
have made the most of this re- 
ligious boom in these last twenty 
years. As elaborate church-cen- 
ters arose in all surburban com- 
munities so more elaborate syna- 



gogue-centers were built. As church 
affiliation grew, synagogue mem- 
berships increased proportionate- 
ly. Religion seems to be "bustin' 
out all over." 

We find, for example, there a 
young Jewish veteran whose fath- 
er attended a socialist Kol Nidre 
ball on the lower East Side, is now 
chairman of the curriculum com- 
mittee of the religious school. This 
extensively furnished school is 
housed in an ultra-modern cater- 
ing-center synagogue establishment 
which serves as the Jews' identity 
pass into American society. In 
these postwar years, Jews have 
been living with a grave and dra- 
matic edi lice-complex which is a 
reflection of the social forces ob- 
taining in the middle-class com- 
munity at large. 

Not to be outdone, Orthodox 
Jews have also entered the race, 
albeit somewhat late. I refer, ol 
course, to "Americanized" Ortho- 
dox Jews, many of whom live sim- 
ultaneously in the two worlds of 
Pumpaditha and Pompeii. 

Surburban and, to a lesser de- 
gree, urban Orthodoxy has be- 
come fashionable. We, too, have 
arrived and are riding the crest 
of the religious wave in America. 
We are becoming, more articulate, 
more vocal and more organized. 
We are erecting bigger and better 
buildings and are attempting to 
prove the possibility and viability 
of an acculturated, yet undiluted, 
halachic community within the 
great American democracy. 

Should you be hungry at the 
l atin Quarter some late evening, 

(Please turn to Page 112) 




*3? 






















Dr. Jonas Salk, polio vaccine developer, points out construction progress 
on laboratories at the new Salk Institute for Biological Studies in San 
Diego, Calif., to Judith Smith, International President of the B'nai B'rith 
Girls of the B'nai B'rith Youth Organization. 




Charlottesville 

The Heart of Historic 
VIRGINIA" 



"JEFFERSON'S COUNTRY" 

Charlottesville has many places of historic interest and 
scenic beauty including Monticello, the home of Thomas 
Jefferson ; University of Virginia, founded by Jefferson ; 
Ash Lawn, home of James Monroe, and Michie Tavern, 
which has been restored and authentically refurnished as a 
museum of Historic Tavern Americana. 

Make Charlottesville your headquarters for tours over the 
Skyline Drive and Blue Ridge Parkway to the Caverns of 
Virginia, Natural Bridge Woodrow Wilson's birthplace, 
Staunton, the homes and Tombs of Robert E. Lee and Stone- 
wall Jaskson, Lexington, historic Fredericksburg and Rich- 
mond. 

PI n now to bring your next convention or conference to 
CHARLOTTESVILLE. 



For Information, Write 

CHAMBER of COMMERCE 
CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA 



THE MICHIE CO. 

Publishers of Law Books Since 1897 
Post Office Box 57 Charlottesville, Va. 

LAW PUBLISHERS PRINTERS 



We Can Supply 
Any Law Book 
In Print 



NEW YEAR 
GREETINGS 




24 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



For a modern bank with roots 100 years deep... 
for a growing bank serving Virginians from the 
Shenandoah Vailey to Tidewater, look for the 
"mark of personal service" 




FIRST a MERCHANTS 
NATIONAL BANK 



HOME 
BENEFICIAL 



LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 



The Home of Protection 



The Rabbi And The Community 



HOME OFFICE 



RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



By Dr. Samuel Belkin 




DR. SAMUEL BELKIN 

There are certain problems, 
with which we must seriously con- 
cern ourselves. Firstly, the Rabbi 
alone cannot be the symbol and 
embodiment of those things which 
Judaism requires from each of its 
members. He cannot be the sole 
guardian of Jewish ideals nor the 
community agent for the observ- 
ance of Torah. Yet how often have 
we heard tell of communities that 
are unable to provide a Koshci 
home for the Rabbi whom they 
have requested, if that be his need. 
The members of the Synagogue 
understand fully that the Rabbi 
must observe Kashrut, but see no- 
thing wrong in their own negative 
attitude towards its observance. 
The Rabbi thus becomes not only 
the representative of the Jewish 
community and the authoritative 
interpreter of Jewish tradition but 
the sole personification of things 
Jewish. This present-day gap be- 
tween the Rabbi and the laity 
with regard to religious observ- 
ance is one of our most challeng 
ing problems. 

One of the peculiar results of 
this situation is the assumption 
by the laity of certain preroga- 
tives not within its purview. The 
Rabbinate, in carrying out its duty 
of teaching Torah and Judaism, 
has always been the accepted au- 



thority and guide for Jewish life. 
No matter how observant or 
learned a community might have 
been, all questions pertaining to 
Synagogue practice and religious 
observance were always '.lecided 
by the Rabbi. Even in those com- 
munities where laymen were as 
learned as the Rabbi — for the 
Rabbi has no monoply on learn- 
ing—his ruling was always accept- 
ed. Was it for this purpose that 
he had been chosen by the com- 
munity as its leader? 

Today, however, when our laity 
openly admits its lack of Jewish 
learning and its laxity of observ- 
ance, perhaps, because of these 
very factors, it has relegated to it- 
self the authcrity of decision in 
matters of religious law, an au- 
thority which belongs only to the 
Rabbi by virtre of his "Semicha," 
his training and knowledge. 

When, for example, a commun- 
ity desires to build a new Syna- 
gogue or school hou se, the Rabbi 
becomes the prime mover in the 
campaign, functioning as the lead- 
er, the worker and fund raiser. 
Rut when fundamental questions 
arise concerning the structure of 
the Synagogue, the type of instruc- 
tion to be given in the school and 
matters of Synagogue worship 
which border along the funda- 
mentals of Jewish law, the mem- 
bers of the congregation assume 
the authority to take decisions by 
vote. Synagogue boards disregard 

(Please turn to Page 63) 



5724-5725 LUACH 1964-1965 

Rosh Hashonah Sept. 1 

Yom Kippur Sept. 16 

Succos — Sept. 21 

Simchas Torah Sept. 29 

Chanukah _ Nov. 30 

Purim _ March 18 

Passover April 17 

Shavuous - June 6 



HAPPY NEW YEAR 

WM. F. GRAVINS & CO., Inc. 

25 S. 13th St. Phone MI 8-4729 Richmond, Va. 

• BUTTER • EGGS 

• POULTRY • FROZEN FOODS 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 



25 



Weitzmann's Legacy Bears Rich Fruit 



Of all the themes at the World's 
Fair in New York the most inter- 
esting in many ways is the one at 
the American-Israel Pavilion. Ap- 
propriately enough, the theme is 
Biblical in concept and dramatic 
impact, yet its scope covers a long- 
er time span: from the primitive- 
way of life in ancient Palestine 
to our nuclear age with its scien- 
tific marvels, as exemplified so 
strikingly by the Weizmann Insti- 
tute of Science in Rehovoth Is- 
rael. It takes you across the cen- 
turies from the remote past when 
the Israelites astonished the world 
with their new religion to the 
phenomenal scientific explorations 
of our day in which Israeli scien- 
tists are playing a leading role. In 
short, from die beginnings of civ- 
ilization to 1964. 

Between these extremes — at one 
end, an Israelite woman milling 
grain in a crude stone vessel some 
4,000 years ago; at the other end, 
a scaled model of the Weizmann 
Institute — a series of dioramas 
show how the Jews, following 
their dispersion, lived, worked, 
stutlied. suffered, and managed 
somehow to survive unending hos- 
tility and persecution. 

After the visitor has viewed 
these dioramas depicting the cen- 
turies-long denial of normal life 
for the Jews, he is all the more 
impressed when he finally finds 
himself standing in front of the 
exhibit of the Weizmann Institute 
—a research institution that sym- 
bolizes the incredible scientific 



New Year 
Greetings 



Lyttle & 
Barnes 

CONSTRUCTION 
CO., INC. 



Belt Blvd. & Hopkins Road 
RICHMOND, VA. 

• SEWERS 

• WATER LINES 

• DISPOSAL SYSTEMS 



progress achieved in Israel within 
the few years since Jewish nation- 
hood was restored in 1948. 

Dr. Chaim Weizmann, the first 
President of the State of Israel, 
and himself, a noted scientist, fore- 
saw as far back as World War I, 
that a land so neglected and poor 
in natural resources as Palestine 
could be rebuilt and made to 
flourish only by the strenuous ap- 
plication of scientific knowledge 
and know-how. Always striving to- 
ward this goal, he was instrumen- 
tal in founding in Rehovoch, in 
1934, the Daniel Sieri Research 
Institute, which later became the 
first unit in the great complex of 
the Weizmann Institute. 

The model on display in the 
American- Israel Pavilon shows the 
beautifully landscaped 200-a< re 
Weizmann campus, with its 20 
modern w e 1 1 - equipped research 
buildings, its library, student dor- 
mitories, residential dwellings and 
playgrounds for the children of 
the Institute's personnel. Here 240 
top scientists and hundreds of as- 
sistants are occupied in research- 
ing more than 200 separate pro- 
jects of far-reaching importance 
in the fields of biology, chemistry 
and physics. 

Suspended above the campus 
model arc globes with magnified 
transparencies. These light up at 
intervals of several seconds, show- 
ing the work that is being con- 
ducted in the corresponding build 
ings. 

This writer made the rounds of 
many national pavilions at the 
Fair, but nowhere did he see so 
many visitors as at the American- 
Israel Pavilion (the only exceptions 
were the pavilions featuring exotic 
restaurants where the people were 
primarily interested in the food). 
And at the Israel Pavilion no other 

(Please turn to Page 101) 

The Knesset resolution declar- 
ing the Indian Jewish community 
in Jerusalem Bnei Israel, as Jews 
in every respect, is belived to have 
resolved that community's fight 
with the rabbinate. The group 
charged that the rabbis were dis- 
criminating r.gainst them in the 
application of Jewish marriage 
laws by searching into Jewish past 
and background. 



HAPPY 




£ Greetings 



FROM YOUR DEMOCRATIC NOMINEE TO CONGRESS 
THIRD CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

DAVID E. SATTERFIELD, III 




I wish to take this opportunity to express my appreciation for 
your support in the Democratic prunary and to respectfully solicit 
your continued support and vote in the general election, November 
3, 1964. 




BUILDING 
OR 

BUYING 



GET YOUR 
HOME LOAN 
FROM . . . 



^ran&iin federal pavings 

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

Now You Get MORE from FOUR 
4% Daily* Dividends • 4 Convenient Locations 

*On Accounts 6 Months Old 



7th and Broad 



Azalea Mall Three Chopt & Patterson 

Southside Plaza 

RICHMOND, VA. 



26 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 




Family Stamp Co. 

1615 W. BROAD ST. RICHMOND, VA. 

Jack Greenberg, Manager 

PREMIUM REDEMPTION GIFT STORES 



Lynchburg, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Bristol, Va. 
Danville, Va. 
Onancock, Va. 
Bluefield, West Va. 
Huntington, West Va. 
Bridgeport, West Va. 
Salisbury, N. C. 
Concord, N. C. 
Lenoir, N. C. 
Canton, N. C. 
High Point, N. C. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Spruce Pine, N. C. 
Troy, N. C . 
Hickory, N. C. 
Siler City, N. C. 
Kannapolis, N. C. 
Charlotte, N. C. 
BurlingLon, N. C. 
Greensboro, N. C. 
Hillsboro, N. C. 
Wilkesboro, N. C. 
Easley, S. C. 
Macon, Ga. 
Columbus, Ga. 
Salisbury, Md. 
Franklin, Ky. 



Harrisonburg, Pa. 




NUMBER 




A PEOPLE AND ITS CALENDAR 



VIRGINIA STATE SEVEN-UP BOTTLERS 



By Dov Peretz Elkins 



If you want to penetrate the 
inner soul of a people, go to its 
holidays, its festivals, its occasions 
for rejoicing and for mourning. 
That is the key to fathoming the 
deep recesses of a people's per- 
sonality: its calendar. 

Egypt, for example, dated its 
New Year from the annual over- 
flow of the Nile. Israel began its 
year on the anniversary of the 
Exodus from Egypt, its great Festi- 
val of Freedom. (Nisan is the first 
month of the year, though Tishre 
marks the beginning of the calen- 
dar year). 

In America, the order of the 
day on December 31 is frivolity, 
noise, and a maximum of inebria- 
tion. Xo historical event is com- 
memorated, no significant idea ex- 
tolled — just another year, and 
"my, how quickly time passes." 

The Jews have always had hard 
li\cs, and it has always been hard 
to be a [ew, as the Yiddish say- 
ing goes. The Jews have always 
been a people with a purpose, a 
meaning for existence, and a his- 
tory which glorified that purpose 
and. that meaning — the good life. 
Hence New Year Holidav is a 
serious one, a somber time for 
reflection and meditation, a time 
for evaluation. 

The key word in this holiday 
period is TESHUVAH, repent- 
ance. And what is repentance if 
not self-evaluation, and a determi- 
nation to bring the evil impulse 
into line — to steadily improve 
our pattern of living. 

For life is an art as well as a 
science. And both the artist and 
the scientist know the importance 
of TESHUVAH - of self-evalua- 
tion and correction of the method 
employed. The artist does not con- 
tinually wield his brush and blend 
his colors — occasionally he stops 
and looks at what he has done, 
and. evaluates. The scientist does 



not constantly manipulate his test 
tubes — at periodic intervals he 
pauses, looks, examines, thinks, re- 
cords — and on some frustrating 
occasions he even begins again 
from scratch. 

Evaluation is part of all life, of 
all science, of all industry, of all 
education. Why should it not then 
be part of the industry of living 
—the science and the art of life 
itself? We Jews were the first to 
set aside time for evaluative con- 
ferences. Our annual evaluative 
parleys, between man and his fel- 
low, and between man and God, 
take place every year in the month 
of Tishre for ten days. True, too 
many of us don't attend to the 
daily and the weekly business that 
takes place between these annual 
conferences — some of us try to 
live on them alone — but for all 
Jewry the ten-day period between 
Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur 
is a time when we evaluate the 
most important thing in the world. 
Not our business profits, nor our 
financial status, but our actions— 
ours is a spiritual inventory. We 
climb up the ladder and inspect 
the shelves of good deeds to see 
if the stock needs replenishing. 
We check and double check our 
cases of oversight, neglect, preju- 
dice, selfishness, and other bad 
products which we must discard. 
We examine our lives, our deeds, 
cur thoughts, and our souls. 

(Please turn to Page 93) 



The National Foundation for 
Jewish Culture has awarded a 
grant of $2,500 to Dr. Irving 
Greenberg, associate professorr of 
history at Yeshiva University, for 
research of the Mussar movement, 
which emerged among Orthodox 
Jews of Eastern Europe during the 
19th century and has a strong phi- 
losophic nad ethical resemblance 
to what is currently called existen- 
tialism. 



NEW YEAR GREETINGS 

CONTINENTAL BAKING COMPANY 

Bakers of 

WONDER BREAD and HOSTESS CAKE 

RICHMOND, VA. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



27 



THE NIGHT AMERICAN JEWRY MET 
MRS. LYNDON B. JOHNSON 



By Jean R. Herschaft 



As the tragic events of Novem- 
ber 22, 1964 go into history and a 
new first lady of the land takes 
over the keys to the White House, 
it is well to recall the night that 
American Jewry formally met Mrs. 
Lyndon B. Johnson. 

Il was an exciting experience 
that saw over 1,000 ot us greet 
Vice President and Mrs. Johnson. 
Jt was a warm encounter that saw 
Lady Bird — then known to mil- 
lions of Americans as the second 
lady of the land — or — Mrs. V.P. 
— affectionately endear herseli 



that night as "Faigale" . . . (the 
Yiddish diminutive for little bird). 

The night was a cold February 
5th, 1961, barely one month after 
Vice President Johnson was in- 
ducted into office. The place was 
the gala Grand Ballroom of New 
York's Waldorf Astoria Flotel. The 
occasion was a Jewish Fraternal 
Organization — B'nai Zion's 43rd 
Annual Banquet in honor of the 
newly elected Vice President of the 
United States. (In 1958, on its 
59th anniversary it had similarly 
honored a young Senator named 
John F. Kennedy.) 




Monsignor Charles Owen Rice, known as Western Pennsylvania's 
"labor priest," was the guest of honor at an impressive dinner in Pittsburgh 
sponsored by the Labor Committee for State of Israel Bonds. Among the 
outstanding personalities paying tribute to Monsignor Rice were the noted 
actor Edward G. Robinson (left), and Michael Quill (right), President of 
the Transport Workers Union. 



Regal Manufacturing Co. 

Manufacturers of 



Quality Elastic Tarns 



Dial 345-4106 212 12th Ave. N. E. Hickory, N. C. 
Dial 821-1571 Chattanooga, Tenn. 



SHIP 'N SHORE BLOUSES 

W. H. STOTT & ASSOC. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 




SEASON'S GREETINGS 
FROM 



THE 



ATLANTA 



BRASSIERE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 




Ruth Originals 
Corporation 

Manufacturers of Children's Dresses 



Peter Mann, Sales Representative 



Dial OX 2-1463 

2029 Asheville Hwy. 
Hendersonville, N. C. 



New York Show Rooms : 

390 Fifth Avenue 
New York Tel. OX 5-7087 



W. G. Jarrell Machine Company 



"Since 1906" 



NEW MACHINES 
TO ORDER 

GENERAL 
MACHINE 
REPAIRS 





• Electric. Acetylene and Heliwelding 

• Portable and Stationary Equipment 



Dial ED 3-7189 
Box 2154 



1200 S. Mint Street 
CHARLOTTE 1, N. C. 



THE SEASON'S GREETINGS 

May the New Year Bring You Happiness and Contentment 

MARCUS & FARBER 

Hollins, Poppleton & Boyd Streets 
BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND 

Manufacturers of "Jay Ray" Sportswear 
JAY MARCUS RAY FARBER 



:28 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



"America's Fastest Selling Junior Dresses" 




Shown In The South 

by JAKE CAUSEY 




New York Show Room 1350 Broadway 

CARL SCHWORM, Representative 




juniors 



New York Show Room 1350 Broadway 

ARTIE GOLDMAN, Representative 




New York Show Room 1350 Broadway 

ARCHIE KOTTLER, Representative 



HERE COME THE GIRLS 

By Ben G. Frank 



Attend any Israel Independence 
Day parade and at one point in 
the ceremony, onlookers, young 
and old, male and female, will 
crane their nicks and exclaim, 
"Here come the girls!" 

The bystanders wdl tell you 
that one of the most exciting part 
of the parade is to see the girls 
pass in review. 

Most Israelis arc proud of their 
women soldiers' dad in khaki 
shirts and skirts, white socks, 
brown shoes and chic barrets; their 
left arms swinging in unison; dreir 
right hands grasping Uzi-sub ma 
chine guns.. 

Yet despite the acclaim at pa- 
rade-time, the question often arises 
whether girls are needed in the 
Israel Army, the only Army in 
the free world with peace-lime 
conscription of women. 

Support for the continuation of 



women in the Defense Army of 
Israel recently came from a sabra 
who was raised in America but 
who three years ago returned to 
Israel. In a year and a half, Miss 
Liana Berner, 23, now in the Unit- 
ed States for one year of study at 
Los Angeles City College, rose to 
rank of sargeant. 

"Every post taken by a girl re- 
lieves a man for field duty," argu- 
ed Miss Berner as she pointed out 
Israel's most cogent reason for 
drafting girls. 

A soldierette, she said, can serve 
as a clerk, storewoman, telephone 
and radio operator, parachute 
packer, teacher or nurse. Men, 
therefore, are free to do more 
strenuous tasks, asserted vivacious 
Miss Berner who would be the 
last one to say that women in the 
Army are less capable than men 
folk. 

(Please turn to Page 38) 




Top leaders of the nationwide United Jewish Appeal greet Israel Prime 
Minister Levi Eshkoi and his wife at the dinner given in their honor by 
the UJA Campaign Cabinet at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York. Left 
to right are Max M. Fisher of Detroit, UJA Associate General Chairman; 
Mr. and Mrs. Eshkoi; Joseph Meyerhoff of Baltimore, General Chairman, 
and Rabbi Herbert A. Friedman of New York, Executive Vice -Chairman. 



PI ease Patronize Our Advertisers 



BCB DREYER 



SAYS - GO 



CENTUR Y 

SKIRTS & DRESSES 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



29 



A CITIZEN OF ISRAEL 

By David Samuelson 



Jaffa, Israel — He was as black 
as my mother's old kitchen coal 
stove after its daily polish. The 
brilliant rays of the Israeli sun 
was reflected in glittering pools of 
brightness from his high cheek 
bones and slightly flaring nostrils. 
He stood on the curb leaning 
against a rickety two wheeled dray, 
to which was attached, between 
the shafts, a hip-high four legged 
animal which looked as if it were 
trying dumbly to make a donkey 
of itself. 

He was looking hungrily at a 
pile of old, ragged, cast-off clothes 
on the sidewalk, over which a 
group of Jews and Arabs were 
haggling with the old clothes man 
(the man you hear every morning 
in Tel Aviv with a bag on his 
shoulders, or riding a bicycle to 
which is attached a two wheeled 
contraption, as he shouts in a 
quaint Yiddish "Alte Sachen!") 

The faces on the would be pur- 



Augusta Mi!! 
Supply Company 

# Industrial Supplies 

# Mill Supplies 

DIAL PA 2-4657 

New Savannah Road 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



Seasons Greetings 



BLANCH 
COTTON MILLS 

AUGUSTA, GA. 



chasers ranged from light Europe- 
an to almost bronzed tan, but this 
fellow was coal black. He shook 
his kinky grey haired pate in pro- 
test at my pointing camera, turned 
slowly, picked up the lead role on 
his draught animal, gave it a 
couple of slaps on its rump, and 
disdainfully walked away. 

Without his Arab headgear, a 
shabby looking kefia, I could have 
sworn he looked like an American 
Southern Negro sharecropper. 
But, the kefia, the loose, dirty blue 
pants, the bag at his rear almost 
scraping the ground, said he was 
not an Uncle Tom. 

He could be Muhammed Ibra- 
him al Tewfik, probably an Afri- 
can slave in his own life time, 
and surely a descendant of jungle 
Africans kidnapped by Arabian 
slave hunters in the past. But 
today, by a particularly important 
event in Middle East history 
some-time in 1948, he became 
automatically a citizen of the form- 
er Arab city of Jaffa, a citizen 
of Israel. 

Somehow this black Arab sym- 
bolized a bizarre phase of human 
history, a swing of the pendulum 
from African savagery, through 
Arab barbarous slavery, to a puz- 
zling civilization, a unique citizen 
in a country which is attempting 

(Please turn to Page 89) 

Negative press reaci.io.i to the 
resignation fo Etienne Sarra, chief 
of protocol of the Swiss Foreign 
Ministry who quit when it was 
disclosed he had made anti- Jewish 
remarks at a dinner last March at 
the home of the Arab Ambassador, 
is being viewed with gr:at concern 
by the Swiss Jewish community. 
News of the remark reached Dr. 
Georgs Brunschvig, president of 
the Federation of Swiss Jewish 
communities some months ago and 
he at once lodged a sharp protest 
with the Foreign Ministry. 



PURITAN FINISHING MILLS 

INCORPORATED 

High Class Hosiery Finishers 
Finishing: Men's, Bovs', Infants' and Misses' Hosiery 
BURLINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



JOANNA COTTON MILLS COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 
WINDOW SHADE CLOTH 

JOANNA, SOUTH CAROLINA 



Selling Agents 

H. S. PARKER COMPANY 

66-72 LEONARD ST. NEW YORK, N. Y. 



CROSS COTTON MILLS COMPANY 



Double Carded and Combed 
KNITTING YARNS 

MARION, NORTH CAROLINA 



CLEARWATER FINISHING PLANT 

DYE, PRINT AND FINISHING 

COTTON PIECE GOODS § 

Clearwater Street Clearwater, S. C. 



Lineberry Foundry 
& Machine Co. 

INCORPORATED 



Woodworking Cutters • High Speed Router Bits 
All Types Carbide Cutters 
Milled to Pattern Knives 

COMPLETE CATALOGS ON REQUEST 



NORTH WILKESBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



30 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 




Sustain Israel's 
Economic Progress 
In The Year 
Of Redemption 



WITH 

STATE OF 
ISRAEL BONDS 

BUY ISRAEL BONDS 

For A New Year 
Of Progress 
For Israel 

Information, Prospectus & Bonds may be obtained at 

Israel Bonds — Virginia & North Carolina Region 
208 W. York Street NORFOLK, VA. MAdison 2-4631 
GUSTAVE BISGYER, Area Manager 



YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS ANY 

By Joel Donner 

The 1 rouble with trying to pre- This statement is not an exer- 

clict what Jewish lite in the United rise in semantics based on the ob- 

States will be like in 10, 20, or 30 vious proposition that no one can 

years is that, in the most real predict the unpredictable. The 

sense, there are no true experts fact is that, in many areas, it is 

on the subject. (Please turn to Page 114) 



u 



The Vanishing American Jew 

(Concluded from Page 21) 



actively, their ultimate 
and essential goals are 



3) We have to help young peo- 
ple see that what they care about 
most, the ideals they seek to pur- 
sue most 
concerns 

often singularly those values most 
deeplv imbedded in Judaism. 

I do not feel pessimistic about 
fewish survival. I feel that what 
Jewish students seek most deeply 
in the inner core of their being 
is that kind of drive to fight lor 
equality and individuality that be- 
speaks of the noblest historic em- 
phases of Judaism. We need to 
channel the Jewish student's quest 
for identity and self understand- 
ing, his quest for love and self 
realization, his urge lor compat- 
ability with people regardless of 
faith, color and economic status 
in the direction of rebuilding the 
total fabric of American Jewish 
life. 

One of the key reasons why 
fewish students rebel against Ju- 
daism is because of its over-institu- 
tionalization: bigger and more 
beautiful temples, less and less 
concern with social justice and 
inner piety. It is true that Judaism 
needs to be less priestly and more 
prophetic. Let us accept their crit- 
icism in light of the maxim: "The 
unexamined life is not worth liv- 
ing" as it applies to Judaism as a 
whole; then our young people will 
have more to love and less to re- 



bc! against in Judaism. 

if American Judaism becomes 
the mature religion it may poten- 
tially become, imbued with the 
rights of all men, "standing on 

he high places of history— cham- 
• ioning justice, equality and 
brotherhood" — in tei marriage will 
decline, more than that — Jewish 
identity and Jewish education, 

Jewish home life and synagogue 
life will take on a richer dimen- 
sion than ever before visualized. 




rental systems 

★ TV SPECIAL * 



*5 



00 



PER DAY 



NO MILEAGE CHARGE 
from 

(9:00 AM to 4:30 PM) 

ASK ABOUT OUR 

WEEKEND SPECIAL 

332-2233 

732 N. TRYON ST. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



SNYDER PAPER CORP. 

Distributors 0/ 
* INDUSTRIAL AND FINE PAPERS 
*FOAM RUBBER AND POLY FOAM 



Brevard Blvd. and Fraley Rd. 
Dial 882-0126 High Point, N. C. 



In Greensboro, N C. 
Dial 275-3452 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



31 



Around Greexsboro 



(Continued from Page 8) 



MRS. SIGMDND DAVIDSON 

Patricia Ellen Kronman, daugh- 
ter of Mayor and Mrs. Samuel 
foseph Kronman of 320 Benner 
Street, Highland Park, New Jer- 
sey, was married Sunday, August 
2, 1964 to Mr. Sigmund Davidson, 
on of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Lev 
Davidson. 



Rabbi. Philip Rithoh/ officiat- 
ed at the rite which took place 
in the Highland Park Conserva- 
tive Temple, Highland Park, New 
Jersey. The ceremony was per- 
formed at five thirty in the even- 
ing. 

Given in marriage by her lather. 



Where Television is a Profession 



Not a Side-Line 






Television & Appliances 



We Service All Makes and Models 
Eight Trained Technicians 
5 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS 
416 W. Market Street — Dial 275-1326 
Lawndale Shopping Center (next to Big Bear) — Dial 272-7088 
Summit Avenue and Church Street — Dial 274-1651 
TV, Radio and Quick Car Drive-In Service 
224 N. Elm Street — Dial 273-0546 
2802 E. Market Street — Dial 274-9081 

Most Capable Electric Repair Service 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous Neiu Year from the Following Firms in 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 




MtONTALDO'S 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 




Town and Country Dressing — the monotone tweed 
wool suit and. matching narrow coat. Blue, green, 
red. $69.95. Coat $75.00. Sizes 8 to 18. As seen in the 
New Yorker. 




Your Home Need More Parking Space? 

ASPHALT PAVING . . . 

Gives You More Space Per Dollar! 



Maintenance, 
If Needed, 
is 

Easier 

Quicker 

Less 

Expensive 




Greensboro, N. c. mgh Point, N. C. 

Danville, Va. 
Martinsville, Va. South Boston, Va. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



We invite you to investigate our facilities for handling any 
type of insurance . . . All of our claims are handled locally. 

Phone 272-4174, 272-4175 or 272-4176 
The Number Which Spells Financial Safety 

WIMBESH INSURANCE AGENCY 

GENERAL AGENTS 

917-925 Southeastern Building, Greensboro, N. C. 

^3ME^ Joseph M. Hunt, Jr. Mrs. Marie T. Merrill 

Mrs. Edith M. Wimbish F. "Jack" Sessoms 

/ George W. Perrett Mrs. J. D. Franks, Jr. 

ndependem Robert G. Troxler Herbert G. Chase 

/AGENT Mrs. John W. Davis Miss Concordia Smith 

itivii/ 7o« /r.«tt- Mrs. Kathleen Wheeler Miss Catherine Bishop 

Charles C. Wimbish 



Insurance jg /AGEI 



Season s Greetings and Best Wishes To Our Many 
Friends for a Happy and Prosperous New Year 

GEORGE W. KANE 



GREENSBORO 



DURHAM 



ROXBORO 



Sour Cream Is The Secret 




HEARTY "MAIN DISH" SALAD 

In a bowl lined with lettuce — mix sliced cheese, cold meats, 
hard boiled eggs, tomato wedges, chopped onion or chives. 
Toss well, top with GUILFORD DAIRY sour cream. 



" Your 
Hometown Dairy' 





ALL PESTS KILLED AT ONCE— MOT EXCUSES — "RESULTS' 
All Services Carry a Bona-Fide Guarantee 



FREE INSPECTIONS 




7 



Fayei.i. . 



High Point 



dial 273-6253 

DAVE GOFORTH. MGR. 

coNsmiMn DooMotoewi k— i of turn 

GREENSBORO. N. C. Wilson 



the bride was attended by Miss 
Marilynne Sheila Kronman ol 
Highland Park, sister of the bride, 
as maid of honor. Bridesmaids 
were Miss Florence Darwin of 
Plainiield, New Jersey, cousin of 
the bride, Miss Frances Kament/ 
of Greensboro, cousin of the bride- 
groom, Miss Anita Mironov of 
Highland Park, Miss Paula Con- 
rad of Highland Park, and Miss 
Frances Mollen of Fort Monroe, 
Virginia. 

Miss Joan Dengrove of Plain- 
field, cousin of the bride served 
a; junior bridesmaid and Master 
Robert Darwin of Plainfield, cou- 
sin of the bride was the ring 
bearer. 

Mr. William Robert Fields of 
Greensboro was the best man as- 
sisted by tishers Barry Kronman 
of Highland Park, brother of the 
bride, William Starr of Greens- 
boro, Robert Lavietes of Greens- 
boro, Barry Frahm of Greensboro, 
ferry Blair and Stephen Sidel of 
New York City. 

Following the ceremony, Mayor 
and Mrs. Samuel Joseph Kron- 
man were hosts to 250 guests at 
a reception and dinner in the main 
ballroom of the Highland Park 
Temple. Entertainment was pro- 
vided b\ the music of the Michael 
Forman Orchestra of South Or- 
ange, New Jersey. 

After a wedding trip to the Mid- 
west, the couple will live in 
Greensboro, North Carolina. 

The bride is a graduate of the 
Highland Park High School and 
is presently a senior at the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro where she is studying for a 
B. S. Degree majoring in Secre- 
tarial Administration. 

The bridegroom prepared lor 
college at the Hotchkiss School 
for Boys in Lakeville. Connecticut, 
attended the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill and was 
graduated from Elon College in 
North Carolina in 1962 with a 
Bachelor of Science Degree in 
Business Administration. He is 
presently sales manager of the 
Davdison Supply Company of 
Greensboro, North Carolina. 

Guests from Greensboro includ- 
ed the following: Mr. and Mrs. 
Herman Lev Davidson, parents 
of the bridegroom, Mrs. Samuel 
Kamenetz, grandmother of the 
bridegroom, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice 
Kamenetz, aunt and uncle o c the 
bridegroom, Miss Frances Eileen 




MUSIC CO. 

Moved Just Around The 
Corner 

SAME FRIENDLY 
SERVICE 
AMPLE FREE PARKING 

3118 Friendly Rd. 292-2330 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



"ORCHID SERVICE" 
Hand Cleaning and 
Finishing 

BLUE BIRD 
CLEANERS, Inc. 

E. J. PERRYMAN & SONS 

1613 Madison Avenue 
Friendly Shopping Center 
Phone 292-1400 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Piedmont Office Suppliers 
Dial 274-5161 

Office Supplies 

308 S. Elm Street 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



PHIL R. CARLTON 

Incorporated 

Real Estate — Rents 
Insurance — Bonding 

Carlton Building 
Opposite Courthouse 

Dial 272-8157 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Bring Your Cars 
For Expert Repairing To 

KIRK'S SENEATH 
Motor Company 

24-Hour Wrecker Service 

Dial 272-3456 

419 Battleground Ave. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish 



riMES-OlJTLOOK 



33 



Stanley Shoes, Inc. 

Featuring Fine Shoes 
for Ladies and Children 

• Paramount 
Vitality 

• Sandler of Boston 

• Buster Brown 

• Simplex 

• and many others. 

Friendly Shopping Center 
Greensboro, N. C. 



\jAFE 

AIR CONDITIONED 

Specialising in . . . 

Western Steaks 

Shis-Ka-Bob 
& Louis Salad 

dial 273-3503 

124 Be'lcmeade 
Opposite O. Henry Hotel 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Good Furniture at Reasonable 
Prices 

BURTNER 
FURNITURE CO. 

Established 1921 
312 S. Elm St. Phone 272-8417 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



BREWER 

Paint & Wallpaper 
Company 

SPECIALIZING IN 
Painting: & Wallpapering 

Residential 
* Commercial 
""Industrial 

1422 Westover Terrace 

Dial 274-5403 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 




Exclusive 
Worn ens 
Apparel 



Friendly Shopping Center 
Northeast Shopping Center 
GREENSBORO. N. C. 

Scales Street 
REIDSVILLE, N .C. 



Kamenetz and Miss Sharon Beth 
Kamenetz, cousins oi the bride- 
groom. Other guests were Mr. and 
Mrs. Victor Bates, Mr. Michael 
Bernhol/. Mr. and Mrs. [erry 
Blair, Mr. and Mrs. Lester Blum, 
Mr. Robert Blum, Mr. and Mrs. 
David Cooper, Mr. and Mrs. Irvin 
Gorman, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond 
Farber, Mr. and Mrs. William 
Fields, Mr. Richard Forman, Mr. 
Barry Frahm. Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Friedman, Mr. Ronald Kap- 
lan, Dr. and Mrs. Harry Karesh, 
Miss Nina Kennedy, Mr. Robert 
Lavietes, Mr. and Mrs. Abe Leavitt, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Pearlman, 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Rose, Mr. 
and Mrs. Harlan Sapero, Mr. Wil- 
liam Starr, and Mr. and Mrs. Max 
Zager. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Shallant an- 
nounce the forthcoming marriage 
of their daughter Judith S. to Dr. 
Mark Perlin, son of Mrs. Louis 
Perlin and the late Louis Perlin 
of Richmond, Va. The wedding 
is scheduled to take place at Tem- 
ple Emanuel on September 26. 

Miss Shallant graduated from 
Greensboro Senior High School 
and Women's College of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. At col- 
lege she was a marshall, vice-pres- 
ident of Hillel, and member of 
Square Circle Mathematics Club. 
She received a degree in mathe- 
matics. She has been living in At- 
lanta, Ga. and has been employed 
as a computer programmer lor 
American Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company. 

Dr. Perlin attended the Univer- 
sity of Virginia where he was a 
member of Alpha Epsilon Pi social 
fraternity. He graduated from the 
Medical College of Virginia, Rich- 
mond, Va. where he was a mim- 




The Rev. Dr. Jacob K. Shankman 
of New Rochelle, New York has 
been elected President of the World 
Union for Progressive Judaism, Ltd., 
the 22-country organization of Re- 
form and Liberal Jews. He succeed- 
ed Rabbi Dr. Solomon B. Frephof of 
Pittsburgh, President since 1959, 



Home Federal Savings & Loan Assn, 

4% Per Annum Current Dividend Rate On Savings 



Main Office: 

113 N. Greene St. 
Summit Branch 
1201 Summit Ave. ^ 

Four Seasons Branch 
2005 Pinecroft Road 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 




Pla^a Branch 
^ 1702 Battleground Ave. 
Friendly Branch 

617 Green Valley Rd. 



The Men who Know BUSINESS MACHINES 

CRANFORD & ASSOCIATES, INC. 

Over 20 Years Experience 
Selling and Servicintr Business Machines 
P. 0. Box 10245 Greensboro. N. C. 



299-0206 



299-0172 



GREENSBORO FORD 

'South's Largest and Friendliest Ford Dealer' 
"We Service After We Sell" 



315 N. Elm GREENSBORO, N. C. 27 5-7264 




Your Money PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 
Buys More m — _ — ppyg 

STORES 




The Drug 

Stores 



ELM & GASTON GOLDEN GATE ELM & MAHKE1 

272-7123 274-0179 272-1169 




In A Lane 

Dru Store Greensboro, north Carolina 



With A 

Hus 



INCORPORATED 



L C 



616-16 SOUTH ELM ST. • POST OFFICE BOX 412B 



GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 




INSWANGER 



LASS CO. 



INSURANCE 
CLAIMS 
HANDLED 



AUTO GLASS INSTALLATIONS — EXPERT WORKMANSHIP 
1710 Patterson Phone 292-2930 Greensboro, N. C. 



34 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



What a Wonderful Place to Raise a Family! 

Starmount Forest - Hamilton Lakes - Hamilton Forest 
Friendly Acres - Green Valley - Guilford Hills 
Garden Homes 

STARMOUNT COMPANY 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 




m COMPANY 



317 N. Elm Street 



"We Lease Anything" 
CARS 

TRUCKS 
EQUIPMENT 

Greensboro. N. C. 



Ralph J. Golden Insurance Agency 

We Feature the New 
B'nai B'rith Disability Insurance Plan 

ALSO, FIRE - CASUALTY - GROUP - LIFE 
INSURANCE 

108 E. Northwood St. Dial BR 5-3400 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Matkin's Auto Glass & Seal (over Center 

AUTO GLASS SPECIALISTS 
COMPLETE AUTO UPHOLSTERY - AUTO TOPS 

431 Battleground Ave. Greensboro, N. C. Dial 275-1359 



WILSON -PICKETT, INC. 

Wm. WILSON H. N. PICKETT 

Residential — Commercial 
Realtors 

SALES — CONSTRUCTION 
MORTGAGES — LOANS 
INSURANCE 




414 Church Street Bldg\ 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Dial 27 5-6373 
Dial 27 5-0639 



Industrial Truck Sales & Service, Inc. 



CL4RK DEALER 



S. Elm St. Ext., at Hiway 220 Junction Dial 274-4641 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



bei of Alpha Omega professional 
dental fraternity and president of 
the Inter-fraternity Council. He 
interned at Sinai Hospital, Balti- 
more, Md., followed by three 
months training in the Depart- 
ment of Anasthesiology at Rich- 
mond Memorial Hospital, Rich- 
mond, Va. He is a member of the 
American Dental Society, North 
Carolina Dental Society and Char- 
lotte Dental Society, and is cur- 
rently practicing dentistry in 
Charlotte, N. C. 

The community extends its sin- 
cere sympathy to Mrs. Harry 
Berkelhammer and family on the 
death of her mother, Mrs. Rose 
Mandelkorn. 78, at Cone Memo- 
rial Hospital on August 7th. 

Mr. and Mrs. Banjamin Marks 
Jr. proudly announce the arrival 
of Michael Alan at Cone Memor- 
ial Hospital on August 17th. 

Kay Bendheim, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Sam Bendheim fr., of 
Richmond, Va. was married to 
Murray Polilis. son of Mr. and 
Mrs. David Politis, at the home 
of the bride's parents, on August 
15th. 



New Circuit Rider 
En N. C. 

Mr. I. D. Blumenthal, Chair- 
man of the Circuit Riding Rabbi 
Project of the North Carolina As- 
sociation of Jewish Men, an- 
nounces the engagement of M. 
Reuben Kesner to fill the vacant 
Southeast Circuit position, under 
the direction of Dr. William B. 
Furie, Executive Director of the 
Circuit Riding Rabbi Program. 
Mr. Kesner. who began his duties 
on August 1. is to serve the four 
communities of Jacksonville, Lum- 
berton, Wallace and Whiteville; 
while Dr. Furie services the re- 
maining Circuit Riding Commun- 
ities of the state. Whereas origin- 
ally one circuit rider visited several 
communities twice a month, the 
new plan is geared to visits two 
to three times weekly. Ultimately 
it is the intention of the Associa- 
tion to support a team of riders, 
each assigned to three or four 
localities which can thus be offer- 

Don't Forget! 
Contribute to the North 
Carolina Home for the 
Jewish Aged 



Hart Hardware Co. 



Your 




APPLIANCE STORE 

Dial 274-4645 
336 Tate Street 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



LAMB 
Distributing Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

Distributors for 
Blatz, Tempo, Ballantine, 
Regent, Champ Ale, and 
Sassy Brew 



LINVILLE 

Service Station 

242 S. Greene Street 

Dial 272-2941 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Please Patronize 
Our Advertisers 



SASLOW'S 
Jewelry Store 

Greensboro's Largest 
Credit Jewelry Store 



Weikei's, inc. 

Write or Calf us for catalogs of 
fund raising gift items for your 
Temple or Synagogue Sister- 
hoods. 

1703 Holbrook Dial 292-0170 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



35 





mOTEL 



• 50 Air-Conditioned Rooms 

with 

• Television — Room Phones 

• Swimming Pool 

• Beautiful Restaurant 

Ad oining 




■\pproved 



Inside City on U. S. Highway 
No. 29-A North 
1 118 Summit Avenue 

Dial 272-010.") 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



DIXIE SALES CO. 

Automotive Service 
Carburetor and Speedometer 
Specialists 

327 Battleground 

Dial 273-6964 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



J. A. WILLARD CO. 

Machine Work — Repairs 
• 

210 S. Forbis St. 272-8735 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



THE BOAR AND 
CASTLE 

TASTY SANDWICHES 
DELICIOUS DRINKS 
CAR SERVICE 

West Market Ext. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 




Smileage/ 



Silvertown 125 
For Safety at Turnpike 
Speeds 



B. F. Goodrich Store 

348 North Greene Street 
Dial 272-3197 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 




M. REUBEN KESNER 

ed more intensive and effective 
spiritual, cultural, educational and 
public relations services. 

Mr. Kesner, a native of Wor- 
cester, Massachusetts, is primarily 
a product of Massachusetts schools. 
He received his undergraduate de- 
gree from Clark University, Wor- 
cester, wh a re he majored in lang- 
uages; and his graduate credits 
from the Wayne University Grad- 
uate School of Social Work, De- 
troit, Michigan. He is a certified 
social worker and a charter mem- 
ber of the National Association 
of Synagogue Administrators. Mr. 
Kesner also attended the Malkin 
Conservatory of Music in Boston, 
Massachusetts, where he studied 
voice; and he was trained in the 
liturgical music of the synagogue 
by the late famed Cantor Hugo 
Chaim Adler. 

Mr. Kesner has taught Hebrew 
and Religious School in Detroit, 
Cleveland and Los Angeles. He 
has served as Cantor and Syna- 
gogue Administrator in a number 
of communities. He is the former 
director of a children's camp in 
upstate Michigan. He has also 
produced recordings for Jewish 
children and for many years di- 
rected a radio program entided 
"The New Voice of Israel," in 
Detroit. 



Organized activity in approxi- 
mately 700 synagogues in various 
parts of the country during the 
forthcoming High Holiday period 
will mark the first phase in the 
Fall campaign to strengthen the 
economy o' : Israel through State of 
Israel Bonds, it was announced 
here by Dr. Joseph J. Schwartz, 
vice president of the Israel Bond 
Organization. 



For GOOD Printing 

Call 272-8809 

Acme Printing Company 

COMMERCIAL PRINTERS 



803 McCormick Street 



Greensboro, N. C. 



Kindley's Used Office Furniture Co. 

DESKS — CHAIRS — V ILES — SAFES 
USED OFFICE FURNITURE — EQUIPMENT 

513 S. Elm St. GREENSBORO, N. C. D al 275-4956 



HOLIDAY GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES FROM 

North Stale Chevrolet Co., Inc. 



SALES 
451 N. Eugene 



SERVICE 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 275-8471 



GUILFORD MONUMENT CO. 

TOM ELDER. JR. 
GRANITE — MARBLE MONUMENTS — MARKERS 

- nisrfi Point Rd. Greensboro. N. G. Dial CY 9-5177 



NEW YEAR GREETINGS FROM 

PLEASANTS HARDWARE 

Friendly Shopping Center 4813 High Point Road 

Dial 275-3308 Dial 299-1042 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



<^K^^~.'^yx^^^-^>-.-^-. yy~. -yy- yy yy- yy *yy< yy- y/~ 'y>~- yy- yy' o^^c>~'^ 

YOUNG'S LANDSCAPE SERVICE | 

All Types Evergreens, Shrubs, Roses | 

Landscape Designing \ 

2810 Battleground Rd. Dial 288-2069 § 

GREENSBORO, N. C. | 




A VERY HAPPY NEW YEAR 
ROBERT H. COX J. THOMAS COX 

CAROLINA GULF SERVICE 

300 S'cuth Greene Street Phone BR 4-4155 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



IN GREENSBORO 



BOOKS — GIFTS 
STATIONERY 

DIAL 272-0175 
— 113 S. Elm Street — 
— Friendly Shopping Center — 



BETTER BRAKE SHOP 



OF GREENSBORO, INC. 



Greensboro's Only "Drive-In" Brake Shop Center 

Dial 274-1580 

SUMMIT AVE. (& FORBIS) GREENSBORO, N. C. 



36 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Allred Printing Company 

Commercial Printers 

409 S. Greene GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 272-2554 



SEDGEFIELD GARDEN CENTER 

"Specialists In Landscape Beautifying" 
FREE ESTIMATES 
DIAL 299-5529 
Visit Our Garden Shop 
5000 High Point Road Greensboro, N. C. 



Leon's Friendly Center Beauty Salon 

3120 Friendly Road Dial 292-1212 

"Two Locations to Serve you Better" 

Leon's Beauty Salon 

340 Tate St. Greensboro, N. C. Dial 273-1726 



SOUTHERN WASTE PAPER COMPANY 

"Waste Paper Specialists" 

501 East Washington Street Dial BR 4-0 J 86 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Greensboro Loom Reed Company, Inc. 

M anufacturers 
GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC COMPANY 

C. L. ELLISON, Owner 
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

Residential — Commercial — Industrial 

2209 Ashe St. Dial 275-8579 Greensboro, N. C. 



AMOS INSURANCE AGENCY 



LLOYD C. AMOS 



HERMAN L. AMOS 



Complete Insurance Service 

2433 Fairview GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 273-0593 



"S.ti Oa\ Signs ^Be Qjoul Silent Salesmen" 

(ALLEN'S iNjlONDISPLAYS) 



Manufacturers of Neon Signs and Letters 



Dial 299-5533 
P. O. Box 3404 
Greensboro, N. C. 



Dial 882-6413 
Branch Office 
High Point, 3SL C. 



LENNOX 



Indoor Comfort Systems' 1 " 

811 Battleground GREENSBORO, N. C 



Aire-Flo Heating and 
Air-Condifioning 



273-0501 



The Name's The 
Same 

By Charlotte Hyams 

Ringo Starr, whose Beatle fame 
has been sprayed throughout the 
world, has created a stir in Jew- 
ish teen circles. "He's Jewish," 
sigh the girls. 

"Ringo? Ringo Starr is a Yid- 
dish nomen?" grandma responds 
quizzically. 

Well, no, he changed it. But 
either way, it's Reuven in He- 
brew. 

Which brings us to an interest- 
ing thought about this custom of 
baby-naming. "1 want him named 
after Uncle Benny," says the proud 
new papa. "Okay," says mama, "if 
we can give him a second name 
for Aunt Fanny." So the late 
Uncle Berel and Tante Freyah are 
memorialized: the baby becomes 
Biuce Franklin. 

Both sides of the family are at 
peace - except, perhaps, Uncle 
Betel and Tante Freyah, God rest 
their souls. 

It happens all the time. Modern 
Jewish children must have mod- 
ern American names. The result 
can be puzzling. 

Take my three favorite nieces 
and nephews: 

1. Leib (named alter grandpa) 
plus Henna (great grandma) be- 
comes Leah plus Ghana becomes 
Laurie (Latin) Ann (French 1. 

2. Dov (daddy's friend) plus 
Yaacov (great grandpa) becomes 
Douglas (Gaelic) James (Latin). 

3. Binvamin (second cousin) 
Shlomo (great grandpa; becomes 
Bryan (Celtic) Scott (Scotch). 

Using this wonderful talent for 
nomenclature chess, we could re- 
verse the procedure and dub any- 
one with a tribal tag. Such as: 

Robin Hood— Reuven Hershel. 

Elvis— Eliezer (freely translated: 
Heaven help me.) 

Charles de Gaulle— Yehezkel der 
Gallitzianer. 

Lady Bird— Leah Zipporah. 

Nikita— Nehemiah. 

Peter, Paul and Mary— Peretz 
and Miriam. 

But my favorite name, I must 
admit, belongs to the executive 
assistant to New York Mayor Wag- 
ner—Julius Caius Caesar Edel- 
stein. Honest. His parents always 
wanted him to be a politician. 



A Very Happy 
New Year 

RALPH PRICE 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



FORD 
BODY CO., INC. 

1200 Battleground Avenue 
Dial 272-1131 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Simpson- Woodell, 

INC. 
Printers 

221 E. Sycamore Street 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Dick's Shoe Shop 

Best Quality 
Repairs 

208 N. Elm St. Dial 272-2459 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



For 24-Hour Emergency 
Wrecker Service 
DIAL BR 3-7411 

Teasley's, Inc. 

"We Never Close" 

General Repairing on All 
Makes of Cars & Trucks 

736 S. Elm Street 
GREENSBORO. N. C. 



'Honey Broasted' 

The World's 
FINEST EATIN' CHICKEN 

1/2 Chicken $1.25 
With All The Trimmings 



'A Honey of a Place To Eat" 

3000 High Point Road 
GREENSBORO 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES OUTLOOK 



37 




Erich Leinsdort, left, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
congratulates Mcsie At^mon ci l&rasi on winning the Leonard Bernstein 
Conductor Prize at Tangitwood. Mr. Atzmon was aided in his career by a 
scholarship trom the American-Israel Cultural Foundation. 

Tomorrow 

A Short -Short Story 

By Philip Bale 



Train 44G rolled along the Po- 
lish plain with its cargo ol "Unter- 
menschen" while the peasants in 
the fields looked at each other sil- 
ently and knowingly, perhaps even 
congratulating themselves on be- 
ing rid ot their Jewish neighbors. 
Every few hours it pulled into an- 
other dreary station, where one 
more wretched contingent was 
herded into the already crowded 
freight cars. So methodically did 
the Nazis wo:k that within lilleen 




(^/mEN ~f AND BOYS 
INC. 



Men's and Bo) s car 



611 Friendly Center Road 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



For Fuel Oil 
Dial 

273-8663 

BERRY 
Coal & Oil Co, 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



minutes the station was again 
empty and the melancholy trans- 
port continued on its way. 1 he 
train had devoured the human 
beings on the platform. Not a one 
was left. Who dared to see any 
loved ones off? 

In the next to the last car, Janos 
Lieberman was getting his first 
sleep since being roused from bed 
the night before. His mother had 
pulled her heavy coal about Ins 
frail thirteen-year-old body, won- 
dering all the time how to tell him 
that his father was dead, shot im- 
mediately alter the roundup. 

Close to forty people were hud- 
dl d together there on the cold 
and dirty floor. As it grew darker 
outside the temperature in the 

ir gradually dropped. Janos' 
mother pulled the boy a little 
closer to herself to protect him 
and to feel his body warmth. She 
even tried to doze, a nervous and 
apprehensive napping. 

In the middle of the night the 
train stopped. The noise from out- 
side woke Janos, who sat up and 
leaned back on the side of the car, 
which he and his mother were 
lucky enough to occupy. His 
mother immediately sat up too. 

She had been putting off tell- 
ing him the sad news, but now she 
felt that she must inform him 

(Please turn to Page <15) 



"Serving Greensboro Since 1919" 

Hanes-Lineberry Funeral Service 

finest facilities - Moderate Cost 



Hanes Funeral Home, Inc. 
401 W. Market St. Greensboro, N. C. 



Dial 272-5158 




Sales - Service 



BLACK 
CADILLAC - OLDS CO. 

304 E. Market St. Dial 275-9641 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



QUALITY CLOTHING FOR MEN AND YOUNG MEN 
Boys Department — Second Floor 

lIounts-WBoe Co. 

f^WHE-BUB. QUALITY IS HIGHER. THAN FKICEj fr 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



For The Best Buy "All Ways" Sic 

Kinney-Keesee Office Supply, Inc. 

"Everything for The Office" 
Phone 274-6341 22:» N. Greene St. Greensboro, N. C. 



PHIPPS HARDWARE COMPANY 

CHINA & GOURMET SHOP — ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 
PAINTS — SPORTINC GOODS — GARDEN SUPPLIES 
A Complete Line of Garden Club and Mechanics Supplies 
215 N. Elm St. GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 272-0179 



MOORE MUSIC COMPANY 

Pianos — Organs — Instruments 

m STEINWAY @ STORY & CLARK 

© WURLITZER © CONN # THOMAS 

"Everything Musical" 

615 W. Market St. GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 274-4636 



MELVIN'S£SS0 SERVICE 

WASHING. WAXING, LUBRICATION, ETC. 
323 S. Greene GREENSBORO Dial 274-4518 



GOODWIN PLUMBING, INC. 

Over 19 Years Experience 
PLUMBING & HEATING — INSTALLATION & REPAIRS 

All Work Guaranteed 
DIAL 275-9563 
719 Winston St. Greensboro, N. C. 



GATE CITY ROOFING CO., Inc. 

APPROVED BARRETT ROOFERS 
SLATE & TILE ROOFING 

402 Tipton PI. GREENSBORO, N. C. Phone 274-0166 



38 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



PAUL B. WILLIAMS, INC. 



313 N. Aycock Street 



Greensboro, N. C. 



VERIFAX COPIERS BY EASTMAN KODAK 
DUPLICATING EQUIPMENT 

"Offices in Principal Cities" 



2 STORES FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 

TIMELYggCLOTHES 

Johnson 3 Aulbert 

CLOTHING COAAPANY 

120 N. Elm St. GREENSBORO, N. C. 2180 Lawndale Dr. 



MILLER FURNITURE COMPANY 

Good Furniture • Reasonably Priced 

314 South Elm Street Dial 273-3441 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



Season's Greetings To Our Many Friends 
For a Very Happy New Year 

PIEDMONT PIE COMPANY, INC 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



Thomas M. Siceloff 

Metropolitan Insurance Consultant 
Estate Planning and Business 
Insurance 
412 W. Market 275-6661 
2618 Beechwood St. 299-7997 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



VERNON L. PENRY 

Jewelry Repairing 

Watson Bldg. 274-0380 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



MANOR MOTEL 

Mr. and Mrs. S. T. Dickinson 
FREE ROOM TELEVISION 

Air-Conditioned 
Circulating Ice Water 
Room Telephones, Radio 
Wall-to-Wall Carpeting 
Beautyrest Mattresses 
Tile Baths 

1045 West Market Street 
Telephone 273-2517 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



MAYRAND, INC. 

PHARMACEUTICALS 

1042 Westside Drive 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



For a coo/,c/ean 
taste... 




Nothing do&2 it 
lite 
Seven-Up! 

Seven-Up Bottling Co. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



BEAUTY SALON 

Expert Hair Styling 

Thalhimer's Ellis-Stone 
3rd Floor 

Dial BR 4-4661 
For Appointment 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Here Come The Girls 

(Continued from Page 28) 
Actually, certain military func- 
tions are carried out better by 
women than men, according to 
Lt. Col. Jacob Mombaz, a mem- 
ber of the Israel mission to the 
United Nations. Women, he said, 
make better radio operators and 
parachute-makers. 

Miss Berner, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Alex Berner of Mexico 
City, worked at Kibbutz Kfar 
Blum, Upper Galilee, in 1958 as 
a member of the Habonim Youth 
Workshop in Israel. After a short 
visit to the U. S., she returned to 
Israel in 1961. That same year, 
she joined Nachal, Army units, 
engaged in agricultural work, and 
soon was promoted to corporal. 
Her lirst assignment was com- 
manding a unit, 90 per cent of 
whom were malss from South 
Africa. 

"At lirst, those South Africans 
thought they were big men and 
it hurt their manly egos having a 
girl standing there and command- 
ing them," Miss Berner recalled. 
But after vigorous training in 
which the then gal-corporal show- 
ed the Anglo-Saxons she could use 
fire arm better than they; could 
hit the dirt faster and co_i>a . de- 
cisive in her commands, their at- 
titude quickly changed to respect 
lor their female superior. 

"I really enjoyed commanding 
them," said Miss Berner. "Boy, I 
gave them a tough time in the be- 
gining. but they became a good 
unit," she said proudly. 

After Nachal, Miss Berner, 
whose lather is director of RAS- 
SCO (Rural and Suburban Settle- 
ment Corp. of Israel) transferred 
to the Regular Army where she 
said there was greater opportun- 
ity for advancement and full-time 
work in training programs. 

Having girls in the Army is a 
real morale booster, said Miss Ber- 
ner. "A boy in the Army always 
has a girl in view. Israel soldiers 
are not lacking fern de commn ion- 
ship," she said, indicating that no 
other Army can make that claim. 

The Army, of course, has been 
a great meeting place for Israelis 
and has resulted in thousands of 
marriages, according to Lt. Col. 
Monbaz. This writer knows one 
Israeli Army female radio operat- 
or, who, unknowing to her super- 
ior officers, often "buzzed" area 
military bases to pass away the 
(Please turn to Page 118) 



The 

Data (enter, Inc. 

DATA PROCESSING 
SERVICE 

1020 E. Wendover Ave. 

273-2521 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



PIEDMONT 
OUTDOOR 
ADVERTISING CO. 

Dial BR 2-6112 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Yost & Little 
Realtors 

272-0151 Piedmont Bldg. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Ask Your Grocer For 




JONES BROS. BAKERY 
Greensboro N. C. 



Sidney B. Allen David W. Allen 

Guilford 
Mortgage Co. 

Real Estate - Mortgage Loans 
Insurance of All Kinds 
220 West Market Street 
Phone 272-8121 
GREENSB'ORO, N. C. 

GREENSBORO 

Marble and Tile Co. 

Marble — Tilework 
1711 Spring Garden St. 
Dial 272-2309 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



J. N. COE & SON 



General 
Building Contractors 



P. O. Box 7215 
4204 Halifax Road 
Phone 299-5941 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



39 



A GOOD OLD AG! 

By Philip Gillon 



ft 



Two ol the ideas which run 
through the Bible and the visions 
of the Jewish sages, are reverence 
for old age and the dream of the 
return to Zion during one's life- 
time. "A good old age" is the Bib- 
lical reward for virtue; the Patri- 
archs are examples of goodly men. 
Moses is rewarded by a view of 
Israel, and is punished by being 
denied tli2 right to live there. All 
the Prophets dream of a golden 
time to come when old and young 
will rejoice together in Zion. 

In our day, the unprecedented 
prosperity of the United States 
and its enlightened social policy, 
have made it possible for Ameri- 
cans who reach retirement age to 
enjoy these Biblical blessings in 
Israel. Owing to the progress in 
medicine, men and women who 
retire at 65 have many active and 
busy years before them: they can 
spend these years living full lives 
in the Holy Land. 

"The American dollar goes a 
lot further in Israel than in the 
United States," says Shoshana 
Mark, of the Association of Amer i- 
cans and Canadians in Israel. 
"The average couple with some 



ROOFING 

We are Specialists in 
Commercial Work 
Built-Up - Tile - Slate 
Asphalt Shingles 
Tar & Gravel 
— Free Estimates — 

Dial 288-1787 

Danford 

Roofing Co, 

510 Denny Road 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



savings and a social security pen- 
sion can live very nicely in Is- 
rael." 

Altogether, there arc some 14,- 
000 immigrants from America and 
Canada living in Israel today: of 
them, about 2,000 are above re- 
tirement age. This is clearly a 
very high proportion. More than 
half these settlers live in the Tel- 
Aviv area: coming for the most 
part from the large cities of 
America and Canada, they prefer 
to live close to the rapid metropol- 
itan beat of Israel's largest city. 

The average unskilled worker 
in Israel today, earns about $90 
a month, on which he has to sup 
port a complete family. A skilled 
worker or fairly high ranking civil 
servant, does not ear: more than 
$170 a month — in no country in 
the world, is the differential be- 
tween unskilled and qualified 
workers so low. This means that 




The worldwide Jewish commun- 
ity was urged to confront western 
culture, rather than avoid ->r evade 
it. by Rabbi Theodore Friedman, 
spiritual leader of Congregation 
Beth El in South Orange, N. J. 



F. J. McFADYEN PLUMBING (0. 

Heating and Plumbing Contractors 
611 W. Lee St. GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 272-9953 




For Engravings of Qualify 



NORTH STATE 

ENGRAVING CO. 



Greensboro. N. C. 



Special Service To 



CHURCH BULLETINS — SMALL NEWSPAPERS 
HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE PAPERS 
NEWS BUREAUS — MANUFACTURERS HOUSE ORGANS 
W* Male foaron'ngi Uted In Thh Publication 



Harold Bennett's Upholstery 
and Drapery Shop 

Complete Decorating Service — Carpets Cleaned 

1402 Battleground Ave. Dial 273-1812 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



CRANE SUPPLY COMPANY 

WHOLESALER 
Plumbing — Heating — Air Conditioning and Valves 

Dial 275-6127 GREENSBORO, N. C. 205 Lynden St. 



Best Wishes for a Happy New Year 

Standard Theatre Supply Co. 

PHILIP WICKER 



215 East Washington 



Greensboro, N. C. 



HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM: 



FRANK R. BUTTON & SONS 

103 S. Greene St. GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 272-6240 



One of the Finer Stores of the Carolinas 

>n£. 



i 



GREENSBORO, N. C 



For the Best in 
Photography 

MARTIN'S 
STUDIO 

112 E. Gasion Dial 272-7237 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



COBLE SPORTING 
GOODS CO. 

"Everything for the Sportsman" 
119 N. Greene Dial 272-0912 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Call for . . . Daily Bread Flour — Joy Brand Corn Meal 
Chatham Dog Food — Security Dog Food — Nutrena Feed 

NORTH STATE MILLING COMPANY 

111 West Bragg GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 275-1355 



SOUTHSIDE HARDWARE COMPANY 

"Serving the Public For Half a Century" 
Power Tool Division Hardware - Water Systems 

515 South Elm Street 523 South Elm Street 

272-1776 Dial 272-2106 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



CURTIS WOODWORK — BUILDERS HARDWARE 
ROOFING MATERIALS 

Guilford Builders Supply Co., Inc. 

1621 Battleground Ave. Greensboro, N. C. Dial 273-9481 



40 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Guilford 
Galleries, Inc 
interior Decorators 

Creators of 
BEAUTIFUL INTERIORS 
FOR HOMES, OFFICES AND CLUBS 

• Furniture © Carpets 

• Draperies ® Accessories 

Dial 274-:>478 363 N. Elm St. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 




Odell Lambeth, President 



Fred Troxler, Sec'y-Treas. 



■ 



^ambetlj~®nixier funeral ^omt 

GREENSBORO S NEWEST AND MOST MODERN 
WENDOVER AT VIRGINIA STREET — DIAL 273-3401 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



HODGIN ROOFING & SUPPLY CO. 

923 West Lee Street Telephone 275-8561 

Authorized Dealer for Ruberoid Products — Asphalt Shingles 
GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



YOU'LL ENJOY EATING AT 

LIE3BY HELIi SEHFOOB RESTHUI 

No. 1 Battleground Road 288-9929 

No. 2 3008 High Point Road 292-2737 

No. 3 2400 McConnell .._ 272-3928 

No. 4 1107 Summit Avenue ...BR 2-2102 

No. 5 King's Shopping Center 292-3553 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



North Carolina's Largest Bicycle Dealers 
A Complete Line of Schwinns 

HIGGINS CYCLE SHOP 

WE FIX ALL BIKES & TOYS 
New Modernized Building 
Radio Equiped Pick-Up & Delivery Trucks 

1214 Spring Garden St. GREENSBORO, N. C. 272-0272 



Bullock and Humble 

Heating and Air Conditioning Contractors 

Carrier^ ) W eathermaker 



Year-round 



COMMERCIAL SELF-CONTAINED AIR-CONDITi ONERS 
Sales, Installation and Service 
STORES-OFFICE-HOMES-RESTAURANTS-FACTORIES 



1027 Oakmont 



Greensboro, N. C. 



Dial 273-1975 



any couple with an assured income 
of $150 or more can enjoy a more 
adequate standard of living than 
they can in the United States, 
where costs are so much greater. 
Apart from their pension, would- 
be retired settlers wishing to set 
up a home, need about $7,000- 
$10,000 to purchase an apartment. 

"Of course, settlers of retire- 
ment age have their problems, just 
like settlers who are young," ex- 
plains Shoshana Mark, "but, ti- 
ll. mcially, they are definitely better 
off" 

Some ol these senior residents 
from the U.S. find that house- 
keeping in Israel is bothersome. 
Even in America, older people 
get tired of the work involved in 
organizing homes and providing 
meals: the strains are considerably 
increased in a country where the 
ways of life are unfamiliar and 
the language is strange. Dealing 
with new tradesmen under such 
conditions is not easy, even tor a 
\oung immigrant. 

To cater to Americans of re- 
tirement age who want to forget 
housekeeping chores, and to solve 
the social problems of loneliness, 
language and strangeness, a new 
retirement dub lias been b.tilt by 
the Rassco organization, one of the 
major companies established by 
the Jewish Agency in Israel. 

The Rassco organization is a 
giant corporation which is run as 
a business venture, but which al- 
so has pioneering ideals. The ob- 
jectives of its enterprises are those 
considered desirable for the ex- 
pansion of Israel and for serving 
the Jewish people. Since one of 
the aims of the Jewish Agency is 
to facilitate immigration to Is- 
rael, Ressco decided to establish 
in Israel "a retirement home for 
pensioners from America and 
Western countries." 

There are many old-age homes 
of various types in Israel. Malben, 
the Israeli arm of the Joint Distri- 



bution Committee, runs some 
magnificent institutions lor indi- 
gent new immigrants. The Gen- 
eral Federation of Labour has old- 
age homes for its members, as do 
the association formed by immi- 
grants horn Central European 
countries and the organizations of 
strictly Orthodox Jews. But Ras- 
sco's Neve Aviv Club is not an 
old-age home in any sense of the 
term: it is an experiment which 
is unique in Israel. 

The Club has been built by 
Rassco in Kfar Shmaryahu, one of 
Tel-Aviv's wealthiest satellite vil- 
lages, which combines in a most 
charming manner the spacious 
homes of the upper middle-class 
with long established farms. The 
architecture of the club is like 
that of a luxury hotel. There is 
a long sweep of open verandah, on 
which people relax in deep lounge 
chairs. This leads to spacious 
lounges, a large modern dining- 
room, a tempting bar, a hobby- 
room and other recreational areas. 
The furnishings everywhere create 
the impression that no expense 
has been spared to provide the 
most gracious living possible in 
the modern age. 

"I must emphasize that this is 
not an old-age home, but a resi- 
dential club for retired people," 
says Mr. Meushar Agib, the Gen- 
eral Manager of the Club. "We 
(Please turn to Page 116) 

WELBORN 

Electric Company 

Commercial, Industrial 
House Wiring Service 

4729 High Point Rd. 299-5526 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Clark Buildini 
Con 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
Residential & Commercial 

5301 Winston-Salem Rd. 
Dial 299-0602 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



J. Harold Smith 
Studio 

Commercial and Portrait 
Photography 

1736 Battle-round Avenue 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Throughout the Year 
Enjoy Eating 

GRIFFIN PIES 

Baked By 

Griffin Baking Co. 

W. Market Ext.— BR 3-3657 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Sep' cm her, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



41 




The 1964 Frank L. Weil Awards of JWB were presented at JWB's na- 
tional convention in Boston to Dr. Abram L. Sachar, left, president, Bran- 
ded University; Walter D. Heller, center, San Francisco, chairman, JWB's 
Armed Forces and Veteran Services, and Arthur S. Kling, right, Louisville, 
Ky., former president, JWB's Midwest Region. 



A NEW AND ANOTHER YEAR 



By Ben Nathan 



Where has the past year gone? 
And where are the years that are 
not \et? Where are those years 
that are still to be? Are the old 
ones, the years past, like tired 
horses, set to pasture somewhere? 
Are the new ones kept like future 




Charcoal 
Steaks 

Seafood 

Italian 
Specialties 



Catering to 
Parties 



Private Dinning 
Room 
Seats 125 



Dancing in 
Cape Cod Room 
Music By 
Sid Hellier 



1.720 Battleground Ave .—272-0537 
Greensboro 



gifts under special wraps? Stored 
and fro/en in celestial boxes each 
waiting lor Pandora's button to 
be pushed? 

Who sorted them? Who molded 
their parts? Who put them in or- 
der? Who determined their se- 
quence? Why were forty years, not 
lour, determined as adequate to 
the separation of Egypt from Is- 
rael? Why is one year a garden 
and. another a desert? Who gives 
them their character? Whence their 
recipe lor their bitter and sweet? 
Is their flavoring drawn from an 
olden book, with measures precise 
and irrevocable, or is each year 
generated anew and prepared 
wholly in the spirit of innovation 
and change? 

What are these years? Who, in 
advance of their expression, in ad- 
vance of their actualization, pre- 
scribes that in such and such a 
year to come so much salt be add- 
ed or so much sweet? Who de- 
termines this alchemy of sweets 
and bitterness? Who is the master 
chef who it is rumored, has al- 
ready made menu of that final 



JONES FUR SERVICE 



''Everything a Fur Coat Needs — Including Storage" 
Two Modem Plants Serving Better Stores 
From The Great Lakes To The Gulf 
1427 Westover Ter. Dial 27 2-8527 Greensboro, N. C. 



H. C. RHODES COMPANY 

LAMPS AND NOVELTY FURNITURE 
• 

WHOLESALE ONLY 

Greensboro, North Carolina 




Brown-Gardiner Drug Co. 

PRESCRIPTIONS OUR SPECIALTY 

PHONE 274-0745 
110 E. Northwood St. Greensboro, N. C- 



HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM: 

HALL - PUTNAM CLOTHING CO. 

Clothes and Furnishings for Men and Young Men 

HON. Elm Street GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 272-6559 

Eye Glass Prescriptions Accurately Filled 





206 N. Elm 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Dial 273-9286 



ELLIOT PLUMBING CO. 

24-Hour Fast City-Wine Repair Service 

COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL 



630 N. Elm St. 



Dial BR 3-0810 



Greensboro, N. C. 



HOWARD E. CARR 
C. L. U. 

Home Office Agency 
Jefferson Standard Life Ins. Co. 

Manager and Associate 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



For All Your Copying Needs 



Call 275-9234 



Copy 
Electrostatic, Inc. 



251 N. Greene St. 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 





To the many friends we have 
already made and to those 
we have yet to earn we ex- 
tend Our Best Wishes for A 
Very Happy and Prosperous 
New Year 

HOLIDAY INNS 
of Greensboro 



42 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



HOLIDAY GREETINGS 



SOUTHERN OPTICAL CO., INC. 
Contact Lens Laboratories, Inc. 



108 S. Edgeworth Dial 272-8146 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



SOUTHERN ELEVATOR COMPANY 

Manufacturers of" 

Freight and Passenger Elevators 

130 O'Conner St. Dial 274-2401 Greensboro, N. C. 



FRIENDLY TOY & HOBBY SHOP 

605 Friendly Shopping Center Dial 292-0808 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Farabee Machine and Parts Company 



ENGINE REBUILDING 
206 Walker Avenue GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Dial 274-0108 




^DELICATESSEN 

f^tf Kosher Style - Pastrami - Cornbeef 
IMPORTED & DOMESTIC 

^ jfc;- Champagne - Wine - Beer - Candy 

Gift Fruit & Food Baskets Shipped Anywhere 
Friendly Shopping Center 
Dial 292-0741 Greensboro, N. C. 



C. E. MOSER & SONS 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
Dial BR 5-4797 

215 Greenside Drive 
GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



least wherein all living things, 
angel and animal, shall simultan- 
eously partake? 

Who prepares? Like those of all 
master chefs his plans are pri- 
vate. A thousand ploughshares 
will not pry them loose. No plea 
can penetrate to his pots and pans 
and none be privy. His \erv own 
prophets only advertise . . . but 
never tell. They can promote . . . 
but never reveal. All his dishes 
are served in darkness. And why 
not? For what reward has he, ibis 
master chef, for his toil il not the 
surprise and excitation ol his 
guests at what they met . . . when 
they get it? Shall we deprive him 
of his wage? Must we sneak a 
peek? Is it really necessan to know 
and drain all the pleasure from 
his pantry, rob all his fun? 

Certainly no;. Spies are in poor 
taste. The over-inquisitive he re- 
gards, and correctly, as ungrateful 
and lacking in manners. Hut how- 



ever improper such over inquisi- 
tiveness be, the absolute lack ol it 
—we surmise— would j)lease him no 
better. Consequently he who pre- 
pares the feast of our years to 
come and renders man immune 
to knowing what indeed await* 
him, rendered him also nonethe- 
less as indeed given to no greater 
instinct than that of finding out. 
Predictability, it would seem, is 
the fundamental ground of all 
human psychoses. We all want to 
know what will happen. Will we 
have the money we need on time 
or won't we? Will the operation 
succeed or fail? Will we retain our 
position or will we lose it? Will' 
things get better or will ihev get 
worse? Will the weather be hot 
or will it be (old? Will the fusion 
of two atoms cause explosion or 
is the threat a dud? Will there 
be war or will there be peace? 

The consequences of the Tower 
of Babel were apparently insuf- 

( Please turn to Page 88) 




President Lyndon B. Johnson greet? Irving M. Engel, prominent at- 
torney and civic leader, and Honorary President of the AMERICAN JEW- 
ISH COMMITTEE, at a recent meeting in the White House of representa- 
tives of organizations concerned with immigration and refugees. 




September, 1964 



The American Jewish 



LIMES-OUTLOOK 



43 



MORE HEBREW IN REFORM JUDAISM 



By Ben Godol 



Appeals to American Jews to 
acquire a knowledge ot Hebrew 
as a second language have mount- 
ed greatly in recent years, particu- 
larly since the re-birth of Israel. 
Like the weather, however, this 
seems to be a problem about which 
there is much more conversation 
than action. 

To those elements who manifest 
a lingering tendency to downgrade 
Reform Judaism as a viable in- 
strument for transmitting the Jew- 
ish heritage and who insist on re- 
calling the time when Reform was 
regarded as synonomous with anti- 
Hebrew attitude, it may come as 
a surprise that the American Re- 
form movement is engaged in a 
vigorous effort to overhaul the en- 
tire program of Hebrew educa- 
tion in its religious schools. 

The scope of the awareness of 
the problem and of the plans to do 
something about it are reported in 
a recent issue of the CCAR Jour- 
nal by Rabbi Samuel Glasner, a 
Jewish educator of note. He has 
described the teaching of Hebrew 
as "probably the most vexing 
area in Reform Jewish education 
today." 

It is all the more vexing, he 
reported, against the background 



of the fact that from the earliest 
days of the CCAR Commission on 
Jewish Education, "Hebrew was 
officially recognized as one 01 the 
important subject-matter areas in 
our curriculum." He added that, 
about ten years ago, a set of 
"Guiding Principles of Reform 
Jewish Education" was formulat- 
ed. This stressed that Hebrew "in 
its various forms has always been 
and still is a religious road to 
Jewish spiritual brotherhood." 

The Commission spelled out 
this general statement with a dec- 
laration that the study of Hebrew 
was "an indispensable element in 
the achievement of this purpose." 
The declaration added that the 
goals in Reform schools should 
include ability to read liturgical 
Hebrew, to translate simple Bibli- 
cal passages, to read and enjoy 
simple modern Hebrew literature 
and to be familiar with "various 
common Hebrew and Yiddish 
terms and expressions which have 
become part of the Jewish lolk- 
lore." The declaration also urg d 
training to develop concern lor 
the importance of Hebrew for 
the survival of Jewish life in the 
United States and appreciation of 
the special importance of the lan- 
guage in Jewish life and thought. 
(Please turn to Page 86) 



COLUMBIA LAUNDRY CO. 

A Complete Service in Laundry and Dry Cleaning 
ZONED PICK-UP AND DEI JVERY 
Try Our Counter Service PROMPT — COURTEOUS — EFFICIENT 

Dial 272-8193 901 Battleground Avenue 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



McMillan's Uniforms, Inc. 

336 S. Elm Street Dial 273-2935 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



Dial 275-5324 



r ri 



Pete" Wall 
Plumbing Co,, Inc. 

PLUMBING & HEATING 
SERVICE 

1030 Westside Dr. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



E. R. ZANE 



Greensboro, N. C. 



Seasons Greetings and Best Wishes to Our Many Friends for a 
HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR 

UNITED SECURITIES COMPANY 

MEMBER: PHILADELPHIA — BALTIMORE 
STOCK EXCHANGE 



8th Floor 
Dial 275-6476 



Southeastern Bldg. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Greensboro's friendliest store since 1 899! 



On Jefferson Square 




Friendly Shopping Center 
Greensboro, N. C. 



Season s Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Very Happy New Year 

Southeastern Adjustment Co. 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



RANCH RESTAURANT 

Open From 6 A.M. to 11 P.M. 
2200 S. Ashe Street— Route 220 South 
Dial 275-5092 Greensboro, N. C. 



"One of Greensboro's Better Drug Stores" 

ELAM DRUG COMPANY 

6 DELIVERIES DAILY 

2112 Walker Ave. GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 275-7278 



YOU'LL SAVE MONEY ON YOUR 
ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

AT 

SUMMERS SUPPLY COMPANY 

flutpoint 

DEALERS 

2919 Randleman Road Dial BR 2-9922 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



44 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 




MUTUAL MLIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 



Clyde E. Swift, C.L.U. 

GENERAL AGENT 

Suite 500 Edgeworth Bldg. P. 0. Box 3505 Tel. 275-8611 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 27402 



(ROSS CONSTRUCTION & REALTY CO, 



DIAL 
274-6181 



1025 Wendover Avenue 



Gi*eensboro, N. C. 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



ALL TYPES OF LIGHTING 

Fabulous LIGHTING CREATIONS, INC. 

(Across from Lawndale Shopping Center) 
275-0201 

2113 Enterprise Dr. Greensboro, N. C 



WoetIs Supply Si Macfeame Co. 
Nora&s Esngfineeffing Co. 

Automatic Heating Plants — Industrial Piping — Mill Supplies 

Phones 865-3632— G')7-'/ f'3 1 Gastonia, N. C. 



SOMETHING NEW AND DIFFERENT 
FOR EVERYONE 



Only $3.95 
At Retail Stores 

We Welcome Dealer and 
Salesmen's Inquiries 

BSSIS GO. 

1224 S. Tarboro Street 
Dial 243-3258 
WILSON, N. C. 




ENGLISH - ISRAEL'S SECOND LANGUAGE 



By I. M. Green 



If the English language is your 
mother-tongue and you cannot 
cany on an exiended conversation 
in any other language, a short 
dip to Israel as a tourist will offer 
you no difficulties whatsoever. You 
will be staying in iirst-class or lux- 
ury hotels where all those who 
have to serve you — desk c lerks, 
i levator operators, waiters, etc.— 
will be speakin» a lair, il not per- 
fect, English. You will be laken 
on sight-seeking tours across the 
country during which the guide 
on your bus will explain every- 
thing to you in your own language. 
In the larger stores in which you 
will be doing vour shopping, or 
in offices with which you may 
have some business, English-speak 

ing clerks will attend to all vour 
needs. 

In this regard Israel is no dif- 
ferent from any other non-Eng- 
lish speaking country which de- 
rives a sizeable part of its income 
from English speaking tourists 
and which must therefore train 
people to understand, so that they 
may cater to, those tourists. And 
if this were the only, or even the 
most important role, of the Eng- 
lish language in Israel— catering to 
tourists in their own language- 



there would hardly be anything to 
write home about on this subject. 

Actually, however, the part play- 
ed by the English language in the 
Jewish State is far more import- 
ant than this. After one has lived 
in Israel for some length of time, 
as did this writer who stayed there 
fifteen months during all of 1965 
and the early part of 1964, one 
learns some very interesting and 
often surprising things about the 
importance of the place that Eng- 
lish occupies in the life of the 
country. One finds then that Eng- 
lish, though not an official langu- 
age together with Hebrew— as is 
Arabic for the Arab minority— is 
so important for the economic, 
political and even cultural life of 
the little country that it can well 
be called a second language 
lor the predominantly Hebrew- 
speaking Israelis, if not an official, 
then a semi-official, language for 
the governmental and Jewish 
Agency offices. Hebrew — "Ivrit," 
as the language calls itself— is the 
official language for Jews. It is 
the main language of communi- 
cation between Jewish immigrants 
who come from various parts of 
the world and who without some 
knowledge of Ivrit wouldn't be 
(Plsase turn to Page 82) 



ve a WORLD of FUN/ 

Travel With JilfJA 28th Year 

Unbelievable low Cost 




fr 




turop 

66-80 Days, Incl. Steamer, from $798 



17-30 Days, Incl. Air, from $1,290 

AROUND the WORLD 

30-46 Days, Incl. Air, from $1,933 

MANY TOURS INCLUDE COLLEGE CREDIT 

Also low cost tours to Mexico $196 up, South 
, America $937 up, The West from $456, Africa 
from $1767. 



LUCAS TRAVEL AGENCY 

116 A North Greene St. Greensboro, N. C. 

Dial 272-0111 



HEMIC! 

Mm 

S )m i-..i of IMM 
Reliability and htupir. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 



45 




The Jewish Institute tor the Blind in Jerusalem, famed for pioneering 
in new concepts for training Israel's blind, has won warm praise from the 
United States Ministry of Health, Education and Welfare for initiating 
courses on IBM machines for the blind. Picture shows blind youth at the 
Jerusalem Institute learning to handle IBM machine control panel. 



TOMORROW 

(Continued from Page 37) 
'Janos," she the hand which 



about his lather, 
said, "I have to tell you something. 
I want you to take it like a man 
because it is the only thing you 
can do now." His eyes widened 
and the fear that registered in his 
face almost made her change her 
mind about telling him now, but 
after a moment's hesitation she 
continued. "Your father is dead. 
The Germans killed him last 
night." 

She watched for his reaction but 
he just sat there silently, his body 
sagging. He seemed oblivious ol 



OAKS DRIVE-IN 
AND 
DANCELAND 

299-9798 
4320 High Point Road 
GREENSBORO, N. C.- 



BROWN OIL CO. 

YOUR FRIENDLY 
INDEPENDENT DEALER 

4820 Clifton Rd. 
299-9772 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



she put to his 
cheek. 

The train lurched once more 
and began to move out of the sta- 
tion. The dim light which had 
filtered in from the lonely plat- 
form was gone, and they were 
again moving through the fore- 
boding darkness. To comfort her- 
self as much as anything else, 
Janos' mother felt his head against 
her breast as though it would be 
possible to do something if he de- 
veloped a fever, and put her arms 
around his trembling shoulders. 
Janos once more fell asleep, but 
it was a restless sleep, short and 
with occasional audible sobs. As 
soon as morning brought the first 
stirrings from the other people in 
the car, he awakened. 

The tiny bits of food which the 
frightened and dispirited, depor 
tees had been allowed to brinx 
with them was now almost com- 
pletely gone and the inevitable 
pangs of hunger were being gen- 
erally expressed. These mutterings 
were to increase and haunt him a 
(Please turn to Page 119) 



Serving Greensboro Since 1945 

PAGE 
Private School 

FIRST GRADE 

For Children Who are Six Years 
ot Age in Oct., Nov., Dec, Jan., 
Feb., March 

Dial BR 2-3268 

1005 W. Market 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



N. Carolina 
Mobile Homes 
Corp. 

Dennis Vance 
Detroiter - Pontiac Chief 

3501 High Point Rd. 

292-3752 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



N A. HOLMES CONTRACTOR 

Remodeling - Painting 

419 N. Edgeworth Tel. 275-4416 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



GARNER PLUMBING CO. 

PLUMBING AND HEATING CONTRACTOR 
Residential - Commercial Repair 

P. O. Box 438 Oak Ridge, N. C. Tel. 643-4206 



D. E. BROWN 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 
• Residential • Commercial 

• Additions and Alterations 



RD 2, Box 843 
Browns Summit, N. C. 



Dial 656-3937 



DAN HOODS RANCH CAMP 



REGISTER NOW 



545-4021 



LAKE HAVEN 

Matthews, N. C. 



USE OUR SERVICE 

In Greensboro, Winston- Salem 
or High Point 




Rent-A-Car, Inc. 

GREENSBORO. N C. 
507 Arlington Dial 275-6378 
WlNSTUiM -SALEM. N. C. 
510 N. Marshall Dial PA 4-6559 
HIGH POINT, N. C. 
117 S. Wrenn Dial 888-7975 



A Very Happy 
New Year 

ACROBAT 
SHOE STORE 

Dial 272-0729 
119 West Market 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Electrical Contractors 

Residential, Commercial 
and Industrial 

Lighting and Electrical 
Heating Specialists 

TALLEY ELECTRIC, INC. 

C. H. TALLEY, Owner 

DIAL 274-1531 
1109 Battleground Ave. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



NATIONAL CASH 
REGISTER CO. 

O. L. FRYMAN 

Branch Manager 

116 East Market Street 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



46 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous Nezv Year from the Following Firms in 

Durham, N. C. 




^ I \ The No. 1 Dairy 
\S j in flit- ' 

Research Triangle 
Area 



LONG MEADOW FARMS 

Durham, Raleigh and Chapel Hill 
and over 25 other surrounding communities 



MECHANICS AND FARMERS BANK 

DURHAM, RALEIGH, CHARLOTTE, 
NORTH CAROLINA 

Established Since 1908 
Resources Over $10,000,000.00 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

DURHAM, N. C. 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



T. E. ALLEN & SONS 

MUTUAL INSURANCE AGENCY 

• HOMEOWNERS POLICY • AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE 

Special Multi-Peril M erchantile Package Policy 
Dial 684-0439 Wachovia Bank Bldg. Room 509 

DURHAM, N. C. 




"Know the Real Joy 
of Good Living" 




The Beer That Made 
M ilwaukee Famous 

DURHAM 
Dis£ribu£ing Co., 
Inc. 



Durham, N. C. 



Balentines 


REBEL 
ROOM 


286-4217 




Northgate Shopping Center 


Durham, N. C. 




FABIANNE BETSY WOLFF 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan R. Wolff 
of Durham, North Carolina an- 
nounce the engagement of their 
daughter, Fabianne Betsy to Alex- 
ander Arnold Gershon, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph S. Gershon of 
Atlanta. 

The bride-elect is the grand- 
daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank B. Clemenko, and the late 
Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Wolff, all 
of New York City. 

Miss Wolff was graduated from 
the Henry Grady School of Jour n- 
alism of the University of Georgia, 
Athens, where she was treasurer 
of Sigma Delta Tau, president of 
Gamma Alpha Chi, and a mem- 
ber of the 1963 alumni committee 
fund. She made her debut in 1959 
at the High Point Cotillion. She 
i: employed by the Atlantic City 
Schools. 

The future bridegroom is the 
grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. 
Morris Gershon of Atlanta and 
the late Mr. and Mrs. Alexander 
Sachs of Chicago. 

Mr. Gershon graduated from 
the Georgia Institute of Tech- 
nology with a Bachelor of Science 
degree in Chemistry. He was pres- 
ident of Alpha Epsilon Pi and a 
Dean's List student. He received 
his Bachelor of Laws degree from 
the L.O.C. Lamar School of Law 
of Emory University. He is cur- 
rently stationed at th? United 
States Coast Guard at Cape May, 
New Jersey. 

A late December wedding is 
planned. 



Don't Forget! 
Contribute to the North 
Carob'na Home for the 
Jewish Aged 



RIGSBEE 
lire Sales, Inc. 

EVERY SERVICE FOR 
ANY CAR 

Recapping 
Any Size Tire Auto - Truck 

Tires Exchanged 
While We Recap Yours 
Muffler Service 
Delco Batteries 
Hercules Batteries 
Seat Covers 
Floor Mats 
Seat Safety Belts 

684-0241 

108 Lakewood Ave. and 
2720 Hillsboro Road 
DURHAM, N. C. 



WALLACE'S 

Radio & TV Service 

Electronics Service Since 1931 

Television Service 
All Makes and Models 

dial 286-1182 

Motorola - Sylvania 
Authorized Service 

2822 Hillsboro Rd. 
DURHAM, N. C. 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



Madde>x-£tafforel 

Rock of Ages 
FAMILY MONUMENTS 

Liberty Dial 682-3465 
DURHAM, N. C. 




CARS & TRUCKS 
Durham, Raleigh, 
Chapel Hdl and 
Raleigh-Durham Airport 

Hearts Stenl H, Car 
System 

114 N. Dillard Dial 684-0204 
DURHAM, N. C 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



47 



THE MESSIAHS OF TEL AY!Y 



By David Samuelson 



It is written in some ancient 
Hebrew tome, an injunction mum- 
bled between bearded lips of Bib- 
lical patriarchs, or perhaps mere- 
ly a gimmick ol some master-mind 
sloganeer in the pay of the An- 
cient Order of Medieval Mendi- 
cants, but of its effectiveness there 
is no doubt. 

And this I heard from a busy 
Tel Avivian on Allenby Road as 
he stopped suddenly in front of a 
beggar squatting on the sidewalk, 
dug into his purse and pulled out 
a ten agorot piece and tossed it 
into the tin can receptacle between 
the legs of the mendicant — one 
of the legs a wooden stump. 

It was the third time on one 
block that he tossed alms into up- 
turned palms or rusty cans. I was 
puzzled. "How come?" I asked my 
friend. He spoke English. "Do you 
have to feed all the bes-gars in 
Tel Aviv?" 

He looked at me sadly for a 
minute. Then with a smile. 

"You heartless, 'am hahoratizm' 
Amerikaner. Don't you know that 
it is written, 'thou shall not spurn 
the outstretched hand of any one, 
for any one might be The Mes- 
siah?' " 



AMERICAN RUG & 
FURNITURE CLEANERS 

8 Yrs. Experience. All Work 

Guaranteed. 
We Give S&H Green Stamps 
— Free Estimates — 
Call 596-6077 
LOCALLY OWNED 
Charlie J. Taylor — W. T. Cash 
DURHAM, N. C. 



Smith Foushee 

Insurance Agency 

Representing Stock 
and Mutual Companies 



Insurance 
for 

1 sm 1 --'ill 
Insurance JB /AGENT Every Need 

Dial ME 6-4151 

Wallace Bl. Rm. 617 
SALISBURY, N. C. 



If that were the probability then 
there are at least three potential 
Messiahs to the block in Tel Aviv. 
Not on the side streets, but on 
the busy thoroughfares of Dizen- 
goff, Ben Yehuda, Herzl streets, 
around the central bus station, al- 
most anywhere where such a leg- 
end can return a profit. 

Yes, neither Tel Aviv, nor [etu- 
salem goes begging for beggars. 

In our youth we were entranced 
by bizarre stories of beggars swarm- 
ing in the Oriental bazzars and 
casbahs. They either slunk, sneak- 
ed, crawled or lurked in the 
shadows of fruit or flower vendors' 
carts, one hand extended palm up- 
ward, the other hidden in die 
depths of ragged folds either 
scratching or clutching a razor 
edge knife. There was something 
glamorous, exciting about these 
Levantine beggars, 

Not so the Tel Aviv or Jeru- 
salem mendicants. (The only ex- 
amples of the breed I could study 
in Israel). None exude die aura of 
Oriental romance; all give off a 
more or less earthy odor of bodies 
long estranged from soap and 
water, and some more pungent in 
clothes greasy and steeped in filth. 
At close range the tall, lull-beard- 
ed, dignified beggar standing in 
front of Tel Aviv's Great Syna- 
gogue, and the Oriental garbed, 
red-fezzed, gray bearded beggar 
sitting on a stocp across the street, 
his lips moving continuously, his 
body swaying as though in perpet- 
ual litany, become mere objects 
of pity, not subjects of literature 
imagery. 

But they do make an interesting 
gallery for the objective reporter 
of things Israel. Four years ago, 
this reporter walked the busy 
streets of Tel Aviv, Jaffa Road in 
Jerusalem, often disgusted, more 
often fascinated, but at ad times 
interested in the interplay of hu- 
man relations between beggar and 
passer-by. 

There would be the patently 
poor Israeli, whose clothes no less 



HADEN'S TIRE SERVICE 

HOME OF B. F. GOODRICH STLVERTOWN 
THE TIRE WITH THE "BIG EDGE" 

Quality Recapping Since 1913 — One-Day Service 
Corner Lee & Liberty Sts. Dial 636-0321 

SALISBURY, N. C. 



HOMESTEAD MOTEL 

Superior Courts Member — Phones - TV - Air Conditioned 

MR. & MRS. E. H. WILLIS 
Chapel Hill Blvd., P. O. Box 218 DURHAM, N. C. 



489-9181 



AWARD'S ESSO SERVICE STATION 

Starter - Generator - Ignition - Mufflers - Exhaust - Tune-Ups 
Shocks - Wheel Balancing 



596-7326 



1402 Angier Ave. 



Durham, N. C. 



TRIANGLE TRAVEL AGENCY 

COMPLETE TRAVEL SERVICE 
Foreign - Domestic - Air - Land - Sea - Tour - Cruises 



1018 W. Main 



DURHAM, N. C. 



682-5521 



C. WOODARD COMPANY, INC. 

OFFICE SUPPLIES, EQUIPMENT, SAFES, AND 
RECEPTION ROOM FURNITURE 
105 North Douglas Street WILSON, N. C. Telephone 243-2450 



• Let STANDARD be your STANDARD" 

Standard Insurance & Really Corp. 

INSURANCE - RENTALS - REAL ESTATE 



Dial GI 6-6156 



Home Savings Bldg. 



ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



7 A.M. - 9 P.M. 
Call Archie Baker 
286-1947 

Broad St. Sunoco 

801 Broad St. 
DURHAM, N. C. 



Johnson 

MOTOR CO. 

682-5486 

Night Wrecker Service 477-4076 
326 E. Main - Durham, N. C. 



SANITARY SEPTIC 
TANK SERVICE 

NIGHT OR DAY CALL 

489-2196 
2900 Chapel Hill Road 
DURHAM, N. C. 



CHICK-N-EAT 
Open 'til 9 PM 
Dining the Good Ole' Way 
682-3616 

WELLONS VILLAGE 
SHOPPING CENTER 

DURHAM, N. C. 



Witherspoon 
Rose Culture 

"The Finest in Rose Plants" 
Wide Selection - Reasonable 
Prices 
Designing - Planting 
Custom Spraying 
Visitors Welcome at Display 
Garden 

Dial 489-4446 

R. K. Witherspoon, Owner 
Located 200 Yds. Off 
New Durham - Chapel Hill Blvd. 



Overton Parnell 
Studio 

Specializing in 
Children Photography 
Groups - Weddings 

Tel. 682-4075 
401 y 2 N. Mangum 
DURHAM, N. C. 



Scott Tailors 

Custom Tailoring 

Made Especially for You! 
Guaranteed Satisfaction 

221 Foster Street 
DURHAM, N. C. 
Phone 681-2531 
Specializing in 
ALTERATIONS 
Ladies & Gents 



50 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



MOORE & JOHNSON COMPANY 

INSURANCE & SURETY BONDS 

"For 40 Years Raleigh's Leading Insurance Agency" 

810 Insurance Bldg., 336 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 
Dial TEmple 3-4619 



Hayes Contracting Wiring Service 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL 
ELECTRICAL SERVICE 
202 Lincoln Court Raleigh, N. C. Phone TE 2-1059 



ROGERS OIL COMPANY 

Distributors for CITIES SERVICE PRODUCTS 

Fuel Oil - Kerosene - Automatic Printed Tickets 
Burner Service 

1316 S. Blount St. RALEIGH, N. C. Dial TE 4-8445 



Village Book & Stationery, Inc. 

Books — Stationery — Cards 
Gifts — Office Supplies — Frames 

Cameron Village Dial TE 4-6234 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



MEDLIN - DAVIS GLEANERS 

"CLEANERS OF DISTINCTION" 
Hat Renovating and DeLuxe Celophane Shirt Service 

123 N. Salisbury Cameron Village 

Dial 828-7254 RALEIGH, N. C. Dial TE 3-2020 



BROWN- WYNNE FUNERAL HOME 

Service Since 1836 
308 St. Mary's Dial TE 2-8839 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



SIR WALTER OPTICIANS 

BROKEN LENSES DUPLICATED 
Modern Eyewear Designed to Tomorrow's Fashion 
Zenith "Living Sound" Hearing Aids 
Professional Building RALEIGH, N. C. Dial TE 3-4629 




MODERN 

Texaco Serv. Sta. 

ROAD 
SERVICE 

Charles Pendergraf, 
Owner 
We Specialize in 

MAJOR AUTO REPAIR 

Engine Overhaul 
Tune-Ups 
Complete Brake Service 
Transmissions 
Wheel Balancing 
158 E. Chatham 467-1214 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



New Year Greetings! 
CHINESE AND 
AMERICAN FOODS 

Temptingly Prepared in 
THE ORIENTAL MANNER 

CANTON CAFE 

Fully Air-Conditioned 

408 Hillsboro Dial TE 2-7867 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Beth Meyer 
Synagogue, 
Raleigh 

MRS. OSCAR LEGUM, 
Correspondent 

Miss Marcia Faye Golden and 
Mr. Donald Harvey Vinnik were 
united in a ceremony solomeniz- 
ed at the Progressive Club, At- 
lanta, Ga. on Sunday, August 9th, 
at high noon. The bride is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest 
Golden, of Atlanta, and the 
groom's parents are Mr. and Mrs. 
George Vinnik of Raleigh. The 
double ring ceremony was per- 
formed by Rabbi Harry H. Ep- 
stein. 

The bride was given in mar- 
riage by her father. 

Mrs. Alan Goldstein, of Gains- 
Mile, Florida, sister of the bride 
was matron of honor. Brides- 
maids were Mrs. frwin E. Vinnik, 
Denver, Colorado, sister-in-law of 
the groom; Sharon Rasken, of Nor- 
folk, Va.; Gail Shemper, of At- 
lanta, Ga.; Janice Zalkow, of At- 
lanta, Ga.; Arleen Unell, of At- 
lrnta, Ga.; and Carol Alpert of 
Wilmington, N. C. Junior brides- 
maids were Sandra D. Green and 
Deborah L. Green, of Raleigh, 
N. C, cousins of the groom. Shelly 
Goldstein of Gainsville, Florida, 
neice of the bride was flower <ml 

o 

and Stephen D. Vinnik, of Den- 
ver, Colorado, nephew of the 
groom was ring bearer. 

Dr. Irwin E. Vinnik, of Den- 
ver, Colorado, was his brother's 
best man and ushers were David 
Golden, Atlanta, brother of the 
bride; Alan Goldstein of Gains- 
ville, Florida, brother-in-law of the 
bride; David P. Green, Terry 
Golden, Melvin Garr and Julian 
Lerner all of Raleigh. 

The parents of the bride enter- 
tained at a seated dinner at the 
club following the ceremony. The 
brides book was kept by Judy 
Abelkop and Harriet Robbins of 
Atlanta, Ga. 

Mrs. Vinnik graduated from 
Henry Gray High School, Atlanta, 
and attended Ogelthorpe Univer- 
sity and the University of Georgia 
where she was a member of Delta 
Phi Epsilon Sorority. 

Mr. Vinnik, a graduate of 
Needham Broughton High School, 
Raleigh, received his college de- 
gree at University of North Caro- 
lina, Chapel Hill, where he was a 
member of Tau Epislon Phi Fra- 
ternity. 



ELECTRIC 
CONTRACTORS 

RONALD L. BULLOCK, 
Owner 

Residential - Commercial 

N. C. License No. 3522 

Fast Service 

Free Estimates 

Dial 266-2775 

BULLOCK 
ELECTRIC CO. 

Watkins Road 
KNIGHTDALE, N. C. 



7- 




Corn's TV Service Co. 



407 W. Peace Dial TE 4-4991 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



AMBURN 
PONTIAC CO. 

3623 HILLSBORO 




EXPERT BODY WORK 
WRECKER SERVICE 

Auto Air Conditioning 
Service 
Radiator Repairs 
Factory Trained Mechanics 
Modern Shop Equipment 

Dial 832-3907 

RALEIGH, N. C. 




LATEST IN STYLES 
AND COLORS 
WE Make A Specialty Of 
Fitting Glasses To Your 
Facial Features, and 
Personality 

TE 2-7228 

Conveniently Located in 
the Bryan Building 
Cameron Village 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish 



XJMES-OUTLOOK 



51 




CAPITAL SIGN SERVICE, INC. 

Eastern Carolina's Largest Sign Manufacturer 

Neon Plastic Signs Ask Us About Our 

Metal & Plastic Letters Electric Sign 

Signs for Every Need Leasing Plan 

Dial 828-5463 317 S. Bloodworth St. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



MRS. DONALD HARVEY VINNIK 



After a wedding trip to Miami 
Beach and Nassau, the couple will 
live at 1508 F Eastcrest Drive, 
Charlotte, N. C. 

We offer our congratulations 
to Mr. and Mrs. Al Eothstein up- 
on the engagement of their daugh- 
ter Lyn to Howard Satisky, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Satisky 



Gus Russos Hatters 
& Gleaners 

Hat Reblocking A Specialty 
Two Hour Dry Cleaning 
122 W. Martin TE 2-3691 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



of Fayetteville, N. C. 

Troop No. 338 Boy Scouts, spon- 
sored by Temple Beth Or, has just 
returned from a two week camp- 
ing trip. The first stop was the 
Boy Scout Jamboree held at Valley 
Forge, N. Y. From there the boys 
toured West Point, visited the 
Worlds Fair, spent a few days at 
Atlantic City, toured Washington 
and had the honor of meeting 
President Lyndon B. Johnson. The 
troop visited Arlington Cemetery 
and placed a wreathe on the grave 
of the late President John F. Ken- 
nedy. 



NOTHING ELSE IS AS GOOD 



AS A GOOD GLASS OF BEER 



N. (. Association Of Beer Distributor 



WILLETT'S BEAUTY SHOP 

"Electrolysis Treatment Room" 
Newly Modernized — Trained Personnel 
CAMERON VILLAGE Phone TE 4-7375 RALEIGH, N. C. 



BLUE RIDGE TRUCKING CO. 

Daily Motor Service to Points West and 
South of Asheville 

Office and Terminal — Simpson Street — Koon Development 
Dial AL 2-1531 ASHEVILLE, N.C. 



ASHEVILLE PAVING COMPANY 

and DRIVEWAYS, Inc. 

DRIVEWAYS & MUNICIPAL PAVING 
7 Market St. ASHEVILLE, N. C. Dial AL 2-4464 




ooinwurs 



HICKORY'S LEADING DEPARTMENT STORE 



James H. Anderson 
COMPANY 

Complete Line of 
Janitor Supplies 

833-2750 

418 W. Peace 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Midway Esso 
Service Station 

"Your one stop Service Station" 
Complete Line of Esso 
Products 

1900 Hwy. 70E 362-2771 

GARNER, N. C. 



STEVE T. ZEBLO 

BUILDERS 

Better Workmanship & Prices 
TE2-8716 

310 Georgetown Road 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



David G. Allen 

Tile - Marble - Terrazzo 

Since 1920 

TE 2-2736 TE 3-1561 

RALEIGH, N. C. 




SEVEN UP BOTTLING CO. 

C. C. HINTON 

129 S. St. Raleigh, N. C. 



52 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Firms in 

BURLINGTON, N. C. 




Extra Food Value 
at no Extra Cost! 

MELVILLE DAIRY 

•ALAMANCE COUNTY'S ONLY 
HOME-OWNED 
HOME-OPERATED DAIRY" 



FOR EVERYTHING irj 





BURLINGTON, N. C. 



Area Code 919 
584-3811 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



LILIEN & LEE, INC. 



CADILLAC 



'STANDARD 
OF THE 
WORLD" 




0LDSM06ILE 

There is a Rocket j 
To Fit Your Pocket 



Quality Built — Quality Sold — Quality Serviced 
OLDSMOBILE — CADILLAC — RAMBLER 



306 N. Church 



Dial CA 7-7448 Burlington, N. C\ 



SELLARS 

O c BURLINGTON 

ALAMANCE COUNTYS LEADING DEPARTMENT 
STORE SINCE 1872 

"AT SELLARS YOU GET MORE" 
CA 6-1686 Main Street 



Current Dividend; 4% Per Annum Compounded Semi-Annually 



INSURED 
SAVINGS 




HOME 
LOANS 



Community Federal 

Savings and Loan Association 



708 S. CHURCH ST. 



BURLINGTON, N. C. 



What About The Biblical Miracles! 



By Robert Appel 



It any one point can be fixed 
in the life experience of the Ameri- 
can Jew where doubt first sets in 
about the validity of Judaism, it 
is probably when, as a college stu- 
dent-, he was asked or asked him- 
self: "Did the miracles described 
in the Old Testament really hap- 
pen?" 

Nowadays, the point may be 
earlier, considering the response of 
t He typical schoolboy to man's ex- 
traordinary scientific masterv of 
(he natural world and the cor- 
respondingly immense prestige of 
science and the scientific method. 

Reform Judaism has disposed of 
the problem of the believability 
of the Biblical miracles by ignor- 
ing it. As a Long Island Reform 
rabbi has put it: "The present- 
day congregant who asks seriously 
about Elijah's ravens or the manna 
is greeted with raised eyebrows 
on the part of his fellows and a 
short, condescending answer from 
his rabbi." 

As Rabbi Alton Winters of Glen 
Cove, N. Y., sees it, "in Judaism 
the miracle is peripheral" and Re- 
form Jews should presumably be 
grateful for this "dispensability" 
of the supernatural. But he also 
contends, in a recent issue of the 
CCAR Journal, that Reform Juda- 
ism may have "lost something 
worthwhile, even precious by not 
having to confront the question." 
Specifically, when the "modern 
rabbi" asks himself what part 
miracles play in the Bible, he is 
too likely "to accept the easy an- 
swers." 

First, according to one of the 
easy answers, the miraculous ex- 
planation was characteristic of 
Biblical times. "That was the way 
they thought about things in those 
days." The other "easy answer" is 
that anything out of the ordinary 
was accounted for "by being called 
a wonder or a sign." 

From the Reform viewpoint, 
Rabbi Winters notes, both answers 
"are essentially true" but there 
are still two motives for the use 
of miracles in the Old Testament 
which Reform Jews "have missed 
because of our casual attitude." 

It is probably wrong, he con- 
tinues, "to speak of a Biblical 



writer, a Biblical theology," but 
he believes that there really "does 
seem to be one unifying idea 
throughout nearly all the books 
of the Holy Scripture" which he 
rails "the Biblical philosophy of 
history." 

From that viewpoint, he argues, 
(he "people who wrote and edited" 
i he Old Testament "were afraid 
of human heroes." They point 
out "with embarrassing candor the 
faults, foibles and sins of our an- 
( estors." Their objective was to 
project the idea that "imperfect 
man provides the dark back- 
ground of contrast to set off the 
bright Hero, God." The Biblical 

(Please turn to Page 107) 

~~~ BARKER'S ~~~ 
TIRE SERVICE 

"U. S. ROYAL TIRES" 

274 W. Davis St. Dial CA 8-8383 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



GREETINGS 
TO OUR MANY 
FRIENDS — AND 
SEASON'S BEST 
WISHES! 

A'WBBB 



FM 



The Radio Voice of Burlington 
E. Z. "Easy" Jones 




'Dutch Boy 

LATEX HOUSE PAINT 

> / 
The last word in exterior paint . . . 
rugged, smooth-flowing, quick dry- 
ing, with amazing color retention. 
|t cuts your painting time in halfl 

Jeffreys Painfl 
& Paper Co. 

Church and Ruff in Streets 
Dial CA 6-6246 
BURLINGTON. N. 0. 



September, 1964 



Ike American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



53 



LUMBERTON, N. C. 




MRS. RAY WEINSTEIN 

The marriage of Miss Elyse the afternoon at the Tuscaloosa 

Landsberger of Tuscaloosa, Ala. Country Club in Tuscaloosa. The 

and Joseph Ray Weinstein of bride is the daughter of Mrs. Ray- 

Lumberton, N. C. was solem lized mond Robert Landsberger of Tus- 

Sunday, July 5, at four o'clock in (Please turn to Page 57) 



Efficient Service Guarantees Insurance Economy 

JONES and PEACOCK, Incorporated 



AKWOOD CT. 



INSURANCE 

H'CH POTKT. N C. 



DIAL 8 '-2-171 6 



Parlier Plumbing & Heating Co, 



Plumbing 

118 Stockton 



Heating • 
CONTRACTORS 

STATESVILLE, N. C. 



Air-Conditioning 

Dial TR 2-2421 



J. R- Graham & Son Construction Co. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

Telephone S8-2-81G7 
Greensboro Rd. 
HTGH POINT, N. C. 




Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Firms in 

BURLINGTON - HIGH POINT, N. C. 



C. B. SMITH ROOFING CO. 

Complete Remodeling — Alterations — Additions 
RUSCO Windows & Doors 

1824 E. Webb St. BURLINGTON, N. C. Dial 226-6604 



The Frieridly "Home Folks" Since 1914 

First Federal Savings & Loan Ass'n. 

HOME LOANS — INSURED SAVINGS 

309 E. Davis St. Burlington, N. C. Dial 226-2417 



C. G. Somers 



Earl Pardue 



The 

Somers - Pardue 
Agency, Inc. 

Serving in 
REAL ESTATE 
GENERAL INSURANCE 

MORTGAGE LOANS 
BONDS and RENTALS 

431 S. Spring St. 

"The Post Office Is Across the 
Street From Us" 

BURLINGTON, N. C. 




BURLINGTON COCA-COUA 

BOTTLING CO. 
Burlington, North Carolina 



COMPLETE PEST CONTROL 

Free Inspection & Estimate t Without Obligation 

h-82-631 9 J 



Locally DIAL 
Owned & Operated 



< 




SILVER FISH ANTS RATS - MICE ROACHES MOTHS 

FRANK GOFOISTH EXTERMINATORS 

1,000 S. Main St. High Point, N. C. 



SEASON'S GREETINGS 



trom 



North State Telephone Co. 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 



OLD DOMINION FREIGHT LINE 

FOR FAST DEPENDABLE 
FREIGHT SERVICE IN N. C. & VA. 

IN RICHMOND IN HIGH POINT 

Dial 233-3091 Dial 822^2547 

or Contact Your Local 
OLD DOMINION FREIGHT LINE OFFICE 



54 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Firms in 

Gastonia, N. C. 



"Connections Covering The Globe" 

Wilson Transfer Company, Inc. 

SUPERIOR TRUCKING SERVICE 

712 W. Airline Ave. Phone UN 7-6308 

GASTONIA, N. C. 
Dial 825-2090 
Direct Telephone Service Charlotte to Gastonia 




Gastonia Mutual Savings & 
Loan Association 

Organized 1905 
HOME LOANS — INSURED SAVINGS 

283 W. Main Avenue Gastonia, N. C. 



SERVING 13 PIEDMONT COUNTIES 
IN SOUTH CAROLINA 

PIEDMONT DIAPER SERVICE 

Check your Telephone Bonk for our nearest office 



Double Cola Bottling 
Company 

C. P. NANNEY 
809 E. Franklin Ave. 
GASTONA, N. C. 



RICH'S WELDING 
PLANT 

Dial UN 5-3651 
224 East Long Avenue 
GASTONIA, N. C. 

SPENCER'S INC. 

Office Supplies 
Printing 

257 W. Main Dial UN 5-2356 
GASTONIA, N. C. 



Our Best Wishes To Our Many Jewish Friends 
For A Happy New Year 

J. E. Sirrine Company 

Engineers 

21 J. a Main Greenville, S. C. Dial CE 3-1621 




First Federal Savings & Loan Ass'n. 
INSURED SAVINGS 



Main Office 

251 W. Main Ave. 
Dial UN 7-7248 



Akers Center Branch 

1327 E. Franklin Ave. 
Dial UN 4-4566 



Second Annual Family and Youth 
Retreat a Success 




FAMILY GATHERING AT WILDACRES 



Sixty-eight participants spent an 
enthusiastic and enriching week 
at Wilclacres during the week of 
July 19-26. This novel project 
which brings together Jewish 
families for Jewish living was 
sponsored by the Circuit Riding 
Rabbi Project of the North Caro- 
lina Association of Jewish Men. 

The Retreat attracted individ- 
uals from Bristol, Virginia, Char- 
lotte, Gastonia, Greensboro, Ham- 
let, High Point, Jacksonville, Le- 
noir, New York City, Roanoke 
Rapids, Warren ton and Worcester, 
Massachusetts. Dedicated to the 



memory of the late President Ken- 
nedy to whose challenges Jews and 
Judaism respond, the Retreats' 
theme was: "Judaism and Our 
Social Outlook." Through discus- 
sion, prayer, study, cooperative 
living and recreation, reading, and 
Jewish fellowship atop "God's 
Mountain" the Retreats' aims were 
to emerge at the end of the week 
stronger, more relaxed, more Jew- 
ishly knowledgeable, more dedi- 
cated to the principles of Ameri- 
can democracy, more intent on 
performing the Lord's "simchot 

(Please turn to Page 68) 



RICHMOND SUPPLY (0. 

Mill Supplies — Tools — Machinery 
Bearing & Transmission Specialists 

652 7th Street AUGUSTA, GA. Dial PA 4-7792 



GASTONIA, N. C. 



PEIHL CORPORATION 



COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL CONSTRUCTION 



207 Bluff Ave. 



AUGUSTA, GA. Dial TAylor 2-6525 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



55 



CHEMHY Oil. CO, 

€ssa 

Fuel Oil 

Dependable 
Metered Service 

City Wide Delivery 

DIAL FR 7-6528 

1006 N. Caldwell 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 




) Store Fronts 
I Glass For AH 

Purposes 
> Paints 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Asheville, N. C. 
Durham, N. C. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Need a Plumber? 
John Hutchinson 

Plumbing Company 

Call 333-6578 
1234 E. Seventh St. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

McKEE REALTY CO 

Real Estate — Insurance 

231 S. Tryon Dial KD 3-1 131 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Dayton Tire Sales Co. 

Dayton Tires and Tubes 
Recapping 

210 W. Morehead Phone 333-3171 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



HOUSE 
RESTAURANT 

Specializing in 

Guaranteed 
U. S. Choice 

and Prime 
Western Beef 
Charcoal 
Broiled 




IN TOWN 



DIAIj 
EX 9-5411 



Wilkinson Boulevard 
U. S. Highway 29 South 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Temple Israel 
Sisterhood 

Isarlotte 

MRS. H. N. (MARCIA) FRIEDMAN, 
Correspondent 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan Barry Cohen 
arc now living in Raleigh at 2700 
B. Bedford Ave. Mrs. Cohen is 
the former Susan Gail Naumoff, 
and the marriage took place in 
Beth Meyer Synagogue, Raleigh, 
on May 31. 

Mr. Sidney Carl Kress, son of 
Drs. Jack and Esta Kress of Wades- 
boro, N. C. and Miss Tune Anita 
Cohen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
David Cohen of Brooklyn, N. Y. 
were united in marriage on June 
2 ! . The wedding took place at 
the East Midwood Jewish Center 
in Brooklvn, N. Y. Mrs. Kress at- 
tended Brooklyn College and the 
University of North Carolina. Mr. 
Mies is a graduate of Duke Uni- 
versity and is presently attending 
the Medical School of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. 

May the newlyweds have much 
happiness always. Congratulations 
to their parents and loved ones. 

Best wishes to Mr. and Mrs. 
Solomon Baicovitz on their 25th 
wedding anniversary. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Strause 
became proud parents of a son 
David Julius. Mazel Tov to them 
and to the grandmother Mrs. 
Sarah Strause. 

Vacation time is nearing its end. 
Registration began for Temple 
Israel Religious School. 

The High Holydays will be 
here soon. May the New Year 
5725 bring peace and happiness 
to everyone. May there be only 
joyous occasions to report for the 
Vmerican Jewish Times-Outlook. 



Charlotte B'nai 
B'rith Woftftfteit 

MRS. STANLEY GREENSPON, 
Correspondent 

The 5th District of B'nai B'rith 
Women held its annual conven- 
tion July 22-24 in Durham, N. C. 
Charlotte's three delegates, Mrs. 
Sol Jaffa; Mrs. Arthur Sklar, im- 
mediate past president; and Mrs. 
Sol Shapiro, current president, re- 
turned home from this convention 
proudly bringing the national Sid- 
ney G. Kusworm Citizenship 
Award. This award is given an- 
nually by National to one of Dis- 
trict Five's 48 chapters. The merits 
of the award are based on a scrap- 
book of civic activities submitted 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous Neiv Year from the Following Firms in 

CHARLOTTE, N. 9 




COURTESY MOTORS 

SALES — SERVICE — PARTS 
Dial FR 7-6581 
514 E. 4TH ST. CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



ASHEVILLE, N. C. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 
HICKORY, N. C. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



• ATLANTA, GA. 

• MACON, GA. 

9 COLUMBIA, S. C. 
® FLORENCE, S. C. 

• GREENVILLE, S. C. 



HENR 



r.ci.rpora 



WHOLESALE REFRIGERATION '. - HEATING 
AIR-CONDITIONING, PARTS and SUPPLIES 



1 !23 South Tryon Street 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Phone ED 3-6665 



Kirk Cousart 
and Associates 

Manufacturers' 
Representatives 

HEATING and POWER 
PLANT EQUIPMENT 

Charlotte, N. C. 375-7737 
Greensboro, N. C. 275-8559 
Greenville, S. C. CE 2-9513 



N. 6. SPEIR, 
Inc. 

Real Estate Sales 

Mortgage Loans 

128-30 E. Fourth St. 

Dial FR 5-9871 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 




Tale Heating & Air Conditioning Co. 

RESIDENTIAL HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING 
Dial EX 9-9727 or EX 2-3032 



By Pass 29 South 



Charlotte, N. C. 



Leo's 
Delicatessen, Inc. 

"Kosh er Food" 

Specialists in Imported 
Delicacies, Party Fare, 
and Gift Packages 

Phone FRanklin 5-2400 
1503 Elizabeth Ave. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Phone ss^-d&sy? 




F B & HL COM 

AND OIL CO, 

624 S. Cedar 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



56 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 




Winslun-Salem, N. C. 



"It's from Montaldos 



Three little words 




with a world of meaning! 




BUTLER 
SEAFOOD 

"Everything in Fresh 
Seafoods" 

919 South McDowell St. 

Just Across from the Addison 

Dial 375-4409 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Fink Electric Co. 



Ele trieal Contracting & 
Repairing 
Heating Specialist 



34 Seigel Ave. 333-6175 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



KIDDIE KORNER DAY CARE CENTER 

COMPLETE CHILD CARE — GOOD FOOD — PROGRESSIVE 
& MUSICAL TRAINING — NEW FACILITIES — STATE APPROVED 



2241 Common Wealth Ave. 



651 Woodlawn 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



375-2796 




CAPITOL MOTORS, IMC. 

Lincoln Continental — Mercury Meteor ^rj 
Comet l 

Big "C", "Where Qualify Cos s Ldcs and Personal Service is Best." 
1220 S. Tryon CHARLOTTE, N. C. 334-3073 



D ^hariotte, i\I.C Locations 
1403 Central Ave. 3440 Wilkinson Blvd. 5119 S. Blvd. 
GREENSBORO : 2804 Bessemer Ave. - 2922 High Point Rd. 

Free Parking 
Nationally Advertised Brands at Low Prices 
Quality — Styles Galore 
"Wear 'em to Compare 'em" 

Also in N. C: Gastonia - Goldsboro - Kannapolis - Winston-Salem 
Concord - Fayet^evile - Burlington _ Raleigh - Jacksonville - Hickory 
S^atesville and Asheville (Sky City). In South Carolina: Columbia 
Cayce - Charleston - Greenville and Anderson. In Georgia: Atlanta 
and Augusta. In Tennessee: Johnson City - Morristown and Kings- 
port. 1 1 p 





Mrs. Arthur Shlor Receiving the 

by each chapter, and it is awarded 
to the chapter considered to have 
made the most outstanding all- 
around civic contribution. 

In addition to winning the 
award four times in the II years 
it has been organized, Charlotte 
B'nai B'rith Women has once 
placed second in the competition. 

The scrapbook has as its theme, 
A Helping Hand.' 



Sidney Kusworm Citizenship Award 

The District organization itself 
also gives an award for one out- 
standing civic project, and Char- 
lotte was also awarded this honor. 
The Charlotteans proudly stated 
that it is rather unusual that one 
chapter should win both awards 
simultaneously. 

The first Fall meeting of B'nai 
B'rith Women is scheduled to be 
held the first Wednesday in Oc- 
tober. 



Centers, Cigarettes and Health 

By Julian N. Jablin 



Should teenagers smoke? A lot 
of teenagers who belong to Jewish 
Community Center groups are be- 
ginning to discuss the question 
seriously. And many of the adults 
who are concerned about the wel- 
fare of these young people have 
already decided that smoking is a 
harmful habit which teenagers 
would do best to avoid— and they 
have taken action accordingly. 

The whole matter came up well 
before the issuance of the recent 
U.S. government report on smok- 
ing. W T ith the coordination and 
help of the National Jewish Wel- 
fare Board, which is the national 
association of YM-YWHAs and 
Jewish Community Centers, board 
members and staff personnel in 
agencies across the country have 
been working to educate young 

Southern Warehouse 

& Distributing Corp. 

934 N. Poplar Dial 3^5-2531 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



people about the dangers of to- 
bacco and have taken steps to for- 
bid smoking while teenagers are 
participating in activities under 
their direction. 

The first Center action took 
place in St. Louis, Mo., where 
2,300 teenagers belong to various 
Center clubs. Smoking had been 
permitted in teen lounges only, 
and when the youngsters re- 
quested that this privilege be 

(Please turn to Page 78) 




Finance 



inc. 



Suite 162 One Charlottetown 
Center 
CHARLOTTE 4, N. C. 



PAINTERS 

'If It's Paivtiva We Do It" 
W. C. WALLACE 
& SON, Inc. 
333-9871 
2420 N. Brevard 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



57 



Jung Bros. 
Cleaners & 
Laundry 

1 Hr. Cleaning 
3 Hr. Shirt Service 

Let Us Fresh The Impression 
Dress Right - You Can't Afford 
Not To 

324 E. Blvd. 377-2007 
2447 Park Rd. 377-4224 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Individual Service 
at 

John Thompson 
Beauty Salon 

"To Make You More 
Beautiful" 

Only Nationally Advertised 
Products Used 

101 Queens Rd. ED 3-6667 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Harry Parker, 
Inc. 

Restaurant Supplies 

333-5609 

316 S. College 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Season's Greetings 

Furr Seed Store 

508 E. Trade Dial 375-3830 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 




ANTIQUE & 
GIFT SHOPS 



D'Art 

ANTIQUES 

HOUSE OF A THOUSAND VARIETIES 

1029 Province Road 
CHARLOTTE. N. C. 
Dial ED 2-7761 

Gifts for all Occasions 
Silver - China 
Objects 
Furniture of All Periods 



Lumherton, N. C. 

(Concluded from Page 53) 

caloosa. The bridegroom's parents 
are Mr. and Mrs. Israel Erwin 
Weinstein of Lumberton. 

Dr. Eugjne Blachschlager of 
Montgomery, Ala., officiated at 
the ceremony, and Mrs. George 
Hamner was organist. 

The bride was given in marriage 
by her uncle. Bertram Julius 
Rosenburg. Sr. 

Matron of honor was Mrs. Al- 
vin Jacobs of Knoxville, Term., 
sister of the bride. Miss Sandra 
Weinstein of Atlanta, Ga., sister 
of the bridegroom, was maid of 
honor. Bridesmaids were Miss 
Betsy Weinstein of Lumberton, 
sister of the bridegroom, and Miss 
Ann Krouse of Memphis, Fenn. 

Sandra Carol Wallerslein and 
Susan Gail Wallerstein of Rich- 
mond, Va., cousins of the bride, 
were flower girls. Richard Strouse 
Wallerstein. Jr., cousin of the 
bride, also of Richmond, was train 
bearer. 

Israel Erwin Weinstein was his 
son's best man. Ushers were Ger- 
son May of Jasper, Ala., Steve 
Soloman of Cario. III., Joseph 
Lilchenstein of Birmingham, Ala., 
Lionel B. Gordon of Lumberton, 
cousin of the bridegroom, and 
David Weinstein of Lumberton, 
also a cousin of the bridegroom. 

Following the ceremony, the 
bride's mother entertained with 
a reception at the Tuscaloosa 
Country Club. Guests were greet- 
ed by members of the wedding 
party and were served delicious 
wedding refreshments by Mrs. 
Erwin Rosenfield, Sr., and Mrs. 
Louis Weisel of Tuscaloosa. Miss 
Naomi Garfinkle presided at the 
bride's register. 

The bride completed her junior 
year at the University of Alabama 
in. Tuscaloosa, where she was a 
member of Sigma Delta Tan social 
sorority. 

Mr. Weinstein graduated from 
the University of Alabama where 
he was vice-president of his fra- 
ternity, Phi Epsilon Pi. He will be 
associated with his father and 
cousin in A. Weinstein and Sons 
Department Store here. He is a 
grandson of the late A. Weinstein, 
whose name is used with the mer- 
chantile firm. 




HOME SAVSNGS 
& LOAN ASSOCIATION 

Charlotte's Savings Corner 139 S. Tryon 
Branch at Park Road Shopping Center 




iHi/Awmm • mtm 

SUPER MARKETS imc 

FINE FOODS 

Charlotte, Gastonia, Mooresville, Newton, Hickory, Morganton, 
Lincolnton, Kannapolis, Cornelius, Forest City and Kings 
Mountain, North Carolina; Rock Hill and Lancaster, South 
Carolina. 



See and Drive the New 1964 



A World 



710 S. Tryon 




City Chevrolet Co. 

"Friendhj People" 
Charlotte, N. C. 



)f Worth 



ED 2-7151 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



E'S PLASTERING SERVICE 

Residential & Commercial 
New & Repair Work 



333-2075 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



1708 Patton Ave. 



£ 



TOY DISTRIBUTORS 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



f 1401 S. Mint St. 



Dial 375-8658 



Harry C Garner 

PAINTING & DECORATING 

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR 



Insured 9 Free Estimates 
2823 Shamrock Drive 



Dial 537-7444 

Charlotte, N. C. 



THOS. GRIFFITH & COMPANY 

Insurance Headquarters Since 1875 
ALL LINES OF INSURANCE (Except Life) 
805 Wachovia Bank Bldg. Phones ED 2-4195—2-4196 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



■58 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



r 



Serving the Colored People of Greater Charlotte 

A Funeral To Fit Every Need — Dependable & Economical 
Service — 24 Hour Ambulance Service 

Dial 333-1167 

If No Answer Dial 392-6775 or 333-6027 



112 N. Irwin Ave. 



Charlotte, N. C. 



531 E. Trade St,. Charlotte, N. C. 

Opposite the Courthouse 




Chevrolet Headquarters Since 1925 
Dial ED 2-3131 



NEW YEAR GREETINGS FROM 

THE HOUSE OF STOKELY 

Representatives of these Fine Foods 

Green Giant Peas - Corn and Asparagus 
Also Frozen Vegetables in Butter Sauce 
Le Sueur Mushrooms in Glass 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



Frank E. Noblett 

Painting & Wallpapering 
Contractor 

Interior and Exterior 
All Work Guaranteed 
806 E. Tremont Ave. 

Phone 377-3371 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



SPE1R & CO. 

Incorporated 

o 

Insurance — Bonds 



Dial ED 3-1171 
130 East Fourth 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



TIGER ENCLOSURES, 


INC. 


GREENHOUSE MFG. 




TOM W. BROOKS, Pres. 




3630 North Davidson 


Tel. 334-2266 


CHARLOTTE, N. C. 





, N. C. 

ANITA GOLSTEIN 
Correspondent 

The initial event of the annual 
Asheville Federated Jewish Char- 
ities drive was held in the iorm 
of a women's tea at the Grove 
Park. Inn, August 16. That even- 
ing, the Initial Gifts meeting was 
held at the home of Dr. Leon 
Feldman. 

The Victory Dinner, officially 
ending the drive, was held August 
30 at the Grove Park Inn. Ashe- 
ville BBG's offered free baby-sit- 
ting for those parents attending 
the affair. 

Mr. Stan Frumkin has been 
elected. President of the Asheville 
United Jewish Appeal. Earl 
Sc brier and Mortimer Cohn are 
cc chairmen of the Initial Gifts, 
anc' Jerry Sternberg is chairman 
of the general drive. 

Mrs. Nat Tureff of Brooklyn, 
New York has been the guest of 
her sister. Mrs. Ben Klein, for a 
month's visit. Mrs. Tureff's grand- 
sons, also of New York, have been 
visiting with their aunts and 
uncles in Asheville. 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Scherr, 
former residents of Asheville, re- 
turned for several days as guests 
at Grove Park Inn. Also visiting 
w ere Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Good- 
man of Tucson, Arizona. Mr. 
Goodman's mother and brothers 
arc residents of Asheville. 

Stuart Cooley, son of Mr. and 
Mis. Harry Cooley, celebrated his 
Bar Mitzvah August 21 and 22 at 
Congregation Beth Israel. 

August 21 was the date of the 
Hadassah board meeting; the reg- 
ular year starts in September. Mrs. 
L. Finkelstein, president, an- 
nounces plans for a donor lunch- 
eon in October. 

Mrs. Kenneth Ness and Mrs. 
Benson Slosman are co-chairmen 
lor the New Year's Dance of the 
Congregation Beth Israel Sister- 
hood. The dance will be held 
September 26 at the Grove Park 
Inn. 

BBYO News 

Miss Trudv Schandler, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Schand- 
ler, sends "Shalom" and best wishes 
to her family and friends, from 
Israel, where she is a part of the 
Israeli Summer Institute. A schol- 
arship from the N. C. Council 
BBYO sent Trudy on her way. 



WALKER'S 
DRUG STORE 

"Since 1918" 

FREE CITY-WIDE 

DELIVERY SERVICE 
ON PRESCRIPTIONS 
2 Convenient Locations 
For Faster Service 

333-4166 376-6437 

332 N. Tryon 229 Hawthorne 
Lane 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



TODD OIL CO. 

24 HR. SERVICE 

365 DAYS-A-YEAR 

392-5274 

If No Answer Dial 
366-6356 

2815 Rozzells Ferry Road 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



PLAZA HILLS 
Pharmacy 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
Filled by Registered Pharmacists 

Eldon McDaniel - Perry Hawkins 
New Owners 
Open Daily 8:30 A.M.-10 P.M. 
Pick-Up & Delivery 
DIAL 376-2774 
2513 The Plaza 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



LONG'S 

Monumsnl Co, 

3016 N. Graham 
Winnsboro Blue Granite 
# Georgia Blue Granite 

Bronze & Marble Memorials 

376-5740 

Nights 
Ray Teague 596-2665 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



KILLO 
Exterminating Co. 

Free Estimates 
Since 1939 
Licensed - Insured 
Call & Lets Discuss 
Your Problem 

Dial 333-9357 

A. G. Killough 

1444 T^. TnHpnonrierice Blvd. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 



59 



W. R. STROUPE, Pres.-Treas. 

MERCHANTS PATROL, INC. 

Licensed and Bonded by 
N. C. State Bureau of Investigation 
Uniformed Security Guard Service 
Patrol Service Licensed Detective 

413 S. Cedar Tel. 376-4422 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



THE PLAZA HOUSE 

Complete Decorating Service for Office or Home 



FR 6-8455 

1237 The Plaza at Central 



Charlotte, N. C. 



ACADEMY STEEL DRUM CO. 

Reconditioners of 
USED STEEL CONTAINERS 

Pineville Rd. P. 0. Box 455 523-2515 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 




• * W£ 0E*tr MOST ANYTHING 



BABY EQUIPMENT — BABY SUPPLIES 
Just Ask Us 



2222 Park Road 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



TOOLS 



Dial 375-4487 



R. E. SOUTHERN CONSTRUCTION CO. 

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

COMMERCIAL — RESIDENTIAL 
BRICKLAYING — HOME IMPROVEMENT — CARPENTRY 



4540 Springview Road 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Tel. 596-4116 



Frank Woods, 



INC. 



Serving Charlotte for 
Over 30 Years 
Pontiac - Tempest 
Jaguar - Jeeps 

Dial FR 6-4871 
522 S. Tryon St. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



AAA Personnel 
Service 

MALE and FEMALE 
OFFICE • SALES 
• TECHNICAL 
No Charge to Employer 

Frances May, Mgr. 
Rachael Burns 
Margaret Dover 

376-3505 

Suite 217-18-19 Wilder Bldg. 
Corner S. Tryon & 3rd St. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Ace Movers, 

INC. 

AGENT FOR 

GLOBAL VAN LINES 

Local - Long Distance 
World Wide 

Move With Confidence 

Storage - Packing - Crating 
Extra Care without Extra Cost 
—FREE ESTIMATES— 



Dial 334-2053 



721 W. 11th Street 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



MAC'S AUTO 
SERVICE 
SHOP 

AUTO REPAIRS 

725 State St. 399-9406 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



SMITH 

FLOOR FINISHING CO. 

Finest in Sanding and 
Finishing 
Tel. 332-3900 
2529 Selwyn Avenue 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



THOMAS 

Cadillac-Olds, Inc. 

SALES & SERVICE 
214 N. Church Dial 334-4656 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



JANITOR SUPPLY 
& SERVICE CO., Inc. 

2221 N. Tryon Phone 333-0481 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 




YOUR FAMILY 
DRIVE-IN RESTAURANT 

3631 S. Blvd. 
3101 N. Independence Blvd. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Judi Schrier, second vice presi- 
dent of Asheville BBG, has been 
in charge of two successful fund- 
raising projects, a bake sale and 
a bargain book sale. 

New officers of Asheville AZA 
were installed August 15 in a tra- 
ditional ceremony. A Havdalah 
service preceded the installation 
and a dance followed. Asheville 
BBG provided the refreshments. 

A slumber party at the home of 
Eileen Kell was sponsored by the 
recreation committee of BBG, of 
which Barbara Cooley is chair- 
man. 

Asheville AZA and BBG were 
hosts and hostesses for the teen- 
age counselors from nearby Camp 
Blue Star who spent a day of 
swimming at the Jewish Commun- 
ity Center pool in Asheville. 



DENY EXISTENCE OF 
JEWISH PROBLEM 
IN SOVIET UNION 

Soviet denial on two successive 
days, through its official news 
agency Tas, of the existence in 
Russia of a Jewish problem and 
of anti-Semitism has set off specu- 
lation in London that the sharp 
critciism which has been leveled 
against the Soviet Union on that 
score in the free countries of the 
world was beginning to bear some 
fruit. The first denial came in an 
article by a Tass commentator, 
Ivan Artemov, who said here was 
no "so-called Jewish problem" in 
the Soviet Union and that Jews 
there were enjoying co-equal 
rights with other citizens ever 
since the Bolshevik Revolution of 
1917. 




The Jewish National Fund of 
America has appointed Rabbi Is- 
dore David Passow as the National 
Director of the JNF Foundations, 
which raise funds for land reclama- 
tion and afforestation in Israel 
through bequests in wills and the 
assignment of insurance. The ap- 
pointment was announced by Max 
BresJer, President of the Fund. 



Guy M. Beaty 
& Co. 

Insulation and Pipe Covering 
Contractors 

520 S. Elliott ED 3-8625 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

1106 Carter St. AM 6-6481 

CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



TERMITE & PEST 
CONTROL 

Brock 
Exterminating Co. 

College Trained Supervisors 
Weed Control, Lawn & 
Ornamental Pest Control 
All Work Fully Guaranteed 
Free Inspection 

Dial 399-5262 

936 Rowan 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



60 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



ESTABLISHED 1907 

H. BEVERIDGE & CO. 

OPERATING BEVERIDGE RENEEDLING CO. 

RtfNEEDLING SPECIALISTS FOR OVER 50 YEARS 
Textile Machine Paris and Repairs 

1243 W. Franklin Ave. Phone UN 5-2641 

GASTONIA, N. C. 



The Nature Of Atonement 

(Concluded from Page 13) 



NEW YEAR GREETINGS . 



Tom 



North Carolina Dyeing & Fishing Co. 

Finishers of Ladies' Nylon Hosiery 

Asheboro Ext. GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 274-4836 



WESTBORO WEAVING COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS 

Tapes and Non-Elastics 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 



WITTEN SUPPLY CO. 

BUILDING MATERIALS 

310 E. Long Ave. GASTONIA, N. C. Dial UN 5-8584 



TEXTILE LOOM REED CO., INC. 

Manufacturers of 
Precision Loom Reeds Since 1928 
Dial 273-6984 P. 0. Box 2546 Greensboro, N. C. 



Bladenboro Cotton Mills, Inc. 

Spinners of High Grade Hosiery, Underwear and Warp Yarns 
2's to 30's, Single and Ply 
BLADENBORO. NORTH CAROLINA 



Seasons Greetings and Best Wishes 
for a Happy and Prosperous New Year 

CAROLINA RENEEDLING WORKS 

COTTON COMBED RENEEDLING 

1415 W. Franklin GASTONIA Dial 865-4156 



could retire from the calling of 
Motherhood at a certain and ap- 
pointed time? 

And the sin that I cannot quite 
face, of losing patience with a 
friend, so that 1 turn away, un- 
willing to listen with empathy, 
to see the world as she sees it, to 
value it as she values it, to recog- 
nize her likes and dislikes, to reach 
out to her need. 

And when did I acquire the sin 
of thinking that I could straighten 
out everybody's affairs? How did 
I arrive at the point where I be- 
lieve that I have such a vast store 
of wisdom that I must say some- 
thing on every subject and oc- 
casion? Why am 1 not nearly as 
careful of what comes out of my 
mcuth as I am with what goes 
into it? 

How could I have let myself 
commit the sin of narrowness, of 
feeling that my brand of Judaism 
is better than another, knowing 
that with very little effort I could 
be a better Jew than I am, that I 
could sanctify the Sabbath rather 
than use it, preserve our rituals 
rather than abandon them, re- 
joice in our liturgy, rather than 
count its faults, translate our time- 
less moral code into the daily acts 
of life rather than wait for a com- 
munity project to do it for me? 

But especially let me seek for- 
giveness if I have indulged in the 
most insidious of sins — the sin of 
omission. For if I have committed 
that sin, then I am one who lets 
somebody else get out the vote; 



1 am one who carps at mv Con- 
gressman, but never communicate 
personally with him to let him 
understand what I think is good 
and what I wish were better. If I 
have committed the sin of omis- 
sion, then I am one of those who 
fail to stop a malicious story at its 
source simple by refusing to Iis- 
len; I am one who avoids contact 
with the aged, lest they disturb 
my carefully cultivated aura of 
youth; and my interest in my com- 
munity is apt to be continued to 
that area which affects my family 
or myself directly. 

Most of all, I seek forgiveness 
for the sin of not enjoying life's 
uncounted, taken-for-granted bles- 
sings: the smiles of my small grand- 
daughters and grandson, the de- 
votion of my husband, the friend- 
ship of my sons and daughters; 
our good health; for the intuitive 
and vigorous preservation of our 
heritage by Jewish leadership both 
lay and professional and, though 
the world stands at this moment 
in the midst of a monumental 
power struggle between nations 
and ideologies, let me be forgiven 
for not enjoying the fun of living. 

President Johnson has named 
Mrs. Joseph Widen of New York 
president of the National Council 
of Jewish Women, as a member of 
the new National Citizens Com- 
mittee for Community Relations 
The committee will endeavor to 
foster voluntary compliance with 
the Civil Rights Act of 1964. 



GRAY & DANIEL, INC. 



Cotton Waste 

Citizens National Bank Building 

GASTONIA, N. C. 



Dial UN 5-124R 



GASTON ELECTRIC COMPANY, Inc. " 

ELECTRICAL SERVICE 

Industrial Power and Wiring 
Fluorescent Lighting 

MOTORS 

Rewound — Rebuilt — Repaired 

New and Used Motors Bought and Sold 

Phone UN 7-7264 P. O. Box 1361 

Gastonia, N. C. 



September, 19,64 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 



61 



WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

MRS. STANLEY TULMAN, Correspondent 





MRS. ROBERT M. SHAFTEL 



Marlyn Lee Saks, daughter of tel, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 



Xh\ and Mrs. Robert J. Saks, be- 
tame the bride of Robert M. Shaf- 



B Schaftel, of Pikesville, Md. on 
August 9th at Temple Emanuel. 



Radio Station 
WAAA 

With More Listeners 
in Winston-Salem 
Than Any Other Station 



NEWMAN'S 

AUTO SERVICE 

SPECIALIZING IN 
AUTOMATICS 

• Tune Up with Scope 

• Brake Service 

• Complete Motor Service 

• AU Work Guaranteed 

• Pick Up & Delivery 

Dial 722-7989 

1931 Vargrave 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



The Foilin Co, 

INSURANCE 



mtWleptnfen, 

bmmJJl /AGENT 

Room 413, Reynolds Bldg. 
Dial 722-7149 
Established 1897 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 




T. W. Garner Food Co. 

Fine Preserves, Jellies, 
Sauces, Syrups 

Since 1929 
WINSTON- SALEM, N. C. 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Firms in 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



W. E. GRAHAM AND SONS 

Division of 
VULCAN MATERIALS COMPANY 

Quality Crushed Stone 

For Driveways — Patios — and 
All Home Improvements 

For Quotations & Delivery 

In Greensboro Dial 643-3721 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. DIAL 767-0911 



Every drop is fresh off 
nearby farms 



fanners 
dairy 




farmers 
dary ntilk 




FRANK VOGLER & SONS 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS — AMBULANCE SERVICE 
Dependable Since 1838 
Dial PA 2-6101 Winston-Salem, N. C. 



BALDWIN 



"SINCE 1862" 




Liberal Trade-In Allowance* 

Moxley Piano Co. 

Dial PA 2-7381 673 W. 4th 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



Be 
Sociable" 
Have A 
Pepsi 



FIVE Complete Stores 

in ONE 
Roof-top Parking for 
Over 300 Cars 




801 W. 4th St. Dial PA 4-4461 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 




PEPSI-COLA BOTTLING CO. 

WINSTON-SALEM. N. C. 



<62 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 




• ROAST BEEF 

• STEAMED OYSTERS 

September thru April 

• STEAKS 
IMPORTED BEER ON TAP 

ALL SERVED IN AN ELEGANT 
OLD ENGLISH SETTING 

Sunday Buffet 11:30 A.M.-2:30 P.M. 

Pepper Bldg. — on the 
Courthouse Square 
Corner of 4th & Liberty Streets 

723-9615 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 




Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



GREETINGS TO OUR MANY FRIENDS 
AND SEASONS BEST WISHES 

Carswell Distributing Company, Inc. 

WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS 

South Stratford Road Dial PA 3-2476-7-8 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



"HOME OWNED & OPERATED" 

WILSON EXTERMINATING CO., Inc. 

COMPLETE PEST CONTROL SERVICE 

Dial PA 2-1194 405 West End Blvd. 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



THE CAMEL CITY LAUNDRY 

"A Bundle of Satisfaction" 
Plant and Office Branch 
512 E. Fourth St. 281 S. Stratford Rd. 

WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA 



Williams Landscaping & Paving Service 

Landscaping and Asphalt Paving 

GARDEN SHOP Free Estimates 

Reynolda Manor Shopping Dial 725-2646 

Center 724-1916 1312 Pine Bluff Road 

. WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



Rabbi David Rose officiated. The 
bride was given in marriage by 
her father. Jane Sachs, of Balti- 
more, was maid of honor, and 
bridesmaids were Mrs. Arnold 
Schaftel, Mrs. Stuart Schaftel, 
Paula Trivas and Leslie Garonzik, 
of Baltimore and Sandy Kaplan 
of Winston Salem. Herbert T. 
Bank of Baltimore was best man, 
and ushers included Gary Saks, 
Arnold Schaftel, Stuart Schaftel, 
Marshal Layton, Louis Levine, 
Sanford Shapiro and John Haas. 
A reception was given by the 
bride's parents at the Robert F. 
Lee Hotel. 

Mr. and Mrs. David Glanstein 
of Miami Beach, Fla., were honor- 
ed at a party Sunday afternoon, 
August 2nd, at Temple Emanuel. 
The celebration was in honor of 
the couple's 60th wedding anni- 
versary. Giving the party were the 
following children of the couple: 
Mr. and Mrs. Murray Glanstein 
of Columbia, S. C; Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Glanstein of Roselle, N. J.; 
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Elden and 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Waldman 
of Winston-Salem. Helping receive 
the large group of guests were Mr. 
and Mrs. Jack Waldman and Mr. 
and Mrs. Jack Manton. 

Mazel Tov to Drs. Bert and 
Dorothy Kalet on the birth of 
their third child Margaret Anna. 
This is the first little girl in rwo 
generations and Grandma Mildred 
Kalet is beaming. 

A group of women jokingly 
called F-O-E-S (Friends Of Elsie 
Shapiro) gathered at the Parkway 
Chalet August 7th to honor Mrs. 
Elsie Shapiro at a farewell lunch- 
eon. Original songs and parodies 
were sung and the honoree was 
presented a black leather hand 
bag. She will be greatly missed 
by her many friends especially the 
members of Sisterhood, and Ha- 
dassah. But she is leaving us to 
fill a very responsible position- 
that of House Mother of Z.B.T. 
Fraternity at Chapel Hill, where 
son Ira resides. Lucky boys! Our 
best wishes go with you, Elsie, 
and keep up that Dean's List 
average, Ira! 



Contribute to the North 
Carolina Home for the 
Jewish Aged 



CALL 
YOUR LOCAL AGENT 

A Complete Insurance 
Coverage for All 

AILRED 

Insurance & 
Realty Co. 

Dial 722-1082 

Fire - Casualty - Etc. 

825 Burke 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



C. R. Strickland 

BUILDING & REPAIRING 
CONTRACTOR 

Residential Repairing 
Expert Remodeling 

Repairing Sub-Standard 
Houses A Specialty 

Tel. 723-2575 

604 Woodland Avenue 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



FIVE POINTS 
CAFE 

Sandwiches - Short Orders 

Plate Lunches 
1155 Burke Ph. 723-9338 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



Joe King 
Esso Service 

Complete Car Care 
For Sudden Service 
723-9426 
1330 E. 5th St. 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



Professional Baseball 
At Its Best 

Winston-Salem 
Red Sox 

Member Fastest Class "A" 
League in the Country 

We Appreciate Your 
Civic Interest and 
Support 

Carl Howerton 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 



63 



Quality Oil Co. 

Distributor of 




PRODUCTS 

Dial PA 4-0521 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



Parcel Delivery 
of 

Winston-Salem 

Dial 725-2998 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



D&D GARAGE 

G. W. DeHART, Owner 
14 Years Experience 
All Makes & Models 
723-2683 
2209 Glendale 
Between Sprague & Waughtown 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



PEST CONTROL 

RESIDENTIAL- 
COMMERCIAL 

Over 12 Years Experience 
Dial 722-0751 

WALL 

EXTERMINATING 

N. C. Pest Control Lie. No. 360 P 
Locally Owned & Operated 

2508 Freeman 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



PLEASANTS 
HARDWARE 

CO. 

General Hardware 
Sporting Goods 
Housewares 
Lawn & Garden Equipment 

Building Materials 
Two Convenient Locations 
60 1 N. Trade 1015 Northwest Blvd. 
723-1881 724-1531 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



The Rabbi And The 
Community 

(Continued from Page 24) 
Torah, and, destroying Jewish 
tradition, destroy Judaism, as well. 

The great Jewish scholar, Na- 
chmanides, was once asked whether 
the rule of the majority, the ac- 
cepted norm in Jewish law, can 
be applied to the opinions ol many 
general practitioners as against the 
judgment of one outstanding 
specialist. His answer was, of 
course, that in a case of that sort 
the opinion of the specialist must 
he accepted. Must not this princi- 
ple, now, be applied to the Rabbi 
who is the genuine exponent of 
the traditions of Israel? Since he 
is one interpreter of Torah Law 
which is eternally binding upon 
every Jew, he must be recognized 
as the indispensable guide for the 
spiritual and religious needs of his 
congregation. 

True, the Rabbi is not infalli- 
ble nor are his teachings or his 
decisions immune from error. The 
Rabbi, however, does not merely 
express his personal opinion. He 
states the law as found in the 
Shulchan Aruch and that decision 
is binding upon the community. 
Unless recognized Jewish authority 
can prove that the Rabbi has not 
correctly interpreted the law, his 
decision must remain binding. 

There is another terribly serious 
matter stemming from this same 
loot with which we must reckon 
at this time — the matter of separa- 
tioil of men and women in the 
Synagogue. It is an unquestion 
able historic fact that as a symbol 
of Jewish purity, mixed pews 
have always been foreign to the 
Synagogue. The past 30 years in 

We would appreciate 
Subscribers ?Jotifying us 
of change of address. 




Henry Sicgman has joined the staff 
of the National Community Relations 
Advisory Council, it was announced 
this week by tsaiah Minkoff. the Coun- 
cil's Executive Vice Chairman. 



MOTHER 




DAUGHTER 



FASHIONS 

The very newest in feminine apparel. 



RALEIGH 

Insurance Building 



WINSTON-SALEM 
(Corner Liberty and 3rd Streets) 



H. B, STIMPSON & SON, INC. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL BUILDING 

Specialziing in 
Remodeling and Additions 

2094 Hawthorne Rd., S.W. 724-9022 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



L. A. REYNOLDS COMPANY 

Grading - Landscaping - Paving 
Garden Supplies 

Thruway Shopping Center 

Member of: 
American Association of Nurserymen, Inc. 

Southern Nurserymen Association 
Associated General Contractors of America 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



Enchantment in Hair Color — Imagination in Hair Design 
For the Woman Who Desires Individual Perfection 

imMJ.ZkM LAMBERTI HAIRDRESSERS 

Three Locations for Your Convenience 

Reynolda Manor Shopping Center 722-6193 
Thruway Shopping Center 723-0791 
Northside Shopping Center PA 4-6387 

WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA 



DRY CLEANERS 




LAUNDERERS 




SARTIN'S 




High Point 




Winston-Salem 


Dial 88-8-4501 




Dial PA 2-7101 



SALEM ELECTRIC COMPANY 

ANYTHING ELECTRICAL ANYTIME 

"24-Hour Service" 
315 S. Liberty St. Dial 722-6174 Winston-Salem, N. C. 



HOTEL ZINZENDORF 

"In the Heart of Winston" 
REASONABLE RATES (Weekly - Monthly) 
Finest Food in the New Air-Conditioned E-Ton's Restaurant 

Dial 722-1121 235 N. Main Winston-Salem, N. C. 



64 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 




LAUNDRY 



DRY CLEANERS — RUG CLEANERS 
Thrifty Wash - Rough Dry - Commercial - Damp Wash 

1000 E. Main WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. Dial 722-5178 



MVE'S ESS© SERVICENTER 

Dial 723-8393 
DAVE MARTIN, Owner 
ROAD SERVICE — Open 7 A.M. to 10 P.M. 

1804 N. Patterson Ave. at Sealtest Dairies 722-9320 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



Hubert M. Brown Plumbing Co. 

Specializing in 

Repairs — Remodeling — Contract Plumbing 



4331 Breck Ave. 



WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



Dial 767-1721 



Creators of Reasonable Drug Prices 

ECKERD'S 

3 Stores in Winston-Salem 

Thruway Shopping Center — Northside Shopping Center 
420 N. Trade Winston-Salem, N. C. 



F. H. GOODE TREE SERVICE 

Old Greensboro Road 
For Complete Tree & Landscape Service 
Dial PA 5-8439 

WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA 



I. L. LONG CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 

Commercial and Home Builders 

REPAIR WORK OUR SPECIALTY 

O'Hanlon Building Dial PA 2-0387 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



THOMAS 
SHELL SERVICE 

Complete Automotive 
Service 
U-Haul Trailers 
1196 Waughtown Ph. 788-9809 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



THOMAS ELECTRIC CO. 

Industrial - Commercial 
Residential 
Dial PA 5-8776 
1318 S. Hawthorne Rd. 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



BASEMENT DIGGING 



GRADING & EXCAVATING 

Specialists In 



• YARD GRADING 



Clyde H. Holder 

OFC. 1101 W. 1st Equipment Yard at Lewisville, N. C. 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. — DIAL 723-8393 



Statesville, N. C. 

MRS. MILTON STEINBERGER 
Correspondent 

With summer vacation behind 
us, and the holiday season ahead, 
we look forward to our many 
Temple activities and New Year 
with renewed vigor. 

Religion has no vacation in 
Statesville, members ol the con- 
gregation and the Bar iVTitzvah 
boys are doing a wonderful job 
conducting the Friday evening 
services. Following the regular 
Friday night services, an Oneg 
Shabbot sponsored by the members 
in the Social Hall of the Temple 
has been most successful. Our 
many thanks goes to Mr. Hy Sil- 
berman who is in charge of this 
program. 

Coming home from a wonder- 
ful trip to far away places and 
moving in their beautiful home 
has been a real exciting time for 
the Albert Schneiders. While 
away this summer they visited, 
Switzerland, Italy, France and 
Denmark. Most of their time was 
spent on the Italian Riviera. They 
were joined on the trip by Mr. 
and. Mrs. Isadore Schneider and 
daughter of New York. A big 
welcome home to Albert, Jackie 
and children, and very best of 
luck in your new home. 

Also returning home from a 
wonderful vacation where she 
spent one month at Camp Tel 
Yehudah, Barryville, N. Y. Wel- 
come home Meredith Ludwio-. 

o 

Mrs. Fllis Gordon and sons, 
Barry and Mark are visiting Mrs. 
Gordon's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Sam Fried of Boston, Mass. 




Mrs. Florence G. Heller, Chicago, 
who was elected president of the Na- 
tional Jewish Welfare Board, :s first 
woman to head the organization and 
is first woman president of a national 
Jewish organization not exclusively 
made up of women or professional 
social workers. 



Security 
Detectives, Inc. 

PROFESSIONAL, 
INVESTIGATORS 

1221 Parkway Plaza 
Tel. 723-0837 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



J. ROGER SPARKS 
CONTRACTOR 

EXCAVATING & GRADING 

Commercial - Industrial 
Residential 
723-8854 Nights 724-4801 

1498 Lockland Avenue 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



So E. Phelps 
Shoe Shop 

A Service for Particular People 
848 W. 4th St. PA 2-2144 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



KINGTON 
Auto Body Works 

Specializing in Wrecks & 
All Types of Body Work 
723-0471 711 N. Trade Street 
Between 7th & 8th Street 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



BARBER'S GULF SERVICE 

Complete Automotive 

Service 
Pick-Up and Delivery 
722-9532 
4000 Country Club Road 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



GARNER'S 

ESSO SERVICE 

ROAD SERVICE 
MINOR REPAIRS 

Dial 725-9215 
580 S. Stratford Rd. 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



AA BURGLAR & FIRE 
ALARM DEVICES, INC. 

Sales - Service - Rentals of 
Fire or Burglar Alarm Systems 
Dial 722-8912 

7 W. 4th St. 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



Your Best Buys 
are at 

EFIRDS 

TOYLAND 

STATESVILLE, N. C. 



TAR HEEL 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 

K. O. MINOR 
Over 29 Years Experience 
Reliable - Reasonable 
2911 Reynolda Rd. 725-4201 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



C:7eic3sn™»R©an©ke Rapids, N. €o 



LOUISE FARBER 

At the annual Temple Emanu-El 
meeting the following officers were 
elected: Ellis Farber, President; 
W. B. Josephson, Vice-President; 
William Kittner, Secretary; Mrs. 
Seymour Roth, Treasurer. 

The officers of the Temple Sis- 
terhood elected were Mrs. Harry 
Fried, President; Miss Louise Far- 
ber, Vice President; Mrs. Morton 
Farber, Secretary; Mrs. Harold 
Bloom. Treasurer. 

Among those attending the 
World's Fair were Mr. and Mrs. 
Seymour Roth, Mrs. Rose Spire, 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Bloom, Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Liverman, Miss 
Betty Michael Liverman, Miss 
Nancy Liverman, Miss Fannye 
Marks, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Freid, 
Miss Josephine Freid, Mrs. Hy- 
man Lienwand and children, 
David, Nancy and Eddie, Mr. and 
Mrs. Eugene Bloom and children 
Dianne and Steve and Mr. Dave 
Bloom. 



Attending the Family Retreat 
Institute at Wild Acres were Mr. 
and Mrs. Morton Farber and chil- 
dren, Maralyn and Henry; Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry Kittner and chil- 
dren Betty, Bertha, Ben and Sam- 
my; Mr. and Mrs. Hy Diamond 
and children Helen and Lee; Mr. 
and Mrs. Murray Levy and chil- 
dren Maralyn, Barbara and Barry; 
and our spiritual leader and edu- 
cator, Dr. William Furie. Our 




NURSERY SERVICE 

LANDSCAPING • DESIGNING ■ PLANTING 
GQLDSQaRO 

Contract Grading 
Seeding 
Pruning 

D. J. ROSE, Owner 



Correspondent 

members reported a wonderful 
time in education, recreation and 
family participation at this in- 
stitute. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Liverman 
and Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Roth 
attended the B'nai B'rith Institute 
at Wild Acres. 

Recent guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Eugene Bloom were Mr. and Mrs. 
Jack Hirshberg and children of 
Los Angeles. 

Dr. William Furie is a patient 
at Emporia Memorial Hospital. 
He is recovering from an opera- 
tion and getting along verv nice- 



Mr. and Mrs. Iz Novey, Miss 
Patricia Novey, Mr. Dave Bloom, 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Bloom, Mr. 
and Mrs. Richard Bloom, Mr. 
Steve Bloom, Miss Diane Bloom 
and Mr. and Mrs. Harold Bloom 
attended the Novey-Marks wed- 
ding in Richmond. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Kittner va- 
cationed in New York, Kingston, 
Philadelphia and Baltimore. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lou Volpicelli 
and children. Gayle and Eddie 
were guests of Mrs. Rose Spire. 

Guests of Mr. and Mrs. L. Kit- 
tner are their grandchildren Sus- 
an and Harriet Kittner of Phil- 
adelphia. 

Recent guests of the Morton 
Farbers were Mr. and Mrs. Joe 
Kline and children, Sandy and 
Benjy of Silver Springs. 



The future Center of Applied 
Research in fsrael, which will 
work in close liaison with the Hai- 
fa Technion, will receive a grant 
of $1,139,000 from the UN Special 
Fund, it was nanounced by B. 
Sumner Gruzen, president of the 
Amrican Technion Society. The 
Government of Israel over the 
next five yars is to contribute the 
sum of $2,666,666 toward Center 
construction and equipment. 





SAVINGS fi. LOAN 

ASSOCI ATION 
Insured Savings - Home Loans 
OUR NEW LOCATION 
201 E. Ash Street Goldsboro, N. C. 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous Nexv Year from the Following Firms in 

Goldsboro, N. C. 



"Serving Wayne County's Insurance Needs Since 1892" 

JOHN R. CRAWFORD, INC. 

FIRE - CASUALTY & BONDS 
Dial RE 4-4966 100 E. Walnut Goldsboro, N. C. 



Houser Insurance & Really, Inc. 

COMPLETE REAL ESTATE SERVICE 
Insurance - Builders - Developers 

121 N. John St. Dial 735-1730 

GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



MAY'S RADIATOR SERVICE 

Auto Radiator Repairing 

313 N, Center Dial RE 5-3517 GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



BRILL'S UPHOLSTERY SHOP 

15 Years Experience 
UPHOLSTER - RECOVER - RESTYLE - CLEAN 

Dial 735-6016 GOLDSBORO. N. C. Brookside Shopping Center 



E. S. WATERS, President S. S. WEATHERS, Secretary-Treasurer 

WAYNE ROOFING & SHEET METAL CO., Inc. 

APPROVED RUBEROID ROOFERS 
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL 

Phone RE 4-5475 GOLDSBORO, N. C. 1000 N. Herman 



Be Sharp - Call 

KEEN 

Plumbing & 
Heating Co. 

Air Conditioning & Warm 
Air Heating- 
Dial RE 5-1920 
606 Walnut St. 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 




ence Williams 

Goldsboro's Dependable Florist 
si&xx^ 2500 E. Ash 
& Dial RE 5-0916 

UNUSUAL GIFTS 
BRASS • CERAMICS 
ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS 
CANDLES 




FUEL OIL 




Printed Metered Tickets 
Prompt Delivery 



Dial RE 5-4911 



Your Warmest Friends 

W. H. Griffin 
S@bis, Inc. 

GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



Qualify Plumbing 
& Healing Co. 

Residential - Commercial 

Contracting 
Repairing - Installation 

Phone 735-4981 
1013 N. William St. 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



66 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Firms in 

Wilmington, X. C. 



WILMINGTON'S OLDEST 

YOPP FUNERAL HONE 

Established 1892 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Dial RO 2-6666 WILMINGTON, N. C. 1207 Market 



"For Those Who Like Finer Dining" 
Enjoy Eating At 

RESTAURANT 
Luncheons — Banquets — Private Parties 
U. S. Choice Charcoal Steaks — Seafood — Chicken 

3911 Oleander Dr. WILMINGTON, N. C. Phone 762-2053 



RUG CLEANING — DRAPERIES AND UPHOLSTERING 
Cleaned In Your Home 
Pick-Up & Delivery— Dial 762-1834 
CUTTING & BINDING — MOTH-PROOFING — DYEING 

Davis Dry Cleaners & Rug Service 

572 Castle Hayne Road Wilmington, N. C. 



FOUNTMN TIME SERVICE, IMC. 



(GENERAL! 

Ii V TIRE 



Goes A Long Way 
To Make Friends 



WHEEL ALIGNMENT AND BALANCING 

175 Castle Hayne Rd. WILMINGTON, N. C. Dial 763-4601 




MARIAN MOTEL 

We Offer Southern Hospitality 



Member 
Superior Courts 
763-2434 



Brunswick River Bridge 
on U. S. 17 South 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



Robinson Alignment Service 

Reasonable Prices — All Work Guaranteed 
Specializing in WHEEL ALIGNMENT 

1 Si'S CATTLE ST. DIAL RO 2-8107 WILMINGTON. N. C. 




HANOVER IRON WORKS 

HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING CONTRACTORS 

1919 Dawson WILMINGTON, N. C. Dial 763-7318 



In Steel Since 1932 

Steel 

FABRICATORS — WAREHOUSE — ERECTORS 
ANYTHING METAL FOR BUILDING 

WAREHOUSE: 13 Wright St.— Between Front J~\'] DA a A?^7 

& The River L ' iai J-vLDI 

FABRICATING PLANT: North Carolina State n,'ol RP» % 
Docks Shipyard 

QUEENSBORO STEEL CORP. 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



Wilmington, N. C. 

MRS. DANIEL RETCHIN, 
Correspondent 

MEET ME ON HENDERSON 
STREET . . . These are familiar 
words to the sun-worshipping na- 
tives of Wilmington and the many 
visitors lured to our town by the 
nearby ocean and beautiful 
beaches. During the winter 
months the long, white strand of 
Wrightsville Beach lies forlornly 
deserted, with only an occasional 
fisherman wandering among the 
jetties. But on the first day of 
June a startling change occurs. 
They are there. For mysterious 
and obscure reasons beyond defi- 
nition, Henderson Street at 
Wrightsville Beach becomes the 
focal point of all activity during 
the summer months. Like lem- 
mings we are drawn to this partic- 
ular small patch of sand, in fair 
weather and foul, on davs bright 
and sunny, and days too when the 
sand blows around us with desert- 
like fury. But who dares miss the 
fun on Henderson Street? 

As tans deepen and children 
build startling replicas of the 
World's Fair (the little ones no 
longer consider it chic to build 
castles), parents exchange recipes 
("I never heard of using vinegar 
in dill pickles"), parents exchange 
children ("Can I spend the night 
with Shirley?"), and fashions are 
thoroughly contemplated ('Last 
year he said I was too old for a 
bikini, this year he savs I'm too 
young for mink.") 

However, the run and games 
are only a part of the picture. 
Earnest and heated political dis- 
cussions frequently enliven the 
long, hot afternoons . . . "Barry 
is so confident of victory he ex- 
pects to carry all thirteen states", 
and "LBJ will run on two tickets, 
Democratic and speeding". 

As this summer draws to a close, 
and we sadly fold our beach chairs 
to return to the routine of life in 
town, we recall with nostalgia the 
hasty summons to "Meet me on 
Henderson Street". 

Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. 
Ben Fassberg of Bethesda, Md., 
on the birth of their son, Robert 
Isaac, and to the proud grandpar- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Sol Checkner 
of Wilmington. 

May I extend to all my heart- 
felt best wishes for a New Year 
of health and joy. L'Shono Tovo 
Tikosevu. 



Prescriptions 
Sick Room Supplies 
Drug Sundries 
Toilet Articles 

Morton's Service 
Drug Store 

"At Your Service" 

Dial 762-7739 
City Wide Delivery 

802 Market 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



Margaret's 
Beauty Den 

Complete Service 
For the Lady Who Cares 

Mrs .Margaret Lawrence, 
Owner 

Miss Clara Talley, Operator 
Hair Styling 

4 N. Lumina Ave. 
Phone AL 6-3557 
WRIGHTSVILLE, N. C. 



JOHN KELLY 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

Weddings and Family Groups 
Are Our Specialty 

1506 S. 3rd Dial RO 2-5003 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



Mr - Conditioning 
Heating 
Refrigeration 

SALES & SERVICE 

Residential, Commercial, and 
Industrial Contractors 

Jordan Blanton Myers Co. 

224 N. 7th Dial RO 3-5397 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



Rollins 
Barbecue 

We Cater To 
Banquets & Parties 

ORDERS PREPARED 
TO GO 

Dial 

763-4221 

4612 Oleander Dr. 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



67 




Prescription Specialist 

Drugs — Sundries 
Cosmetics, etc. 

QUICK DELIVERY 
Dial 762-4422 

129 Princess 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



T. W. DILL & SON 



DILL 



Furniture & 
Novelty Co. 

Upholstering 

Furniture Made to Order 
Modern & Antique Furniture 

Refinishing - A Wide 
Selection of Fine Materials 

Dial 763-4697 

3313 Carolina Beach Road 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



Wilmington 

Sanitary 
Supply Co. 

"Home of Janitorial Supplies" 
Chemicals - Towels - Tissues 
Mopping Equipment 




Ycur Johnson Wax Distributor 
2215 Carolina Beach Road 

RO 2-8242 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 



Coastal 

Beverage Co,, Inc. 

Distributors of 
Carling Black Label Beer 
and 

Miller High Life Beer 

S. A. L. Freight Depot 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 



Plain Talk 

(Concluded from Page 6) 
Yes, and as I grow old, I keep 
on understanding this better and 
better. The other clay a Negro 
came to my desk in the daily 
newspaper office for which I 
write . . . "Sir," he said, "you 
are Jewish and I'm colored and 
Christian. But as I understand 
you, your way of religion cares 
about all kinds of people. Maybe 
you can be of some help to me 
and my family." 

I served him and I'm mention- 
ing this by way of the meaning 
of Rosh Hashonah, as I learned 
it from my papa. Sure, Rosh 
Hashonah has to do with the high 
way of living throughout the years 
... no matter whom one serves, 
of whatever religion or color of 
face. 

So I keep thanking papa for 
having led me in that direction 
long long ago and on this Rosh 
Hashonah may I be excused for 
boasting here as one who along 
hi:. 80 years of life keeps trying 
to live up to the Rosh Hashonah 
ideal which his papa taught him. 

Though really, I do have some 
faults against which I'll speak up 
to God in the coming Rosh Hash- 
onah service. 



To discourage a repetition of an 
incident last week in which ob- 
scenities and other markings were 
found on the walls of the Sinai 
Tmple in Michigan City, Ind.., ad- 
ditional police patrols have been 
assigned to the area of the Temple. 
Police attributed the incident to 
"juvenile vandals." 




The Rose L. Halprin Community 
Hall of Batzra Village, near Kiar 
Saba, was de<ncf>+*-tl in h*w">* "f 
the American Zionist leader who is 
chairman of the Jewish Agency- 
American Section. 



H. B. LUDLUM & SONS 

BUILDING MATERIALS and WRECKING 

Dial RO 3-2634 Carolina Beach Road Wilmington, N. C. 



KELLY'S BEAUTY SALON 

LILLIAN KELLY POWELL 
Owner and Stylist 

Specialists in Beauty Culture 
1703 Princess 763-3055 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



AMERICANA MOTEL 

"One of Wilmington's Finest Motels' 

Located on Highways 17 & 74 
2929 Market St. 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 



763-3318 



MILL UPHOLSTERY COMPANY 

COMPLETE UPHOLSTERY SERVICE 

FROM MODERN TO ANTIQUE 
Auto Upholstery — Seat Covers — Convertible Tops 

Free Estimates — Pick Up & Delivery — All Work Guaranteed 
2217 S. Front WILMINGTON, N. C. Dial 762-7016 



DICK HANSON 




CHEMICAL CO., INC* 

Termite & Household 
Pest Control 



"Continuous Service Since 1878" 
Dial 762-4033 Wilmington, N. C. 



TAYLOR'S DETECTIVE AGENCY 

LICENSED — BONDED 
Confidential Investigations 

1301 Princess Tel. 762-2849 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 



RENT!! WHY BUY? 

WILMINGTON LINEN SERVICE 



Dial RO 3-24C6 



1313 S. 5th Ave. 



WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



STANDARD PAINT & GLASS CO. 

PAINT — WALL PAPER — GLASS 
Custom Picture Framing 

21 Market St. WILMINGTON, N. C. Dial 762-3355 



Farrar Transfer & Storage Warehouse 

Authorized Agents for Allied Van Lines, Inc. 
Household Goods Moved, Packed, Shipped and Stored 
1121 S. Front WILMINGTON, N. C. Dial RO 2-5317 



68 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



HOBBS MOTEL 

AIR CONDITIONED 
TELEVISION TELEPHONE 
22 ROOMS 
PETS ACCEPTED 

WALDO & RUTH C. WHITE, 
Owners 
RESTAURANT NEARBY 

Dial 762-8546 

Located 1 Mile from City- 
Limits — 6 Miles from 

Wrightsville Beach 
4404 Market Street Rd. 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



OLEANDER 




Service (enter 

• Washing • Waxing 

• Lubrication • Oil Change 

RO 3-1042 

4100 Oleander Dr. 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



THE SURF 

42 OCEAN FRONT ROOMS 

Room Television & Tele- 
phones - Dining Room 
Outdoor Terrace 

Located Near Fishing Pier 

For Reservation 

Dial AL 6-2275 

111 S. Lumina Ave., 
Wrightsville Beach, N. C. 



DOROTHY OWEN 

Florist 

Flowers for Every Occasion 
1619 Nun St. Dial RO 2-5142 
WILMINGTON. N. C. 



PADGETT'S 

SERYKENTER 

For 

Complete Car Care 
Dial 762-9374 
2325 Market 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



J. M. HDHMS 

Color Matching A Specialty- 
Residential - Commercial 

Interior & Exterior 
Brush & Spray 

Bonded & Insured 

762-8395 

208 S. 41 St. 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



SERVICE 

FUEL OIL CO. 

For Home Heating and 
Burner Sales & Service 
COURTEOUS, SPEEDY, 
RELIABLE DELIVERY 
We Honor Esso Credit Cards 

Dial 762-4061 

R. H. STANLEY, 
Owner & Operator 

1104 Chestnut Street 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



LKS 

ELECTRIC MOTOR 
REPAIR & REWINDING CO. 

924 S. Third Street 
Dial RO 3-1227 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



COASTAL 

Office Equipment Co. 

Dial RO 3-7326 3926 Market 
North 17 Shopping Center 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



Ed Mintz Painting 
& Decorating Co. 

RESIDENTIAL AND 
COMMERCIAL 

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR 

"As Good as The Best — 
But Not as High as The Rest" 

— Free Estimates — 

6036 Wrightsville Avenue 
Dial 256-2923 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WILDAGRES 

(Concluded from Page 54) 
shel mitzva — commandments of 
joy," better able out of Jewish 
sources to respond to the chal- 
lenge, "Ask what you can do for 
your country!" Handling each age 
group on its own ability level, 
the Retreats dealt with the major 
social issues agitating our society 
— civil rights, civil liberties, mar- 
riage, intermarriage and the fam- 
ily, housing, interreligious rela- 
tionships, economic justice, crime 
and delinquency — application of 
Judaism to the contemporary 
scene. Jewish practices around the 
week, including a full observance 
of Shabbat: services, candle light- 
ing, kiddush, z'mirot, sholosh seu- 
dot, havdalah. Many of the par- 
ticipants committed the Birkat 
Hamazon to memory during the 
week's stay. 

The staff included: Dr. William 
B. Furie, Director, Julius Cohn, re- 
tiring southeast Circuit Rider, M. 
Reuben Kesner, southeast Circuit 
Rider-elect and Mrs. Gertrude 
Rogers, Hebrew teacher and staff 
member of Temple Emanuel, 
Worcester, Massachusetts. So suc- 
cessful were this year's Retreats 
that it is planned to set aside three 
Wildacres weeks for them in 1965: 
the week for families following 
July 4; a week for teenagers; a 
week for Golden Agers. 



Do Your Part! 
Contribute to the NorUi 
Carolina Home for the 
Jewish Aged 



p 

i 

w 














I 










Max Bressler, President of the Jew- 
ish National Fund of America, flew 
recently to Jerusalem for consulta- 
tions with governmental and Jewish 
National Fund leaders concerning the 
establishment of the John F. Kennedy 
Peace Forest in Israel. 



BOILING SPRING 
LAKE, N. C. 

© 50 Fresh Water Lakes 

• Swimming • Fishing 

• Boating • Golf Course 

• Country Club 

• Beautiful Resort Motel 

• Picnic Grounds 

"A Paradise In The Pines" 
On Hwy 87 Near 
Southport, N. C. 

Get Complete Literature and 
Information by Writing to: 

Reeves Broadcasting Corp. 

Boiling Spring Lakes 

Southport, N. C. 

Bolivia, N. C. 253-6249 

Wilmington, N. C. 762-6988 



Tate 

Tenneco Service 

24 Hour Wrecker Service 

Mechanic on Duty 
Minor Repairs 
Brake & Muffler Service 
Steam Cleaning 
Open 7 Days 
Road Service 
Pick-Up & Deliverv 
762-7373 
2886 Carolina Beach Rd. 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



PLEASE PATRONIZE 
OUR ADVERTISERS 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 
Dial 763-3123 



Murray's Studio 

BILL MURRAY, 
Photographer 

• Portraits 

© Commercial 

• Weddings 

• Restoration 

• Bar Mitzvah 
Custom Framing 

Color - Black & White 

123 Grace 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



69 



FAYETTEVIEXE, N. C. 

MRS. ALEX WAITMAN, Correspondent 



Heartiest congratulations to our 
Lumberton neighbors, Mr. and 
Mrs. Emanuel Sugar, on the en- 
gagement of their son Allen, to 
Miss Phylis Friedman of New 
York and Lumberton, N. C. 

To our St. Pauls neighbors, we 
extend congratulations also. Miss 
Frances Sugar, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Stanley Sugar, and 
Charles Margolis, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Matthew Margolis, attended 
the Governor's School at Winston- 
Salem. Frances was one out of fifty 
students chosen to return this year. 

Congratulations to Harris Rul- 
nick on passing his State Boards 
and becoming a full-fledged C.P.A. 

We welcome to our community 
a new family, Mr. and Mrs. Sam 
Hockfield, formerly of Durham. 

Rabbi and Mrs. Henry Ucko 
are motoring through New Eng- 
land. 

Happy to report that Mr. [ack 
Mendelsohn is much improved fol- 
lowing hospitalization in Wilming- 
ton. Also that Mrs. Harry Shavitz 
is recovering after a fall at her 
home. Mrs. J. E. Union is recup- 
erating after minor surgery. May 
God heal all who are suffering 
and grant good health to them in 
the approaching New Year. 

Your correspondent has receiv- 
ed a note from Aunt Ida Fleish- 
man of Miami, formerly of this 
city, conveying her thanks to 
friends and family for their many 



kindnesses to her. She is recover- 
ing at home after being hospitaliz- 
ed for a broken collar bone as the 
result of a fall. 

Our condolences to Mrs. Mau- 
rice Fleishman upon the loss of 
her brother, Harris Abel of 
Charleston, S. C, and to Mrs. Mor- 
ris Sabath on the passing of her 
mother. Mrs. Augusta Lipson, of 
New York. 

August 9th was a sad dav for 
this community, as there were two 
funerals. Mrs. Fannv Bridge pass- 
ed away on the day before, after 
a short illness. The deceased had 
resided here for fifty years and 
was the sister of Mrs. Harry 
Fleishman, Mrs. Mary Cheplow, 
Mr. Harry and David Shavitz of 
Fayetteville; and Mrs. Frank Fried- 
enberg of Richmond, Va., Mr. 
Barney Shavitz of Baltimore and 
Mr. Sam Shavitz of 
N. C. 



High Point. 



Mr. Samuel Fleishman, former- 
ly of Dunn, N. C, but living in 
Wilmington, N. C. for the past 
few years, died unexpectedly on 
the same day. He was the son of 
Mrs. Mary Fleishman, brother of 
Mrs. Minnie Fox and Mr. William 
Fleishman of Wilmington and 
Mr. Harry Fleishman of Fayette- 
ville. 

We extend our sincere sympathy 
to both of these families, and pray 
that they may be comforted. 



Charles Pearsall, Mgr. "Complete Pest Control Sendee" 

CAROLINA EXTERMINATORS 



HE 2-4138 



Small Monthly Terms to Meet Your Budget 



Fayetteville, N. C. 



INDUSTRIAL PIPING SUPPLY CO. 



A II Types of 
PIPING SUPPLIES 



1501 Dowd Road Dial FR b . 5661 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosp erous New Year from the Following Firms in 



Ed Fleishman Bros. 
MEN'S CLOTHIERS 

"Nationally Advertised Brands" 



107 Hay Street 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



223 N. Front Street 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



FAYETTEVILLE UPHOLSTERY SHOP 

1315 South Main Street 
"NO JOB TOO LARGE OR TOO SMALL" 

Dial HU 4-7274 5224 Bragg Blvd. Fayetteville, N. C. 



ALTON B. MEDLIN, CONTRACTOR 

TILES — MARBLE — TERRAZZO 

Authorized SUNTILE Dealer 
335 Rowan Street FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. Dial HE 2-6367 



PRITCHARD INSURANCE CLINIC 

R. W. PRITCHARD 

ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE 

408 Lawyers Bldg. Dial HE 2-3128 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Heating Oil 



D. K. Taylor 

Oil Co* 

Dial HE 3-3106 
Fayetteville, N. C. 



Carrier 



Room Air 

Conditioners 



Maymount 
Esso Servicenter 

PETE SUGGS 
824 Hay St. 
4 SS.37 55 

(£sso) 

Person 
Esso Servicenter 

PAUL WALTERS 
400 Person St. 
HE 2i-2638 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Carlton Person 

ELECTRICAL 
CONTRACTOR 

Complete Electrical Service 

DIAL HE 2-6703 
Commercial - Industrial 

Residential 
Wiring and Maintenance 

All Work Guaranteed 

1706 Camden Rd. 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Roscoe L. Blue 

BLUE 
Realty Co. 

REALTOR 

A Complete 
Realty Service 

Dial HU 4-2161 
111 Oakridge Avenue 
Fayetteville, N. C. 



940 on your dial 

WFNC 

Now 10,000 Watts 

CJ&PE FEUR 
Broadcasting do. 

FAYETTEVILI F. N. C. 



70 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Firms in 

WILMINGTON - FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Dial 763-5573 
BOSTIC 
RADIO & TV 

REPAIR SERVICE 

1319 Castle Street 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



A Happy New Year 

Todds Downtown 
Furniture Co. 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 



PHOTOCOPY 
Sales & Service Co. 

Copying Machines Supplies 
and Service for Most 
All Copiers 
121 S. 17 762-8634 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



THE STYLE 
SALON 

NEVADA JONES, Owner 
Complete Beauty Care 
3619 Wrightsville Ave. 

Dial 763-6619 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



W A, Stewart Flooring Contractor 

RESIDENTIAL — COMMERCIAL 

FINISHING and INSTALLING of 
ALL TYPES OF FLOORS 

Free Estimates - All Work Guaranteed 

4009 Raeford Rd. P. 0. Box 3325 Phone HUdson 4-6904 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



3oni«uiiiiMMiimiiiiminiiiiiiiMiiiiiiimniM 

I MOORE'S INSURANCE AGENCY 1 

I CHAS. J. BLAKE, Mgr. | 

Complete Insurance Protection | 
205 Princess St. WILMINGTON, N. C. Dial RO 2-8588 | 

innraniininiiiiiiiiinitiiiiiiiHitiiriiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiuiiitiiiuiiiitiiniiiuiJiuiiuUTiiuiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiuiiiijjiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiimtitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iitiiimi mmniiimimiiiiiti 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



F U R N I U R E 

"One Stop Shopping" 

Famous Brand Quality 
Furniture at 
Reasonable Prices 

• FURNITURE 

• APPLIANCES 

• TELEVISION 

Dial HU 4-2187 

The Merchandise 
Marl 

3702 Bragg Blvd. 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Dial 484-4111 

For a Complete Line of 
Advertising Giveaways 

* Achievement Awards & 
Executive Gifts 

* Calendars 

* Pens & Pennants 

* Book Matches 

* Ash Trays 

* 76,000 Other Items with 
your message imprinted 
on them. 

Business Aids 
Unlimited & 
Military Service 
Co. 

Warehouse & Showroom 

New Location 

2833 Bragg Blvd. 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Rocky Mount 
Temple Beth El 
Sisterhood 

MRS. ARNOLD J. KRIDEL. 
Correspondent 

Our congregation has been 
traveling East, West, North and 
South for their vacations these 
past three months. Many have 
been to New York to see the fab- 
ulous World's Fair. All told, a 
wonderful time has been had. 

We would like to welcome two 
new families to our congregation. 
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Leband. Mr. 
Leband is with N. Sumergrade & 
Sons of Rocky Mount. Mr. and 
Mrs. Burt Baker and children, 
Donald and Anita, and Tobin. 
Mrs. Baker is the daughter of Mrs. 
Harry Shrago of Goldsboro, N. C. 
The Baker family has lived in 
Quincy. Mass. for the past 20 years. 
We hope they will enjoy many 
pleasant years in Rocky Mount. 

Rabbi Israel J. Sarasohn attend- 
ed the Central Conference of 
American Rabbis held in fune in 
Atlantic City, New Jersey, and 
then traveled to Hollywood, Flor- 
ida to spend his vacation with his 
sister. We welcome him back. 

Temple Beth El Congregation 
wishes all their friends a healthy 
and happy New Year. 



Williamston, N. C. 

MRS. IRVING M. MARGOLIS, 
Correspondent 

Summer time means much com- 
ing and going. Mr. and Mrs. C. 
D. Pittman have had as their 
guest', Dr. and Mrs. Edward Bo- 
gen of Columbia, S.C., and Mr. 
and Mrs. M a r 1 o w S o 1 o m a n 
and children, Rachel, Beverly, 
Kerry, and Alan, of St. Louis, 
Mo., visited his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank J. Margolis. ft was 
the first visit to their grandparents 
for the two younger children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Goldstein 
and children, Bennie and Mariana, 
were guests of her mother at At- 
lantic Beach, Morehead City. 

Congratulations to Dr. and Mrs. 
Gary R. Smiley of Chapel Hill 
upon the birth of their daughter, 
Karen Beth, and every good wish 
to her. Congratulations, also, to 
her brother Steven, and to her 
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Smiley of Spartanburg, S. C, and 
to Mr. and Mrs. Irving M. Mar- 
srolis of Williamston. 



STATION 
OF THE STARS 

WF LB 

The No. 1 Station 
1490 On Your Dial 
THE MUSIC, NEWS AND 
WEATHER STATION 

Fayetteville, N. C. 



Swain's Uphc Istering Shop 




Tufting A Specialty 

FABRICS & PLASTICS 

3234 Bragg Blvd. 
Dial HU 4-7424 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



SALES - SERVICE 
RENTALS CENTER 

Expert Repairs on Any 
Make or Model TV or Radio 
Dial RO 3-6286 

Landen's 

Telewssi^n Center 

820 Market Wilmington, N. C. 



JACKSON 
MATTRESS CO., Inc. 

Mattresses • Box Springs 

• Pillows • Pads 

Renovated and Sterilized 
535 S. Cool Spring Street 
DIAL HE 3-3153 
FAYETTEVILLE. N. C. 



In Town Motel 




Nearest City's Center 
Most Convenient to Ft. Bragg 

U.S. 401 N. At Jet. 87 & 210 
3 Blocks North of Market House 

ROOM PHONES - T.V. 
ALL CONVENIENCES 

Near Restaurants, Movies, Shops 
Commercial & Family 
Accommodations 

Dial HE 2-3202 

MR. & MRS. C. J. SCHICK 
Owners & Managers 
430 Ramsey Street 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



71 



CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 



Miss Phyllis Cecile Rundbaken, 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Abe 
Rundbaken of Charleston, South 
Carolina, and Mr. Arthur Leigh- 
ton Shorago, a son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Morris Shorago of Coral 
Cables, Florida, were married 
August 2nd at Synagogue Brith 
Shalom Beth Israel in Charleston, 
South Carolina. Officiating were 
Rabbi Hersh Galinsky and Can- 
tor Isaac Koenig. 

The bride was given in mar- 
riage by her father. 

Mrs. Lowell Epstein, of Sumter, 
S. C, was her sister's matron of 
honor. Bridesmaids were Mrs. 
Paul Rundbaken of Jacksonville, 
Florida, sister-in-law of the bride; 
Miss Phyllis Shulman of Syracuse, 
New York; and Miss Marsha 
Rosenberg of Charleston, a cousin 
of the bride. 

Mr. Paul Rundbaken of Jack- 
sonville, Florida, brother of the 
bride, was the best man. Ushers 
were Mr. Lowell Epstein of Sum- 
ter, S. C, brother-in-law of the 
bride: Dr. Stanley Salzman of Mi- 
ami, Florida; and Mr. Harold 
Koslow of Charleston, South Car- 
olina. 

Mrs. Shorago, a graduate of M. 
Rutledge Rivers High School in 
Charleston, attended the Univer- 
sity of Alabama, where she was 
a member of Sigma Delta Tau 
social sorority. She was graduated 
from the University of South Car- 



olina in 1962 with a BA degree 
in elementary education and was 
a member of Kappa Kappa Gam- 
ma honorary education sorority. 
She is presently employed by the 
Miami Public School System as a 
teacher at the Citrus Grove Ele- 
mentary School in Miami. 

Mr. Shorago attended the Uni- 
versity of Denver and was grad- 
uated from the University of Mi- 
ami with a bachelors degree in 
business administration. He is al- 
so a graduate of the American In- 
stitute of Banking and is employ- 
ed by the Central Bank and Trust 
Company in Miami. 




Milton Berger of Congregation 
Adath Jeshurun In Philadelphia, was 
convention chairman and Jack Mit- 
tleman convention director, at the 
five-day convention of the United 
Campaign of America, held at the 
Concord Hotel, November 17th through 
the 21st. 



SELLERS TRANSFER COMPANY 

SAFE — DEPENDABLE — FAST-MOVING — STORAGE 

6 Hassell Street CHARLESTON, S. C. Dial RA 2-8753 



FREDRICKSON 
Motor Express Corp, 

"Serving: North Carolina" 




General Office 
CHARLOTTE. NORTH CAROLINA 
PHONE 376-3661 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Firms in 

Charleston, S. C. 



SAFETY 



SERVICE 



SECURITY 



Atlantic Coast Life Insurance Co. 

149 Wentworth St. CHARLESTON, S. C. 

"The Golden Rule Company" 

ORDINARY— HOSPITALIZATION— WEEKLY PREMIUM 

INSURANCE 



Tidewater Concrete Block & Pipe Co. 

P. O. Box 162 Dial SH 4-5376 

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 




FIRST FEDERAL 

SAVINGS A LOAN ASSN. 




More Than a Quarter of a Century of Service to th< 
Charleston, S. C. Community 



AVONDALE 
PHARMACY 

INCORPORATED 
Self-Service Drugs 

Dial SN 6-1611 

AVONDALE 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



COPLESTON'S 

Quality 
Dry Cleaning . . . Laundry 

Dial RA 2-5505 
537 Meeting Street 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 




2ff JB«f 77 f fjkjfl 



- THAT L/V£$ FOREVER 

£ # J*fTteCfl RTHY$ SONS 



MEMORIALS SINCE 1X60 



Magnolia Crossing 
Dial RA 3-8381 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



72 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 19,64 



B. L. BRADHAM & SONS 



Excavating 



Pile Driving 



Grading - Clearing 
Top Soil - Fill Dirt 
COMMERCIAL— RESIDENTIAL— INDUSTRIAL 
Asphalt Paving 
Parking Areas - Roads and Sub Divisions 

508 Stono River Rd. — Dial 768-5116 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 




6 Broad Street 



CHARLESTON'S MOST COMPLETE 
REALTY FINANCING SERVICE 

Fred Laing Mortgage Broker 

CHARLESTON, S. C. Phone (803) 722-2082 



CHARLESTON DRY DOCK COMPANY 



E. End Calhoun St. 



Phone RA 2-2941 



CHARLESTON, S. C. 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



You'll Enjoy Shopping at 




517 King St. 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



STANDARD OF THE WORLD 

CADILLAC 
Sales, Service & Parts 
478 E. Bay St. RA 3-1669 

Quality Value Cars 
379 Meeting RA 3-9214 
Low GMAC Financing 

MILLER 
Cadillac, Inc. 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



FUEL OIL 




Prompt Fuel Deliveries 

Daily from 8 AM to 11 PM 
May "We Suggest 
The Convenience of Our 
"Keep Filled Service" 
"We Give Gold Bond Stamps" 
Space Heaters Installed 
Dial 775-1862 

Nights 773-2996 

Singleton's 
Servicenter 

216 S. Main Sumter, S. C. 



B. Ammons 

Refrigeration & 
Air Conditioning 

SALES & SERVICE 
Commercial 
Residential - Industrial 

Since 1937 
Dial 773-8323 
815 Manning Ave. 
SUMTER, S. C. 



WOULDN'T IT REALLY BE LOVELY 
IF THEY EMBRACED! 



By Harold J. Goodman 



Gamal Abdel Nasser and Levi 
Eshkol embraced warmly. It hap- 
pened at the Gaza Strip, on a 
gently sloping hill. 

Nasser was the first to speak. 
He said, 'I came because I dream- 
ed a dream'. 'I, too, come because 
I dreamed a dream', said Eshkol. 

'In my dream, behold/ said Nas- 
ser, 'I stood upon the brink of 
the Nile; and, behold, there came 
out of the river seven mushrooms, 
huge, awe inspiring; and the stems 
of the mushrooms were like mighty 
columns, and the heads were like 
huge clouds, billowing smoke and 
fire. The mushrooms rose, and 
spread, and winds were blowing 
fiercely. And I saw in my dream, 
seven lotus flowers come out of the 
river; and the stalks of the lotus 
were miles high, and the flowers 
were white, and the leaves were 
miles across; and the mushrooms 
and lotus were in fierce battle, 
lighting for supremacy. And there 
1 stood, by the bank of the Nile, 
beholding this wondrous spectacle, 
pondering the meaning of it'. 

'In my dream', said Levi Eshkol, 
'I stood at the foot of Mt. Carmel. 
And, behold, seven bridges came 
into view; and the bridges con- 
nected all the lands of the Arab 
world with the land of Israel; and 
the bridges were majestic, and the 
lands of Islam and the land of Is- 
rael were as one. And, behold, 
seven ladders rose into the sky, 
one from the center of each bridge, 
and they reached to heaven. And 
the angels of God were ascending 
and descending. And I stood there, 
beholding the majesty and glory 
of what I saw, pondering the 
meaning of it'. 

'And my dream is more', said 
Nasser. 'As I stood there in won- 
der and in awe, behold, there was 
a crash of thunder and a flash of 
lightning, and there was chaos, 
and the end of the world was near. 
And the prophet Mohammed, 
apostle of Allah, said, the Lord 
hath sent me and I come to de- 
clare your dream, to interpret the 
meaning of it. The number seven 
is the seven lands of Islam. The 
mushrooms stand for the power 
and wrath of Allah and of the evil 



that consumes the peoples of Is- 
lam, of the hatred between broth- 
er and brother, of the enmity to- 
ward your neighbor, Israel, And 
the flower of the lotus is the love 
of God, the love of brothers, the 
love of your neighbor, Israel, that 
Allah enjoins upon thee; the 
dream is one. And Mohammed 
said unto me, in the name of Al- 
lah, love your brothers, make 
peace with them; and go thee forth 
to the land of Israel, to the border 
of it. And there, behold, at the 
Strip of Gaza, there is a gently 
sloping hill; go thee to the top of 
this hill, and there thou shalt em- 
brace your neighbor, the ruler of 
the land of Israel, and say unto 
him; I bring thee peace, my broth- 
er. Thus spake Mohammed unto 
me, and he said: Go thee now and 
do as the Lord commandeth, lest 
the wrath of Allah descend upon 
thee, and ye perish from the earth: 
and if thou doeth the will of the 
Lord, his countenance shall shine 
upon thee, and ye shall live for 
evermore'. 

'And my dream, too, is more', 
said Eshkol. 'As I stood there, in 
wonder and in awe, behold, there 
was a flash of fire, and there was 
great light in the firmament of 
the heaven, and it was as if the 
presence of God was there. And, 
behold, Moses stood beside me, 
and said: the Lord, the God of 



INSURANCE 

Representing 

Security Insurance 
Companies 

Complete Insurance Service 
Life - Health - Hail 
Auto - Fire 

775-1283 

Jess W. Martin 

C&J Insurance 
Service 

31 N, Main - Sumter, S. C. 



.September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



73 




Under the impact of Israel Bond investments, Israel's merchant fleet 
is rapidly expanding:. Workers are shown completing construction of a new 
3,500-ton coastal freighter at Israel Shipyards Ltd. in Haifa, which was re- 
cently established with Israel Bond aid. The merchant fleet also includes 
deep-freeze fishing beats. Approximately 1,000 skilled workers are employed 
at the shipyard, and many hundreds of others are engaged in expanding 
the harbor facilities at Haifa and Elath and in completing the new deep- 
water port now under construction at Ashbod south of Tel Aviv. 



jour fathers, the God of Abraham, 
hath sent me unto you; I am come 
to interpret your dream, to declare 
the meaning of it. The number 
seven is the seven lands of Islam; 
(he bridges are bonds of peace and 
friendship; the ladders are the 
blessings of God and the bene- 
ficence of the Lord. And he said, 
the Lord, who has once brought 
thee out of the affliction of Egypt, 
now commands thee to return to 
the land of Egypt, and oiler the 
hand of friendship and make 
peace with the lands of Islam.' 

And when the telling of the 
dreams was ended, Gamal Abdel 
Nasser and Levi Eshkol embraced 
with deep feeling, and Gamal 
Abdel Nasser was the first to speak, 
and he said, 'My dream and your 
dream are one; the voice of your 
God and my God are one'. And 
Levi Eshkol spoke, and he said, 



'the dreams are one; the will of 
my God and your God is one'. 

And so it came to pass, in the 
days and years ahead, that peace 
reigned in the land of Israel and 
the lands of Islam. And war was 
no more. And the face of the land 
was filled with fruitage. And the 
years were years of plenty. And all 
the people were as brothers, and 
the spirit of God prevaded all the 
lands. 

And the word spread to the 
whole world, that peace and broth- 
erhood were in the land of Islam 
and the land of Israel. And rulers 
and kings descended on these lands 
to behold the miracle of it and to 
find the secret of it. And Gamal 
Abdel Nasser and Levi Eshkol 
spoke to them, and gave them the 
secret of it, and they said unto 
them: 'God is one. All men are 
one'. 



Pelham Roofing & Sheet Metal Works 



RESIDENTIAL 

267 Meeting St. 



Established 1928 
- COMMERCIAL - 

R. L. "Bob" PELHAM 
Charleston, S. C. 



INDUSTRIAL 

Dial RA 3-2095 



Certified Dealer 



LENNOX 



Comfort Craftsman 

Rice & Santos, Inc. 

Dial SN 6-0208 
181 Andrews Blvd. 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



For Your 
DRUG STORE NEEDS 

Dial RA 2-2460 

CONAWAY 

Drug Company 

Registered Druggists 

City-Wide Delivery 

613 King Street 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



NEW YEAR GREETINGS 

A-l PALMETTO FENCE CO. 

Residential and Industrial 

Heavy Duty Galvanized Wire 
Western Cedar Board and Picket Fences 
Free Estimates — All Work Guaranteed 

Dial 744-5839 Charleston, S. C. 



PARKER'S MEAT MARKET 

We Specialize in Western Meats 
Fish & Poultry 

RAmond 3-1007 CHARLESTON, S. C. 614 Rutledge Avenue 



CHARLESTON 
REWEAVING 
SERVICE 

Burns, tears, moth holes rewoven 
82 1/2 Wentworth RA 2-2441 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



SIRES 
LUMBER COMPANY 

Lumber — Mi fl work and 
Building Materials 

790 Meeting St. Dial RA 2-3863 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



The Art Store 

Picture Framing 
Artist's Supplies 
Dial RA 3-9523 
183 King Street 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



BURBAGE 
TIRE COMPANY 

Sinclair Oil Products 

524 Meeting at Lee 
Dial RA 2-6295 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 

TAYLOR'S" 
BAKERY KITCHEN 

Established 1938 
Jewish Bakery Products 

42 Spring St. Dial RA 2-0235 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



Buckler's Studio 

Portraits of Distinction 

192 King St. Dial RA 2-0792 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



Seasons Greetings 

Carolina 
Skyways 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



JENKS MONTGOMERY 
ESSO 

RA 3-0860 
Rutledge at Cannon 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



ROBINSON FLORIST 

Flowers for Every Occasion 

Citywide Delivery 

Dial RA 3-3392 59G Rutledge Ave. 
CHARLESTON. S. C. 



For the Finest in Reweaving 

Strocks Reweaving 
Service 



121 Wilson Avenue 
Dial SH 4-0531 
CHARLESTON HEIGHTS. S, 



C. 




and . 



Hardware & 
Supply Co. f Inc. 



Virginia Machine Tool Company 

JOBBERS . . . 

"We Specialize in Your Factory Requirements" 

Mill Supplies • Heavy Hardware 
Woodworking Machinery 
Machine Shop Supplies • Cabinet Hardware 

Woodworking Tools 

LENOIR, N. C. and BASSETT, VIRGINIA 



74 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Firms in 

COLUMBIA, S. C. 



M. B. KAHN 
Construction Co. 

General 
Contractors 




COLUMBIA, S. C. 



w4 T 




HEATING CO. 




WE SERVICE 
WHAT WE SELL 



Heating & Air Conditioning Contractors 
i-'-B Industrial — Commercial — Residential 
• Estimates Cheerfully Given # 
DAY OR NIGHT CALL SU 7-7563 

844 Pepper Columbia, S. C. 



Distinctive Office Furniture 



A. Hines McWaters 



1819 Taylor St. Dial 253-7503 



COLUMBIA, S. C. 



Sellers 
Easy Method 
Driver Training 

Columbia's Only Complete 
DUAL CONTROL 
Columbia's Oldest 
Free Door to Door 
Service 
We Help Obtain 
Learner's Permit 
License Test in Our Car 
Mrs. Amick & J. C. "Tony" 
Sellers 
1400 Laurel 
AL 3-5194 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



DANIEL CONSTRUCTION 
COMPANY, INC. 
Builders In and of the South 



GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA 
BIRMINGHAM • GREENSBORO • JACKSONVILLE • KINGSPORT 
ATLANTA • RICHMOND 

NEW YORK (SALES OFFICE) 



Columbia, S. C. 

MRS. BERNARD LADEN, 
Correspondent 

Louis Nover Gruber, son of 
Rabbi and Mrs. David S. Gruber, 
was the first honor graduate at 
the Medical College of South Car- 
olina at Charleston on June 5th. 

Dr. Gruber, whose father gave 
the invocation at the graduation 
exercises, had an outstanding 
scholastic record through Dreber 
High School and college. At Har- 
vard College, he was graduated 
with an A. B. degree, cum laude 
in 1959. 

At the Medical College, Dr. 
Gruber dropped out of the regu- 
lar curriculum for one year to 
work as a post-sophomore fellow 
in the Department of Pathology. 
At the end of his junior year, he 
spent last summer in Israel as a 
participant in the program of the 
Professional and Technical Work- 
er Aliyah, assigned to the Hadassah 
Hospital of the Hebrew University 
in Jerusalem. 

He took field trips to various 
types of medical facilities and 
other areas, and found visits to a 
rural clinic and a leprosarium of 
patricular interest. He has taken 
both Part I and Part II of the Na- 
tional Board of Medical Examin- 
ers examination, ranking first in 
his class. 

Dr. Gruber began an internship 
at the University of Florida Teach- 
ing Hospital in Gainesville on 
July 1. His father, Rabbi Grviber, 
has been at the Tree of Life Syna- 
gogue for many years. 

The Bar Mitzvah of Mark 
Steven Rivkin, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Arnold Rivkin took place 
June 6th at the Beth Shalom Syn- 
agogue. 

Sam Rubin was elected com- 
mander of Richland Post No. 6, 
of the American Legion. . . . Na- 
omi Abrams of A. C. Flora High 
School attended the National 
Speech Tournament in Akron, 
Ohio. . . . Samuel Laden attended 
the Institute of Judaism in Char- 
leston as a delegate from A. Z. A. 

Barbara and James Pittman of 
Atlanta, Georgia and Su Bogen 
Schwartzman of Belleville, New 
Jersey visited their parents, Di. 
and Mrs. E. J. Bogen, recently. 

Mr. Gus Oppenheimer was hon- 
ored at the Beth Shalom services 



Baldwin's 
Driving School 

Complete Dual Control 

(For "Raw" Beginners) 
Dual Control 

Without Dual Steering 

(For Advanced Drivers) 
Automatic or Standard 
Parallel Parking Made Easy 
Home Pick Up Service 
No Permit Needed 
License Test On Last Lesson 

Free Written Test 
35 Bayview Dr. SU 2-1230 
If no answer dial 
782-1307 - 787-2577 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



The Home of Italian Food 

LUIGI'S 
ITALIAN KITCHEN 

Pizza - Lasagna - Spaghetti 
& our famous Submarine 
Sandwiches 

794-4803 
1215 Augusta 
WEST COLUMBIA, S. C. 




General 
Contractors 

Repairs 
Large or 
Small 



'No Job Too Small" 



Dial AL 2-9442 



If no answer dial 256-3917 



1348 Omarest 



COLUMBIA, S. C. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



75 



BEST WISHES 

JOHN W. RILEY 
SONS, INC. 

General Plaster Contractors 
"Quality Since 1912" 
3600 Marsteller 
AL 2-2572 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



AAA 
Home Cleaners 

ALL TYPES CLEANING 

Rugs 

Upholstered Furniture 
Wall to Wall Carpets 
WALLS & CEILINGS 
MACHINE CLEANED 
Floors Cleaned 
and Polished 

AL 3-5188 

806 Pavillion 
COLUMBIA, S. C, 



PLEASE PATRONIZE 
OUR ADVERTISERS 



Mann Electric 
Service 

All Types Of 
Electrical Wiring 
Contracting - Repairs 

Dial 

AL 4-8824 

Radio Equipped Trucks 
For Prompt Service 

Free Estimates 

2110 Bronx Road 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



on the evening of June 19th as 
the "Father of the Year". 

The high school graduates in 
the area included Evan Arnold, 
Andrea Bogen, Harriet Coplan, 
Mark Coplan, St?ve Cremer, Nard 
Fleischman, and Elizabeth Vogel. 
Elizabeth has been awarded a fresh- 
man scholarship for the 1964-65 
year at Washington University, 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Rabbi Murray Gershon has be- 
gun his duties at the Beth Shalom 
Synagogue. He served for five 
years in Revere, Mass, and has 
also filled ministerial posts in 
Summit, New Jersey and Tucka- 
hoe, N. Y. 

Isadore E. Lourie has been nam- 
ed for inclusion in the 1965 edi- 
tion of "Outstanding Young Men 
of America," the Junior Chamber 
of Commerce announced. Mrs. 
Dena Bank, director of Friendship 
Rehabilitation Center, has been 
named chairman of the Poverty 
Committee of the Citizens Design 
for Progress. . . . Saul Lavisky, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Mike Lavisky 
of Columbia, has been promoted 
to lieutenant colonel in the U.S. 
Army Reserves in Washington, D. 
C. 

Helen Mendel and Lou Kaplan 
had parts in the play "Oh, Dad, 
Poor Dad, Mama's Hung You In 
The Closet and I'm Feeling So 
Sad." Mel Glass directs the play. 

Paul Ritter, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Leon Ritter has come borne 
from Swim Meets this summer 
with several medals and ribbons. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nat Allshuler 
(Lora Oppenheimer) and two chil- 
dren visited her parents Mr. and 
Mrs. Gus Oppenhiemer for a 
short while bMore going on to 
Raimey Air Force Base, in Puerto 
Rico. 




Reuben E. Gross of Staten Island, 
N. Y., prominent author and at- 
torney, served as general chairman 
of the first National Planning Con- 
ference of Torah Umesorah, the Na- 
tional Society for Hebrew Day 
Schools, to be held during the week- 
end of May 22-24 at the Pine View 
Hotel in Fallsburg, New York. 



ABC Driver Training School 

Experienced, Dependable & Convenient 
Complete Dual Control - Air Conditioned 

Home Pick Up and Return - License Test in Our Car 
Training Sunday Through Friday - At Your Convenience 
MILDRED F. STEVENS, Instructor 



1631 Marley Drive 



COLUMBIA, S. C. 



Dial 253-4491 



WASHING 



GREASING 



Bill Parker's Phillips 66 
Service Station 




PICK-UP AND DELIVERY SERVICE 
FUEL OIL SERVICE 
2909 Rosewood Dr. Columbia, S. C. Tel. Alpine 4-9384 



Millen Moving & Storage Co. 



MEMBER 




Local - Long Distance - Overseas 
PACKING & CRATING - FREE ESTIMATES 

DAY 253-8087 — NIGHT 765-1993 

995 HOLLAND AVE. CAYCE, S. C. 



FORT ROOFING & SHEET METAL WORKS 

ROOFING — HEATING AND SHEET METAL FABRICATORS 
14 W. Oakland Avenue SUMTER, S. C. SPruce 3-9391 



J. Rubin and Son Company 

WHOLESALE DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS 

1742 Blanding COLUMBIA, S. C. Dial AL 2-3607 



CLAUDL RHODES, President 



RHODES PRINTING £0. 



COMMERCIAL PRINTING — ENGRAVING — OFFICE FORMS 
INSURANCE FORMS— WEDDING INVITATIONS 
ADVERTISING PROGRAMS— PUBLICATION PRINTING 
815 Harden St. COLUMBIA, S. C. Dial AL 6-0704 



YONCE INSURANCE AGENCY 

SERVICE WITH SINCERITY 
Complete Insurance — Auto & Business 

256-6233 

Palmetto State Life Bldg. Columbia, S. C. 



"50 Years oj Dependable Service" 

CAPITAL CITY LAUNDRY 

PROSPERIZE DRY CLEANING 
2227 Sumter Street Dial AL 2-4341 Columbia, S. C. 



L 



J 



78 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Black's Texaco 

SERVICE STATION 

• 24 HOUR SERVICE 

• AUTO REPAIRS 

• ROAD SERVICE 

SU 7-7440 

4411 Devine 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



CABINET MAKERS 

All types of Cabinets, Ward- 
robes, Chests, Beds, Porch and 
Lawn Furniture, Store Fixtures 
Church Pews. Also Screens, 
Windows and Doors. 

"No Job Too Large or Too Small" 

JOHNNIE McRANT 
CABINET SHOP 

2501 Millwood Ave. AL 2-4954 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



McCAW PRINTERS 

Printing — Engraving 
Ruling — Binding 
Offset Lithography 

At 2610 Devine Street 
(Since 1914) 
Dial ALpine 4-6123 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



Season s Greetings and 

Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous 
New Year 

WCAY 

RADIO STATION 

CAYCE, S. C. 



EDENS 



TRUCKS 



TRUCK GO. 

252-9323 
SALES & SERVICE 
1200 Bluff Road 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



Berry's 

"On Main" 
1608 Main Street 

B. Berry's 
Dept. Store 

1416 Assembly Street 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



"Recaps Unconditionally Guaranteed" 

HARVEY & EARL, INC. 

TIRES 

Mounted and Balanced at No Extra Charge 

326 Broad St. Phone 755-2397 - 775-2398 

SUMTER, S. C. 




HOYT'S REFRIGERATION CO 

HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING 



Equipment - Supplies 
Commercial — Residential 



Service 
Industrial 



775-1378 



Bultman Drive 



Sumter, S. C. 



a social problem, too often a 
nauseating eyesore to the fastidi- 
ous. The Western tourist often 
asks. "Why doesn't the Govern- 
ment (the miracle working govern- 
ment of Israel) perform another 
miracle in this direction?" Some- 
how he forgets that our Western 
oovernments with more of the 



physical assets necessary for any 
miracle of wiping out social wel- 
fare problems than Israelitas, 
have failed to eliminate our own 
potential Messiahs, to keep them 
away from the snooty esthetes, or 
from the unconscious guilt feel- 
ings of those of us who have to 
resort to a reducing diet. 



Centers - Cigarettes and Health 

(Continued from Page 56) 



broadened to include all facilities, 
the Center board of directors 
countered with a proposal that the 
Senior High Council prepare a 
program on the pros and cons of 
smoking. After a consideration of 
the findings presented at the pro- 
gram, the Center board ruled 
against all smoking at Center 
sponsored activities on the basis 
that it is a harmful habit. 

JWB's Health and Physical Ed- 
ucation consultant, Michael M. 
Rand, and the JWB Public Infor- 
mation Service, recognizing that 
this was a question which affected 
young people far beyond St. 
Louis, gave the action wide pub- 
licity in the press and in JWB 
publications. Response was almost 
immediate, with reports of similar 
actions and requests for additional 
information. 

The health education commit- 
tee of the Jewish Community Cen- 
ter in Buffalo, N.Y., adopted a 
resolution opposing all smoking at 
the Center and calling for an edu- 
cational campaign on the health 
hazards. The resolution came as a 
result of an extended study by a 
special sub-committee of two doc- 
tors, one of whom was the former 



Byrd's Phillips 66 
Service 

Dial 254-9289 

2382 Gervais 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



Brittain's 
Art & Yarn Shop 

Knitting Instructions with 
All Types of Yarns 
1114 Taylor St. AL 6-3620 

COLUMBIA, S. C. 



county health commissioner. 
Among other things, the commit- 
tee asked that Center personnel do 
not smoke while working with 
young people, that the Center re- 
move a cigarette vending machine 
in its lobby, and that the Center 
realize no funds from the sale of 
cigarettes on its property. 

Meanwhile, the JWB Health 
and Physical Education Services 
had compiled a listing of re- 
sources to meet requests for infor- 
mation which were increasing in 
number. Materials prepared by 
the American Cancer Society,. 
Consumers Union, the govern- 
ment and other agencies were in- 
cluded in the list— and this was 
still before the U.S. Department 
of Health, Education and Welfare 
issued its 387-page report on 
Smoking and Health in mid-Janu- 
ary. Center professionals and vol- 
unteer leaders from such commu- 
nities as Detroit, Harrisburg, Pa.,. 



JACK JOHNSON 
BODY REPAIR 

WRECKS REBUILT 
AUTO PAINTING 
534 S. Saluda Ave. AL 2-0529 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



TED O. McMcGEE 

Realty Co. 

Real Estate & Insurance 

560 Meeting W. Com 765-2381 
WEST COLUMBIA, S. C. 



Clyde A. Strange 

Plumbing & Heating Co. 

Installations & Repairs 
812 Howard AL 2-5078 

COLUMBIA, S. C. 



SEASONS GREETINGS 

COLUMBIA MILLS COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 
COTTON DUCK 
COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




HARRISON & BATES 

INCORPORATED 

Realtors 

COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY 

Dial 

Ml 4-2965 



RESIDENTIAL 
SALES 
RENTALS 
MANAGEMENT 



INSURANCE 
APPRAISALS 
MORTGAGE 
LOANS 



2 SOUTH 5TH ST. 
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



» AARROW — 

Rent-Alls 

RICHMOND'S RENTAL DEPARTMENT STORE 
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



2367 Staples Mill Road 
5065 Forest Hill Avenue 



EL 9-2408 
232-7821 

WE RENT MOST ANYTHING 
Party Banquet Needs — Hospital Equipment 





GREETINGS 



Harwood Bros., Inc. 

Distributors 

BENJAMIN MOORE & CO.'s PAINTS 
1009 E. Canal Street Richmond, Va. 



P. L. FARMER, INC. 

FUEL OIL, KEROSENE, MOTOR OIL— COAL and WOOD 

2020 Lewis Dial MI 3-9 1 1 6 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



SEASON'S GREETINGS 

Mutual Assurance Society of Virginia 

(FIRE) 

Founded 1794 
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 




"EVERLASTING BEAUTY IN MONUMENTS" 

HENWOOD & WILSON 

Designers and Manufacturers of 
GRANITE and MARBLE MONUMENTS — MEMORIALS 
413-415 S. Cherry St. DIAL MI C---T34U Richmond, Va. 




Abraham Borman (left), leading Detroit businessman, philanthropist 
2nd communal leader, is shown presenting an initial gift of a $50,000 en- 
dowment in State of Israel Bonds to Dr. Clarence B. Hilberry, President of 
Wayne State University in Detroit. The university will establish a fund for 
scholarship . from the proceeds of the interest on the Israel Bonds, whictt 
will total $2,000 annually. Mr. Borman, an Israel Bond Golden Trustee, is 
Co-Chairman of the 1964 Detroit Allied Jewish Campaign and a Vice Pres- 
ident of the United Foundation. He is Chairman of the Board of BomiaTi 
Food Stores, Inc., which sponsors the Borman Near Eastern lecture series 
ati Wayne State University. Israel Bonds, which are sold in denomsnatiojas 
of from $100 to $100,000, pay 4% interest. 



New York City, Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y., Milwaukee, Hartford, 
Conn., and Manchester, N. H., as 
well as several YMCAs and other 
youth-serving agencies wanted to 
know more about the subject. The 
Poughkeepsie Center banned 
smoking by teens outright. 

For the most part, Center ac- 
tivities in this regard are aimed at 
helping teenagers decide for them- 
selves whether smoking is or is 
not harmful and whether they 
should or should not use cigar- 
ettes. Center leaders admit that 
they are in contact with young 
people for only a comparatively 
brief time each week, and that in 
most instances parents have given 



permission for the teenagers' 
smoking. However, they feel that 
these educational programs and 
outright prohibitions on the use ol 
tobacco at the Center can drama- 
tize the situation to the point 
where youngsters will cast an indi- 
vidual vote for health. Adult edu- 
cation is important, since in taking 
up smoking, youngsters are imi- 
tating respected adults. 

In their discussions about the 
use of cigarettes, Center teenagers 
have one additional aspect to con- 
sider. This is the moral issue 
which has been raised by religious 
leaders of all faiths: if smoking is, 
indeed, a habit which is harmful 
(Please turn to Page 81) 




An Eloquent 
Remembrance 

FLOWERS 
MI 4-2321 




304 North 6th St. 

Our Only Location In Richmond 



24-HOUR TRUCK SERVICE 

MAINTENANCE LEASE OPERATING 



SALES 
107 W. Canal Street 



PHONE MI 3-9173 

Richmond. Va. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



NEW YEAR . . . 
GREETINGS . . . 

Shelburne 

Transfer & Storage Corp. 

4920 W. Broad St. 
RICHMOND, VA. 

At Your Service for 
Over a Quarter Century 

MOVING 

Local and Long 
Distance 

Direct Service — 36 States 
Phone AT 2-4228 
AT 2-4229 - AT 2-4220 



The Significance oi BrsSherhood 

(Continued from Page 14) 



NEW YEAR 
GREETINGS 

At Your service 

• THEO. W. KELLEY 

• RALPH S. GOODE 

• SAM COHEN 



Julius Straus 
& Sons 

General Insurance 

Insurance Building 
10 South 10th St. 
RICHMOND, VA. 




ADDISON 
Cleaning Co. 



5-7-9 Stafford Ave. 
RICHMOND, VA. 
EL 5-1765 



111 



two religious institutions have 
ministered to the religious needs 
of their respective congregations, 
side by side. The Mother Church 
of the South Carolina Catholic 
Diocese and the Cradle of Reform 
Judaism in America have develop- 
ed a spiritually sound and relig- 
iously dedicated citizenry of Cath- 
olics and Jews on opposite sides 
of the same street for almost two 
centuries. 

To my Jcnowledge, anil to that 
of my colleague Father Charles 
Molony, the relationship between 
these two institutions has been 
warm and cordial throughout the 
years. A treasured collection of 
anecdotes— some perhaps apocry- 
phal — have developed between 
them. But commuunication has al- 
ways remained clerical — restrict- 
ed to friendly although sometimes 
deeply significant, exchanges be- 
tween the rabbi and the priest. 
Never have the two congregations 
met together for worship or for 
dialogue, nor has the rabbi ever 
been asked to speak before any 
group within the church. 

And yet tonight, after 175 years 
of polite but virtual separateness, 
the rabbi of Beth Elohim stands 
before representatives of every 
Catholic Church in Charleston, 
having been invited to speak to 
them. 

Of course, it is the very invita- 
tion, along with the events within 
the Roman Catholic Church, 
which has lead up to it and that is 
the subject on which I have been 
asked to speak to you tonight. 
That is, I have been requested to 
respond to your invitation - to 
express my reactions and those of 
the Jewish community, as I un- 



derstand them, to the new-look of 
Catholicism in 1964. 

Now you know, perhaps as well 
as 1 that the real significance of 
my appearance here tonight i 1 
not merely the breaking of a 175 
year Charleston tradition — but 
also that of an almost 2000 year 
history of distrust, hatred, persecu- 
tion and death between the people 
of the Church and the people of 
the Book; between the followers 
of Jesus as the Chrisi and the fol- 
lowers oi the tradition in which 
he was raised; between those who 
defied him and those accused of 
deicide in relation to him. For al- 
most two millenia, the household 
of Israel has been plagued by the 
Stigma of guilt lor the crucifixion 
of the man whom the Roman 
Catholic Church, along with all of 
Christianity, considers the son of 
God. 

We Jews have been decried and 
maligned, toriured and persecut- 
ed, discriminated against and put 
to death as a result; of religiously 
condoned condemnation in scrip- 
ture, liturgy and homeletics — all 
for an invidious role assigned 10 
us by the playwrights of the drama 
of the origin of Christendom. 

Under such an atmosphere of 
derision; accused of deicide and 
referred to in liturgy as "perfidious 
Jews", what chance has there been 
throughout the centuries for com- 
munication, understanding, mu- 
tual respect or love? That we sur- 
vived at all and were able lo lbe 
any kind of peaceful co-existence 
in the modern world is the mystery 
of the ages. 

But on October 28, 1958, with 
the election of John XX) 1 1 as 

(Please turn to Page 110) 



METROPOLITAN 

LINEN RENTAL SERVICE COMPANY 



EXTENDS TO YOU 



Passover Greetings 



219 S. 15th Avenue 



HOPEWELL. VA. 



F. L. PARSLEY 

Wholesale Kerosene Distributor 

HARRY BASS MI 8-0779 

Sole Representative 2600 Nine Mile Road 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



ft for Relaxing . . . 




ft for Rewarding . . . 




ft for Refreshing . . 




To a man... 
the S in 
efreshment is 

ftichtmm 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 




U.S. Senator Hubert H. Humphrey of Minnesota, center, a ranking mem- 
ber of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, shown with leaders of the 
United Jewish Appeal just before he delivered an address terming the 13 j A 
'one of the greatest voluntary instruments for life-saving and life-building 
ever created by Americans." Shown greeting the Senator are Alan Sagner 
of Newark, N. J., right, Chairman of UJA's newly created Young Leader- 
ship Cabinet, and Rabbi Herbert A. Friedman, left, UJA Executive Vice- 
Chairman. Scene took place at UJA's Third Annual National Young Leader- 
ship Conference held at New York Hilton Hotel. Senator Humphrey called 
on young Jewish leaders to assume and complete rescue tasks "begun by 
your elders." Over 400 young leaders from all parts of the country took 
part in the three-day meeting. 

Cenfiers - Cigarettes and Health 

(C n-'ued from Page 79) 



to the human body, it is against 
religious principle to continue it, 
since it is destructive to the body 
which God has given man. There 
are Biblical and Talmudic refer- 
ences which support this, and in 
|ewish Community Centers, where 
traditional Jewish values are ap- 
plied to contemporary concerns, 
this factor is sure to be a consider- 
ation, however it may be interp- 
reted. 

Smoking, according to the gov- 
ernment report as well as to 
studies made by other agencies 





SCHNEIDER'S 
Transfer fo. 

4th and Maury St. 
RICHMOND, VA. 
Phcn- BE 2-12 ,7 l 



.ind governments, is dangerous to 
people of all ages, and the ulti- 
mate Center concern is to safe- 
guard the health of all members. 
However, the most effective steps 
at the moment seem to be in the 
area where the habit is the least 
ingrained— at the teenage level— 
and it can only be hoped that the 
educational process will pene- 
trate to other age groups. In many 
Centers the information campaign 
is directed at parents as well as 
teens, since the medical evidence 
seems to be that cutting the habit 
short is beneficial to health at any 
age. 

The present campaign in Cen- 
ters is but one facet of the Center's 
total concern for the well-being of 
its members and of the commun- 



Seafiom For Meafiln' 

OIL - CO A 



• Burner Sales & Service 




• Budget Pay Plan 
W. E. SEATON SON, INC. 

Phone 358-0475 
RICHMOND, VA. 



SAVE by the 10th 
EARN from the 1st 




4% 



Current 
Annual 
Dividend 



FREE PARKING right next door on Main Street 
FREE Save-By-Mail Envelopes .... Dial 643-6751 
SAVINGS INSURED by Federal Savings and Loan Ins. Corp. 

Richmond Federal 



Savings & Loan Association 



8th and MAIN 



m 



If 

lit 



1810-16 W. Main 



EL 5-2838 



Since 
1920 
THE 
HOME 
OF 
BETTER 
MILK 

Richmond, Va i 



SINCE 1919 

Union electric 

Contractors Engineers 
POLE LINE CONSTRUCTION 

Wiring — Commercial — Residential • Fixtures — Incandescent 

Fluorescent 

FACTORY AUTHORIZED APPLIANCE SERVICE 

"ANYTHING ELECTRICAL" 

2607 Willard Road 
BT 3-4044 

RICHMOND, VA. 



32 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



BRIDAL PORTRAITS 
AND CANDIDS ARE 
OUR SPECIALTY 



phone EL 8-4826 
WENDELL B POWELL STUDIO 




Telephone: MI 3-2831 



3201 GROVE AVENUE — RICHMOND, VA. 



Sheraton ' Monroe 
IsAotor Inn 

Franklin and Belvidere 
RICHMOND, VA. 

Teletype: 703-649-3960 



s 










i 


STANDARD PARTS CORP. 

Genuine Parts Reliable Service 




; RICHMOND, VA. 
500 E. 9th St. Rd. 
P. O. Box 4197 


NORFOLK, VA. 

3225 Granby St. 


ROANOKE, VA. 
4117 Williamson Rd 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



THE ECLIPSE 

LAUNDRY and CLEANERS 



L529 W. Main St 



RICHMOND, VA. 




Greetings 



Emrick Chevrolet Sales Corporation 

1801 Chamberlayne Ave. 



Richmond, Va. 



sales is^msm SERVICE 



ity. While Centers provide a lull 
range of cultural, informal educa- 
tional and social activities, the 
health and physical education as- 
pect of Center service is one which 
grows with the needs of the times. 



JVVB's Health and Physical Edu- 
cation Services defines total fit- 
ness, as a combination of physical 
fitness, emotional stability and so- 
cial well-being — desirable objec- 
tives for a Center program. 



English - Israel's 

(Continued 

able to understand each other. He- 
brew is the language of instruc- 
tion in all public elementary and 
high schools and to youngsters 
who are brought up in American 
or British schools, whatever other 
language they may hear their 
parents speak at home. Hebrew 
is the main spoken and written 
language of governmental and 
communal institutions, of the 
army, of the agricultural kib- 
butizm and moshavim, of industry 
and commerce. For those who were 
brought up in the schools of the 
country, who didn't come to Is- 
rael when they were already mid- 
dle-aged or old, Hebrew is not an 
acquired language but a active 
language in which they can ex- 
press themselves better, because 
more naturally, than in any other 
tongue. 

It is therefore inevitable that 
English should play second fiddle 
to Hebrew in Israel. But it is a 
second fiddle whose playing is at 
times so loud and important that 
one wonders if it isn't really the 
first violin. English is so important 
to the country because it is Is- 
rael's major vehicle of communi- 
cation with the rest of the world. 
Only when one reminds himself 
that the overwhelming majority of 



Second Language 

from Page 44) 

Israelis — not only the Oriental 
but also the East European immi- 
grants — cannot speak English 
does one regain a proper perspec- 
tive on this question of "Ivrit" 
and "Anglit" (as the English lang- 
uage is called in Hebrew.) 

Here are some facts about the 
important role played by the Eng- 
lish language in the Jewish State: 

1. It has been estimated that 
90 % of paperback books sold in 
Israel are in English— paperbooks 
imported mainly from America 
and Britain— while only twenty- 
five per-cent of the hardcover 
books sold are written in Hebrew 
and even of the hard-cover books 
sold, a majority are publi.hed in 
English and a sizeable percentage 
also in French, German and Rus 
sian. I could never on entering a 
bookstore in Jerusalem or Tel 
Aviv get over my surprise when I 
saw the flood of books in English 
there, with Hebrew books either 
absent entirely or relegated to the 
back of the store, though to keep 
the picture straight I must add 
that there are some bookstores 
here and there which sell only 
Hebrew books. Since I once read 
a newspaper item to the effect 

(Please turn to Page 84) 




Dot's Pastry Shop 

3136 W. Cary Street 
RICHMOND, VA. 
DIAL EL 8-2011 

Bakfr of Fancy Pastries 




/ 



jr. 




and L Straus Beverage Co. 

•_What'll YOU Have? "Original" 

= Fabst Blue Ribbon Beer 

RICHMOND, VA. 



.September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



83. 




RASSCO's Neve Aviv Retirement Club 
at Kfar Shmarvahu near Tel A\iv 



Believing that 
"seventy laces" shining lorth to 
the initiated and that every word 
;md command of the Torah is en- 
shrined in mystery (ra/a), the Cab- 
balist gave much thought to the 
.Shofar. The Zohar (the Book of 
Splendour) gives die mystic point 
oi view. The reason that Israel 
uses the ram's horn on this clay 
and not on an> other is because 
"we know to what place the horn 
belongs and we do not desire to 
awaken judgment. For, we have 
learnt, by word and deed we have 
to awaken secret powers. Now 
when the supernal shofar, in which 
Is the illumination of all removes 
itself and does not shine upon the 
sons, then judgment is awakened 
and the thrones are set up lor 
judgment. . . . But when this 
Shofar rouses itself and men re- 



The Shofar Echoes 

(Concluded from Page 16) 
the Torah has pent of their sins, it behoves them 



VIRGINIA OFFICE 
EQUIPMENT CO. 

4203 W. Broad Street 



to blow the Shofar below, and 
the sound thereof ascends on high 
and awakens another supernal 
Shofar, and so merc\ is awakened 
and judgment is removed." 

In Chassidism, too, the Shofar 
occupies a unique >l.ue in the 
Service. Piety, integrity and schol- 
arship were the qualities demand- 
ed of the Officiant. These were 
weapons he needed to strengthen 
him in his struggle with the Satan. 
Manx of the great Chassidu rab- 
bis acted as Baale Tekioth and 
used the Shofar to storm the Judg- 
ment Room and to intercede be- 
fore the Heavenly Tribunal. Many 
delivered stirring discourses be- 
fore the sounding oi the Shofar 
and great care was taken to have 
the right Kavanoth (intentions). 
The Chassidim believe that the 
Shofar is sounded as a signal and 
a reminder to "put away cause- 
less hatred and to stir up love, 
nnit\ and peace." 



RICHMOND, VA. 

Connie Wash 
Wimpy Lane 




353-6679 




Monroe Sweda 




Cash Registers 




Plenty of Parking 


• 


ADDING MACHINES 


• 


CASH REG'STKRS 


• 


TYPEWRITERS 



POHLIG 
BROTHERS 

Established 1866 

25th and Franklin Sts. 
RICHMOND, VA. 



Manufactu' -^rs of Quality and 
Distinction in Paper Boxes 
PLAIN AMD FANCY 
SET-UI & FOLDING 
BOXES 
Stork Sizes — Oi Made to Order 
Waxing — Laminating — Easels 
Mounting — Die Cutting 



- 1 M MEDIATE 




INTEREST 
ON REGULAR 
SAVINGS 
ACCOUNTS 

Regardless of Amount! 

*From Day of Deposit to 
Day of Withdrawal! 



. . . Interest on One- Year Certificates 

of Deposit 
In Amounts from $100 to $100,000 




OPEN YOUR SAVINGS ACCOUNTS TODAY 
AT ANY OF OUR 5 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS 



Richmond, Virginia — Since 1916 

fmthern Bank and Trust Company 

Grace at Second Street • 15th and Main • 7605 West Broad Street 
3201 West Cary • 3404 Hermitage Road • 2730 Buford Road-Bon Air 



M • m b • r > « d ■ 



re-closable 
end label 

SEALS - 
RE-SEALS 

and 
RE-SEAL 



c. 




"The Frpshe«t Thino- In Town 



Am er i c a iri Maid 

NO IDE'S 

: BR E A D tnd tAKE S 

At your p e trier's 



. Visit ISRAEL 

$535.00 



Economy Jet Air round trip from New York 
Also inclusive land arrangements 

• Two week tour in Israel— $152.00 

• Three weeks Israel and Greece— $270.00 

• 24 Days Israel, Rome, Paris, London — $348.00 

C. O. ALLEY TRAVEL AGENCY 

708 E. GRACE ST. TELEPHONE 643-0126 

RICHMOND, VA. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



HUNGERFORD 

INC. 

MECHANICAL 
CONTRACTORS 

Fuel Oil 

3800 Deep Water 
Terminal 

RICHMOND, VA. 




Chesapeake Ba 
Sea - Food 

BERNIE WEISS 

128 N. 18th Street 
RICHMOND, VA. 



English - Israel's Second Language 



El 



DELIVERY, 



'"WE DELIVER THE C.OODS" 
Established 19.4 55 . 



1400 BROOK ROAD 



Milton 8-2826 



RICHMOND, VA. 




GREETINGS 



GENERAL 

Wholesale Corp. 

1213 E. Main St., MI 3-9085 
RICHMOND, VA. 




GREETINGS 



Richmond 
Guano Company 

P. O. Box 544 
RICHMOND, VA. 



VIRGINIA MACHINERY & WELL (0. 

PLUMBING FIXTURES 

1319 E. Main St. Dial Ml 8-8311 

RICHMOND, VA. 



NEW YEAR 
GREETING 



WHITE 
Hardware Co. 

7039 Three Chopt Road 

RICHMOND, VA. 

• FULL LINE OF GIFTS 
HOUSEWARES 

Charge Accounts Welcome 
Phone: AT 8-4284 

We Deliver 



NEW YEAR 
GREETINGS 

AHERN AND 
CARPENTER. Inc. 
PRODUCE 

1309 E. Cary 
RICHMOND, VA. 



(Continued from Page 82) 



that less than 20,000 Israeli resi 
dents come from English-speaking 
countries, I kept wondering who 
buys all these English books. 
Even if you add to this number 
foreign students — Jewish and non- 
Jewish — who come to study in 
Israeli universities and a few thou- 
sand English-speaking tourists, the 
enormous number of buyers of 
English books in Israel can only 
be attributed to the fact that Is- 
raelis who are not themselves na- 
tive to the language, particularly 
the younger generation which wa 
born or reared in the country, 
buy these English paperbacks in 
overwhelming numbers. 

2. This leads me to the fact thai 
English is taught in all Israeli 
government schools (which in- 
cludes all schools except those 
that are run by the ultra-Orthodox 
Agudat Yisrael party) as a second 
language from the fourth or fifth 



grade on. With so many years of 
training in the language, particu- 
larly for those who can go on to 
high school where a tuition fee 
is required, it is no wonder that 
a very large proportion of young 
Israelis acquire a fair reading 
knowledge of English, even 
though, as in the case of one 
"sabra" (the nickname for a na 
tive) girl that I met it may be 
difficult for them to carry on a 
conversation in our tongue. 

3. The publication of official 
government documents, press re- 
leases and even books in English 
as well as Hebrew adds prest'ge 
to the English language in Israel. 
In the Government Press Of Lice 
in Jerusalem where I would often 
come in I woidd always find lying 
on the table in the journalists' 
working room as many press re- 
lease in English as in Ivrit. The 
Government's annual report, a 
thick volume, is published in both 




Religious Education Director Rabbi Chaim Davidovich imparts the 
message of hope of the shofar to Jacov Wiesel, 9, Kivyat Motykin, Israel 
and Phyllis Arnold, 10, New Fork City at the Jewish National Home for 
Asthmatic Children at Denver. 



f 



Serving 



Readers of this 
magazine for 87 years - . 

Joseph W. Bliley 

FUNERAL HOME 

Conveniently Located 
Third & Marshall Streets 
Richmond, Virginia 

I AMPLE PRIVATE 
PARKING SPACE 





Greetings 

raron ira«wnw 

BOULEVARD 
DELICATESSEN 

Barney Bass — Sammy Shear 

5218 W. Broad St. 
Richmond, Va. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



85 



languages, as are the Jerusalem 
and Tel Aviv telephone directories 
(telephones in Israel are govern- 
ment-owned). The Government 
and the Jewish Agency, the latter 
of which has a quasi-governmental 
status as the agency in charge of 
the immigration and absorption 
of Jewish newcomers to Israel, 
publish many pamphlets in Eng- 
lish which tell of their manifold 
activities. 

4. English is spoken in all post- 
offices, at least in the lamer cities. 



Drivers on all ordinary urban and 
inter-urban buses which, unlike 
the special sight-seeing buses for 
tourists, cater overwhelmingly to 
residents, will answer in English 
any question you may put to them 
in that language. All street signs 
in the cities are spelled out both 
in Hebrew and in English, some- 
times also in Arabic. Also in the 
overwhelming majority ol cases, 
signs over stores, offices, restau- 
rants, etc. appear in both langua- 
ges. 

(Please turn to Page 107) 




The American-Israel Pavilion at the New York World's Fair has placed, 
side by side, a reproduction of the anti-Israel mural now in the Jordan 
pavilion and its answer in the form of a poem composed by Harold S. 
Caplin, Chairman of the board of the American -Israel World's Fair Corpora- 
tion, (Shewn here). 




■<0 




UNIVERSITY PHARMACY 

Westhampton Delivery Service 

Dial AT 6-4900 

5718 Grove Avenue RICHMOND, VA. 



LUKHARD 
SUPER MARKETS 



• BROAD ST. AT HORSEPEN ROAD 

• 5418 LAKESIDE AVENUE 



• 5710 GROVE AVE. 

• 1229 BELLEVUE AVE. 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 
8811 Foresthill Ave. Bon Air, Va. 





DIAL RICH. 

EL 5-1745 



(D^erd the ^inedt 

MILK 

And other 

Dairy Products 



RICHMOND'S 
MOST MODERN DAIRY 



Milk Available In Famous Pure-Pak 



fait* 

M 



Prompt, Courteous p aoer Cartons From Your Favorite Dealer 

Delivery 

1600 ROSEN EATH ROAD 



8 



INC. 




People you like . . . like Coke! 



*"toe«C* m a AcotsTcneo tradc-mmhi 





BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY tit 

RICHMOND COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY, INC. 




GREETINGS 



DOMINION CHEVROLET CO. 



SALES 
SERVICE 



TRADE WITH THE DEALER WHO APPRECIATES 
YOUR BUSINESS ENOUGH TO BRING YOU THE 
FINEST CARS AT THE LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES. 




4400 W. Broad St. 



Richmond, Va. 



.8.6 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



& New Year 



— G 



' . ^ — - 




PLEASANTS HARDWARE 

SINCE 1915 

"Most Anything" General Hardware 

INDUSTRIAL BUILDERS 

© Display Room: 612 N. Lombardy 
• Store: 1G07 W. Broad © RICHMOND. VA. 

PHONE 359-5066 
New Expanded Store with entrances on Broad & Lomba: dy Sts. 



IN RICHMOND 

For The Best Cleaning 

Dial EL 5-91 13 

"None Better" 

Laundry — Dry Cleaning 

12 Routes — 10 Stores 

To Serve You With 
Lux Flakes Laundering 
and STA-NU Cleaning! 



PEARL 



laundry 
Cleaners 
Dial 
EL 5-9113 

1208 Parkwood Avenue 



® Safety • Responsibility 

Red Top 

Cabs 

PHONE NUMBER 

EL 8-611 1 

All Cabs Equipped with 
2-Way Radio System 

Nati3nal Cab Co. 
RICHMOND, VA. 




May we wish you many years 
of health and happiness ahead. 

J. Kennon Perrin Co. 

General Contractors 
Central National Bank Bldg. Richmond, Va. 



RABE 
ELECTRIC CO. 



• Electrical 

• Contractors 

Ml 3-8397 

328 So. 5th Street 
RICHMOND, VA. 



"Keep Your Trees 
Healthy" 

For Complete 
TREE SERVICE 
All year round 

Van Wormer 
Tree Service Co. 

3122 W. Clav Street 
RICHMOND, VA. 
Established Since 1917 




Under Secretary of Commerce Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr., recently 
toured the American-Israel World's Fair Pavilion. Secretary Roosevelt 
(center) is being welcomed by Nathan Straus, III (left), chairman of the 
board of the American-Israel Chamber of Commerce, and Zechariahu 
Sitchin (right), president of the American-Israel World's Fair Corporation. 



M€»?e Hebrew In Belosm Judaism 



(Continued from Page 43) 



A lew years ago, Dr. Glasner 
reported, the Curriculum Com- 
mittee of the Commission decided 
that such goals were far from 
realization in Reform child edu- 
cation and asked its Committee 
on Experimental Education, head- 
ed by Rabbi L. W. Schwartz, to 
get the facts. A survey was made 
by mail and by visits to schools. 

"The survey revealed that the 
stated aims for the teaching of 
Hebrew in our Reform religious 
schools varied from the mere par- 
rot-like repetition of the various 
blessings and prayer-responses to 
the (hoped-for) fluent use of mod- 
ern Hebrew in conversation. The 
stated, aims made little difference," 
Dr. Glasner not:d, "because none 
of them was being achieved in 



actuality except in a lew scattered 
cases." 

in Baltimore in 1959, a stand- 
ard test of simple prayerbook read- 
ing was administered to all pupils 
in grades four to eight of alf the 
Reform religious schools. The 
test was made up of 100 Hebrew 
words from the Unicn of Ameri- 
can Hebrew Congregations prayer- 
book, taken in sentence-length con- 
text, which the pupils were asked 
to read oralh in two minutes. 
Only words read correctly were 
counted. The average scores rang- 
ed from eight correct words at 
the end of grade four to 19 cor- 
rect words at the end of grade 
seven. These averages, moreover, 
included the scores of some chil- 
dren attending one or two week- 




Greetings 

own o raw 

® RESERVE 

• IMPERIAL 

• WINE 

Product of 

DIXIE WINE CO. 

RICHMOND, VA. 



• New Year 

* Greeting! 

Prevent 
Forest Fires 

H. J, & B* H 
BECKSTOFFER 

• Lumber 

1209 N. °°th Street 
RICHMOND, VA. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 



87 



day sessions in addition to Sunday 
school. 

The survey found that in very 
few of the schools were there any 
full-time professional Hebrew 
teachers "such as are employed 
by many if not most Orthodox 
and Conservative schools." The 
schools were found to be using 
some 90 or more different texts 
for Hebrew instruction alone, 
generally ignoring the series of 
graded Hebrew published in the 
thirties by the UAHC Commission. 

Some schools were found to be 
achieving satisfactory results in 
their Hebrew programs so the 
Curriculum Committee gave spec- 
ial attention to learn why Com- 
mon elements did appear, report- 
ed Dr. Glasner. All of the more 
successful schools devoted consider- 
able time to teaching Hebrew, 
usually adding two week-day ses- 
sions to the o:ie on Sunday. All 
•of them spent considerable money 
in terms of batter trained teachers, 
a variety of teaching materials 
and special incentives I'm jmpiJs. 
Hie rabbi, in addition, pushed 
the Hebrew program hard, giving 
it liberally of his time and energy, 
setting firm standards and propa- 
gandizing for it active!-. 

The next step in the evaluation 
was an exhaustive stud) of expert 
information on language teaching 
in general at a conference of a 
group of Jewish and general ex- 
perts. The conference agreed that 
Hebrew instruction must first of 
all be meaningful and second that 
it requires a considerable invest- 
ment of time, boih in hours of in- 
struction and in extent of years, 
to be effective. The most signifi- 
cant finding, Rabbi Glasner said, 
was that "all of the authorities 
agreed upon the optimistic con- 



EAGLE TRITPLEX 

BURIAL 
VAULTS 

Manufactured by 

JOSEPH L. 
BURRUSS 

4001 Mechanicsville Pike 
RICHMOND, VA. 

Phone MI 8-1022 



elusion that satisfactory levels of 
achievement in Hebrew are cjuile 
feasible within a Religious school 
framework." 

The Curriculum Committee 
then proceeded to set tip a group 
of reasonable objectives. One was 
that the ability to "davven"— to 
pray mechanically without know- 
ledge of the meaning of the pray- 
ers—was "completely indefensible 
from the Reform point of view." 
It was agreed that children might 
perhaps be taught rote recitation 
of the prayers and the blessings, 
under some such label as "ritual 
skills," but with the understand- 
ing that this definitely was not 
Hebrew. 

Next, the committee agreed 
there might be legitimate differ- 
ences between various congrega- 
tions and proposed two approach- 
es. One was the goal of study ol 
Hebrew for comprehension of se- 
lection. 1 from the classic texts. The 
other would approach Hebrew as 
a "living language-' using audio- 
lingual methods to prepare pupils 
to understand selected portions in 
Hebrew from the Bible, UAHC 
prayerbooks and modern Hebrew- 
literature. Adequate Bar Mitzvah 
•>t 1 i<i\ was to be included in both 
approach s. 

The commission also proposed 
th.il there be 120 hours of instruc- 
tion in Hebrew per school year 
in no less than three sessions w eek- 
ly for a total of three uvd a half 
hours of Hebrew a week. 

The group next arranged lor 
the services of a group of Reform 
Jewish educators, expert in He- 
brew, to evaluate all available 
textbooks as to suitability for use 
in either of the two basic ap- 
proaches and "the results of these 
hundreds of evaluations are now 
being tabulated." 

Dr. Glasner agreed that much 
spadework will have to be done 
throughout the United States "to 
prepare our Reform congregations 
Cor the acceptance of this quite 
radical curricular change." The 
next progress report should be of 
special interest. 



If You Enjoy The 

TIMES-OUTLOOK 
ask a friend to subscribe 



* G Co 



osb 




1376 



TRANSFER ^STORAGE Dial 

2910 N BOULEVARD t/ Richmond 30. Va. £L 5" 

Conveniently Located Across From Parker Field 7471 

CRATING - - PACKING 

Local And World Wide 

MOVING — LOCAL — LONG DISTANCE 
AGENT: REPUBLIC VAN & STORAGE CO., INC. 



* NEW YEAR 

• GREETINGS 

AND BEST WISHES 




RUCKER AND RICHARDSON 

• REALTORS 

Real Estate and Insurance — Mortgage Loans 

118 North Eighth Street 
RICHMOND, VA. 




Greetings 



HORINGTON 

Construction Company, Inc. 

2106 NORTH HAMILTON STREET 
POST OFFICE BOX I-Q 

Richmond, Virginia 



Grove Avenue 
Pharmacy 

4911 Grove Ave. 
RICHMOND, VA. 

For Fast Delivery 
DIAL 5-3405 

• Prescriptions 

• DRUGS 



WESTHAMPT0N 
FLORIST . . . 



320 Libbie Avenue 
RICHMOND, VA. 

Specializing in 
Artistic Weddings, 
Decorations of AP Types 

Dial AT 2-2460 

Mr. «fc Mrs. 
F. N. Hickernell 



88 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



DeJARNETTE & PAUL 

INSURANCE — SURETY BONDS 
Phone MI 3-8456 Agency Est. 1899 307 West Main 

Customer Parking 



Ed. T. DeJarnette 
Jas. A. Paul 
J. Robert Bond 



James L. Lipsey 



M "dependent Jas. A. Paul, Jr. 
JwranJJL AGENT 

Mitv n/ tow / nit* Carter E. Talman, Jr. 

T. Elwood Waters, Associate 



Hyman Bros. 
Ponliac, Inc. 

YOUR VOLUME 
PONTIAC DEALER 

Complete 
Auto Service 

1016 N. Boulevard 
RICHMOND, VA. 



HAPPY NEW YEAR 



^* w » 

DIXIE 

WHEEL CO. 

916 North Boulevard 
RICHMOND, VA. 

• WHEELS • RIMS 

• DRUMS • BRAKES 

Automotive Parts 




JONES 
Motor Car Co. 



2923 West Broad - - Richmond, Va. 



Sales and Service 



CadillacT= 
Oldsmobile 



ads Used Cars 




New Year Greetings 



Ch 



anes 



E. B 



rauer 



.ompany, inc. 

Wholesale Contectioners 
Dial MI 3-2503 
19 S. 14th St., Richmond, Va. 



GREETINGS 



S. P. TERRY 

517 W. 7th Street 
Dial BElmont 2-5663 

PAINTING, PAPERING 
and DECORATING 

Commercial, Industrial and 
Residence 
Spray Painting 

RICHMOND, VA. 




U.S. Senator Jacob K. Javits of New York (right)) receives the con- 
gratulations of Lionel K. Bauman, president of the American Friends of the 
Hebrew University, as he assumes the chairmanship of the National Ad- 
visory Board of the organization. 

R New And Another Year 

(Continued from Page 42) 



ficient. The memories of the 
punishment have apparently sub- 
sided. We are at it again. This 
time our attempt at scaling the 
heavens of the future is effected 
instead by 
computer. 



something called a 



But the chef in that celestial 
kitchen suffers small trepidation 
at those toys. If his ways were as 
logical as are the ways of that 
machine, then perhaps he'd have 
cause for concern. If his ways 
were as logical as the machine, 
then perhaps he would rightly 
tremble its possible success in in- 
vading his preparations and pro- 
grams for tomorrow. But he is ap- 
parently not logical. Certainly not 
as a machine is. That's his de- 
fense. His recipes are sale. Safe 
and sealed. Logic is no key to 
these. 



Now, of course, any jackass 
knows that there'd be no point 
in me writing and you reading an 
article that after all these words 
says nothing more than that the 
luture that is before us all is un- 
predictable. We know that already. 
The full impact of that inability 
either to predict the future or 
remember the past is exactly what 
diocks new-born children into an 
inability to even speak a syllable 
lor almost the first twelve months 
of their earthly existence. The un- 
predictability of the future isn't 
therefore th^ point of these words. 

But if not, then what? 

Well if you are patient, I'll let 
you in on the secret. 

The mystery is evident. The lu- 
ture can't be seen because the 



luture o 



TARRANT 
PRESCRIPTION 
DRUGGISTS 

MOTORCYCLE DELIVERY 

Foushee and Broad 
MI 3-3469 Richmond. Va. 



sly is not what you 
get and a'so because one can never 

| New Year Greeting's 

Hudgms Drug Co. 
Dial MI 8-8397 

7 West Grace Street 
RICHMOND, VA. 



New Year 
Greetings 

STRANG'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 
2698 Williamsburg Road 
Dial MI 8-9390 
RICHMOND, VA. 



New Year . . . 
Greetings . . 

• EARL PECK 

2314 Bells Road 
RICHMOND, VA. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



89 



be sure that what one gets is what 
the getting is. Obviously, the more 
one is given, and the fuller one's 
cupboards are, the greater is that 
man's terror that tomorrow what 
he has shall be had. So that all 
such a man has been given is 
only the terror of loss. Thus what 
the chef has put in his plate is 
loss and fear of loss, not nourish- 
ment. And so the man with a thou- 
sand cattle has an empty barn. 
But the begger in his alms bowl 
carries a cosmos. The one cannot 
be parted from his herd and the 
other from his cosmos. 

So who can be sure of what he 
who gives gives? 

That obviously is the master 
chef's secret. You may be eating 
at his table like honored guests 



and fall from deprivation before 
you reach his door. Yet the scav- 
enger with his nose pressed against 
the glass nibbling on crusts may 
find himself suddenly possessed 
of an intake sufficient to bring 
him upright before the very pres- 
ence of Gabriel. 

Which is the point about the 
future. One can never be sure 
that that which provides is provis- 
ion. You may ask and get, and 
you may get what you ask, but 
what you ask and what you get 
may have no relation whatever 
to what you think or desire to pos- 
sess, even if you have it. 

That's the chef's secret. That's 
the recipe. You get what you get 
and still what you get is not what 
you have gotten. 



ATTENTION! WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS! 
Is your Sisterhood or Hadassah taking- advantage of this easy fund- 
raising plan? Obtaining subscriptions for THE AMERICAN JEWISH 
TIMES-OUTLOOK is an easy way of raising money for your projects 
or general fund Mail in your list of subscriptions your workers sell. 
We will send you a check in full for 50% of the total amount. You do 
not have to collect. We will bill them. Address The American Jewish 
Times-Outlook, 530 Southeastern Building, Greensboro, N. C. 



A Citizen of Israel 

(Concluded from Page 29) 



to help the land of his ancestors 
in its first steps upward out of the 
jungle. 

There have been other black 
men in Israel, representatives of 
African nations, visitors and 
guests in Israel since 1948, search- 
ing for a key for their own deve- 
lopment. They have come to Is- 
rael's schools of social welfare, to 
Israel's kibbutzim, to Israel's tech- 
nical and military schools to find 
a way of life that would forever 



erase in their countries the kind 
of life our Negro Aral) in Jaffa 
symbolized. 

From Jaffa to Jerusalem is only 
about an hour and a half ride on 
a bus, and in Jerusalem we see 
another Negro-a black man of 
royal blood who has come to Israel 
to interlink his newly freed state 
with Israel's know-how and tech- 
nical assistance. 

King Charles Mwambutsa IV of 
Burundi, part of a former East 



NEW YEAR GREETINGS FROM 

HORACE S. FL0URN0Y 

Plumbing — Heating — Air Conditioning 

S. T. JOHNSON OIL BURNERS 
WE SPECIALIZE IN POWER PLANT WORK 

1607 High Point Ave. RICHMOND, VA. 



THE LIBERTY PRESS 

Rush Printing Photo Offset 

• Specializing in Wedding and Bar Mitzvah Invitations 



1402 E. Main St. 



Norman L. Williams, Jr. 
RICHMOND 19, VA. 



Dial MI 3-1103 




SIMS AND LEVIN 



1108 E. Main Etreet 
# SALES # RENTALS 

Mortgage Loans 

RICHMOND, VA. 



Dial 643-6779 
INSURANCE 

Simon Levin 



Try Our Golden Circles Bread 



Baked 
While 
You 
Sleep 



BREAD AND CAKES 

AMERICAN BAKERIES CO. Richmond, Va. 




SUPPLY COMPAQ 

First & Stockton Streets Richmond, Va. 

Home Heating Consultants 



CITIFS 




SERVICE 



WE WELCOME THE OPPORTUNITY TO SERVE YOU 

OFFICE PHONE NIGHTS & HOLIDAYS 

BE 2-5651 BR 2-2144 EL 3-3039 



(all ELgin 5-7891 



READY MIXED CONCRETE 

ASSEY 

eans "READY TO SERVE YOU" 

UILDERS' 

ETTER 

SUPPLY CORP. 3712 W. BROAD 

ervice RICHMOND, VA. 

ASBESTOS SIDING — BEACH SAND — BRICKS — CEMENT — 
CINDER BLOCKS — CORRUGATED PIPE — DOORS AND WINDOWS 

— DRAIN TILE — FLAGSTONE — GLASS BLOCKS — GLASS WOOL 

— HARDWARE TOOLS — INSULATION — LATH — LUMBER — 
PLYWOOD — MASONRY MATERIALS — PAINTS AND VARNISHES 

— PLASTERING PRODUCTS — ROOFING — SAND & GRAVEL — 
STEEL SCAFFOLDS' — STEEL WINDOWS — TERRA COTTA PIPE 

— WATERPROOFING PRODUCTS — ZONOLITE 



"Nothing To Sell But Fast Service" 



• OVERNITE 

Transportation Co. 



1100 Ninth St. Road 



RICHMOND, Va. 



BE 3-9611 



90 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Jacobsen 

THE COMPLETE LINE OF , 
ALL-SEASON ALL-PURPOSE TRACTORS 




Modal 100C Shown with 36 inch rotary mower attachmen: 



OLD DOMINION 
Tractor and Equipment Co., Inc. 

2001 Westmoreland St. Phone 353-2757 

RICHMOND 30, VIRGINIA 



Sewing Richmond With the Finest 
in Seafoods for 35 Years 

Rappahannock Seafood Company 

NOW 

2 LOCATIONS 

IN WEST-END RICHMOND 



New Store 

2004 Dabney Road 
Phone 353-7744 



Since 1928 
105 N. Robinson St. 
Phone 353-1235 




PLASTIC SIGNS 



STAINLESS STEEL LETTERS 



OUTDOOR ADVERTISING 



TALLEY NEON & ADVERTISING CO. 

1908 CHAMBERLAYNE AVE. 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA % PHONE 649-0325 



African German colony of Ruanda- 
Urundi, the first royal head of a 
state to come to see Israel and 
sign treaties of friendship and 

technical assistance with scholarly, 
kibbutznik, President Itzhak Ben 
Zvi. 

Israel (Palestine), once the 
dumping ground lor Arabia's 
black slaves, is now the hunting 
grounds lor Africa's intelligent 
resurgent peojales. Burundi is but 
one of many Afro-Asian nations 
pursuing this guest, and only one 
of many who are benefitting by 
die great numbers of experts 
sent by Israel without any political 
"lish-hooks" to help them find the 
way out on their own grounds. 

fust by coincidence am I typing 
this item on the desk of one of 
Israel's agricultural experts now 
in Kenya. He is Arie Amir, Deputy 
Minister of Agriculture who is on 
a two year's leave of absence, 
whose apartment we have leased. 

On the eve of his departure 
Mr. Ami spoke of the study of 
Kenya's agricultual and social pro- 
blems which he had made on a 
previous visit, and feels thrilled 



that he is given the opportunity 
of helping create a new society of 
farmers, uplifting the economic 
standards and social outlook of an 
almost landless Negro population 
whose economy is mainly agri- 
cultural. 

His study has convinced him 
that the best form of farming for 
Kenya peasants, is a community 
paralleling Israel's "moshavim" — 
cooperative settlements in which 
p:oduction and distribution are 
communal, and family life (dome- 
stic economy) individualistic, with 
an ultimate and equal distribution 
of the profits. This form of farm- 
ing and settling has proven so suc- 
cessful in Israel, stated Mr. Amir, 
that it has attracted more settlers 
than the originally wholly com- 
munal kibbutzim where the profit 
incentive for the individual is of 
no concern, as long as the group 
prospers as a whole. 

It's a far cry from our Jaffa 
Negro Arab to King Charles 
Mwambutsa IV, but it is in Israel 
that they have found a stage for 
the enactment of a happy scene 
in the great drama of the Black 
Man in a White Man's World. 



Yiddle and The Fiddle 

(Continued from Page 9) 



the bill into the hat on Friday. 
If the Day of Atonement fell on a 
weekday. I also saw to it that he 
received the money a day in ad- 
vance so he could prepare his 
family for the big meal to herald 
the two he would miss. 

I followed the same pattern for 
Passover even though I knew there 
was no absentention. For this holi- 
day I many times advanced the 
date of giving, for the Easter holi- 
day had a more cheerful aura to 
be considered. And again I sin- 
cerely hoped his holiday would 
be bountiful. 

At no time did I talk to (he 
man. His baggy clothing were ob- 
vious signs of deprivation. 1 never 
knew if he had a family, what 
his obligations or circumstances 
were. He. somehow, did not have 
the veneer of a professional pan- 
handler. Somehow I always felt 
it was against his general makeup 
to do what he was doing, but his 
needs were greater than his pride. 

As I look back on The Yiddle 
With the Fiddle I recall how this 
calling came about in my mind. 

One morning, as I deepened 
my entrance into the labrynth of 



underground where the Independ- 
ent Suwbay carried myriads to 
t heir points of employment, I 
overheard two men in conversa- 
tion. 

"The Yiddle With the Fiddle 
must be pretty desperate to stand 
out there in such a snowstorm," I 
eavesdropped. On a terribly rainy 
day I also managed to hear re- 
marks in a similar vein. 

(Please turn to Page 99) 





Greetings 

I f CHARLES 
i | HABOUSH 

,C y RICHMOND, VA. 



H 

n 



MELVIN W. F.STES 



*" By" AT In* m 

Sssoj 



Servicenter 
NOW LOCATED 



2301 W. Broad St. 
Phone EL 5-9715 
RICHMOND, VA. 



September, j 964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



91 



ART FOR THE TORAH IS TORAH 

By Rabbi William M. Kramer 



Feu elements of Jewish life 
have been more subject to mis- 
understanding than that of art. 
Jews have been called by partisans 
and detractors alike "anti-art", the 
suggestion being made that Jews 
were incapable of this mode of 
expression, a kind of "racial" 
deficiency. 

Obviously, there has been (he 
polarity of attraction and repul- 
sion to art expression in Judaism. 
The well-known scriptural pas- 
sages would seem to forbid much 
of art. The many injunctions of 
the rabbinate over the centuries 
would seem in most instances to 
reinforce this view. 

It may be assumed, however, 
that the rabbis did not bother to 
condemn what did not obtain. 
Judging by the opposition, art 
was an ubiquitous, if not always 
welcome, handmaiden to the Peo- 
ple of the Book Indeed, the Book 
itself was over the ages enhanced 
bv art. 



With an apprciation for the in- 
tertwining of the beaut\ of holi- 
ness with the holiness of beauty, 
the late Rav Kook (Yitchak Ha- 
Cohen Kook whose brilliant chief 
rabbinate was from 1931 to 1935 
in Eretz Yisrael), hearlded the 
happier view needed lor the re- 
emergenl state and lor world 
Jewry. 

Rav Kook taught that "a true 
apprecation of the attitude of Ju- 
daism toward art can only be 
gained when viewed against its 
pagan background. The set pur- 
pose of halakhic legislation is to 
protect the creative act by pre- 
venting it from degenerating into 
the unbridled grossness of pagan- 
ism." 

Talmudic passages and refer- 
ences from Maimonides and from 
Karo's Shulchan Arukh are cited 
by Rav Kook showing "that there 
is no prohibition against art for 
art's sake." We may then see in 

(Please turn to Page 94) 




Dr. Harry M. Seldin, right, eminent American dental educator, receives 
an Honorary Doctorate of Philosophy from Eliahu Elath, President of the 
Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Dr. Seldin was honored for "his immense 
contribution to the advancement of dental science in Israel and his leadinpr 
part in the establishment of the Hebrew University-Hadassah School of 
Dentistry Founded by the Alpha Omega Fraternity." The new dental school 
will be dedicated in August. 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



Richmond Office Supply Company 

Stationery, Office Furniture and Appliances 

816-818 l£ Main Street Dial MI 4-4025 

RICHMOND 19, VIRGINIA 



RICHMOND ICE CO., INC. 

FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE — 24-Hour Service 
at our Ice Vending Stations 



Harrison & Marshall 

Williamsburg & Government Roads 

Petersburg Pike & Court House Rd. 

1211 Westover Hills Boulevard 

Three Chopt Road near Patterson 

4*00 West Broad Street 

5515 Lakeside Avenue 

5805 Grove Ave. 

4700 Petersburg Pike 

Mechanicsville Pike & Dill Road 

Mechanicsville, Va. 

2601 Chamberlayne Avenue 



Fr»di: y .. Store — Williamsburg: Road 
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



l-East Laburnum Avenue 

North 25th & Fairmount Avenue 

Stratford Hills — Humble Station 

Highland Springs — Gulf Station 

Sneeds Store — Huguenot Road 

2201 West Main Street 

3500 W. Cary Street 

Azelia & Chamberlayne Avenue 

fil09 W. Broad Street 

McGuire Circle 

Ri^ge & Patterson Avenues 




"6* 




Martin fflrj^fsT Sales 

Corporation 

214 Cowardin Avenue 
Richmond's Largest Chevrolet Dealer 

• SALES • SERVICE 

Service Department Open 7:30 A.M. to Midnight 
Monday — Thru — Friday 



THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE FOR 
REAL CLAY TILE 

TILE MARBLE TERRAZZO 

• RESIDENTIAL 
• COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL 

• FREE ESTIMATES • 



Call 353-2761 

rrNTDAi TILE & MflRBLE 

ULIILlfHL COMPANY, Inc. 



2118 Lake Avenue 



Richmond, Virginia 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 196,4 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Firms in 

Porftsmouth-Rlorf oik-Virginia Beach, Va. 



HOTEL GOVERNOR DINWIDDIE 

NEWEST HOTEL IN THE NORFOLK-PORTSMOUTH AREA 
100% AIR-CONDITIONED 
FAMILY PLAN RATES :-: A GRENOBLE HOTEL 

One- Acre Guest Parking Space 



Telephone EXport 3-2511 PORTSMOUTH, VA. 




J Portsmouth Lumber Corporation 

"THE BEST IN LUMBER AND MILLWORK" 
2511 HIGH STREET PORTSMOUTH, VIRGINIA 23707 

EXport 7-4646 



McLean Pontiac Corporation 

2323 HIGH STREET • PORTSMOUTH. VIRGINIA 

• PONTIAC • VAUXHALL 

• LARK • TEMPEST 



BRENNAN 



Directors and Embalmers 

EXport 7-3851 

711 Washington St. 
PORTSMOUTH, VA. 



SNOW-WHITE 

Beautitone 

ry Cleaners — Launderers 

• Virginia Beach 
GA 8-5851 

• Norfolk, Va. 
JU 8-6796 

• Bayside, Va. 
Branch Office 




GREETINGS 

OVERMYER 

and ENNIS, INC. 
MONUMENTS 

Fifty Years' Experience 

MA 7-1822 
950 West 21st Street 
Norfolk, Va. 



NEW YEAR 
GREETINGS 

uel r Feed & 
uilding SuppSi 



Corp 



Established 1927 

® Ail Departments 

• At Corner 

• 19th and Pacific 

• Virginia Beach, Va. 



J 



Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson 

(Continued from Page 27) 



It was Lyndon Johnson's first 
formal speaking engagement since 
attaining the second highest oil ice 
in the land. 

It was, though, infinitely more 
to the 1,000 guests who had brav- 
ed three feet deep snow to come 
and personally pay tribute to the 
Vice President. And, he in turn 
paid the highest tribute to these 
guests — accompanying him was 
his radiant wife, Lady Bird John- 
son. 

The significance of Mrs. John- 
son by his side cannot be stressed 
sufficiently for it conveyed a social 
impact that long eluded the Jew- 
ish organizational dinner-meeting. 

This was an honor. This was 
indeed a "social" revolution — a 
" coming of age" distinction, the 
final hechsher stamp of status! 

For years our Harry Golden, so 
often, sadly lamented that while 
great men of America had accept- 
ed the accolades and awards be- 
stowed by Jewish sources, it was on 
a cool impersonal basis. For, alas, 
never a wife was present to warm 
the occasion; to share the bloom of 
honor; to wave hti hand in recog 
nition. It was empty, Golden 
chronicled. 

Thus, when this dubious dis- 
tinction was finally felled, per- 
haps it was just that the impact 
was devastating! 

In the reception room of the Wal- 
dorf, preceding the affair the then 
Vice President Johnson proudly 
introduced a beaming lady . . . 
"Meet Mrs. Johnson, my wife" . . . 
"This is Lady Bird . . ." to mem- 
bers as well as the dignitaries A 
the organization. 

Small Lady Bird, standing be- 
side a towering 6'4" Vice Presi- 
dent, graciously shook many hands 
that night and signed many auto 
graphs on Menu cards. She wore 
an orange-gold brocade cocktail 
length gown with a jacket. "It's 
from Neiman-Marcus, in Texas ol 
course," she answered one guest. 
"You resemble a Sabra," another 
told her. And indeed she did. 



Dark eyes and hair were pronounc- 
ed with features that tradition 
usually blessed a good-looking 
Jewish with and is a considered 
Sabra "type." 

"My name is really Claudia Al- 
ia," she told this writer in an im- 
prornlu interview we held with 
her in the midst of the crowded 
circle of ladies there. Upon hear- 
ing this one, one lady spoke out: 
"Mrs. Johnson, do you know that 
your name '.Vita' means 'living to 
a ripe old age' in Yiddish transla- 
tion?" 

"I didn't," she said in a soft 
Southern accent, "but I'm real 
happy to know it . . ," 

Mrs. Johnson, smiling in all 
directions, directing her gaze to 
include all the ladies present, went 
on to explain why "Lady Bird" is 
used rather than Claudia Alta. It 
was simple. The Vice President 
preferred it that way. He is a firm 
believer in the initials LB J. 

It was a most personal, warm, 
intimate chat Lady Bird Johnson 
was having with us technically, but 
with all the ladies grouped nearby 
literally. 

She had then been 2nd Lady of 
the land for over a month. The 
only wives of Cabinet Officers she 
was familiar with was Mrs. Abra- 
ham Ribicoff, (Conn.) then Sec- 
retary of Health and Welfare. 
"We've recently dined in the Rib- 
icoff home," she offered, going on 
to extol Mrs. Ribicoff as a hostess. 

Lady Bird confided that she 
was looking forward to attending 
for the first time, the Cabinet 
Wives' Luncheon that was held 
once a month, usually. "It's pre- 
sided over by the President's wife 
. . . (Jackie) and its an unofficial 
gathering to discuss problems that 
face our nation," she explained. 

As she spoke ... a newcomer 
in the Executive Branch of Gov- 
ernment life . . . although a vet- 
eran in the ways of Washington 
protocol ... no one that night, 
and least of all this petite South- 
ern Texas who symbolized tradi- 
(Please turn to Page 109) 



C Caltgart & ^ons 

for DECORATIVE PAINTING 

Phone MA 7-9279 NORFOLK, VA 808 W. 21st St. f 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OU TLOOk 



918 




Mrs. Joseph Willen. National President of the National Council of Jew- 
ish Women, is shown here with pupils at one of seven New York City 
schools opened this summer for a six-week program of remedial assistance 
and school readiness help to youngsters from deprived areas. Mrs. Willen 
in the first volunteer in a drive by the NCJW and the New York Urban 
League to enlist volunteers as teacher aides. 

A People And Its Calendar 

(Concluded from Page 26) 



We have all heard the story of 
the man with a penchant for being 
ubsentminded. Each morning he 
lad to leave himself notes to help 
him locate his shirt, his tie, his 
shoes. One morning he awaken- 
ed, found all of his wardrobe, 
stared himself in the mirror and 
asked: "I know where my shirt is, 
I know where my tie is, I know 
where my shoes are, but where 
am I?" 

This is the question each of us 
must ask himself during Rob 
Hashana, "Where am I?" Because 
if we don't, then God will ask us, 
|S he asked Cain, "Where art 
thou?" And it is always wise lo 

kc an account of ourselves be- 
fore others have to ask us. 

Jewish tradition has always had 
cue tried and true method of 
measuring the deeds of the past: 
study of Torah, in its broadest 
sense. All of Jewish literature deals 
with the question of "Where am 
1?" It deals with the question of 
how to live a life that Isaiah and 



Amos would be proud of. A life 
(onstantly absorbed seeking out 
the best path ol life lor man to 
walk on. Those whose only lan- 
guage of communication is Eng- 
lish need not be deprived of the 
benefits of Hebrew literature. 
Thank goodness one thing our 
blessed country produced is good 
books about Jewish hislor\, about 
Jewish thought, about Jewish law, 
Jewish literature, and Jewish re- 
!'g:cn. These eternal sources of 
wisdom will provide the sincere 
repentant with ways and means 
to measure the content of his life, 
rules by which to live, and norms 
In which to make decisions. Avail 
yourself of these rich fruits—their 
taste is sweet and their message 
important. 

And so if we make no other 
resolution this year on Rosh 
Hashana, let us resolve to read 
Jewish books, to studv Torah, arid 
to do it with the intention of im- 
proving our lives, and then these 
t°n days will have served their 
purpose admirably. 



CITY STEAM LAUNDRY 

and DRY ^LEANINH 

Special 24-Hour Service On Men's Shirts — Cash and Carry 
614 Middle Street Portsmouth, Va. 

EX 7-1251 1 -Day Cleaning Service— Cash and Carry 

3 Days Cleaning Service — Call For and Deliver 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Finns in 

Portsmouth, Va. 



"PET. .you bet!" 




MILK COMPANY 



DAIRY DIVISION 

"CHET" BRENNAMain, Mgr. 

PORTSMOUTH, VA. 



AMERICAN 
NATIONAL 

BANK 

TJF PORTSMOUTH. 



DEDICATED TO COMMUNITY SERVICE « 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 




GREETINGS 
AND BEST WISHES 




* NORFOLK 

• Ship Salvage Co., Inc. 

• CAPT. COLONNA 

BERKLEY SOUTH NORFOLK, VA. 



CAFFEE'S BAKERY 

Portsmouth's Leading Bakery and Pastry Shop 
COMPLETE LINE OF FANCY BAKED GOODS 



425 County St. 



PORTSMOUTH, VA. 

Portsmouth, EX 7-0753 



94 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Firms in 

ROiiNOKE, VA. 



HAPPY 




Greetings 



BLUE RIDGE MOTORS 

INCORPORATED 

SELL - GUARANTEE - AND MAINTAIN 
Buick Automobiles 

625 W. Campbell Ave. Roanoke, Va. 

COME IN AND SEE THE 1964 BUICK 



HAPPY HEW YEAR 



Clover Ice Cream 




is what it takes 



to make 
a party 



CLOVER CREAMERY, ROANOKE 



NEW YEAR GREETINGS FROM 

Antrim Motors, Inc. 



510 McClanahan St., S. W. 



Roanoke 1, Virginia 



'64 DODGE-DODGE DART 

5 Years - 50,000 Mile Warranty 

POWER GIANT Trucks FIAT 



SALES & SERVICE 




SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

CHURCH AT FIRST, S. W. • tiOANOKE, VA. • Diamond 5-15SS 

Branch Office : Cross Roads Mall 
Telephone DI 5-1535 ROANOKE, VA 



SPORTSMAN 

SODAS 
LUNCHEONETTE 
CIGARS 

Corner Jefferson and Church 
ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 



Where Clothing and FurnishingM 
Are Just Different Enough to 
Make Them Distinctive 

FOX-HUNT 
LOYD 

Corner First and Kirk, S. W. 
ROANOKE, VA. 



Art For The Torah 

(Continued from Page 91) 



the presence of art of a religious 
character throughout the Jewish 
ages the vise of art for God's sake. 

Rav Kook only enjoined against 
"mythological subjects, pagan or 
Christian. Here there can be no 
concession." he stated, "for there 
are to this very day symbols of 
that which must forever be shun- 
ned by Judaism." 

While Rav Kook brought a 
fresh breath of air into the stilted 
chambers where worn out and 
wrong ideas are stored, even he 
did not encompass in his vision 
the actualities. 

Long ago in the midst of im- 
portant architectural scripture, 
murals and mosaic floors that fill- 
ed synagogues with themes from 
the Bible, themes enriched with 
human and animal figures and 
even the hand of God, one could 
find pagan symbolism made to 
serve a decorative purpose to the 
glory of God. 

For example, the head of Zeus 
appears as an ornament in the 
necropolis of Beit-She'arhu, the 
place where the 3rd century com- 
piler of the Mishna, Judah Ha- 
Nasi, taught and was buried. In 
the 6th century synagogue at Beit- 
Alpha are the great mosaics of the 
Solomonic temple shrine, and the 
story of the binding of Isaac, and 
with them the Zodiac with its 
pagan elements spoked about a 
hub incorporating Apollo, his 
chariot, and his horses. 

Indeed, the Zodiac continues in 
the synagogue to this day in many 
a small orthodox synagogue with 
its signs equated to the months of 
the Hebrew calendar. Likewise, 
the ruins of the third century 
synagogue at Korazim show the 
Medusa head as a decorative motif, 
and many other examples are not 
wanting. 

Nothing, not even pagan sym- 
bolism, has been held back from 
the "morgue" of the Jewish artist 
providing that the purpose he 
wished to serve was such as would 
glorify the Creator and his crea- 
tions. 

J. P. Hodin of London could 
well say at last year's international 
Gongress or Art Critis in Tel Aviv: 



"Thanks to the researches made 
by archaeologists and art histor- 
ians, and to the work produced 
by Jewish artists in the first half 
of the 20th century, there is no 
longer any validity in the peculiar 
assumption . . . that Jews are not 
capable of expressing themselves 
fully in terms of visual arts." 

Through, archaeological and lit- 
erary sources it is now almost 
possible to demonstrate Jewish 
creativity in the visual arts for 
religious (usually bibliocentric) 
purposes, in every century of Jew- 
ish history. Likewise, there is an 
awareness and utilization of the 
Hebrew-Scripture-oriented output 
of non- Jewish artists. 

Art has been applied to Judaism 
(Stephen. Kayser's more felicitous 
phrase rather than Jewish art) by 
Jews and non- Jews throughout the 
ages. The visual arts were never 
long absenl from the floor and 
walls and ceilings of synagogues, 
manuscripts of the Bible and iis 
commentaries, the prayer books, 
the marriage document, the Scroll 
of Esther, the charity box, the 
laver, the Mizrach and even the 
amulet. Biblical themes and icon- 
ographs predominate. 

When, as now, in Jewish Com- 
munity Centers affiliated with the 
National Jewish Welfare Board 
across the nation the visual arts 
created by Jewish and non-Jew- 
ish artists bring inspiration to and 
derive inspiration from the Holy 
Text, the tradition is maintained. 

Four factors account for the re- 
inforcement of interest in the vis- 
ual, arts as related to Judaism. 

(Please turn to Pag^ 115) 




Greetings 



• FLOWERS 

430 Church St. S. W. 
and 

Towers Shopping Center 
Dial DT 3-1567 
ROANOKE, VA. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



95 



OUR BROKEN PROMISES 

By Rabbi Samuel Umen 



Moments of profound inspira- 
tion tend to soften the heart, stir 
the mind, and often transform a 
human being into something no- 
bler, greater, and finer than he 
ordinarily is. fn such moments 
selfishness is weakened, stubborn- 
ness broken, laxity overcome; the 
animal in man is subdued, his best 
human qualities emerge and take 
command. In short, during mo- 
ments of deep inspiration, man 
rises to his highest self. 

The High Holy Days afford 
us rare moments of inspiration. 
The Holy Day moments appeal 
to the very best in us. They clear- 
ly show us how we live, what we 
are, what we can be, and what we 
ought to strive to be if we are 
to be above the beast. 

In response to the Holy Days 
appeal, we promise ourselves that 
in the days to come our way of 
life will be much nobler than be- 
fore, that the time allotted to us 
will henceforth be used frugally, 
wisely and fruitfully. 

There is an ancient saying: 
"Promises Made in Storms Are 
Forgotten in Calm." So it is with 
the resolutions we make on the 
Holy Days. The storm of the Holy 
Days, so to speak, passes, the calm 
sets in, and the high promises lose 
their force. What appears to be a 
simple act under the spell of an 
inspiration, in an ordinary hour 
becomes burdensome, trying, insur- 
mountable, and is consequently 
deferred for a later time. 

Thus a New Year comes, re- 
minds us of our broken promises, 
evokes new ones from us which 
are similarly destined to be ig- 
nored, and silently passes on. 

What is to be done? Shall we 




discontinue making resolutions on 
the New Year? Shall we determine 
not to heed the appeal of the Holy 
Days, which reveals our foibles, 
failings, defects, and arouses the 



si ul 10 clamor for its due? 

The answer, of course, is that 
we must continue to make prom- 
ises and vows, again and again, 
until we realize that everv mission 



RABBI SAMUEL UMEN 

we impose upon ourselves, even' 
goal and objective we set for our- 
selves, cannot and will not be at- 
tained without sacrifice. 

(Please turn to Page 109) 




To you and yours . 
health, 

happiness, 

prosperity 

for the 

coming year 



Power" Company 

An Invttlor-Qwifd Public Utility 




96 



T'. ■ American Jewish TIMES-OL 1 LO ;K 



September, 1964 




Tlalujiai BnkLge 

Imj smart footwear 



Portrait of A Generation 

(Continued from Page 7) 



yy^ LjfrUA, QAMAAj J^JL^ 

Advertised in VOGUE and McCALL'S and 
available at leading shoe and depart- 
ment stores throughout the country. 

NATURAL BRIDGE SHOEMAKERS, Division of Croddock-Terry Slioe Corporation • Lynchburg, Virginia 



If you say . . . 

HAPPY NEW YEAR 

. . . Say it 
with 
Flowers 
from 




DI 5-7709 



A 

\/ \7 New Year 

(S s J \ Greetings 
And Best Wishes From 

Best 
In 

Television 
and 
Radio 

CBS in Roanoke 

WDBJ 

960KC 
and 

WDBJ-TV 

(Ch. 7) 



Ingleside 



FAIRWAY MOTOR 
INN, Inc. 



"Where the fairways meet the mountains" 

ON U. S. 11, 3 MILES NORTH OF 
STAUNTON. VIRGINIA 
Dial TUxedo 5-1201 
HOWARD DAVIS, Gen'l Mgr. TOMMY TUCKER, President 

Golf, Tennis, Swimming, Practice Putting, Driving Greens, Shuffle- 
board, Horseback Riding, Fishing Lake, Children's Swimming Pool, 
Playground Nearby, Dancing in the Club Room, Superb Food. 



South Roanoke 
Lumber Go. 

Building Materials of 
All Kinds 
Fine Millwork 

2329 Franklin Road 
ROANOKE, VA. 



ewald - dark 

The CAMERA and 
GIFT STORES 

• 17 W. Church Ave. 
and 

• Tower Center 
ROANOKE, VA. 



There they come under strong 
and persuasive influences of the 
majority's religion and culture. 
Yet, with few exceptions, they are 
ill prepared — as we well know 
— to defend their Jewish loyalties 
and their minority status. What 
kind of Jewish community will 
these people foster when their 
time comes to lead? The Hillel 
Foundations are doing magnifi- 
cent work: but is not the time at 
hand when the entire Jewish com- 
munity ought to evince more 
thoughtful interest in this basic 
problem? 

This brings us, in reviewing 
this book, to what seems to us to 
he a fundamental consideration. 
Philanthropy is the outstanding 
activity of American Jewish life. 
It is articulated through com- 
munal organizations. There is no 
such thing as a nation-wide Jew- 
ish community; there is no such 
thing as a single organization that 
speaks for all American Jews. The 
best we have been able to attain 
is an almost nation-wide and very 
weak Synagogue Council and a 
Council of Jewish Federations and 
Welfare Funds which has purely 
advisory powers limited primarily 
to the area of fund raising. In 
point of fact, each community, 
whether its leadership be wise or 
foolish, whether its horizons be 
broad or narrow, is an indepen- 
dent entity. 

This independence, however, is 
confined to two areas: how much 
the community is to raise and by 
what methods, and for what pur- 
poses it will use the comparatively 
small amounts left in its hands 
for local needs. By far the largest 
portion of what money is raised 
goes by agreement to overseas aid. 
This may all be right and proper; 
but in view of the cultural situa- 
tion which our book describes, is 
it not high time the entire matter 
was re-evaluated? 

The volume under discussion 
provides much evidence that re- 
ligious and cultural activity has 
increased in the past thirty years. 
The greater strength of the various 
rabbinical institutions, the revival 
of Orthodoxy and its new assertive- 
ness, the growth of the Jewish 
Day School movement and of He- 
brew summer camping — all point 



lo the possibility of a spiritual 
revival. 

On the other hand, the purely 
cultural institutions that existed 
thirty years ago (Yivo, JPS, AJHS. 
and a few others) have done no 
better than to just about hold 
their own. This has happened, be 
it noted, with no support from 
community funds, or so little as 
to be ridiculous. A National Foun- 
dation for Jewish Culture has 
come into being, with limited 
plans, limited funds and limited 
possibilities. The modesty of the 
Foundation's approach to the 
American Jewish community is 
proof of its low opinion of the 
Jewish cultural level of the 
American Jewish community. 

It is clear from the facts given 
in this book, aside from the per- 
sonal opinions expressed above, 
that the American Jewish com- 
muity has done very well organi- 
zationally, but quite poorly cul- 
turally. As Dr. Janowsky points 
out in his conclusion, Jews every- 
where else in the world look up to 
the American Jews for aid, but 
look down upon it in matters of 
spirit. Our portrait, in other 
words, shows a vigorous bodv, and 
a handsome, kindly, but rather 
blank face. 

Why should this be so? Dr. 
Janowsky reminds us of an old 
historical explanation on which 
we fall back in hours of frustra- 
tion. It is pointed out that every 
previous Jewish community, from 
ancient Babylonia to Germany to 
Poland, took several hundred 
years to develop an independent 
culture. Our community can count 
barely a hundred years since it 
became a sizable aggregation from 
which something significant could 
be expected. Dr. Janowsky, there- 
fore wants us to have patience. 

But with the world's pace as ac- 
celerated as it now is. can we wait 



H. C. Baker 
Sales Co. 

Distributor of 
Radio Parts and Sound 
Equipment 

JOHNS-MANVILLE 
Blown Rock Wool Insulation 

19 Fr-mklin Rd. Roanoke, Va. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



97 




Louis F. Berman, 6, of Beverly, Mass., listens as the shofar is sounded 
above the open Torah, signifying the beginning of the New Year. Louis is 
m asthmatic patient at the free, nonsectarian National Jewish Hospital at 
Denver, research and treatment center for chest diseases. 



even a single century more? One 
may minimize the current rate of 
intermarriage; but 1 lie fact is that 
there is no visible effort to stem 
it or to find a persuasive justifica- 
tion for our youth to avoid it. Yet 
such justification must be sought 
and made patent, since it alone 
can stop that flight from Judaism 
and the Jewish people, of which 
intermarriage is but a symptom. 

Several of the contributors n 
this volume do, in fact, implicitly 
suggest this question of Jewish 
survival. It was not for them to 
answer it. For it is clear that no- 
thing will change until the Ameri- 
can Jew frees himself from his 
sense of inferioritv in matters of 



The Roanoke Newspapers 
Sell This 
$865 Million 
Market 




A 17-COUNTY MARKET WITH: 

560,510 Population 
$865,761,000 Buying Income 

THE ROANOKE TIMES 
She Snamike Mnrlft-Npnifi 



Jewish culture. He gives millions 
of dollars for general educational 
institutions and shrugs ofJ the 
distinctively Jewish ones. Accultur- 
ration to the American environ- 
ment has become synonymous with 
deculturation from Jewishness. 

The tragedy of American Jewish 
life, according to one thoughtful 
contributor to this volume, Edwin 
Wolf, 2nd, who is currently presi- 
dent of the National Foundation 
lor Jewish Culture, has been its 
failure to develop far-seeing lead- 
ership. It is a truth that hurls, 
but must be taken to heart. Louis 
Marshall and Stephen S. Wise 
emerge from the records of Ameri- 
can Jewish history in the 20th 
century as the two men who had 
the moral and intellectual force 
to give guidance to the total com- 
munity. Unfortunately both were 
compelled by the circumstances 
of Jewish life to turn their ener- 
gies away from internal to "for- 
eign" Jewish affairs, such as de- 
fense and the upbuilding of the 
new community in the Holy Land. 

They left no statesmanlike suc- 
cessors. Neither Louis Marshall 
nor Stephen Wise was a rich man; 
each, driven bv a consuming dedi- 
cation to the best in Jewish life, 
led by the force of his personality. 




VACATION 




AUTOMOBILE 



HOME 




APPLIANCES 



It's Wiser To Save First 
But If Borrow You Must 
See Mountain Trust 

Successful saving means you can buy many good things 
in life and at the same time enjoy a feeling of financial 
security. 

But remember, if borrow you must MTB will be happy to 
lend you money for any worthwhile purpose. 



SOLID AND FRIENDLY AS THE MOUNTAINS OF VIRGINIA 



Ml 



MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



TWO 

DOWNTOWN 



REXALL 

DRUG STORES 



Roanoke, Va. 



irner Drug Co., Inc. 

101 Market Square 
Phone DI 5-8134 



Pafsel Drug Co,, Inc. 

129 Salem Avenue, S. W. 
Phone DI 5-8129 




GREETINGS 




SKYLINE LUMBER COMPANY, INC. 

BUILDING MATERIALS — MILLWORK 
"The Home Builder's Home" 
1255 3rd Street. S. E. Roanoke, Va* 



98 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 




DISTRIBUTORS OF 




• FUEL OIL FOR HOME 
AND INDUSTRY 



Day and Night 
Delivery 



2677 ROANOKE AVE. S.W. 



DIAL Diamond 5-8866 



ROANOKE, VA. 



NeW 

[A* 



1964 
5725 



from ttie staff of WSLS-TV 

Roanoke, Va. 



SPECIALIZING IN 



^ T at,tv FURNISHED XJfuiN 
ESTIMATES GLADLY * D RIVEWAYS 

Mams Construction Company 

BUdllia W hoANOKE, VIRGINIA 



2725 Roanoke Avenue 




Telephone: DI 3-2409 
P. O. Box 60 




GREETINGS 



Ideal Laundry 
& Dry Cleaners, Inc. 

ROANOKE, VA. 
"A Name in Quality Service Since 1906" 

COMPLETE SERVICE 
LUX LAUNDRY 
STA-NU DRY CLEANING MIRZA RUG CLEANING 

LINEN RENTAL SERVICE 
UNIFORM RENTAL SERVICE 



But when they passed on, leader- 
ship was taken over by successful 
men of business, lew of whom 
have seen Jewish life whole or 
even as particularly sacred. All 
too often, it has been a matter of 
the childish American game of 
status-seeking either in their re- 
spective communities or their or- 
ganizations. They shine; they do 
not lead. 

There are, to be sure, wonder- 
ful and devoted men among them. 
Why do they not lead except in 
the superficials? There are many 
possible answers to this puzzle. 
Perhaps the simplest is that they 
have not yet realized that a spirit- 
ual community, such as the Jew- 
ish people has to be if it is to be 
anything at all, must be built from 
the inside out, not from the out- 
side in: where there is no spirit, 
a body must wither. 

So it turns out that the ex- 
pression on the face of our com- 
munity is not really one of vacu- 
ity, but of dormancy. When will 
the real leader come along an 
make purposeful the latent ener- 
gies, the sub-surface spirituality 
of a large community eager to be 
led? For this is a magic portrait, 
ready to come to life at the touch 
of an inspired leader's staff. 

The above are some thoughts 
which this book has stirred in one 
reader. No doubt other readers 
will derive other ideas and draw 
other conclusions from this highly 
stimulating compilation of essavs. 
For though each contributor to 
the volume sticks to his own 
theme, the whole describes a peo- 
ple whose experience during the 
past generation constitutes a very 
significant chapter in the evolu- 
tion of the American dream and 
American reality. 

Each of the essays is interesting, 
important and revealing. Each 



can and should form the topic of 
more than one evening's discus- 
sion, whether in one's parlor or 
adult class. The entire volume 
is nothing less than a challenge 
to the American Jewish commun- 
ity. It shows what we have achiev- 
ed — and it is no mean achieve- 
ment. It also shows what there 
is still to be done, which, if ac- 
complished, will make the Ameri- 
can Jewish community a blessing 
to itself and to America as a 
whole. 



A one-man campaign by the pro- 
minent Jewish attorney Fernando 
Levisky to eliminate anti-Semitic 
innuendo from certain definitions 
in the Great Brazilian Encyclope- 
dia came to fruition this week 
with the appearance of a new edi- 
tion of the encyclopedia. One of J 
the deletions from the new edi- 
tion was the definition of a Jew as 
"swindler," of a rabbi as "devil" 
and of a synagogue as "a place 
where people gather for illegal 
business." 




Emanuel G. Scoblionko, promi- 
nent Pennsylvania attorney, was 
elected president of the World Coun- 
cil of Synagogues at its fifth inter- 
national convention in Mexico City, 
Mexico. 





• NEW YEAR 

• GREETINGS 
AND BEST WISHES 

The Caldwell Sites Co. 

Roanoke, Va. Winchester, Va. 

Caldwell-Sites' complete stock of all office equipment and 
supplies is "better-brand" merchandise — the best there is. 
We welcome the opportunity to serve you. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 



99 



Yiddle and The Fiddle 

(Concluded from Page 90) 



At no time did I ever speak to 
1 he man whose time-worn amor- 
phous shoes, frayed trousers and 
coat sleeves bore the burden of 
his plight. 

All f knew about him was that 
he must have needed the money 
desperately to weather all kinds 
of elements for the paltry contri- 
butions. 

There were times I seriously 
questioned his being Jewish, when 
he looked more Italian than of 
Latin descent. 

In the hot, humid days of mid- 
summer he would be there, at his 
post, as it were, inching his bow 
on strings strained and warped. 

There must have been trying 
days because of vacations which 
must have cut into his daily con- 
tributions. 

I felt sorry for this unfortunate 
creature, a victim of lather Time. 
No, I did not extend any advance 
contributions. I don't know why I 
didn't, but as I shunt back into 
those periods I must admit I felt 
awfully sorry for the fiddler. 

He was not my cross to bear 
and I honestly hoped others would 
make up for my default. 

Somehow, as the holiday of per- 
scrverance and atonement arrives, 
the image of The Yiddle With the 
f iddle returns upon an invisible 
screen. It haunts me as I patiently 
sit through the long orthodox ser- 
vices in a synagogue of Ma's 




Roanoke & 
Leading 
Funeral Director 
Economi ;al- 
Dependabi. 



JOHN M. 

►AKEY 




INC. 



f<SinOice 
f Diamond 1-4451 



choice. 

And suddenly, as I repeat the 
annual ritual, I ask myself, Who 
said this man with the fiddle was 
a Jew? The question does not end 
there. 1 1 comes up again and again, 
as my eyes swim through the print- 
ed type from right to left. 

The type changes form and sud- 
denly there are musical notes be- 
fore me on the page. [ seem to 
hear a refrain from Humoresque 
when Gaston Glass played it in 
the movie. It has haunted me 
ever since. 

And that personable Gaston 
Glass impressed me beyond com- 
prehension. 

This is the time of the year I 
wonder what happened to him? 
Does he still play the violin? Or 
am I being facetious? By that I 
mean did he really play the fid- 
dle? The film was produced in the 
days before sound. 

In any event, the more import- 
ant cjuestion is whatever became 
of The Yiddle With The Fiddle? 
He was never to be seen on the 
High Holy days. 

There may have been one or 
two good reason.,. On Yom Kip- 
pur he either felt his staple con- 
tributors would not be passing by 
the subway dip or that is was sac- 
religious to be making music on a 
day when it was to be silenced. 

Whatever may have been the 
true reason, too late to check in- 
to now, I like to feel he too found 
time to take inventory of his sins, 
however few they may have been, 
and join with us in a mutual un- 
derstanding. 

I hope he knew where to find 
a waterbed nearby to cast his sins 
like Ma used to do at the East 
River in Harlem. During the past 
three years I find Santa Monica 
Beach in California an ideal spot 
to make amends. 

When I do this I am troubled 
by wonder: I wonder if The so- 
called Yiddle With the Fiddle had 
to go through with this ceremony 
or visited a Confessional? Both 
serve the same purpose, regardless 
of religion. 

Whatever it was, the memory 
of The Man With the Violin ling- 
ers on. 




TRAVEL IS FUN! 
TRY IT 



With your own group ... or independently. Meet new 
friends. For the time of your life ... or just relaxing, 

TAKE A CRUISE 

and enjoy gracious living aboard a floating resort. 

BUSINESS OR PLEASURE . . . 

Let us make your reservations . . . anywhere in the world. 

OUR SERVICE, 

by experienced personnel, 

COST YOU NOTHING EXTRA. 



Jjfon^Ti'fluel Scruice 




INCORPORATED 



Phone 342-7875 15 W. Church Ave., Roanoke, Va. JflSTfi| 

Frank J. Sherertz Mrs. Given Moomaw Symbol 0/ Experwicr, 

President Vice President Rtliability and Integrity 



RED LINE, Inc. 

ROANOKE, VA. 

MODERN MOTOR EXPRESS 

Speed — Flexibility — Economy — Safety 

Operating between Baltimore, Md., Washington, D. C, and Staunton. 
Roanoke, Harrisonburg, Charlottesville, Lynchburg, and Danville, Va. 

TERMINALS: 

Baltimore, Md . 2723 Old Annapolis Road 

Washington, D. C._ -218 - "D" Street, S.E. 

Roanoke, Va. _. ..2310 Orange Avenue, N.E. 

Lynchburg, Va. .. .3310 Naval Reserve Street 

Martinsville, Va. DuPont Road 

Danville, Va .1080 Riverside Drive 

Staunton, Va 352 Kalorama Street 

Charlottesville, Va. 1001 River Road 

Harrisonburg, Va Charles Street 

Refrigeration Service Between Baltimore, Md. and Roanoke, Va. 




Magic City Mortgage Company, Inc. 



130 Church Avenue, S. W. 



Roanoke 11, Virginia 



BRANCH OFFICES: 



@ Bristol, Virginia 
Norfolk, Virginia 
@ Greensboro, North Carolina 

REAL ESTATE — GENERAL INSURANCE 
LONG TERM LOANS — LOW INTEREST RATES 



100 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Whatever your 

BANKING NEEDS 

you can always be sure of 
a cordial welcome 
fullest cooperation 
and 

personalized service 
at 

COLONIAL-AMERICAN 

NATIONAL BANK OF ROANOKE 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Federal Reserve System 



Land Available 

SALE - LEASE OR TRADE 
Industrial Timber 
Business Mineral 
Subdivision Recreation 
Farm Mountain 

Development Desired 

Be will build and lease any type of Building or Plant. 
We will purchase and lease existing Office Buildings, 
Stores, and Plants. We will trade presently owned 
properties for Commercial properties. 

Virginia Land 
Developement Company 

Telephone DI 5-8124 
P. O. Box 1871 

A SUBSIDIARY OF 

VIRGINIA IRON, COAL, & COKE CO. 

325 West Campbell Avenue 
Roanoke, Virginia 



Likewise Gaston Glass, the man 
who played the son of Vera Gor- 
don, a wonderful actress whose 
daughter Alma Rubens portrayed 
Glass' sweetheart. 



All I know is that Yom Kippur, 
in reverie, has its moments of the 
sad and the pleasant, as we urge 
ir, th N°w Year. These are mo- 
ment., I would no do without. 



The Eatefel M>md The Community 

(Concluded from Page 63) 



the Rabbi, vote to abrogate tradi- 
tional standards of the Synagogue 
and introduce features which are 
anti-Jewish in character. Majority 
rule becomes Jewish Law! But of 
what value is majority rule if its 
decisions negate the laws oi the 
America, however, have seen de- 
structive action by irreligious, or- 
ganized Temple bodies whose real 
motivation — let us not be satisfied 
by rationalizations — was firstly, 
(he desire to imitate the church — 
imitation has been the character- 
istic feature of the non-traditional 
Jewish community lor the last 
century — and secondly, a desire 
lo achieve an actual separation 
from the traditional Rabbinate 
and from the traditional commun- 
ity, as the early Church, lor ex- 
ample, changed the Sabbath to 
Sunday in order to show a tangi- 
ble division from Jewish tradi- 
tion. Hence, non-Orthodox bodies 
have not merel) tolerated, but 
actually welcomed and encourag- 
ed this breach in Jewish tradition 
as they have striven for funda- 
mental changes in the Prayer 
Book, thus abrogating not only 
Jewish practice but renouncing 
fundamental beliefs of Judaism. 

The problem is presented most 
challenginglv by the Synagogues 
now being erected and bv the 
architectua! plans now being pre- 
pared for the future. Where some 
congregations hesitate to make 
changes in existing structures for 
sentimental if not religious rea- 
sons, thev feel hardly any obliga- 
tion to continue the tradition in 
a new Synagogue. These are facts 
with which we must reckon and 
concerning which we must take a 
united stand. 

It. is the duty of a Rabbi who 
finds himself in a community 
which has. through ignorance of 
Jewish tradition, drifted from an 
understanding and practice ol 
Jewish observance, to make every 
effort to restore the true standards 
of the Synagogue. 

Our laitv must be shown the 



destructive results brought about 
by the breakdown of tlu tradition- 
al Synagogue and their energies 
must be brought to bear to streng- 
then and preserve the Orthodox— 
the historic Synagogue. A few peo- 
ple can no longer be permitted to 
force the issue at congregational 
meetings and vote to abrogate 
basic tradition. All this will re- 
quire dedication and struggle. The 
ijsults of acquiesience, however, 
are obvious. They spell our own 
destruction. 

We require most oi all. a strong 
movement that will lead to an 
understanding of Orthodox Syna- 
gogue tradition— a movement that 
will unite all Orthodox Synagogues, 
still the majority of American 
Synagogues, into one strong and 
cohesive body. As long as individ- 
ual Synagogues are permitted to 
drift and thoughtlessly tread their 
own path, Jewish tradition in 
America will surely be neither 
the beneficiary nor the spiritual 
benefactor. Only a forceful and 
intelligent Traditional Synagogue 
organization will be able to truly 
draw the lines of responsibility 
lor the Rabbi and lay leaders of 
(lie congregation, so that they will 
become partners and co-workers 
in this sacred enterprise. Only if 
the traditional Synagogue will 
base itself upon a single and firm 
policy toward Jewish observance, 
w ill the Synagogue and the Rabbi 
again become the great unifying 
and creative forces in Jewish life. 



Happy New Year 
from 

EE Roby H. 
== Patrick, Jr. 



DOVE 
Flowers 

Send To Your Loved Ones 
FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
Hotel Patrick Henry 
Dial DI 4-9287 Roanoke, Va. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



101 







W''-v:':>': : : : : : :< : :; 


1 






pill 

■111 


■ 




11111111 










Judge Arthur J. Goldberg (right), Associate Justice of the Supreme 
Court and newly designated Chairman of the Board of Overseers of The 
Jewish Theological Seminary of America, with Dr. Louis Finkelstein, 
Seminary Chancellor. The picture was taken at a special convocation, when 
Dr. Finkelstein, on behalf of the Seminary, conferred upon Judge Goldberg 
th« honorary degree of Doctor of Laws. 



Weitzmann's Legacy 

(Concluded from Page 25) 



exhibit drew so much attention us 
that of the Weizmann Institute. 
As the long queue kept moving 
up, men, women, and children all 
voiced keen interest on beholding 
the Weizmann campus model and 
the transparencies above, lighting 
up one after another with their 
identifying legends: 

"Brain Research," "Research in- 
to Human Fertility," "Experimen- 
tation in Artificial Muscles," 
"Production of Heavy Oxygen" 
(Israel, through the Weizmann In- 



J. P. BELL 
COMPANY 

Established 1859 
816 Main Street 
LYNCHBURG, VA. 



stitute, supplies practically all of 
the world's needs of Heavy Oxy- 
gen for research), "Delving into 
the Secrets of Cancer Cells," "New 
Device for Electronic Diagnois," 
etc. 

When Dr. Weizmann conceived 
the idea for a great science re- 
search center in the Holy Land, 
he was called a dreamer. And so 
he was. But, he was a dreamer 
who knew how to harness his vis- 
ions to reality. And even before 
he died in 1952, the idea of a 
science center in Rehovoth was al- 
ready being translated into fact. 
The Weizmann Institute exhibit 
at the World's Fair provides an 
inkling of how rich are the fruits 
of Dr. Weizmann's spiritual legacy. 



• Office Outfitters 
• Stationers 
• Printers 



Because of economic reasons 
Ireland has not been fully able 
to exchange diplomatic and consu- 
lar representatives with Israel, but 
the imbalance will be corrcted as 
the years go by, it was declared by 
Prime Minister Sean F. Lemass, 
who noted that Ireland had exten- 
ded both de jur and de facto recog- 
nition to Israel. 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous Nexu Year from the Following Firms in 

Lynchburg, Va. 





'Lynchburg's Downtown Hotel Of Distinction" 
Group and Convention Facilities 



JAMES B. MERRILL 
Executive Vice-President 



8th and Church Streets 
Lynchburg, Virginia 



4% 



KARN £MJJ/s%, per annum COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY 

Money invested before the loth of the 
month earns full month's dividend. 

FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS 
& LOAN ASSOCIATION 

OF LYNCHBURG, VA. 

HOME OFFICE : Main Street at Tenth, Phone VI 5-2371 

PLAZAVUE BRANCH: Memorial Ave. at Wadsworth Street 
Dial VI 7-4437 

WHERE THOUSANDS SAVE MILLIONS 
FASTER WITH INSURED SAFETY 




Central Virginia s 

FAMILY 
NEWSPAPERS 



The newspapers that are read by 
nearly everyone in the large 
Central Virginia area 

E\)t jgetos; 

Published by The Lynchburg News, Inc. 

THE DAILY ADVANCE 

Published by The Lynchburg Daily Advance, Inc. 



102 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 




SAVE- --AND MAKE IT A HABIT! 



Current Dividend Rate per annum 



LYNCHBURG FEDERAL 
Saving and Loan Association 

Home Office 615 Church St. Dial VI 5-4551 

Miller Park Branch 1990 Fort Ave. Dial VI 5-6091 

Brookville Branch 7114 Timberlake Rd. Dial CE 9-5210 
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



The Democratic Jews 

(Continued from Page 18) 





G reetings 



STROTHER DRUG CO., Inc. 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 

Established 1853 

# LYNCHBURG 

# RICHMOND 

# VIRGINIA 



Pettyjohn Bros. 

Shoe Manufacturing, Incorporated 

601-603 12th St. Lynchburg, Virginia 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

• INFANTS • CHILDREN'S 

• MISSES © SHOES 

The Most Outstanding 
POPULAR PRICE LINE 

NOT THE BIGGEST LINE BUT THE BEST SELLER 



ANDERSON'S 

Piggly Wiggty 

SUPER MARKETS 

Lynchburg, Va. Danville, Va. 

Alta-Vista, Va. 



culture are Learning (Torah), 
Charity (Zedakeh) and Life's pleas- 
ures (non-ascenticism or this world- 
liness). Learning is translated po- 
litically into respect for intellec- 
tuals and intellectual independ- 
ence (i.e., civil liberties), identifi- 
cation with the Democratic presi- 
dential candidates and their brain 
trusts, at least since 1932, as well 
as the notion of social planning 
through the cooperation of uni- 
versity scholars and intellectuals 
in government as was done by the 
Democrats. 

The second value, Charity, is 
translated politically into support 
for welfare policies and social jus- 
lice for underprivileged groups, 
while non-asceticism means that 
the. Jews are concerned with a 
better life, here and now, and 
favor reconstructioning the present 
society. In addition Fuchs also 
notes that Jewish insecurity has 
made them more liberal. 

There are two things to be said 
of this analysis. First, Fuchs pro- 
vides no evidence that these are 
in, fact the distinctive values most 
( haracteristic of the American 
Jewish subculture distinguishing 
it: from all other groups. Second- 
ly, assuming Fuchs to be correct 
mi this score, one would expect 
that those Jews who are more 
steeped in these particular values 
would be more liberal. There is 
no evidence to that effect and 
some evidence to the contrary, al- 
though we must admit, no one 
has ever studied Jewish voting be- 
havior using Fuch's particular con- 
cepts as his hypotheses. (More will 
be said of this below.) In other 
words to really know whether a 
particular explanation for Jewish 
political behavior is adequate, one 
must ask whether the same expla- 
nation is adequate to account for 
differences among Jews themselves. 
This would not be a sufficient 
condition to "prove" the explana- 
tion valid but it is a necessary one. 

A second type of explanation 
to account for Jewish political be- 
havior is essentially historical. An 
example is the interpretation of 
the origin of modern Jewish po- 
litical activity offered by Werner 
Colin. According to Cohn, after 
the French revolution only the 
parties to the "left" propounded 
the view that religion was irrele- 



vant to the determination of citi- 
zenship. The parties of the "right" 
were open only to Christians with 
the result that Jews had no al- 
ternative except to join with the 
left. The continued adherence of 
Jews to liberalism is explained by 
"their insecure place in the world- 
wide Gentile environment." Cohn 
feels that this feeling will persist 
since the ancient barriers between 
Jew and Christian will not fall. 

A third explanation for Jewish 
political behavior, one alluded to 
by almost all students in the lield, 
is "status inferiority." Represen- 
tative of this position would be 
Lipset in his volume Political 
Man. According to Lipset, who in 
turn relies on a number of pre- 
vious studies both in the United 
Slates and Europe, Jews are in an 
anomalous position. Economically 
they are among the most advantag- 
ed, groups in society. But their 
status in the Gentile society is 
quite low. This discrepancy be- 
tween economic position and so- 
cial status invokes a feeling of 
frustration on the part of the Jew 
and alienation from the status quo* 
I Ic feels permanently insecure and 
hence is especially sensitive and 
feels particularly threatened by 
attacks on the civil liberties of any 
groups. In addition, his alienation 
from the higher status "roups in 
society, among whom he feels he 
belongs by virtue of his economic 
success, permits him to identify 
with parlies of the "left" who op- 
pose the whole social structure. 

Although this explanation may 
be valid, it lacks a firm empirical 
foundation. At the very minimum 
the concept of "status inferiority" 
would have to be defined opera- 
tionally and we would then have 
to test whether those Jews who 
felt greater "Status Inferiority" 
were, other things being equal, 
more liberal or leftists in their 
voting and attitudes then those 
Jews who felt less of a 'status in- 



Marvin Moseley 

• Plumbing 

• Heating 

• Contractor 

Ralph Moseley 

1816 Park Avenue 
LYNCHBURG, VA. 

• Contractor 

• Insulation 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



103 



leriority." At least one effort in 
this direction has been made. In 
one of the few careful studies of 
Jewish voting behavior, Edgar Litt 
tested the relationship of political 
behavior to what he termed ethnic 
involvement and ethnic subordi- 
nation among a small sample of 
second generation, middle income, 
Conservative (as distinct from Or- 
thodox or Reform) Jews, all of ap- 
proximately equivalent education 
and all affiliated with the Demo- 
cratic Party. 

For our purposes we are in- 
1 crested in only one of the many 
questions to which Litt sought an 
answer. Are those Jews who feel 
more ethnically subordinate also 
more favorable to liberal policies? 
The measure of ethnic subordina- 
lion included "perceived anti-Jew- 
ish hostility and discrimination, 
feelings of insecurity and defens- 
iveness in social situations with 
•Gentiles and concern about re- 
criminations for conspicuous Jew- 
ish behavior." Liberalism, or as 
Litt called it "political altruism" 
was defined as favorable attitudes 
toward public welfare policies, Ne- 
gro political influence, and for- 
eign aid. 

Contrary to what might have 
been, expected, feelings of ethnic 
subordination were found to be 
inversely related to political altru- 
ism. In other words, Ave find just 
the opposite of what might bave 
been predicted from Lipsct's the- 
ory of "status inferiorit/' assum- 
ing, as seems reasonable to do, 
that "ethnic subordination'' as 
defined by Litt, is roughly equiva- 
lent to "status inferiority" as de- 
fined by Lipset. One studv then, 
as limited in sample si/e and scope 
as it was, nevertheless indicates 
'.h it the greater the status inferior- 
ity of the Jew, the less libera! he 
is. Furthermore, of interest is Litt's 
finding thai die Jews who are less 
ethnically involved (defined as 
identifying with Jewish groups 
and agreeing with Jewish social 
and religious norms) are almost as 



liberal as those with high ethnic 
involvment. This is something of 
a. challenge to Fuch's conclusions 
although Liu's precise definition 
of Jewish social and teligious 
norms is not specified and is prob- 
ably different from dial of Fuchs. 

In summary we can say that 
we know a great deal about how 
Jews behave politically but we 
are far from understanding the 
reasons. 



Some 100 Jewish stores were 
wrecked and looted in the Negro 
rioting in Rochester, N, Y. which 
started in an area where most 
businesses are owned by Jews. El- 
mer Lewis, excutive director of 
the Jewish Community Council of 
of Rochester, said "the Jewish busi- 
nessmen just happened to be there 
and were therefore the worst suf- 
ferers when thing-, suddenly got 
out of hand" at die outbreak of 
the riot. "Jewish businessmen" he 
added, "were not the prime target 
because thev wer^ Jews and this 
outbreak must no! be interpreted 
as anti-Semitism." The cit\ faced 
a breakdown in law and order and 
the Jews were th° principal suf- 
ferers, he declared. 




Maxwell M, Rabb of New York, 
former secretary to the cabinet of 
the United States during the Eisen- 
hower administration, has been ap- 
pointed chairman of the Bequest 
and Legacy committee of the Na- 
tional Jewish Hospital at Denver. 



EXCLUSIVEL 



v 
1 




For Complete Eye Care: 
Consult Your EYE PHYSICIAN 
Then See Your GUILD OPTICIAN 

A. G. Jefferson 

Ground Floor Allied Arts Bldg. Lynchburg, Va. 



o 
p 

T 
I 

C 
A 
L 



FOR EXCELLENCE IN SERVICE 



• WAITRESSES 

• NURSES 



CUNIc . 

UNIFORMS jgf 



TECHNICIANS 



FROM 

DUT1-DUDS, IMC, Manufacturers 
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Available in Retail Outlets Nationally 



wran mid iuw 



BERGMAN 

C. B* Cones Divisi 




Established 1879 

MANUFACTURERS OF HIGHEST QUALITY 
WOMEN'S SPORTSWEAR AND PLAY CLOTHES 

1701 Twelfth Street Dial VI 7-4429 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 




GREETINGS 




and 

PATTESON: 

REALTORS - INSURORS 

ESTABLISHED I9U 

Property M anagement 

• General Fire and ® Casualty Insurance 

• Rentals @ Sales 

• Appraisals © Auctions 

217 Ninth Street Lynchburg, Virginia 



Patterson 

DRUG Co., inc. 

Lynchburg — Danville — Martinsville 
Altavista — Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Roanoke, Va. 



104 



The American Jeuish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



THE 

Presidential 



MOTOR INN 

Intersection Main and 
Expressway 




Lynchburg, Va. 
Telephone 845-5975 



TWX No. 846-0946 EveTJ GueSt d V I. P 

Downtown in the heart of Lynchburg 

• Sample Rooms with all Display Equipment 

New Meeting and Banquet Facilities Unequalled 

• Special Commercial Rates $7.50 and $8.00 

• Every Hotel Service, Every Motel Convenience 

• Excellent Food in our beautiful Dining Room 



Yiddish Magic 

(Concluded from Page 17) 



May God's Richest 
Blessings Be Yours 
For 1964-5725 



raran mid nm 



EASTERN ELECTRIC CO. 

WHOLESALE ONLY 
1100 COMMERCE ST. LYNCHBURG. VA 

RADIO - TV 
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 







Be Wise 

Insure 
With B-Y 


B.Y.CALVERT j 

INC. 

General Insurance I 

Since 1907 
716 Church Street 
LYNCHBURG, VA. 
Dial VI 6-0566 







Greetings 

• VIRGINIA 

• LAUNDRY 

• CRUTCHFIELD 

• CLEANERS 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 




NEW YEAR 
GREETINGS 

Lynchburg 
Ready - Mix 
Concrete Co., Inc. 

LYNCHBURG, VA. 



ous belly laugh at the customary 
understatement. He said: 

"During the War 1 drove a 
droshke (horse and team) until I 
caught a chest full of German 
shrapnel. Pour ribs, one lung and 
a lew pounds of liver they remov- 
ed. But alive I am, so nicht gesor- 
get (why worry). With me it goes 
good now. 1 make 120 to 150 dol- 
lars a month. My daughter's a 
stenographer, a good one, makes 
$80. And so I live good in two 
rooms, comfortable and warm with 
my wife and daughter and young 
son who is 15. An engineer he 
wants to become. If harder he 
doesn't study, a droshke driver like 
his father he'll be." 

"We in America hear that it 
goes badly for the Jewish intel- 
ligensia (artists, professionals, doc- 
tors, lawyers and Jews in the mili- 
tary staff." 

"So? Hard is this to under- 
stand? The Russians tell the Jew- 
ish intelligensia— Look, why do you 
climb toward the clouds? Don't 
you know Russia is for the Rus- 
sians? Your passports we stamp 
'Jew.' Why don't you keep your 
place?" 

"What about the Communist 
party line about equal opportuni- 
ties for all minorities?" 

He looked at me shrewedly and 
said, "Look I tell my son, an en- 
gineer you want to become? Be- 
come an engineer. But rub a little 
invisible dust on you. And out of 
politics, keep yourself. Well here 
we are," he ended as we stopped 
in front of a brilliantly illuminat- 
ed Concert House. 

"Avrom," I said, "how about 
picking me up after the concert. 
Maybe your wife and children 
would enjoy talking to a co-re- 
ligionist from the West." 

"Fine, fine," he said, and then a 
little dubiously. "A humble home I 
have. But full of love," he added 
brightening. "We will set a ban- 
quet table with a white embroider- 
ed tablecloth and drink a glessele 
(little glass) wine and be froelich 
(happy)." 

The opera was "Boris Godinov" 
lavishly produced with extravagant 
costuming and wild exhilarating 
dances. When the last curtain call 
had ended (14 of them) I searched 
for my namesake Avrom. I tound 
him a half block away from the 



opera house and entered Ins cab 
and said in Yiddish, "Let's go, 
brother." 

When Avrom failed to respond, 
I repeated myself. He stirred un- 
easily and then said, "1 called my 
wife Raisele (little Rose) and she 
said, 'Avrom, crazy you must be to 
bring an American into our home. 
Trouble you want to make for 
yourself? Have you forgotten the 
warning our Chief Rabbi gave on 
Rosh Hashanah (High Holydays)? 
'Stay away from Westerners,' he 
said. 'The lot ot the Jew in Russia 
can only be made more serious by 
such contacts. Spies they'll say we 
are. A fool don't be Avrom. Come 
home alone.' " 

Avrom fell silent, I consoled 
him. 1 told him about the deep 
concern American Jews felt for 
our co-religionists in Russia. 

"Friend of my heart," he replied. 
"To home I cannot bring you, but 
into my heart I can. A little bit of 
chazan (cantor) It was many years 
ago. So my audience you will be 
while I ride you in my taxi." 

Avrom had a rich, resonant bari- 
tone. During the moonlit night 
we drove 'round and round the 
grim walls of the Kremlin in front 
of Lenin's mausoleum. The five- 
pointed red star of Spjasskaya 
Tower glared at us malevolently 
while this mustachioed Russian 
Jew serenaded me and wove a web 
of magic with his old Yiddish mel- 
odies and Hebrew songs from the 
pen of King David. 




IM m LIGHT 




Flowers 



SCHOOL EQUIPMENT CO., Inc. 
327 W. Main, Richmond, Va. 



Brown Morrison 
Company 

Fine Printing . . 

Office Supplies 

LYNCHBURG. VA. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



105 




M a military post overseas, the Jewish chaplain conducts Yom Kippur 
servicer: foj Jewish GTs and their families. Religious activities for all mem- 
bers of servicemen's families are an important part of the year-round morale 
and welfare program of the National Jewish Welfare Board (JWB) for 
more and more men have their wives and children with them on post. 



A M@th.er In Israel 



greater resources. 

Since his death in 1956, his son 
and partner, Dov Safrai, has car- 
ried on these traditions, remain- 
ing right at the heart of Israel's 
rapid development into an art 
centre of international interest. 



(Concluded from Page 19) 

Some of this interest is due to Dov 
Safrai's own efforts, lor he was 
among the first to organize full- 
scale exhibitions of the works of 
Israeli artists in Canada and (he 
[ T nited States. 




OPEN AN ACCOUNT 
.... AND 

SAVE BY MAIL! 

.... the easiest way we 
know to earn 4% quarterly, 
compounded semi-annually. 
No one has ever lost a pen- 
ney in an account insured 
by the F.S.L.I.C. 

Save by the 15th — 
Earn from the 1st. 
Save before you spend — 
by mail. 



THE CO-OPERATIVE 
BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

HOME OFFICE 
1001 Church Street, tynchburg, Va. 

BRANCH OFFICES 

2015 Wards Rd. - U.S. 29 North 



As further encouragement, the 
Safrai Gallery has established in 
the name of its founder a Jeru- 
salem artist's prize, to be awarded 
a 1. tin Spring Exhibition sponsor- 
ed annually b\ the Jerusalem 
Municipality. 

The Gallery serves as an Open 
House, where artists, locals and 
tourists from the four corners of 
the world make a habit of 'just 
dropping in'. Easy going, but emi- 
nently efficient, Dov Safrai meets 
every caller and every situation 
with Talmudic wisdom spited 
with modern wit. A visit to the 
Safrai Gallery is a rewarding ex- 
perience, whether from the artistic 
point of view, or that of human 
contact. 



Archbishop Dom Antonio de 
Siqueria of Brazil, on meeting with 
an American Jewish Committee 
delegation headed by Morris B. 
Abram, AJC chairman, said he 
was in agreement with a recent 
statements by Francis Cardinal 
Spellman of New York in favor of 
a Vatican declaration exonerating 
of guilt in the death of Jesus. Lead- 
ing members of the Sao Paula 
T°wish commum'fv were pi-sent at 
the meeting with the Archbishop. 



1964-65 



725 



Sincere Good "WisJies 
for flie INFew Year 




Orion. Exterminating Company, Inc. 



FOR -The Best Deal In Town" SEE 




VAUGHAN 

• Sales 

• Service 

Lynchburg, Va. 
• CORVAIR 




FRIGIDAIRE 



CADILLAC 




Always Buy and Serve The Finest 




FINFR % 
DAIRY PRODUCTS 

Milks - Ice Cream - Butter - Cottage Cheese - Sour Cream 
Fresh Cream - Dips - Fruit Drinks 

LYNCHBURG - WESTOVER DAIRIES, INC. 

2801 Fort Avenue Dial 847-4476 Lynchburg, Virginia 



YOU OWE YOURSELF ONE NIGHT 
FOE SELF-IMPROVEMENT 

Complete Business Education for Men and Women 
Four 12-week quarters each year, day or night 

TOPS BUSINESS COLLEGE 



1112 CHURCH STREET 



LYNCHBURG, VA. 



New Year 
Greetings 





or 



General Building Contractors 

Allied Arts Bldg. Lynchburg, Va. 



106 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Firms in 

NORFOLK, VJL 




4 



wim 



W. D. SAMS 
& Son, Inc. 

424 W. 21st Street Norfolk, Va. 

PLUMBING — HEATING — AIR-CONDITIONING 
RESIDENTIAL — COMMERCIAL — INDUSTRIAL 





OLD DOMINION TOBACCO CO. 



124 W. Main Street 
NORFOLK, VA. 



BEST WISHES FOR A 
HAPPY, HEALTHY, 
AND PROSPEROUS 




5725 



Moon Engineering Co. 

Incorporated 

General Marine and Industrial Plant Repairs 

545 Front Street Norfolk, Virginia 




GREETINGS 



Edwards-Councilor Co.. inc 



Janitor's Supplies 



121 Colley Avenue 



Norfolk, Va. 




DAY CAMP AT NORFOLK JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER 



Norfolk, vmmmm 

(Concluded from Page 10) 



who takes over the duties of Pro- 
gram Director is a native of VVil- 
kes-Barre, Pa. and Mrs. Lorna 
Grubei, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lester Sherrick, who recently 
acquired her Master's Degree in 
Social Work will serve the Cen- 
te; as Childrens Activities Direct- 
or. The Center is already hum- 
ming with new innovations and 
programs to interest the members 
of the Norfolk Jewish Community 
Center. 

At Temple Israel, newly-arriv- 
ed Irwin Weiner has assumed the 
duties of Executive Director and 
Youth Director. Mr. Weiner is a 
native of New York, graduated 
from Labavitcher Yeshiva and N. 
Y. City College. Mr. Weiner comes 
to Norfolk from Louisiana. A 
hearty welcome to Mr. Weiner. 

During the latter part of August, 
Norfolk bade farewell to Com- 
mander Elihu R. Rickel, Chaplain 
at Norfolk's Naval Base who has 
transferred to Chicago. The Jew- 
ish Navy personnel will miss Chap- 
lain Rickel who brought a fount 
of knowledge and understanding 
to the servicemen who attended 
weekly at Commodore L e v y 
Chapel. 

Norfolk's many philanthropic 



organizations are busily planning 
fall and winter programs and we 
shall be reading about it in next 
month's issue of Times-Outlook. 

The Jewish community of Nor- 
folk asks to take this opportunity 
to convey to all the readers of 
American Jewish limes-Outlook, 
a very healthy and happy New 
Year and may we look forward 
to a peaceful year all over the 
world. 



Rufus Learsi, noted Jewish his- 
torian and writer who died at the 
age of 76, was born in Russia, and 
he came to this country as a child. 
His name originally was Israel 
Goldberg. Among his outstanding, 
works is "Israel: A History of the 
Jewish People,'' "The History of 
the Jews in America" and "Fulfill- 
ment, the Epic Story of Zionism." 
He was also co-author, with the 
late Dr. Samson Benderlv of the 
three-volumn "Outline o! Jewish 
History." He was also the author 
of a prayer to the martyrs o f the 
Warsaw Ghetto which entered the 
Jewish liturgy. In addition he was 
a wide contributor to various Jew- 
ish publications both here and 
abroad. 



ROYAL SILVER MFG. CO., INC. 

REFLATING SILVER, GOLTI. NTCKEL and CHROME 
QUALITY PLATING SINCE 1907 

NEW LOCATION 

3135 Arizona Avenue — Just off Chesapeake Blvd. 
Fairmont Park NORFOLK, VA. Phone LO 3-0262 



.September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



107 



English - Israel's Second Language 

(Continued from Page 85) 



5. Finally, there is the snob ap- 
peal of English, perhaps partly 
a heritage from the days when 
the British ruled Palestine before 
the birth of the Jewish State, and 
perhaps even more due to the 
present prestige and power of 
American Jewry and of America 
generally, people who were 
brought up in Eastern Europe in 
the Yiddish language will olten 
prefer to speak to you in a halt- 
ing English rather than a good 
Yiddish. Editorial opinions of the 
"Jerusalem Post," the only Eng- 
lish language daily in the country, 
are often quoted in the Hebrew 
language press and on the Gov- 
ernment owned radio, but never 
the editorial opinions of the Yid- 
dish daily "Letste Nates," which 
has a larger circulation than the 
"Post" but which caters to a hum- 



bler class of readers. An elderly 
Yiddish journalist from Poland, 
who knows Hebrew well, who 
spent several years in New York 
where I became acquainted with 
him and who now lives in retire- 
ment in Tel Aviv, told me there 
that whenever he has to go into 
a Government office to transact 
some business he always prefers 
to speak English rather ihan He- 
brew to the official in (barge, be- 
cause he felt he would thereby 
get more attention and respect. 
This may be an exaggeration on 
his part, but I heard similar stories 
from several other persons. 

With all that, if you come to 
Israel, stop some Moroccan Jew 
to ask in English lor some direc- 
tion and he gives you a blank 
stare, don't think he is being rude: 

(Please turn to Page 122) 



What About The Biblical Miracles? 

(Continued from Page 52) 



"As in the case of the miracles," 
Rabbi Winters asserts, "humanist- 
naturalist thinkers have found 
ways around this central idea" of 
the Old Testament. The approach 
is that some of "these sinning 
folks" are considered as the great 
est religious geniuses who evei 
lived. Therefore, "if they, normal 
people, could live and still achieve 
the spiritual and ethical heights, 
then there is still hope for us." 

This widely applied approach, 
according to Rabbi Winters, "com- 
prises the midrash of modern Juda- 
ism" but one of its consequences 
is that those Jews who believe in 
this "midrash" no longer "see God 
as the only true Hero of history. 
Thus they no longer comprehend 
history as the arena in which God's 
heroism is displayed." A theologi- 
cal loss of such proportions "is a 
terrible price to pay for a minor 
humanist gain," the Reform rabbi 
adds. 



bin there is an even greater 
cost, which is both theological and 
humanist, he contends, which 
arises from the fact thai the mir- 
acle was not only objective reality 
to the- Biblical writers: it was also 
a symbol. "The reality of the mir- 
acle represented God as the Hero 
in the struggles of imperfect, un- 
heroic men," Rabbi Winters 
writes. "The miracle as a symbol 
represented God's triumph over 
nature." Otherwise put, the mir- 
acle "symbolized God's control 
over his creation" since he could 
suspend and change natural law. 

This idea is needed now more 
than ever before, in Rabbi Win 
ters' view because man's science 
"has produced its own miracles," 
with "astounding control over na- 
ture." However, this is an advance 
which has given man neither hap 
piness nor security. If today's 
weaponry, for instance, "terrifies 
us, we may well tremble at what 
will be possible tomorrow." 




GREETINGS 



ALBERT ASHBY 

WHOLESALE LUMBER 
Park Avenue and Truxton Street 



P. 0. Box 5124 



South Norfolk, Virginia 



7964 BUICK 

With Exclusive "Advanced Thrust" Design 

WINNER MOBIL GAS 
ECONOMY RUN 




The 1964 Buicks 



Buicks finest . . 
Buicks smartest 
Buick s liveliest 
Buick s sweetest 
Buick s thriftiest 



the Electra 225 
. the LeSabre 
. the Wildcat 
, . the Skylark 
. . the Special 



PERRY BUICK COMPANY 



Granby Street— 14th to 15th 



NORFOLK. VA. 





VIRGINIA PILOT 
ASSOCIATION 

NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 

G. ALVIN MASSENBURG 



President 



Ferrell Linoleum & Tile Co. 

INCORPORATED 

326 W. 21st St. NORFOLK, VA. 

# TILE # TERRAZZO $ MARBLE 

VINYL TILE # RUBBER TILE 

MOVING TO NEW LOCATION 
1225 West 25th Street 



108 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Firms in 

Newport News, Va. 



HAPPY 



Greetings 




at 33rd Street 3 
New] ort News, Va. 



Office: 



Kecoughton Road 
at Wythe Center 
II mpton. Va. 




Newport News, Va. 
Brentwood Shopping Center 



Happy 




Greetings 



HOTEL WARWICK 

DOWN TOWN IN NEWPORT NEWS, VA. 

FAMILY RATE — CHILDREN UNDER 14 FREE 

Newly Decorated Rooms 
Air Conditioned, Radio, and TV 
MODERATE RATES 

Excellent Meals In Our Dining Room 
Our Own Free Lighted Parking Lot 

H. L. GRAHAM, Ma-ajer 



BENSON - PHILLIPS CO. 

READY-MIXED CONCRETE AND INSULATION 

COAL — FUEL OIL — BUILDING SUPPLIES 

NEWPORT NEWS, VIRGINIA 
Since 1891 



FLORIDA 
ORANGE 
STORE SUPER 
MARKETS 

4 Units 

Newport News, 
Virginia 



The nature which man needs 
most to control is his own. "To 
create is God-like; to control one's 
creation is the ethical imitation of 
God; to control one's self is the 
moral phase of assimilating the 



divine attributes." 

In sum, says Rabbi Winters, it 
would seem that "the miracle as 
a symbol of triumph over nature 
is not without utility even for 
rationalists today." 



Our Broken Promises 

(Concluded from Page 95) 



'Oil let my weakness have an 
end! 

Give unto me, made lowly wise, 
The spirit of self sacrifice. . . ." 

To suit our actions to our 
words and our words to our ac- 
tions, to be true to our commit- 
ments, true to ourselves, we must 
be prepared for sacrifice, even as 
the patriarch Abraham was pre- 
pared, to sacrifice Isaac, as told in 
the story of the "Akedah," the 
scriptural reading for Rosh Hash- 
onah. 

Nothing good, nothing endur- 
ing, has ever been achieved by 
man or society without "sweat, 
blood and tears." Yes, it is better, 
it is wiser, to continue making 
promises and fail to fulfill them, 
rather than refrain from extract- 
ing resolutions from ourselves. 

For unfulfilled promises have 
a way of haunting, nagging and 
tormenting the conscience. This 
being the case, there is hope that 
one day we might call a halt to 
vacillation, deferment, indifference 
—become masters of our destiny 
and, at long last, thrill to the ex- 
perience of having turned words 
into acts, and acts that have made 
us better and happier human be- 
ings. 

Let us trust that God in His 
mercy will grant us another year 
of life, another chance to make 
a promise, and that this time we 
will seize the opportunity and, by 
will and sacrifice, succeed in wip- 
ing' failure from our record. 

Of the new opportunity that 
may come our way to make good 
our promises, the poet sing; tlvs- 
ly: 

"They do me wrong who say I 
come no more 



When once 1 knock and fail to 
find you in; 
for every day I stand outside 
your door 
And bid you wake, and rise to 
fight and win. 
"Wail not lor precious chances 
passed away! 
Weep not lor golden ages on 
the wane! 
Each night I burn the records of 
the day - 
At sunrise every soul is born 
again! 

"Dost thou behold thy lost youth 
all aghast? 
Dost reel from righteous retri- 
bution's blow? 
Then turn from blotted archives 
of the past 
And find the future's pages 
white as snow." 



Denial of the existence in Ar- 
gentina 01 any significant and or- 
ganized anti-Semitic campaign was 
made in Washington by Argen- 
tine, Foreign Minister Miguel An- 
gel Zaval Ortiz. The Foreign Min- 
ister made the denial in an inter- 
view with Milton Friedman of the 
fewish Telegraphic Agency. Mr. 
Ortiz told the JTA correspondent 
that the question of Argentine 
anti-Semitism had been "magni- 
fied" out of proportion to the ac- v 
tual facts. His government, hi 
said, "will not tolerate any racial 
discrimination." Apropos the re- 
cent demand by a Peronist deputy 
that the government investigate 
the activities of Argentine Jewr 
Mr. Ortiz said Argentina was a de- 
mocracy where legislators had free 
expression and the right to make 
whatever legislative proposals thev 
wished. 




COAL FUEL OIL 

PRINTED METER DELIVERIES 
PHONE CH 4-8484 NEWPORT NEWS, VA 



^MOSTCOMPtETE LIKE ONPEHIKSUlA 



?2,«tWASHI»J<r.,I«* ATE 




September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




The shofar sounds to summon Jewish servicemen to the observance 
oi' the New Year. Around the world, this scene will be repeated wherever 
U.S. troops are on duty. Jewish chaplains, recruited, endorsed and served 
by the National Jewish Welfare Board (JBW). will call their Army, Navy 
and. Air Force congregations to prayer to celebrate the most holy days on 
the Jewish calendar, just as thfy observe all of the Jewish holidays and 
iestivals. 



Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson 

(Concluded from Page 92) 



tional southern hospitality, could 
have dreamed that in less than 
3 years, the keys of the First Lady 
of the Land would bear the ini- 
tials LBJ, just as (lie Presidents 
would bear LBJ. 

That night in February, 1961, 
'V.P.' were the outstanding initials 
of Lyndon B. Johnson, hei hus- 
band who was being honored . . . 
She was theie in full culmination 
of the triumph sharing ii with 
him. And when B'nai Zion an- 
nounced that a forest of f 5,000 
trees were to be planted in the 
honor of Lyndon B. Johnson in 
Israel, she clapped the longest if 



not the loudest in that tremendous 
ballroom . . . waving her arms to 
B'nai Zionists in warm gratitude. 

Thus it was that all hearts reg- 
istered with Lady Bird that night 
and led the famous raconteur 
Harry Herschfield 10 crystallize in- 
to worded sentiment the all em- 
bracing affection generated: 

"To our great nation you ma) be 
Lady Bird," he said, "but to all ol 
us here tonight and to American 
Jewry you will always be 'FAT- 
GELE' . . ." 

The night American Jewry met 
Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson. 



ATTENTION! WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS! 
Is your Sisterhood or Hadassah taking advantage of this easy fund- 
raising plan? Obtaining subscriptions for THE AMERICAN JEWISH 
TIMES-OUTLOOK is an easy way of raising money for your projects 
or general fund. Mail in your list of subscriptions your workers sell. 
We will send you a check in full for 50% of the total amount. You do 
not have to collect. We will bill them. Address The American Jewish 
Times-Outlook, 530 Southeastern Building, Greensboro, N. C. 




THOMAS PIANO COMPANY 

"EVERYTHING MUSICAL" 
210 Twenty-eighth St. Newport News, Va. 




FROM 



WGH 

Affiliate of 

American 

Broadcasting Co. 

Serving the 
Hampton Roads Area 



The Daily Press 
and 

Times-Herald 

"Hampton Roads 
Newspapers" 

Newport News and 
Hampton, Virginia 




GREETINGS 



MAY THE NEW YEAR BRING YOU 
HEALTH & HAPPINESS 




Downtown and Warwick Center 
Stores 

NEWPORT NEWS, VA. 




Since 1921 Trading as Newport News Automobile Exchange 

Telephone 244-49 1 1 
3400 HUNTINGTON AVE. NEWPORT NEWS, VA. 



• W. C. BOWEN 

# G. K. McMURRAN 
#W. COOPER BOWEN 



BOWEN CO. 



Insurance Consultants 

LIFE — AUTO — CASUALTY — FIRE — MARINE 

135-27th Street — Exchange Building 
Newport News, Virginia Phone CH 4-1441 



110 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Firms in 

Newport News - Hampton - Phoebus, VA. 




Very Happy 

• NEW YEAR 
• GREETINGS 

CROWN 

NEWPORT NEWS, VA. 




AKERS BEVERAGE CO. 



128 24th Street 



NEWPORT NEWS, VA. 



What'll YOU Have? "Original" 



Pabst Blue Ribbon Beer 
Hamm's Beer 




Baked fresh daily in Newport News, Va. 



WILSON AWNING COMPANY 

Oldest In The Peninsula 

RAY W. MALONE, Prop. 

2313 Washington Ave. NEWPORT NEWS, VA. 

Awnings, Covers, Tarpaulins, Flags and Yacht Work 



The Lackey-Saunders Co., Inc. 

REAL ESTATE, RENTAL AND 
INSURANCE AGENTS 
HAMPTON • VIRGINIA 





Greetings 

R. F. Slaughter Lumber Corp. 

Dealers and Manufacturers of 
Lumber, Millwork and Building Materials 
Phone PArk 2-4381 PHOEBUS, VIRGINIA 



EARL R. HATTEN 

Handy Oil Corporation 

Small Boat Harbor 
Phone CH 4-1444 
NEWPORT NEWS, VA. 

SOCONY - MOBIL 
PRODUCTS 



ROUNTREE 
FURNITURE CO. 

Hampton's Progressive 
Home Furnishers 

General Electric 
Major Appliances 
HAMPTON, VIRGINIA 



The Significance of Brotherhood 

(Continued from Page 80) 



Pope of the Roman Catholic 
Church, a new era for the Church 
was finally begun. This man was, 
to use the Jewish accolade, a 
mensch — an individual deeply 
and ultimately concerned for hu- 
manness in all mankind. He in- 
stilled, throughout the church, a 
spirit of reverence for human per- 
sonality — a love for the children 
of the One eternal God . . . all of 
the men, women and children on 
this earth! And Pope John ac- 
complished this in dramatic and 
significant ways; he exemplified 
ultimate concern and mutual re- 
spect through the life he lived, 
and he demanded emulation by 
the Church. 

He, for example, called on ad- 
visory committee meetings in re- 
gard to the removal of the nega- 
tive and emotion-producing ad- 
jective "perfidious" which was 
applied to the Jews in the Good 
Friday Mass. He found it person- 
ally offensive and destructive and 
obnoxious — and he ordered it re- 
moved! He was sick and tired of 
the back-biting and hostilities and 
disagreements and disrespect with- 
in and without the Church — and 
so he convened the first Vatican 
Council as a major and vital step 
toward ecumenicity; toward mak- 
ing the Catholic Church truly 
catholic. 

But to the anguish and heart- 
ache of the entire world, John's 
papacy was too short-lived. He 
died having just begun the renov- 
ation of the Church. 

But when the assembly of Vati- 
can II was convened under Pope 
Paul, we were hopeful that though 
John had died, he would still be 
present in the midst of the Cath- 
olic Church . . . that Pope Paul, 
who was continuing John's work 
had really been "given to the 
Church to endow the prophetic 
intuitions of his predecessor with 
form and substance." 

The world was hopeful and 
waited for the results. 

In the midst of the difficulties 
that afflicted Vatican II, encou- 
ragement and added hope was 
given by Cardinal Suenens in an 
address preached at a special Mass 
commemorating the election of 
John XXIII, In effect he told the 



Council Fathers that Pope Paul's. 
Council had begun, and, in case 
anyone had any doubts, it was go- 
ing to continue along the pastoral 
and ecumenical lines laid down 
by Pope John. 

The issues discussed by the pre- 
lates at Vatican I and Vatican II 
are numerous and far more fa- 
miliar to you than they are to me. 
By and large, with one specific 
exception, they shall have much 
more influence upon your relig- 
ious lives than mine. However, 
the spirit that motiviates the en- 
tire movement is one of liberalism 
— and this concerns us all. 

And flowering out of this spirit, 
of course, is thai critical section 
of Schema 4 relating to the Jews. 
In paraphrased explanation, Car- 
dinal Bea's proposal states that 
"the part the Jewish leaders of 
Christ's day played in bringing 
about the crucifixion does not ex- 
clude the guilt of all mankind. 
But, the personal guilt of these 
leaders cannot be charged to the 
whole Jewish people either of his 
time or today. It is, therefore, un- 
just, to call this people 'deicide' 
or to consider it 'cursed' by God." 

The prospect of such a proposal 
being adopted by the Roman 
Catholic Church was greeted with 
great applause by Jewish leader- 
ship everywhere. While the sec- 
tion, if adopted, will not com- 
pletely remove the Jew from in- 
volvement in Jesus' death, it 
should hopefully and significant- 
ly shift the focus of guilt from the 
Jew to all mankind. 

We therefore welcome and look 
forward to such a change . . . and 



New Year Greetings 




HOTEL LANGLEY 

AND 

COFFEE SHOP 

HAMPTON, VIRGINIA 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 



111 




Among speakers at international convention of World Council of Syna- 
gogues held in Mexico City July 20-22 were (left to right) Council presi- 
dent Charles Rosengarten of Waterbury, Conn.; Rabbi Bernard Mandelbaum, 
provost of Jewish Theological Seminary of America; and Rabbi Marshall 
T. Meyer, director of Council's Latin American office in Buenos Aires. 



yet it fills us with certain ambi- 
valent feelings. Not so much dur- 
ing the deliberations of Vatican 
II, perhaps, as after its adjourn- 
ment without having adopted this 
section of Schema 4. Now the 
ambivalence is marked! Yes, of 
course we are still thrilled at the 
prospect of having the Church cor- 
rect a gross injustice of the ages— 
but why have they waited so long? 
Why not before the Crusades and 
the Inquisition, the Russian pog- 
roms and Nazi genocide? Why has 
there been a 2000 year delay in 
eradication of falsehood? 

Why must we now wait until 
Vatican III — and will the vindi- 
cation come then? 

But despite the mixed emotions, 
we hope and pray for ultimate 
success and the positive conse- 
quences of such. For it should ul- 
timately lead to an end to relig- 
iously instigated anti-semitism and 
allow the Jew the right to be judg- 
ed and considered an individual, 
along with anyone and everyone 
else. 

But I personally hope for some- 



44|iL 



2% f astrg ^l]np 

ALBERT DOUGLAS, Prop. 

FANCY CAKES— PIES 
BREAD and ROLLS 

Duke of Gloucester Street 
WILLIAMSBURG, VA. 



thing beyond the absence of anti- 
semitism, and I interpret this 
meeting here tonight as the initia- 
tion of that toward which we move 
... a sound and realistic dialogue 
between Christianity and Judaism 
so that we may come to under- 
stand and thereby to respect the 
religious points ol view of each. 

This week is National Brother- 
hood Week — a time for the ex- 
change of ideas in an attempt for 
better understanding. But Brother- 
hood has finally reached that point 
of maturity in this world of ours 
where we no longer delude our- 
selves with the euphoric nonsense 
that everybody is just like every- 
body else. Through closer and 
more honest communication we 
have come to realize that each of 
us is different one from the other, 
and that the element of difference 
is good — as long as it is under- 
stood in positive and constructive 
terms. 

As Catholics and Jews, the time 
has come for us to get to know 
each other better and to truly 
manifest the meaning of brother- 
hood within our lives — not to 
the point at which we shall be 
called upon to answer the Biblical 
question of Cain: "Am I my broth- 
er's keeper?" — but rather to the 
point where we clearly under- 
stand that we are our brother's 
brother, and that in order to get 
along together, side by side, our 
relationship must be based on mu- 
tual understanding and love for 
one another. 



Do Your Part! 
Contribute to th« North 
Caro^'na Home for the 
Jewish Affed 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Firms in 



WE WISH TO EXTEND TO 
YOU AND YOURS 

Best Wishes for a 
Happy New Year 



Williamsburg Automobile 
[Dealers Association 

• Colony Motors, Inc. 

PONTIAC - RAMBLER 

• Walls Motor Co., Inc. 

CHEVROLET - BUICK - FIAT 

9 Harman Olds-Cadillac Corp. 

CADILLAC - OLDSMOBILE 

• Person Ford 

FORD - MERCURY 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



Lafayette Specialty 

Shish Kebab and Pilaf 
Live Maine Lobsters 
From Our 
Neptune Tank 



WESTERN CHARCOALED 
STEAKS . . . IMPORTED 
WINES AND CHAMPAGNE 
OUR FAMOUS LAFAY- 
ETTE SALAD . . 





Charcoal -Steak ana* Seafood 
Jjouse 




RECOMMENDED 

For Reservations Call Williamsburg CA 9-3811 — CA 9-9045 
WE HAVE BEEN SERVING GOOD FOOD FOR OVER )0 YEARS 



1203 RICHMOND ROAD 
MEMBER AMERICAN EXPRESS 



Meet Your Friends and 
Make Up Your Parties. 



BANQUET FACILITIES AVAILABLE 



Vl2 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Firms in 

Charlottesville, Va. 




— G 



V 



Let the Banks of Charlcuesviile Serve You 

• THE CITIZENS BANK & TRUST CO. 

• NATIONAL BANK & TRUST CO. 

• THE PEOPLE'S NATIONAL BANK 





Greetings 




MONTICELLO 
DAIRY 



295-5123 



CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. 



JARMAN'S 

Everything for the Office 



OFFICE FURNITURE 
AND SUPPLIES 



"The Business Man's Department Stores" 
• FURNITURE • SYSTEMS • SUPPLIES 

Charlottesville & Waynesboro, Va. 



CITY LAUNDRY 



for Our Twin Service in Charlottesville . . . 

"Just Dial 295-9136 



& DRY CLEANERS 



Happy New Year . . . 

THE DAILY PROGRESS 

Over One-Half Century of Public Service 
"ROOTED IN HISTORY — IN STEP WITH THE FUTURE" 
Charlottesville, Virginia 



Old Time Religion 

(Continued from Page 23) 



for instance, you can go around 
the corner and into a nook of 
Times Square and have yourself 
a glat-kosher pastrami on real 
Jewish rye. Should you have an or- 
iental yen, you can travel doAvn- 
toAvn and be served Chinese deli- 
cacies under rabbinic supervision. 
Further south, you can even board 
Noah's ark for kosher pizza pie 
while listening to the tunes of an 
Orthodox beatle. The somewhat 
more sophisticated can uoav em- 
bark on a non-Jewish ship for a 
kosher cruise in the Carribean. 

Despite lack of central organiza- 
tion, Orthodoxy has created a re- 
markable educational pyramid in 
America, with its base of primary 
education widening yearly, culmi- 
nating in its apex of higher educa- 
tion which is rising majestically 
over Manhattan's Washington 
Heights. Whereas a generation ago 
a Jewish mother spoke of her son 
the doctor, Mother Judaism can 
now point proudly to her sons the 
builders. The results of this edu- 
cational drive are becoming ap- 
parent and its influence has of 
late been felt on many secular 
campuses where Orthodox fewish 
groups are flourishing to the dis- 
may of their critics and antagon- 
ists. 

Does all this and more spell a 
religious revival? Perhaps not. To 
be sure, this does not mean a dis- 
avowl of the successes of Ortho- 
doxy. These have much positive 
value when seen in proper per- 
spective. Nevertheless, they also 
seem to be symptoms of an accom- 
odation of the forms of Orthodoxy 
to Main Street, USA. While the 
knitted yarmulke indicates the 
pride of the wearer in his religion, 
it may also show our society's ac- 
ceptance of it as a fashion. The 
signs point to Orthodoxy's return 
to vogue. Of this we should be 
wary. When religion becomes 



fashionable it is not yet necessarily 
alive and vibrant. It may become 
smug and complacent. 

It has now become proper lo 
enroll one's child in a private Jew- 
ish school, attend the synagogue 
decorously, "enjoy'' the services 
and the rabbi's sermon, respond 
generously to various worthy ap- 
peals, and hold an aesthetically 
appealing prayerbook. One won- 
ders whether the recent spate of 
siddur publishing in America re- 
flects a true revival of prayer, the 
epitome of religion, or whether it 
exemplified the sub-situation of an 
object, a means, for an ideal, an 
end. 

One's home is strictly kosher, is 
decorated with bronze Israeli ob- 
jects d'art, and has a small shelf 
of Jewish books including the 
latest translation of the Torah. 
Pedal-pushing young matrons buy 
ready-to-heat-and-serve Jewish del- 
icacies just like mother used to 
make and vie with each other 
over how many people each is 
having for Kiddush. 

Six days of the week are devot- 
ed to the creation of the where- 
withal of this accomodation of Or- 
thodoxy to middle-class values of 
the American "WASP" (White- An- 
glo-Saxon-Protestant). One sus- 
pects that it is their values by 
which the modern Orthodox Jew 
really lives with the addition of 
a distinguishing religious ritual 
and color. The immediate need 
of the means for this religious 
coloration take up all of his en- 
ergies. Means are seen as the ulii- 
mate ends of Torah. "Religious 
revival" is essentially absent from 
these important but external su< 
cesses of Orthodoxy. 

Real religion cannot be institus 
tionalized. Synagogue buildings oi 
organized kashruth are not self- 
sufficient ends. A religious reviv- 




GREETINGS 



KELLER & GEORGE, Inc 

Jewelers and Opticians 
— Since 1875 — 



CHARLOTTESVILLE 



VIRGINIA 



September, 1964 

al can not be planned like an in- 
dustrial relocation. The Jewish re- 
ligious revival that grew out of 
sixteenth-century Safed and eigh- 
teenth-century Podolia was not 
planned or organized out of a 
complex of offices. Religious il- 
lumination speared from the light 
that was seen by a few singular 
religious personalities. 

The religious dimension of life 
is an individual, not a mass or 
group experience. It takes place 
in the innermost recesses of one's 
self as he relates to God. This re- 
lationship becomes his ultimate 
and absolute concern and thus 
"relativizes" all other concerns and 
values which are now no longer 
primary. His life is no longer frag- 
mentized. It is now unified; it is 
directed; it is religious. 

Thus true religion generally, 
and Orthoodx Judaism in particu- 
lar admits no peers in value or 
commitment. The unity of God- 
the fundamental affirmation of 
Judaism-demands the correspond- 
ing indivisible unity of man, 
where all his needs, concerns and 
values are directed toward his ul- 
timate and absolute need, con- 
cern, and value-God. 

It is this unity and primacy of 
concern which seems to be lack 
ing in contemporary Orthodoxy. 
God, Torah, religion are not our 
"ultimate concern." The) are con- 
cerns among many and are condi- 
tioned by special situation and 
temporal occasion. 

We have a plurality of concerns 
and values. Our lives are, there- 
fore, departmentalized and frag- 
mented. We relate God to an oc- 
casion, an institution or, a division. 
There is a time for God and a time 
for golf, a time to pray and a 
time to play. We live a smoothly 
organized life where each part, 
including religion, plays its role. 
We render to God what is God's 
and what remains is ours. The 
modern Orthodox Jew, smug and 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



complacent, is convinced of his 
just deserts and confidently awaits 
lu's generous portion of the Levia- 
than. 

Here is the rub. Religion to be 
religious cannot be just another 
function of man. It does not serve 
any other purpose nor fill any 
other need, be it psychological, 
social, political, or aesthetic. God 
has not come to inaugurate politi- 
cians in office nor to be invoked 
at farewell dinners nor even to 
make man happy and give him 
peace. God is either man's only 
absolute value or He becomes 
another idol of man's market place, 
another item in the suburban shop- 
ping center. God is either our ulti- 
mate concern or He is of no con- 
cern. Religion is its own end; total 
man in the service of God. 



The UJA's Fourth Annual 
Young Leadership Mission re- 
turned from an intensive three-and- 
a-half-week survey of Jewish immi- 
grant resettlemnt and refugee ai l 
programs in Israel, France and 
Italy supported with funds raised 
through the UJA's nationwide 
campaign. The mission was head- 
ed by Rabbi Herbert A. Fried- 
man, [JJA executive vice chairr- 
man. 




Adele H. Nusbaum, former public 
relations director of the United Jew- 
ish Federation of Pittsburgh has been 
named director of public relations for 
B'nai B'rith Women, Mrs. Leonard 
Sims, BBW president has announced. 



Blair House 

Route 29-250 Bypass 

University Cafeteria 

1517 W. Main Street — Charlottesville, Va. 
THOS. JEFFERSON INN DINING ROOM 

Route 29 N. CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. Free Parking 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Firms in 

[, VA. 




WELDON MILLS, Inc. 

• Emporia, Va. 
BELDING HAUSMAN FABRICS, INC. 

1407 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 18, N. Y. 



— - Season s 
ZZ~ Greetings 

"Your Financial Friend" 

THE CITIZENS NATIONAL BANK 

EMPORIA, VIRGINIA 




Serving this community since 1897 
Member ^DIC 





Greetings 




Greetings 



The 
National Valley 
Bank 

of 

STAUNTON, VIRGINIA 



HARDWARE 

OF ALL KINDS 

Charlottesville Hardware Comp 

316-318 East Main Street 
CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGTNTA 



ny 



114 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous Neiu Year from the Following Firms in 

Danville, Va. 



Your Guess 

(Continued from Page 30) 



Our Very Best Wishes to Our Many Jewish Friends 
For a Happy New Year 

SECURITY BANK 
and TRUST COMPANY 

• Main Office ... ...524 Main Street 

• Branch Office.... Riverside Drive 

• Branch Office Ballou Park 

"Large enough to serve you 
Small enough to know you" 
DANVILLE, VIRGINIA 

MEMBER 

FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM • FEDERAL DEPOSIT 
INSURANCE CORPORATION 



wmaiiiiuiimiiMniraiimuitiniiiiiiwiiiiiiiLs 



SINCE 1909 



DANVILLE LAUNDRY 

"A Soft Water Laundry" 

DRY CLEANING 

"Approved Sanitone Service" 
FUR and WOOLEN STORAGE 



mniinHimminmi 1 hi utii lining 



WE OFFER A COMPLETE 
LAUNDRY SERVICE 

Telephone SW 3-7211 
BRANCH OFFICE: BALLOU PARK 



COMPLETE BANKING SERVICES 

BUSINESS and the INDIVIDUAL 

Deposits Insured by FDIC Up to $10,000 for Each Depositor 

FIRST STATE BANK 

Union and Spring Streets 
DANVILLE, VIRGINIA 
"A Good Bank for Everybody" 
Member American Bankers Association 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



NEW YEARS 
GREETINGS 

Swicegood 
Funeral 
Home 

"The House That 
Service Built" 

Phone SW 2-5611 
DANVILLE, VA. 




Ask For FAULTLESS 
Dairy Products 

Fresher because only 
FAULTLESS Products are 
Made Here in Danville 

DANVILLE DAIRY 
PRODUCTS CO. 

Phone SW 2-2515 



possible to project existing trends 
and to make educated guesses as 
to what the trends might total up 
to at a given point in the future. 
This is done with population 
data, for example, and is wide- 
spread in business forecasting. 

The trouble with trying this with 
Jewish life is that the Jewish ex- 
perience in this country is totally 
unlike that of any other recorded 
Jewry in history. In the light of 
that recorded experience what is 
happening in American Jewish life 
is strange enough to drive the Jew- 
ish pundits to distraction. 

The result is the emergence of 
what might be called an opposing 
polarity of views. There are those, 
described as "Negators of the 
Gault," who can see only group 
oblivion for American Jews. The 
opposite polt is inhabited by those 
who— observing with awe the un- 
usual wealth of resources of every 
kind of Amei icanjew— say the Jew- 
ish future in America cannot be 
other than bright. 

Both postures deal with unreali- 
ties. The fact seems to be that if 
the yardsticks of Jewish life of pre- 
Hitler Eastern Europe are used, 
only one conclusion is possible. 
These American Jews who do 
things — Jewishly-speaking, that 
is — so differently from their Eu- 
ropean forebears must disappear. 
How else? 

But the European pale or ghetto 
and the American freedom are of 
the substance of two different 
planets and the comparison cannot 
be valid and the yardsticks do not 
measure. All that the unbiased ob- 
server can do is to look at the 
American Jew as he is and does, 
and grapple with the realization 
that this Jew is composing his own 
special kind of Jewishness. He does 
want to be a Jew and he wants 
his children to be Jews, though it 
is unwise and possibly frustrating 
to press him for details. 

Passover is one of the typical 
examples. Why should the home- 
maker of a Reform Jewish family 
buy all the kosher food trappings 
for a Passover table from which 
kosher foods are lacking the rest 
of the year? It is likely there will 
be bread on the Seder table along 
with the matzoh. The combination 



would be a shocker to one of the 
martyred Jewish families of Dvin- 
sk, but it is a Passover table and 
it springs from an authentic Jew- 
ish impulse. 

How does one measure the mean- 
ing of the sudden upsurge each 
year in kosher-for-Passover in- 
terest and sales. Stores in Jewish 
neighborhoods report that they 
sell as much kosher products in 
the two-week-pre-Passover period 
as they do during the other 50 
weeks. 

Consider the experience of the 
Kosher Certification Service of the 
Union of Orthodox Jewish Con- 
gregations. It publishes two types 
of kosher products directories. One 
is a year-round listing and the 
other is a once-a-year Passover 
Products Directory. The number 
of Passover Directories asked for 
each year — and the organization 
sends out material only on re- 
quest — averages close to an 
astounding 200,000 copies, well 
above the total of the year-round 
Directories it distributes on re- 
quest. If it is assumed that there 
are about 1,500,000 Jewish fami- 
lies in this country, almost one in 
every seven such families get this 
Directory each year and presum- 
ably uses it. 

Moreover, the trend in Kosher- 
for-Passover products has been 
rising steadily each year lor more 
than half a decade, according to 
no less an authority than the Wall 
Street Journal. Kosher product 
sales generally also have been ris- 
ing but not at the same pace. It 
is impossible to classify the precise 
Jewishness of such behavior but 
it w«uld be preposterous to argue 
that at its core it is not Jewish. 
It is. 

And there is much more of this 
puzzling activity. There is the 
practically universal observance of 
Chanukah among suburban fami- 
lies. This Chanukah, like Passover, 
has been put through the Ameri- 
can Jewish twentieth-century mold 
and in some aspects is weirdly dif- 
(Flease turn to Page 120) 



CLEMENTS 
and PARKER 

FRIGIDAIRES 

Home Furnishers Decorators 

FLOOR COVERINGS 
Danville Hotel Bldg. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



115 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous Nexv Year from the Following Firms in 

HarorisoEibiarg - Wayaiesfo®ir© # Va. 




The opening of a road linking the Negev development town of Arad 
with S'dom on the Dead Sea was hailed as a major victory in Israel's hattle 
to roll back the desert. Built with the aid of Israel Bonds, the new road 
serves residents of Arad who commute to the Dead Sea Potash Works, and 
is expected to be of major importance as a spur to the development of in- 
dustries in the Arad area. The Israel Bond campaign provides the resources 
for development, irrigation, settlement in the Negev and for the expansion 
of every major branch of the economy of the State of Israel. 



Art For The Torah 

(Concluded from Page 94) 



First, is the new experimentation 
in synagogue architecture and the 
related boom in synagogue affilia- 
tion. Second, is the re-birth of the 
State of Israel requiring a living 
art for a living people whose 
home is in the midst of its his- 
tory. Third, was the emergence 
of the Jewish Museum movement 
beginning at the end of the last 
century with its collections in 
England, Germany, Prague, Hol- 
land, Israel, Cincinnati, and most 
importantly in New York under 
Dr. Kayser. 

Last, but not least, is the con- 
tinuing role over recent decades 
of the Jewish Community Center 
movement which in the lengthen- 
ed shadow of Mordecai Kaplan has 
become the corporate Jewish pa- 
iron of the arts, the basis of an 
ecole Juif in all the arts for all the 
Jewish people. 



St. 

NATIONAL 

BANK 

Waynesboro, Va. 
—Main Office- 
Main at Wayne Ave. 

DRIVE IN 
for Your Convenience 
WEST MAIN BRANCH 
Member F. D. I. C . 



The show of graphic arts and 
1 lie Hebrew Bible tradition at the 
Westside [ewish Community Cen- 
ter in Los Angeles, and later at 
other Centers and YM-YWHAs, 
had its roots in Judaism as ancient 
as that day when the first beauti- 
ful Hebrew letter was incised into 
stone or clay, depiciting forever 
the art of faith. 

Since that day art for the Torah 
lias been Torah. 

Cuba, which boasted a [ewish 
population of about 15,000 before 
the Castro era, now has 1,152 
Jewish families, or an estibated 
2,785 souls, according to reports 
reaching here from reliable sour- 
ces in Cuba. 

Though virtual!) decimated, 
the Jewish community in Cuba 
has managed to maintain its reli- 
gious and cultural identity, with 
five synagogues meeting the spiri- 
tual needs of the Jewish residents, 
the report said. The largest house 
of Jewish worship is Adath — Is- 
rael svnago^ue in the heart of the 
old city of Havana, an orthodox in- 
stitution. The city also ahs a bu- 
rial society and a cantor who per- 
forms marriage rites. It also has 
two kosher meat markets, a ko«her 
r^taurant and a Tewi«h bakery. 
Th° n^si'^pnt o f the Adafh I e rael 
conerpeati'on, Aaron Gehholtz, 
was renort^d to have told visitors 
that the svnao-omi^ was getting 
along well financially. 



INDEPENDENT TELEPHONES 
help you reach ALL AMERICA 





Digging out. Main roads are 
open almost before the storm lets up. 

Telephone crews are out all 
night. Thousands of homes are back 
in touch by morning. For this is 
modern America where isolation Is 
obsolete. Where Independent telephone 
companies operate nearly 9 million 
telephones in 47 .states. 

One of America's 4,700 Independent Telephone Companies 

HARKISONIiURG TELEPHONE CO. 

105 Newman Avenue 
HARRISONBURG, VA. 



^Nai.onaj y Bank 

of HARRISONBURG. VA. 

with offices at 

HARRISONBURG - WEYERS CAVE 
GROTTOES - MOUNT SIDNEY - VERONA 



A FULL SERVICE BANK 

with a tradition for 
Courtesy — Service - - Security 



Total Resources . $22,000,000 
4% Paid on Savings deposited for 1 year 

Loan Limit 127,000 

All Type Loans 

Installment - Appliance - Automobile 
Home Improvement - Real Estate - Farm 
Personal - Education - Business - Other 

Member Federal Reserve System and 
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 




Harrisonburg Loan & Thrift Corp. 

4 , /2% - Interest paid quarterly on Savings 
LOANS — Up to $100,000.00 at Low Rates 
SERVICE — Fast and Friendly 
CLUBS — Christmas & Vacation, Pay 4% Interest 



116 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



ttron mid raw 





Greetings 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 



Organized 

1865 




Harrisonburg, 
Virginia 



The oldest and largest bank in the entire area that renders 
all banking services. 



NOW SERVING YOU AT 3 LOCATIONS 

Main Office: 

Corner Main and East Market Streets 
Drive-In : 
44 Newman Avenue 
Spotswood Motor Branch: 
31 Carlton Street 

"Building to Serve You Better" 

The 

l\ational Ban\ 

of Harrisonburg 



Harrisonburg, 
Virginia 





HAPPY 
NEW YEAR 





To Our Friends, and To All the Citizens of Harrisonburg 

METRO PANTS CO. 

JOSEPH MINTZER 
Manufacturers of 

BOYS' & YOUTHS' TROUSERS 

HARRISONBURG, VIRGINIA 



€s©©d Old Age" 

(Continued from Page 40) 



are not concerned with solving the 
problems of Israel's aged, but of 
providing a happy home for peo 
pie who want to rethe in the 
Holy Land. We accept guests of 
all ages, provided ihey are in good 
health." 

Guests become members of the 
Club by buying a life time mem- 
bership. The prices are such that 
it requires something more than 
the Social Security pension to pay 
the cost involved. Membership re- 
quires the payment of an entrance 
fee of $3,500 for a single room 
with a monthly payment of $200: 
if the member shares a room, the 
entrance fee drops 10 $2,250 and 
the monthly charge to $'55. While 
a member makes up his mind 
whether or not to join the Club, 
he pays a lower deposit and a 
higher monthly fee for a period 
of 6-9 months. Every year, 25 per 
cent of the entrance lee goes to 
the Club. If the member leaves or 
passes away before the lapse of 
four years, the balance of the en- 
trance fee is refunded. 

The Club employs a doctor, a 
nurse and an occupational thera- 
pist, who is in charge of the hobby- 
room. This is equipped with 
games and hobby material. There 
is a billiard-room available for 
members who play the game. Many 
of them play cards. Cinema per- 
formances are given twice a week. 
There are Hebrew lessons and 
Bible classes. 

"Every Friday evening and 
Saturday morning, we have syna- 
gogue services, conducted by a 
well known cantor. These are ex- 



tremely well attended," says Mr 
Agib. "We have lectures on all 
sorts of subjects. To give you an 
example, one which we have just 
heard which was particularly sue 
cessful, was by Rabbi Meir Passow, 
on: 'Why the Jew laughs*'. Every 
Sabbath, we have a special Oneg 
Shabbat which is always a great 
success. 

'We have been particularly 
pleased by the response to the 
sight-seeing tours we organize. 
Some of these are very strenuous 
for older people, but they all go 
along and seem to enjoy the ride. 
We have gone very far afield, but 
they all seem able to keep up. 

"Talking about the energy of 
our members, every morning we 
have medical gymnastics. You 
would be amazed to see the re- 
sponse. Our oldest enthusiast is 
88 years old, our youngest is only 
47." 

The languages spoken at the 
Club are English, Yiddish and 
German. More than a third of the 
members are American. Others 
come from South America, South 
Africa and Israel. The village of 
Kfar Shmaryahu has granted all 
members of the Club honorary 
citizenship. This enables them to 
participate in all local festivals 
and festivities. 

Mr. Harry Zuckergood, a form- 
er New Yorker, arrived in the 
Club a short time ago. He ex- 
plained his motives for coming 
here. 

"I worked very hard all my life, 
very hard indeed. I retired at the 
age of 65 and received $80 social 



Urn 



A 



PRESCRIPTIONS 



Hostetter's Drug Store, Inc. 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS" 

103 S. Main St. Dial 4-7368 

HARRISONBURG, VA. 



We Work for Those Who Love and Remember . . . 

W. A. HARTMAN MEMORIALS 

All Work Guaranteed — Reasonable Prices 

459 Noll Drive — Harrisonburg, Va. 
1301 E. Market St. — Charlottesville, Va. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



117 




Pinhas Sapir, Israel's Minister of Finance and Commerce and Industry, 
and Senator Abraham Ribicoff of Connecticut were the principal speakers 
al a tribute to Baron Edmond de Rothschild for his outstanding leadership 
in Israel Bonds in Europe. The occasion hcn:>?ing Baron de Rothschild, who 
is President of the Israel Bond drive in Europe, was the International In- 
augural Conference dinner at Miami. In addition to Mr. Sapir (top left) and 
Senator Ribicofi (top center), the leading, rarticipants in the conference 
were Samuel Rothberg, Chairman of the conference and National Campaign 
Chairman for Israel Bonis (top right) ; (second row, left to right) Abraham 
Feinberg, President oi the Israel Bond Organization; Ira Guilden, National 
Chairman, and Dr. Joseph J. Schwartz, Vice President; (bottom row) Louis 
H. Boyai, National Chairman fc: Trustees; Mrs. Jan Peerce. National Chair- 
man, Women's Division, and Lawrence G. Laskey, Chairman. Executive 
Committee. 



security, but I saved up some 
money from my earnings, enough 
to pay my entrance fee and to 
bring my income up to the $200 
a month I need for my fee lor the 
Club. I have something over for 
pocket money and I still have some 
reserves. As a matter of fact, I in- 
vested my savings in Rassco shares 
in America, and I have allocated 
some of my dividends to paying 
my way. 

"I always wanted to visit Israel, 



GOOD 

GAS SERVICE 

• MAKES 

• WARM 

• FRIENDS 

Petersburg-Hopewell 
Gas Company 

PETERSBURG — HOPEWELL 
COLONIAL HEIGHTS 



but 1 had n.YLi managed to do so. 
When 1 retired, 1 could not find 
any place to live in America which 
appealed to me. J heard about the 
Club and decided to join it. f am 
certainly having a good time here 
-I like everything about it. I play 
cards and billiards, 1 talk to the 
people, I learn Hebrew — don't 
worry about me, I'm enjoying my- 
self alright." 

While the Club accepts only 
people in good health, the doctor 
and the nurse are constantly in at- 
tendance. Membership also carries 
with it an automatic health in- 
surance. Clients are guaranteed 
what hospitalization they need, up 
to 60 days a year, in 'Assuta", one 
of the best private hospitals in 
Israel. This guarantee covers med- 
ical expenses, medicine, x-rays and 
all ancillary needs. 

Thus Americans of retirement 
age need not fear that ihe future 
will be bleak and dull for them 
after they give up work. They 
can share in the exciting adven- 
ture of rebuilding Israel. 



Happy and Prosperous New Year from llie Following Firms in 
Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 

Petersburg, Va. 



The Light 
refreshment 
for modern living 




now i& Pepsi 

Tor those who think young 

Pepsi-Cola Bottlers of Virginia 



E. E. TITUS, INC. 

General Foundry and Machine Shops 

IRON • BRASS and ALUMINUM CASTINGS 
• Machine Work • Pattern Work 



Established 1884 



Telephone REgent 2-4512 



Petersburg, Virginia 



HAPPY NEW YEAR 

Let Us Be Your Stationers 

Powell - Cole Stationery Co., Inc. 

11 North Sycamore Street Phone RE 3-6571 

PETERSBURG, VIRGINIA 

"Everything for the Office" 
Also Artist Supplies 



MASTER 
SYSTEM 
BAKERY 

• 

Bakers of 
BETTER BAKED GOODS 

Specializing in 
Wedding and Party Cakes 

• 

21 West Washington 
PETERSBURG, VA. 




GREETINGS 

Cify Savings 
Bank & Trust Co. 

PETERSBURG, VA. 

OPERATED UNDER THE 
STATE BANKING 
DEPARTMENT 



.118 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



BEST WISHES TO ALL OUR MANY JEW- 
ISH PATRONS AND FRIENDS FOR A 
HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR. 

TITMUS OPTICAL CO., INC 



Manufacturers of Ophthalmic Instruments, Lenses, 
Frames and Sun Wear 

PETERSBURG, VIRGINIA, U.S.A. 



Here Gome The Girls 

(Concluded from Page 38) 



Greetings 





and Best Wishes from 

BURTON P. SHORT 
AND SON 

Petersburg, Virginia 




rcron mid naw 




Greetings 



AND BEST WISHES FROM 



RICHARD WINE CELLARS, INC. 

PETERSBURG, VIRGINIA 




Greetings 



SALES, INC. 



35 East Bank Street — Petersburg, Virginia 
• Sales • Service 



Cadillac 
Chevrolet 




time by talking to her male coun- 
terparts. One night, a soldier liked 
the sound or her voice and said 
he would like to meet her. "Sure," 
replied the girl. They met and 
after their Army service, were mar- 
ried. 

The participation of women in 
today's modern Israel Army is not 
the first ttme in the Yishuv's his- 
tory that women have served along- 
side men. In the early 1900's, wo- 
men stood watch with the first 
self-defense unit, the Shomer. La- 
ter, women served in the Hag- 
anah and Palmach and fought in 
the War of Independence. Wo- 
men consistently have possessed 
equal status and responsibility in 
Israel society. 

Commenting on today's pion- 
eering women, Miss Berner said 
women in the Army perform a 
vital service to the nation by teach- 
ing immigrant recruits Hebrew, 
Jewish History and the country's 
way of life. 

The biggest problem facing Is- 
rael today, according to its leaders, 
is to educate to European stand- 
ards the thousands of immigrants 
from Arab lands. Immigrant girls 
must be educated to independence 
and self-reliance. Immigrant men 
have to exorcize scores of miscon- 
ceptions about the general role of 
women in society. 

What better place is there than 
the Army to educate newcomers, 
point out Israel Army officers. It 
is cheaper and easier to teach in 
the Army. There are fewer dis- 
tractions for the pupil and disci- 
pline helps to fan the melting pot 
process in Israel. "If anything has 
served as a melting pot for new 
immigrants, it has been the Army," 
declared Lt. Col. Monaz. 

There are those in Israel, of 
course, who are against women 
serving in the Army. Some Ortho- 
dox groups look askance at fie 
drafting of women. (Women serve 
for two years; men, two and a 
half.) Many Orthodox Jews believe 
the only proper place for a Jew- 
ish woman is within the house- 
hold. 

In the early 1950's, a compro- 
mise was worked out with various 
Religious Party Knesset leaders 



whereby women from Orthodox 
homes are allowed to take their 
period of national service in ap- 
proved civilian jobs, such as hos- 
pitals and immigrant centers. 

Opposition to girls in the Army 
also comes from a group which 
believes that the Army is causing 
Israel girls to lose some of their 
feminity. Lt. Col. Monbaz refutes 
this charge. He proudly points to 
Israel beauty queens who were 
in the Army and adds that the 
Army has not caused his attractive 
daughter nor his nieces and other 
female relatives to lose any of their 
feminity. He added that the Army 
instructs women in proper dress 
and organizes socials for its gal 
soldiers. "If a girl has masculine 
tendencies, she has them with or 
without the Army," he said. 

There are still those in Israel, 
non-Orthodox persons included, 
who are not satisfied with the 
"bland government declaration,'' 
that women are needed for the 
defense of Israel. They say the 
efficient use of women in the Army 
is limited to a few specific jobs 
in this the nuclear age and that 
most nations do not conscript wo- 
men in peacetime. 

Prime Minister Levi Eshkol in- 
dicated at a recent news conference 
that the government is considering 
reducing the length of military 
service. 

Meanwhile, the Army attracts 
people like Miss Berner who is 
exuberant over her role and ex- 
perience in the Army. Today, Miss 
Berner is studying journalism. 
Like another well-known former 
Israeli soldierette, authoress and 
daughter of a famous Israel gen- 
eral, Miss Berner hopes to write 
about Israel. One can be sure 
that much of the material wdl 
come from her Army service. 



Brinkley and Co., Inc. 

PETERSBURG, VA. 

Fruits — Vegetables — Produce 
Dixie Margarine 
Light White Flour 

Bennett's Mayonnaise 

Hunt Club Dog Meal 
Sausage and Hams 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



119 



long time. Late that afternoon, the 
first of the human cargo, an old 
lady, collapsed from exhaustion 
and lack of food. The frantic ef- 
forts to revive her raised a com- 
eraderie among the wretched. 

Janos turned to his mother and 
spoke his first words since hearing 
of his father's death. "Momma, 
why do thy do this to us? What did 
we ever do to them?" 

"Janos," she answered, "We 
don't know why God made such 
beasts, who know only how to rob 
and kill, but we do know that if 
he made such men He must have 
had a reason." 

"Reason! What reason was there 
for them to kill Pappa? What rea- 
son was . . .?" and then he began 
to cry again. 

As the second night closed about 
them the people were no longer 
quiet. The myriad sounds of suf- 
fering, the grinding hunger, the 
strain of standing or lying so long 
in one position, continued to be 
heard all night, adding their 
voices to the continuing Jewish 
lamentation of the Hitler era. 

In the morning another stop 
was made, and again more people 
were shoved into their car. Now 
there was even a shortage of foot 
space as the guards kicked shins 
and buttocks to make room for the 
frightened new arrivals. Janos' 
mother nudged him. "Listen," she 
said, "no matter what happens, I 
want you to understand one thing. 
Your father is dead, but he lives 
in another world. This world 
where Germans march about is 
what God has created lor us to 
live in temporarily before going 
on." 

"Yes, but if God is so merciful, 
as you always say, why wasn't the 
future world given to us right 
away? Why do we have to go 
through this now? What are we 
supposed to do— be happy about 
this?" 

'There is no happiness," she 
answered, "but there is something. 
There is something to live for." 



Dividend-Paying Fire 
and Auto Insurance 
Phone King 9-0744 

Julian T. Burke, Inc. 

218 King Street 
ALEXANDRIA, VA. 



"Live? I would rather be dead." 
She slumped against the wall of 
the car and was quiet. 

During the day snow fell. By 
night the pain of the cold made 
them forget their hunger. Janos' 
mother felt weak, hardly able to 
speak. Later— no one ever told him 
how much— as Janos leaned against 
her to sleep she said quietly, al- 
most inaudibly, "Listen, it doesn't 
always have to be like this." He 
fell asleep. 

He tried to make them let go 
but they wouldn't. Then he woke 
up and saw that two men, gaunt 
faced and tired, were gently lift- 
ing him up. They took the coat, 
spread it out over his mother and 
then slipped it over her head. 
They mumbled a prayer. 

Years later, he was again to be 
awakened on cold winter nights 
by the cries of a fitful sleep — his 
daughter's. He would get out of 
his warm bed and walk into the 
child's bedroom. There, sitting on 
her bed he chatted with her about 
what they woidd do tomorrow. 

Agreement on the development 
of a nuclear reactor for use in the 
desalination of sea water has been 
reached between the United States 
and Israel following a s.iuly a 
special joint committee of techno- 
logists of both countries, it was 
announced here. Formal conclu- 
sions are to be presented next 
month in Washington and Israel. 
The study was ordered following 
agreement between President 
Johnson nad Premier Levi Eshkol, 
on his visit to Washington, on 
joint efforts in sea water desalina- 
tion by nuclear power. 




At the recent convention of the 
Rabbinical Council of America 600 
delegates from every part of the 
United States and Canada unani- 
mously elected Rabbi Israel Miller 
as President. Rabbi Miller is spirit- 
ual leader of the Kingsbridge 
Eieights Jewish Center, Bronx, New 
York. 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year from the Following Firms in 

Alexandria - Martinsville 
South Boston, Va. 



The 1964 BUICK 

@ Buick's finest . . . the Electra 225 

• Buick's smartest . . . the LeSabre 

• Buick's liveliest . . . the Wildcat 
® Buick's sweetest . . . the Skylark 
® Buick's thriftiest . . . the Special 

OPEL— Europe's most distinguished ECONOMY Car 

TEMPLE MOTOR COMPANY 

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA 



THE 

SEAPORT 

INN 




Fine Food in a 
Fine Atmosphere 



He. 8 KlNC STDIR, ALKXANORIA, VIRGIMI& 



A fine Sea Food Restaurant 

Located in the heart of 
the Old Alexandria Port area 



KI 9-1265 Est. 156O 

JAMES HENRY BEACH and SONS 

Sheet Metal Work 
210 King Street ALEXANDRIA, VA. 



Nothing Beats Money In The Bank For 
Independence and Financial Security 

South Boston Bank and Trust Co. 

SOUTH BOSTON, VA. 

RESOURCES OVER $7,500,000 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Member Federal Reserve System 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



SAVE! IT S THE AMERICAN WAY TO SUCCESS! 

SAVE MORE — EARN MORE 
Bank With Your Friendly 

Citizens Bank of South Boston 

SOUTH BOSTON -:- VIRGINIA 

Federal Deposits Insured Up To $10,000 
Member F.D.I.C. 



120 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 




Greetings 



and Best Wishes From 

LEE TELEPHONE COMPANY 

MARTINSVILLE, VA. 
"Through Service We Grow" 



W. T. TURNER, Inc. 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

Phone ME 2-3427 

• Harold G. Martin 

• W. T. Turner 

• Mildred H. Kidd 

• Hilda Barbour 

205 E. Main St. 
MARTINSVILLE, VA. 



Best Wishes for a 
Happy New Year — 



BUD SHELTON'S 

PHARMACIST 

100 Oakdale Street 
MARTINSVILLE, VA. 

632-3433 

Just Behind Hospital 



TOM BURCH 

Burch- Whittle 
Inc. 

General Insurance 
Real Estate 

115 E. Main Street 
MARTINSVILLE, VA. 



NEW YEAR 
GREETINGS 



WYATT BUICK 
SALES CO. 

J. EDWARD RICHARDSON 
Martinsville, Va. 

BUICK 

• SALES • SERVICE 



Greetings 
G. T. White • N. R. Burroughs 

Burroughs - White 
Chevrolet Corp. 



MARTINSVILLE, VA. 




• NEW YEAR 
GREETINGS 

Southwestern 
Virginia Gas Co. 

MARTINSVILLE, VA. 




Governor William W. Scranton of Pennsylvania was the guest of honor 
a' a dinner sponsored by the. Hirrisburg Committee for State of Israel 
Bonds, where he received a plaque paying tribute to his "profound under- 
standing and warm sympathy and friendship for the people of Israel." 
Shown presenting the plaque to the Governor is Mrs. Judith Beilin, Consul 
oi the State of Israel. 



Five Justices oi the Israel Su- 
preme Court ruled this week that 
the high court had the competence 
to examine and rule on decisions 
handed down by the Supreme 
Rabbinical Council of the land. 

The court ruling was handed 
down in a test case at the sugges- 
tino of Attorney General Moshe 
Ben Zeev. The rabbinate had re- 
fused to grant a hcc'hsher to a 
slaughter house which, it claimed, 
had refused to comply with cer- 
to withdraw certificates of kash- 
ruth to retailers handling the com- 
tain conditions. It also threatened 
pany's products. The owners of 
the slaughter house contended 



they were complying with Jewish 
laws, that the terms of the rabbi- 
nate were unreasonable and that 
in any event its operations were 
going on under the supervision of 
a rabbi. The rabbinate's retort was 
that it wasn't so and that the al- 
leged rabbi who was supervising 
the slaughterhouse had not been 
recognized by the central rabbinic 
body. 

The Rabbinical Council did 
not appear at the court hearing 
presumably because such a move 
would be interpreted as conceding 
that the High Court had a right 
to determine maters of religious 
law. 



Your Guess 

(Concluded from Page 114) 



l ei en t. But is it Jewish? 

The question is not really wheth- 
er these activities deserve a Jew- 
ish label. The real question is 
whether these emerging customs 
have any lasting viability. It is 
true that this Jewry is discarding 
man) of the Jewish behavior pat- 
terns which grew out of and ad- 
hered to a pattern geared recog- 
nizably to Jewish religious law. 
But it is a mistake to leave it at 
that. This Jewry is also creating 
its own patterns of Jewishness. 
Since man)' of these creations defy 
comparison with past patterns, 
which demonstrate their viability, 
who can realistically measure the 
durability — or lack of it — of the 



emerging patterns of Jewish he- 
ll a vior? 



BOSTON 

Drug Co. 

A. B. Glover, Jr., Pharmacist 

The Store of 
Personal Service 

Phone 2-0555 
SOUTH BOSTON, VA. 



September, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



121 



Advertising Index 



rcran mid ihw 




Greetings 



The advertisers listed herewith extend to their friends and patrons 
their most sincere holiday greetings. 



PAGE 



12 



American Furniture Co 

B. Ammons Refrigeration & 

Air Conditioning Co — - 72 

Arrow Trade Mark, Inc. — 17 

Asheville Paving Co - 51 

Atlantic Rura! Exposition - 4 

Avgusta Mill Supply __ - 29 

B 

B & L Hosiery Mill 17 

Barkley Machine Works - — 122 

Battery Park Hotel — 22 

Belks Dept. Store - 13 

Bellcraf" Manufacturing Co. — 8 

H. Beveridge & Co. - 60 

Bladenboro Cotton Mills 60 

Blanche Cotton Mills 29 

Block-Southland. Sportswear, Inc. 13 

Blue Ridge Hardware & Supply Co. 73 

Blue Ridge Trucking Co. 57 

Boling Chair Co. J* 

Boyle Construction Co. — 

D 'E. Brown, Genera] Contractor 45 

Brown-Williamson Tobacco Co. 

Back page 

Burgaw Veneer Co. 15 

Burlington Industries, Inc " 

Burruss Land & Lumber^ ^ ^ 

C 

C & J Insurance Service __ — 72 

Carol-May Finishing Co., Inc. 17 

Carolina Reneedling Works 60 

Carolina Power & Light Co 22 

A. B. Carter, Inc. 11 

Century Dresses & Skirts _ — — 28 

Charlottesville & Albermarle County 

Chamber of Commerce _ 23 

Roger Clarke, Inc — 

Clearwater Finishing Plant 



PAGE 



Gardner Plumbing Co — — 45 

Gray & Daniel 60 

Gaston Electric Co., Inc 60 

Gastonia Textile Sheet Metal Works .... 15 

Giant Foods _ — 4 

Wm. F. Gravins — 24 

Greensboro Auditorium 

&: Coliseum - 7 

Greensboro News-Record 12 

H 

Ha-'en'-. Tire Service — 47 

J. J. Haines 18 

Harley-Mitcham & Co - — 12 

Hartwel! Garment Co. _ 8 

Harvey & Earl, Inc. - — 78 

Her Grace — 28 

Herman-Sipe Co - — 15 

Hickory Foundry & Machine Co 15 

Hickory Paper Box Co. 16 

Hildebran Hosiery Mills 16 

Home Beneficial Life Insurance Co. 24 

P- 1 ^ Hood Ranch Camp ._ - 

Hoj t's Refrigeration Co. 

Hungerford Coal Co - 

I 



•78 
20 



Colonial Group - * 



92 



Colonial Stores 
Crawford Hosiery Corporation 16 

Cross Cotton Mills 29 

D 

Daniel Construction Co. 74 



Ffirds 

Etta Paper Box Co. 



E 



64 

27 



26 



Family Stamp Co. 

First Federal Savings & 

Loan Associat'on Inside front cover 

First & Merchants National Bank 24 

Fort Roofing & 

Franklin Federal Savings 

& Loan Association . — 25 

Fredrickson Motor Express — 71 



Industrial Piping Supply Co 69 

Israel Bonds 30 

Ivey's Motel & Restaurant 77 

J 

W. G. Jarrell Machine Co. 27 

Joanna Cotton Mills 29 

K 

Kirk's Taxie Co. 48 

Kline Iron & Steel Co 22 

Lafayette Pharmacy 21 

LeBrun Brothers - 15 

Leder Brothers — 13 

Lenoir P?d & Paper Co., Inc. — 14 

Ls.tc Brothers Inside front cover 

Lineberry Foundry & Machine Co. 29 

P. Lorillard Co. - 9 

Torimer Hosiery Mills, Inc. 17 

Lyrch Hosiery "Mill ~ 16 

Lovable Brassiere Co. — 27 

Lyttle & Barnes — 25 

Mc 

McFarlane Desk Co _ 44 

M 

Marcus & Farber 27 

Martinsville Novelty Co 18 

Maxwell Royal Chair Co 14 

Michi". Co. 23 

Mid State Paper Box Co 17 

Morrison Furniture & Fixture Co. 15 

Mother's Food 14 

Murray Oldsmobile - 20 



You don't know what you're missing til 
you get new RCA VICTOR COLOR TV! 



Dependability is why more people buy 

rca Victor 

than any other television 

Visit your dealer for a demonstration 




The Donley 
FF567-E 



rca Victor Mw Hsta 

COLOR TV 

Distributed by 

Southern Radio Corporation 

"Pioneers of color television in the Carolinas" 
Charlotte, N. C. Columbia, S. C. 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for a 
Happy and Prosperous Neiu Year from the Following Firms in 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



Knoxville Sand & Gravel Co. 

READY-MIX CONCRETE 

SAND - GRAVEL - CEMENT 

Dial 523-2147 KNOXVILLE, TENN. 503 Blount Ave. 




W£ MOST ANYTHING * » 



Dial 525-8479 Nights & Sundays Dial 522-0751 

3641 Magnolia Ave., N.E. Knoxville, Tenn. 



Dial 524-3331 

READY - MIXED CONCRETE CO. 

18 2-WAY RADIO TRUCKS SERVING KNOXVILLE 
All Ready Mixed Concrete for Driveways 
Floors — Steps — Sidewalks — Etc. 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



TUCKER STEEL CORPORATION 

STEEL FABRICATORS 
FOR EVERYTHING IN STEEL 

411? "nderson Rd. N.E. Dial 689-3387 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



POWER EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

ALL TYPES OF CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT 

Alcoa Highway N.W. Dial 577-5563 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



WELDING GAS PRODUCTS CO. 



DIAL AM 6-6437 



Main Office & Plant: 
821 East 11th Street: — Chattanooga, Tenn. 

BRANCHES: 

Nashville, Tenn. Greenville, S. C. 
516 Fifth Ave., So. Easier Highway 

Knoxville, Tenn. 
2300 Sycamore Dr. 



Athens, Ga. 
160 Vine St. 
Gainesville, Ga. 
1218 Broad St. 



122 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



September, 1964 



OLDSMOBILE 

THE QUEEN OF THE GENERAL MOTORS CARS- 



RICE OLDSMOBILE, INC. 




"HOME OF QUALITY SERVICE" 

1720 West Cumberland Dial 5-7103 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



PAGE 



N 



l LEE E. CLARK, Owner \ 

CLARK ROOFING COMPANY j 

ALL TYPES OF ROOFING § 
SIDING WATERPROOFING SHEET METAL WORK | 

Call Day or Night — 524-0505 | 
2515 Harvey Ct., N. E. Knoxville, Tcnn. & 



Sanitary Laundry 
Dry Cleaning Co. 

"Decidedly Better" 

Fur and Woolen Storage 

Dial 2-6162 
625 Broadway N. W. 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



Paramont 

Uli\a 
Cleaners 

one of 

KNOXVILLE'S 
MOST MODERN 
DRY CLEANERS 

4687 N. Broadway 

Dial 680-5116 
741 N. Broadway 
523-7112 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 




The Better Kind of 
Dry Cleaning 
Service 

614 Sevier Ave.. Dial 525-8114 
Branches: 
Newcomb Ave. N. W. 
213 Union Ave., S. W. 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



Fresh, Nutritious Foods 




Real Money-Saving 

Prices 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



STON E 



INCORPORATE D 



SUTHERLAND AVE. 
P. O. BOX 72 

DIAL 524-4352 




KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



N & W Industries, Inc. 

Inside front cover 

Norris Supply & Machine Co. 44 

North Carolina Association 

of Jewish Men 3 

North Carolina Dyeing 

& Finishing Co. 60 

P 

Parliev Plumbing & Heating Co 53 

Peihl Corporation _ — 54 

Pat Perkins 28 

Pet Dairy Products — 20 

Piedmon'! Aviation 13 

Piedmont Diaper Service 54 

Pilot Freight Carriers 11 

Puritan Finishing Mills 29 

R 

Regal Manufacturing Co. — 27 

Richmond Department of 

Public Utilities Inside front cover 

Richmond Supply Co. — - 54 

Carol Rodgers, Jrs — 28 

Ruth Originals __ 28 

S 

Dave E. Satterfields - 25 

Scales Furniture Co. — 14 

Sealtest Foods, Inc. ... — 10 

Schwartzchild Bros. 20 

Security Federal Savings 

i: Loan Association 4 

Silver Knit Hosiery Mill 16 

Singleton's Servicenter — ^2 

J. E. Sirrine Co — ~~ - 54 

Shee; Metal Works, Inc. — — 75 

Smith Foushee Insurance Agency 47 

Snyder Paper Corporation — 30 

South Carolina Electric & Gas Co. 11 

Southern Radio Corporation — .121 

Spainhcurs - - 51 

Spartanburg Paper Box Co 17 

Standard Insurance & Realty Co 47 

j'. P. Stevens & Co., Inc. ... -. 22 

Roy Stone Transfer Co. 

Inside back cover 

Stoneville Furniture Co — . : — 14 

W. H. Stott & Associates ... 27 

Stout Chair Co _ 14 

T 

Troutman Chair Co. — 14 

U 

Union Bag Camp Paper Co 19 

United Mills Corp. 11 



PAGE 



22 



George Vanderbilt Hotel 

Virginia Carolina Freight 

Inside back cover 

Virginia Crafts 18 

Virginia. State Seven Up Bottling Co.. 26 

W 

Weaver Electric Co. 77 

Welding Gas Products Co. 121 

Westboro Weaving Co _.. 60 

Helen Whiting — 28 

Witten Supply Co. 60 

C. Woodward Co.. Inc — 47 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Burlington 52- 63 

Charlotte - 55- 60 

Durham - - 46- 48 

Fayetteville - 69- 70 

Gastonia 54 

Goldsboro _ — 65 

Greensboro — — 31- 45 

High Point __ - _ 53 

Raleigh - 49- 51 

Wilmington - — 66- "O 

Winston-Salem — 61- 64 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston - - 21- 73 

Columbia 74- 78 

TENNESSEE 
Knoxville - 121-122 

VIRGINIA 

Alexandria _. 119-120 

Charlottesville _ 112 

Danville -114 

Emporia - 113 

Hampton ...110 

Harrisonburg - 115-116 

Lynchburg - — - 101-105 

Martinsville 119-120 

L'ewport News 108-110 

Norfolk -- - — 92 & 106-107 

Petersburg — .117-118 

Phoebus — - .110 

Portsmouth - 92- 93 

Richmond 79- 91 

Roanoke - - — - 94-100 

South Boston _ - 119-120 

Staunton - - 113 

Virginia Beach — -- 92 

Waynesville - 115-116 

Williamsburg _ Ill 



English - Israel's Second Language 

(Concluded from Page 107) 

to your Yiddish, no matter how 
imperfectly you may speak "marne- 
loshen." 



lu simply doesn't understand Eng- 
lish, and if you don't know He- 
brew but do know some French, 
ask him in that language because 
many Moroccan Jews can speak 
both French and Arabic. And if 
you shoud stop a Polish Jew to 
ask tor information, your English 
will get a blank stare from him 
too, but he will quickly respond 




Knoxville. Ten*. 

Flowers To All The World By Wire 



■w 



Southern Business Forms 


Corp. 


Manufacturers Of 


Tabulating and Interleaved Carbon Sets 




4609-13 Beverly Road 


Dial 522-0122 


KNOXVIT.T.E, TENN. 





BARKLEY MACHINE WORKS 



Manufacturers of 

TEXTILE MACHINERY PARTS 



GASTONIA, NORTH CAROLINA 



Rov Stone mmsfBRcom 




ROY STONE 

TRANSFER CORP. 

Collinsville, Virginia 
Phone MIday 7-5514 

We Are Proud of Our Record, Serving All the Industries In 
This Area For Over Twenty-seven Years 

Overnight Service To and From 



• Alabama 
9 Chicago 

• District of Columbia 

• Florida 

• Georgia 

• Indiana 

® Maryland 

• New Jersey 



• New York 

• North Carolina 
Ohio 

• Pennsylvania 

• South Carolina 

• Tennessee 

• Virginia 

• West Virginia 



SMITH'S TRANSFER CORPORATION 

OF STAUNTON, VIRGINIA 
P. 0. Box 1000 Main Terminal TUxedo 6-6231 

Regular and Irregular Route Common Carrier 
Cargo Insurance $1,000,000 



FAST THROUGH SERVICE BETWEEN 

New England — New York — New Jersey — Philadelphia — Baltimore 

AND 

Washington — The Virginias — The Carolinas — Georgia — Alabama 
Florida — Kentucky — Tennessee — Ohio 



NORTHERN 
TERMINALS 

BOSTON, MASS. 

442-2820 
BRIDGEPORT, CONN 

FOrest 8-3118 
HARTFORD, CONN. 

522-2191 
HOLYOKE-SPRING- 
FIELD, MASS. 

781-0521 
MERIDEN, CONN. 

BEverly 5-5721 
MfDDLETOWN, CONN. 

ENTerpnse 8650 

NAUGATUCK-WATER- 
BURY, CONN. 

754-4857 
NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 

CO!ony 9-7794 
WALLINGFORD, CONN. 

COiony 9-7794 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

ORegon 5-3130 
NEW HAVEN. CONN. 

ENTerprise 8650 
JERSEY CITY, N. J. 

SWathmore 2-2332 
NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 

CHarter 9-8700 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
336-6770 



TRENTON, IM. J. 

OWens 5-7611 
PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

GArfield 5-6777 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Dickens 2-6555 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

FLeetwood 4-2600 



SOUTHERN 
TERMINALS 

ALEXANDRIA, VA. 

FLeetwood 4-2600 
BECKLEY, W. VA. 

CLifford 3-6204 
BLUEFIELD, W. VA. 

DAvenport 7-7164 
BRISTOL, VA 

NOrth 9-2138 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 

CAnal 8-8324 
CHARLESTON, W. VA. 

WAlnut 5-4791 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

EDison 3-9601 
CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. 

3-9161 
COVINGTON, VA. 

962-2134 
BUENA VISTA, VA. 

CO 1-2141 



GASTONIA, N. C. 
UNiversity 4-1931 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 
275-1681 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 
232-7615 

HARRISONBURG. VA. 
434-4468 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 
888-4612 

HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 
JAckson 9-2431 

LYNCHBURG, VA. 
Victor 7-6629 

PRINCETON, W. VA. 
GArdner 5-3771 

ROANOKE, VA. 
Diamond 4-6619 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 
583-7988 

STATESVILLE, N C. 
862-6197 

STAUNTON, VA. 
886-6231 

WAYNESBORO, VA. 

WHitehall 2-1188 
WINCHESTER, VA. 

MOhawk 2-4139 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

PArk 3-6042 



"Nothing To Sell But Fast Service" 

VIRGINIA-CAROLINA 

Freight Lines, Inc. 

MARTINSVILLE, VIRGINIA 




OVERNIGHT SERVICE 
General Commodities 

1 * North Carolina - South Carolina - Maryland - Virginia 

)C]fVin££ West Vir S inia - Tennessee - Washington, D. C. - East- 



tern Pennsylvania. 



Main Terminal: 
Martinsville, Va. — ME 8-8721 
Terminals: 
Baltimore, Maryland — 

Phone: Mulberry 5-3330 
Charlotte, North Carolina — 

Phone: 377-1450 
Richmond, Virginia — 
Phone: BE 2-6244 



UNITS OPERATED 

150 Tractors 
225 Semi-Trailers 
200 Van Type 
25 Open Top 
15 Pick-Ups 



J. C. STONE, President and Manager 
TERRELL C. CLARK, Executive Vice-President 



BEST WISHES FOR A 
HAPPY, HEALTHY, 
AND PROSPEROUS 




1964 



572; 



BURRUSS BRAND 
PRODUCTS 

• BURRUSS BRAND 

• OAK FLOORING 

• LAMINATED TRUCK 

• FLOORING 



Ask Your Local Dealer 

BURRUSS LAND & 
LUMBER CO., INC. 

VT 5-2343 
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



Happy New Year 

from 

Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation 

Makers of 

Viceroy G garettes 



not too strong... not too light... 
VICEROY'S got the Deep-Weave Filter 
... for the taste that's ri g ht! 



BROWN & WILLIAMSON TOBACCO CORPORATION 







Presenting A Copy 
Of The Graphic 
i History t Of The 
Jewish Heritage" 



Left to* Right: 
Richard Tucker, 
Label Katz 
And Joseph Schlang 



OCTOBER 1964 




Hotel Roanoke 

AND MOTOR INN 

Roanoke, Virginia 

Headquarters for Virginia's scenic and 
historic Southwest. Just minutes to Blue 
Ridge Parkway, Shenandoah Valley, Natural 
Bridge and Dixie Caverns. 
A 425-room, air-conditioned version of an 
Old English Inn featuring motel conven- 
ience with hotel luxury and service. 
In the heart of downtown Roanoke at the 
intersection of Routes 11-220 and 460. 
RATES FROM $7.00 



What's Up Downtown? 




Your new First Federal building is up at Broad 
and Third. Watch for the grand opening. We're 
anxious to show it off to you. We think you'll like it. 

FIRST 
FEDERAL 

SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 
OF RICHMOND 



Protect Virginia's Best Investment 

Loyalty 

Experience 

Training 

Seniority 
RE-ELECT 

YOUR CONGRESSMAN 

RICHARD H. POFF 

6TH DISTRICT OF VIRGINIA TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3RD, 1964 




October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



.3 




Taney foods 



■ ■■■LISCE 
fresh 

out of the cards 




AT 
YOUR 
GROCERS 




SO-O-o RICH 
in FLAVOR 



In your heart, you 
know he's right 

Vofe for 

BARRY GOLDWATER 



Tuesday, November 3. 1964 



(Political advertisement paid for by the Republican Party of Virginia — Robert J. Corber, Chairman) 




4 



77/6- A im-nain 'Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



VIRGINIA 
GO FORWARD 



WITH 




LYNDON B. JOHNSON 

VIRGINIA, A DEMOCRATIC STATE, MUST 
SUPPORT OUR DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATES 

ON NOVEMBER 3rd VOTE FOR LYNDON B. JOHNSON FOR PRESIDENT 

Sydney S. Kellam 

Campaign Manager 

Garland S. Harwood 

Office Manager & Assistant Treasurer 

VIRGINIA DEMOCRATIC CAMPAIGN HEADQUARTERS 

ROOM 370 — HOTEL RICHMOND 
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 




VOLUME XXIX • OCTOBER 1964 



EDITORIALS 



NUMBER 2 



-Qaesfter A. Brown, Editor 



Russia And The Jew 

Much has been written and spoken about Jewish life in 
the Soviet and the purpose of this editorial is not the hope thai 
we can add much by way of supplying additional information, 
or in suggesting a remedy. Rather, it is to point out a new 
analysis of the motivation for what is taking place there. 

A summary of most of the seemingly authoritative reports 
makes it clear that the situation that exists can in no way be 
compared to that which prevailed in Nazi Germany. The plan- 
ned strategy is not primarily physical harassment; rather it is 
based on the thought that discouraging Jews in the practice 
of their religion will lead to assimilation. 

The 350 synagogues that at one time existed in Russia 
have dwindled to about go. These for the most part arc at 
tended by the older people, and attendance has been frought 
with danger, for, intermingled in the congregation are in- 
formers, on the lookout for some breach thai could lead to 
arrest and prosecution. Religious educational and cultural life 
is virtually extinct. There is but one rabinical seminary, which 
has never ordained a rabbi, and which never had more than 
14 students. 

In late 1961, a Yiddish literary bimonthly was established, 
limited to a circulation of 25,000. Of the nearly 150 living 
Jewish writers who contribute to this journal, not one has 
been allowed to publish a volume of his work— whether fiction 
poetry, literary criticism or historical research— in the language 
in which he writes, Yiddish. 

With this drive toward assimilation, even those who have 
taken the path of least resistance and succumbed, fin 1 that this 
is no answer. Perhaps their progeny may benefit over a period 
of years, but they themselves find that assimilation has made 
little difference in their day-to-day living, and they are still 
regarded as Jews and subject to all of the usual embarassments. 

Our national government has seemingly indicated interest 
in this situation and last Spring President Lyndon B. Johnson 
met with a group of Jewish leaders at the White House to dis- 
cuss the findings presented on the problem by a previously 
held conference of several Jewish organizations in Washing- 
ton. We know of course, that the government has many pro- 
blems, national and international in scope, and we can only 
hope that eventually it will get around to the devising of ways 
and means to remedy the position of the three million Jews in 
Russia. 

Jewish Education 

Geneva, Switzerland, was the site recently of a Jewish 
I parley that could herald a new approach to the problem of 
(Jewish education in the countries outside Israel if the decision 
by the World Conference on Jewish Education to establish an 
;organ that is to deal with the situation on a global scale meets 
tthe support it deserves. 

The ultimate objective of the 50-member World Council 
ton Jewish Education is to stimulate interest in Jewish educa- 
tion on a global basis and to be helpful in the establishment of 



Jewish educational facilities in countries where none or few 



exist. 



However, as serious as is the basic problem, the peripheral 
one — lack of teachers — is perhaps of more immediate im- 
portance. 

Continental Europe and Great Britain were reported 
losing annually about 360 of their combined number of 1,800 
teachers while turning out only 38 each year. When this is 
added to the fact that only 25% of the children in continental 
Europe are attending Jewish schools, it is obvious that the situ- 
ation for Jewish survival takes on an ominous character. 

In the United States, where the teacher shortage is not as 
acute as it is in Europe, the situation is such that 8,500 teachers 
are occupying 19,000 posts by holding on to dual or more jobs, 
to the detriment of the educational system and to themselves. 
In addition, only half of the annually vacated teaching posts — 
estimated at 1 ,200 — are filled by competently trained teachers 
coming from the various rabbinical schools and teacher train- 
ing seminaries. If it were not for the fact that many of the 
teachinp; posts are filled by Israelis in our country, the dearth 
of Jewish teachers in our own community would be a tragic 
one. 

There will be much pondering of this situation in Jewish 
professional and lay circles concerned with the problem of edu- 
cation. As laymen, we have no ready answer, but it seems to us> 
there can be no augmenting of the teacher cadre unless we 
create a climate in which the Jewish teacher can live on the 
same level of income, security and community respect that is 
extended to teachers in our areas of general education. 

To attract new teachers, Ave must make the field of edu- 
cation, of Jewish education, an attractive one in every sense to 
those who would enter it. The crisis is a real one, but it is not 
insoluble if there is will to solve it. The effort, however, will 
require more than local action. 

Qrt's War On Poverty 

At this time of public concern in our country with the 
war on poverty and the effects of technology on unemploy- 
ment, it is appropriate to call attention to the work of ORT. 

A report on the world-wide activities of this agency has 
just been published under the title "ORT Yearbook 1964." It 
describes how the teaching of trades is used to modernize the 
way of life among Jewish youth in Tel Aviv, Casablanca, 
Teheran, Bombay and Tunisia. It tells of extensive programs 
to impart skills to 120,000 Algerian Jewish refugees in France 
so that they can become eligible for jobs and begin to con- 
struct a new life. It reports how 20,000 young people in Israel 
are being imbued with knowledge and training in mid-twen- 
tieth century technology, the better to participate in na- 
tional development and, at the same time, to fill the vacuum 
of skills in Israel's emerging industries. 

ORT is doing this kind of work in 22 countries. It is the 
largest voluntary program of vocational and technical educa- 
tion in the world. Its network of over 600 schools includes, 

(Please Turn to Page 35) 



The American Jewish Times-Outlook, published monthly at 530 Southeastern Building, Greensboro. N. C. Chester A. Brown. Editor: David Bernstein. General :.l?naeer; 
Nathan Kessler, Manager, Virginia Office; Florence Byers, Virginia News Editor; Broad Grace Arcade, Richmond, Virginia. Member Seven Arts Feature Syndicate, Inc. $3.00 
teer year payable in aavance. Secona-Class Postage paid at Greensooro, N. C. Tne views expressed by contriDutors are not necessarily those of the publishers, Dut may oe 
published m tne interest of freeaorr. of the press. The American Jewish Times-Outlook: is, owned and eaitea solely as an inaepenaem enterprise and is not a Jewish com- 
rnunitiy undertaking 



6 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



PLAIN TALK By ALFRED SEGAL 



THIS COLUMN BY A BOY 

He began his speech: "I am the 
'mystery man' of the American 
Revolution. My ancestry is Jewish- 
Portuguese. I was born in Lissa, 




ALFRED SEGAL 

Poland, about 1740. Early in life 
1 joined the cause for Polish free 1 - 
■dom and was expelled from my 
^country by the Russians because 
of my passion for independence." 

"Who am I?" he asked. "I am 
Haym Salomon, known to my con- 
temporaries as 'the mystery man' 
of the American Revolution. 
Haym in Hebrew means 'life.' I 
rejoice that I was able, in the 1 only 
way I could, to give my substance, 
even my life, for the cause of Ame- 
rica, the bulwark of freedom." 

The one who was speaking as 
Haym Salomon to me and others 
in the hall was a high school boy 
of our town . . . Larry Hall, a 
'Christian youth. He and nine 
other high school boys were speak- 
ing there that morning in an ora- 
torical contest of the Sons of the 
American Revolution. 

I was one of the judges of the 
contest ... to pick the winner. 
ILarry Hall continued in his role 
as Haym Salomon: "Forced to flee 
for my life, I arrived in England 
with the spark of freedom still 
-glowing in my breast ... I was 
engaged in a plot to burn the Bri- 
tish fleet and was condemned to 
xleath." 

Larry went on to report that as 
Haym Salomon he fled "to the 
shores of America where I joined 
xhe cause of the Colonist. By 1772 



I had become a broker in New 
York. My activities in behalf of in- 
dependence in 1776 led me to ar- 
rest as a spy by the British. 

"After being paroled, I acted as 
undercover agent among the Hes- 
sians and was arrested again as a 
spy in 1778 and sentenced to 
death. By briefing the jailor, of 
Provost Prison in New York with 
a string of gold guineas concealed 
in my clothes. I was able to escape 
execution." 

Well, we three judges of the ora- 
tory contest listened with rapt rec- 
ognition of Haym Salomon. We 
knew about him but this was the 
first time we'd ever heard him . . . 
anyway, in the voice of Larry Hall. 
He told us that he became a 
broker in Philadelphia and was 
appointed paymaster for the 
French Army of the American 
Revolution ... "I persuaded lit- 
erally hundreds of Hessians to 
desert or resign from the British 
service. I recall giving James Mad- 
ison and other delegates money 
so that they could stay in Congress 
when their states were unable to 
pay their salaries. Altogether I 
advanced something like $700,000 
to the Continental Army and to 
the maintenance of the bankrupt 
government's credit. 

"My fortune, which was consid- 
erable, was given without hesita- 
tion to the American fight for 
freedom. 1 encouraged other pa- 
triots to do likewise." 

After that Larry spoke up as 
Larry himself, a youth of today's 
world, who is worried about it 
because of all that goes on now. 
He was saying that today "the 
world is so small that its two vital 
parts . . . democracy and commu- 
nism . . . each has sufficient nu- 
clar power to bring about total 
world destruction by mere push- 
button control. Now more than 
ever we need such men on the 
side of democracy as Haym Solo- 
mon to preserve its principles on 
our planet. 

"Democracy which assures to 
each man his personal dignity, 
grants him his inalienable right 
. . . has been born of the travail 
of persecuted and enslaved peo- 
ples. Haym Salmon was such a per- 
son. A devout Jew, he had known 
religious persecution in its bit- 



Editorials 

Plain Talk — Alfred Segal 

Have Fun, Ladies — Ethel L. Levy 

Discontent — Dire Disease — Rabbi Joseph Asher 

Solomon Nunes Carvalho — Harry Simonhoff 

The Preacher of Lubno — Dr. H. Rabinowisz 



_ - ~_ 5 

6 

7 

9 

_.. 11 

12 

The John F. Kennedy Peace Forest — A. Schreiber 14 

What Jewish Young Adults Want — Dr. Harry Specht 16 

Hillel in North Carolina — Rabbi Joseph H. Levine 17 

Reform Rabbis and Intermarriage — • Robert Appel 18 

Changing Styles in Jewish Foruns — Dr. Samuel D. Freeman 20 

Jews In Spain — Ben G. Frank - 22 

The Jewish Heritage — Dr. S. Margoshes * 24 

A. Man For All Seasons — Sheldon E. Elstor 27 

What's Borthering Jews of America? — Alfred Dobroff 32 



North Carolina 



Wilmington — ■ Mrs. Daniel Retchin — 
Whiteville — Mrs. Martin Bernstein .... 



Raleigh Beth Meyer Synagogue — Mrs. Oscar Legum 

Around Greensboro 

Weldon-Rcanoke Rapids — Miss Louise Farber 

Charlotte Temple Israel — Mrs. H. N. Friedman 

Charlotte Temple Beth El — Mrs. Doris M. Hellman 

Winston-Salem — Mrs. Stanley Tulman 

Fayetteville — Mrs. Alex Waitman 

Williamston — Mrs. Irving M. Margolis 



8 
8 
28 
29 
31 
33 
34 
46 
48 
54 



Virginia 

Richmond , 10 

Roanoke B-eth Israel Sisterhood — Mrs. M. K. Goldstein 10 

Richmond Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood — 

Mrs. Kenneth W. Rojas 19 

Newport News — • Mrs. Martha B. Shapiro 23 

Norfolk — Mrs. William Schwartz _._ 26 

South Carolina 

Charleston - — 53 

Columbia — ■ Mrs. Bernard Laden - 56 



Tennessee 



Knoxville 
Chattanooga 



Savannah 



Georgia 



58 
59 



64 



THE COVER 

Label Katz, President of B'nai B'rith, receives a copy of 
"The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage" from Joseph 
Schlang, New York realtor, stockbroker and sponsor of the 
book. Richard Tucker, Metropolitan Opera Star and guest of 
honor, participated. One Hundred copies of the book are to 
be contributed by Mr. Schlang to leading Hillel Club Libraries. 
Mr. Schlang made this presentation and pledge at a recent 
dinner tendered to Mr. Tucker. 



terest form. Though a man of 
wealth and education, he was an 
outcast. The pressure was so great 
that he was willing to dedicate his 
wealth to the last cent and his life 
to the last drop of blood for the 
cause of religious freedom. In the 
greater Quaker City of Philadel- 
phia he firmly established Jewry." 

Haym Salomon reminded Lar- 
ry Hall of another Jew he has 
met. Said Larry: "He is like an- 



other of the same ancestry whose 
life so greatly changed the world. 

It is a challenge to us to preserve 
our religious heritage where even 
today within our borders are 
rumblings of racial and religious 
intolerance . . . Silver and gold 
Haym Salomon had, and of such 
he freely and unselfishly gave to 
the cause of liberty . . . The cost 
of the American Revolution was 
(Pleast Turn to Page 33) 



October, 1964 The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 

Have Fun, 
Ladies 

By Ethel L. Levy 



Thirty years spent in club work 
with Jewish women's organizations 
have left me with moments of 
awful clarity when I rear back 
and shriek: "Morror, mirror on 
the wall, if I do any more of this, 
I'll bawl." 

In most cities, there are hun- 
dreds of women's clubs, of these, 
according to the rate of Jewish 
population, there will be a num- 
ber of Jewish women's sisterhoods, 
associations, clubs, organizations 
or leagues, and I would guess that 
three-fourths of the Jewish women 
in any given city or town would 
belong to one or more of these. 
Many who do are the much be- 
littled, but oh, so necessary dues 
paying members. The rest are the 
»ood-doers or what are euphemis- 
tically called leaders. To these ac- 
crue many rewards, but there are 
two sides to every coin, and I feel 
compelled to mention along with 
the rewards, a few of the pitfalls 
ready and waiting for the unwary 
female who wants to be outward 
bound without joining the bona 
fide (that's salaried) working wo- 
I men of America. 

The task would be simpler if 
I I could divide the ladies already 
involved in club work into neat 
I c ategories and use them as back- 
ground statistics. Dividing them 
, into groups like these: A. . . . The 
i Dedicated Souls, B. . . . The Help- 
ful Hannahs, C. . . . The Misguid- 
jed Misfits, and D. . . . The Self- 
Therapist . . . would be of inesti- 
mable help. The only problem 
'with such divisions is that the 
j girls don't fit neatly into any one 
;of them. Everyone overlaps. Some- 
1 times. The Dedicated Soul is also 
la Miseuided Misfit. All too often, 
I the Self-Therapist turns out to be 



a very Helpful Hannah. There 
just aren't enough categories to 
go around. 

Furthermore, each organization, 
by its very nature, has chronic 
problems of personnel and each 
organization has an Executive 
board, headed by a President, 
otherwise known as the Target 
For The Year. Before you can 
get Up There (to the Executive). 
\ou can with willing heart, serve 
an apprenticeship of what seems 
like twenty years, but is probably 
only four. You may do this in the 
kitchen, cooking, or in the dining 
100m, serving, or on the telephone, 
soliciting, or in the bingo, raffle, 
rummage or bake sale, raising 
money. I must tell you, however, 
that you can do all of these and 
yet never get Up There. If 1 
hear faint cries of "who needs it?" 
and "I wouldn't have it as a 
gift," or "I've got a Master's in 
social work and anytime I want, 
I can quit," I will ignore them. 
But let's say you arrive at the top. 
You are the perfect worker; dedi- 
cated, but not blindly devoted, di 
plomatic but not pompous, a 
speaker with a message AND a 
sense of humor. Besides these basic 
assets, you have a memorable 
memory and 20/20 vision which 
enables you to recognize each and 
every member from a distance of 
two blocks in a pouring rain. As 
a fund raiser, you have no equal. 
You are a personal friend of every 
person of means in the commun- 
ity and are so filled with novel 
ideas for separating them from 
a small part of their capital gains 
that a tape-recorder stands at your 
bedside for thoughts that come to 
you in the night. This is You, the 
Chairman. 



How did it happen? First of all, 
\ou made the prime move, you 
joined the organization. There are 
any number of reasons given by 
any number of ladies for becom- 
ing part of woman's clubs. Here 
are a few I've heard: "Betty and 
Sharon belonged, so . . . The kids 
belong to a club they sponsor . . . 
My husband is a member of the 
Men's Club . . . They have a ter- 
rific bowling, or golfing, 01 de- 
bating (?) society ... 1 like to go 
to luncheons." What I'm getting 
at, of course, is that no one ever 
seems to join a group for the ideals 
or principles by which the group 
stands or lor the projects which 
it supports. If they do, it is ap- 
parently incidental to the other 
reasons. 

Allright, you are now a mem- 
ber. You attend your first meet- 
ing. If everything goes well, i.e., 
the lunch is good, your new suit 
is a hit, you arc seated with peo- 
ple you know, and the business 
meeting isn't too boring, you come 
again. As they say when you win 
your first bet at a race-track, now, 
you are in trouble. The girls UP 
THERE, known to all but never 
to their faces as the "old guard" 
have you spotted. You will, in 
short order, be asked to announce 
that "refreshments are served;" be 
invited to model a creation at the 
next Israel Fashion Show; to pre- 
side in sequined gown in the wel- 
come booth at the annual dinner- 
dance. All manner of glamorous 
chores will fall into your lap. 
You love it; who doesn't? 

But watch out! The next re- 
quest is the sneakvpunch. You will 
probably be asked to solicit do- 
nations from business men who 
will tell you they stay in business 



7 




ETHEL L. LEVY 



only by not making donations. If 
you accede to the request, you are 
in the game for good. II this 
sounds like the spider and the fly 
story, I remind you that you are 
not a fly, but a creature with the 
ability to make a choice, and you've 
made it, sister. From soliciting do- 
nations (you were surprisingly 
successful) you go to sharing the 
Purim Festival. In September, 
you supervise the Fall Member- 
ship Party. You take minutes", 
total figures, and present reports. 
For a girl who shook like a leaf 
when she had to call the family 
for supper, it is remarkable how 
you have come to respond to any 
audience of more than three peo- 
ple. You now stand before all 
kinds ol groups, and the words 
How on and on and on. 

The day comes when yon are 
an elected member of the Ex- 
ecutive. Your husband, who till 
now looked upon your activities 
with narrowed eye and sullied 
brow, comes home with "I saw 
your friend today and she said 
she enjoyed your talk yesterday." 
Or, "I met so-and-so and she told 
me everyone in the organization 
is proud of the work von are do- 
ing. He looks at you as though 
he hasn't seen you in the last ten 
years. If you are honest, you, too, 
will recognize that you have chang- 
ed. You read more and better lit- 
erature than you did. You think 
more clearly. You are aware of 
and alert to local, national and 
international issues that once were 
only headlines. You are in contact 
with the leaders of your commun- 
ity, your state and often, of your 
nation. There is a spring in your 
step, a sparkle in your eve, joie 

(Please Turn to Page 60> 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOUK 



October, 1964 




WILMINGTON, N. C. 

MRS. DANIEL RETCHIN, Correspondent 



Kf. C. 




MRS. PHILIP ROBERT SIMONS 



"Rhoda Linda May and Philip 
Robert Simons of West Hollywood, 
Fla. were married Sunday, August 
30th at 3 p.m. in the B'Nai Israel 
Synagogue. Rabbi Samuel Fried- 
man performed the marriage cere- 
mony. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold May of Wil- 
mington, and the bridegroom is 
the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Irving Simons of Miami, Fla. 

Miss Carol Alpert and Mrs. Al- 
bert Levite, aunt of the bride, pre- 
sented the wedding music. 

Given in marriage by her father, 
the bride wore a formal gown of 



silk organza appliqued with hand- 
made lace medallions and seed 
pearls. She carried a white bible 
with white orchids and stephan- 
otis. 

Miss Joyce May, sister of the 
bride, was maid of honor. She 
wore a street-length dress of cerise 
taffeta with a matching headpiece, 
and carried a cascade of pink car- 
nations and ivy. 

Bridesmaids Miss Patric'a May, 
sister of the bride, and Mrs. Ralph 
Schneeweiss of West Hollywood, 
Fla. wore dresses identical to that 
of the maid of honor in pale* - 
shades of pink. 

(Please Turn to Page 60) 



MRS. H. N. FRIEDMAN, Correspondent 



The Whiteville congregation 
welcomes Mr. M. Reuben Kesner 
and his sister, Miss Ruth Kesner, 
who have recently moved to 
our community. Mr. Kesner will 
Sill the vacant Southeast Circuit 
position under the circuit Riding 
Rabbi Project of the North Caro- 
lina Association of Jewish Men. 
Mr. Kesner is serving the com- 
munities of Jacksonville, Lumber- 
ton, Wallace, and Whiteville. 

The M)()l-(i. r i season got under 
way with the Beth Israel congrega- 
tion's monthly social held Septem- 
ber 2, at the Beth Israel Center. 
Hostesses for the affair were Mrs. 



Herman Leder and Mrs. Martin 
Bernstein. 

The Irving Mann family has re- 
turned from the World's Fair in 
New York. Also the family visited 
Mr. and Mrs. Larry Mann and 
daughter in Washington, D. C. 
Mrs. I. Mann and son, Harold, 
have recently visited with relatives 
in Omaha, Nebraska. 



5724-5725 LUACH 1964-19G5 

Chanukah Nov. 30 

Purim . March J18 

Passover April 17 

Shavuous . Jane & 



THE NO. 1 NAME IN 



MILK 




COTTAGE 
C H E E S E 




ICE CREAM 




ealfesl Foods - Southern Division 



VIRGINIA 



COLLINSVILLE 

DANVILLE 
HARRISONBURG 
NEWPORT NEWS 



NORFOLK 
PETERSBURG 
RICHMOND 
ROANOKE 



NORTH CAROLINA 



ALBEMARLE 
ASHEVILLE 
BREVARD 
BRYSON CITY 
CHARLOTTE 
DURHAM 
ELIZABETH CITY 
FAYETTEVILLE 
GREENSBORO 



JACKSONVILLE 
MOREHEAD CITY 
RALEIGH 
ROCKY MOUNT 
SALISBURY 
WHITEVILLE 
WILMINGTON 

WILSON 
WINSTON-SALEM 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



9 




RABBI JOSEPH ASHER 

It only comparatively recently, 
the overriding concern of mankind 
was physical survival, — and as I 
look over my sermons of the last 
several years, this concern is re- 
flected in them — we are now less 
worried about that. I don'l know 
whether this is just because we 
have become accustomed to this 
threat, or whether the threat has 
actually receded. At any rate, the 
fallout shelter business is bad and 
that's good. 

Thi;. phenomenon today is dis- 
content. This in itself is nothing 
new. Man has always thought 
himself unfulfilled, a state which 
has urged him on to greater ac- 
complishments. What is new is: 
that it occurs at a time ol un- 
precedented prosperity, at a time 
when the prospects for peace are 
better than they have been in any 
time in the last fifty years, at a 
time when science has lifted the 
burden of labor and physical suf- 
fering from off mankind and cer- 
tainly off the vast majority of 
Americans. And, that this discon- 
tent manifests itself not bv urg- 
ing him further ahead, but by 
turning him backward to the good 
old days, when discontent was 
surely more justifiable. 

Whenever we pick up a book or 
magazine dealing with contem- 
porary history, it is this gnawing 
and galloping disease seemingly 
attacking with ever growing fero- 
city the very fiber of our being, 
which is constantly being pointed 
out, diagnosed and analyzed. The 
Talmudic injunction: to be con- 
sent with one's lot is a lost art. 
There is nothing wrong for man 
to try and improve his lot. What 
is wrong is that when the im- 
provement is accomplished, it fails 
to do to us what it was expected 



Discontent - 
Dire Disease 

By Rabbi Joseph Asher 



The following is a sermon delivered by Rabbi Asher at Temple Emanuel, 
Greensboro, N. C. on Rosh Hashona day. — THE EDITOR. 



AROUND 



t(i do. The American who has fin- 
ally broken out of the crowded 
tenement into woodsy suburbia is 
unhappy and nostalgically recalls 
the "carefree" days when fresh air 
would only be enjoyed on a 
crowded fire escape. He sees his 
children enjoying all the advan- 
tages he did not have and for 
which he fled the squalor in the 
first place, only to see his children 
discontented with the things with 
which he would have been delight- 
ed. The problems of the cold Avar 
make so many nostalgic for those 
days when victory was a victory 
and defeat was defeat. When there 
were still ways to get it over with, 
one way or the other. 

Labor saving devices have un- 
chained the American woman 
from an overheated kitchen and 
the American man from much of 
the back-breaking and mind-dull- 
ing labor, only to make him dis- 
contented with an abundance of 
spare time with nothing to do, and 
the anonymity of his contribution 
co our society. Young American 
women almost envy their mothers 
kneading dough in their kitchens 
for their daily bread, and young 
American men hobby and garden 
themselves into a sweat, perhaps 
to relieve vicariously the ingenu- 
ity of their pioneer, self-reliant, 
inventive forebears. The American 
Negro is more discontented now 
with all the strides he has made 
than, he was, when he did not 
know any better, a generation ago. 
And the Southern white who never 
had it so good, is discontented at 
being dragged belatedly into the 
20th century. And the talk among 
Negroes about black nationalism 
and among the southern whites 
about state's rights are both utter 
nonsense and only backward-look- 
ing catalysts for their discontent. 



All this discontent is bound to 
make our lives miserable, individ- 
ually and collectively. More crime, 
more violence, more divorces, more 
juvenile delinquency, more drug 
addiction, more alcoholism, more 
mental illness, they are the visible 
symptoms of this debilitating sick- 
ness of discontent. And these 
symptoms are as nothing compar- 
ed to the unheard and unnoticed 
despair that beset so many jives in 
the stillness of the night and the 
privacy of our homes, never quite 
exploding into visible soreness, 
yet festering with ever growing 
malignancy. 

Before we can even begin to at- 
tack this dreadful disease, we 
should know what causes it. And 
surprisingly, its causes are very 
simple. But, as with so many sim- 
ple things, they are not recogniz- 
ed very easily. They are hidden 
under double-talk and the abra- 
cadabra of quackery. We are dis- 
content because we have been mis 
led to believe that material pro- 
gress is an end in itself. Now we 
know, this is not true and we don't 
know what to believe. Our entire 
culture is geared to the acquisition 
of material goods and the promise 
that they bring happiness. What 
are some of these promises? A 
better home in a better neighbor- 
hood will raise better children — 
wrong. There are as many delin- 
quent children in good neighbor- 
hoods as in the depressed ones. 
Bigger weapons in greater num- 
bers will bring peace — wrong. 
Little Cuba and even lesser Viet 
Nam with virtually no weapons 
can cause us no end of trouble. 
More take home pay will relieve 
us of financial worry — wrong. It 
only gets us, it seems, into bigger 
debt! More freedom guaranteed 
(Please Turn to Page 38) 





RELY ON 
PIEDMONT 

. . . for convenient, com- 
fortable flight service 
linking 68 cities. Sched- 
ules are tailor-made 
for business travel. 
Excellent service is also 
offered to many famous 
vacation and resort 
areas. 

Next time you take 
a trip along the Route 
of the Pacemakers, en- 
joy Piedmont's friend- 
ly service, convenient 
schedules and modern, 
comfort-conditioned 
planes. Join the people 
who rely and fly on 
Piedmont Airlines! 




PIEDMONT 
AIRLINES 

home office and operations base:. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 



10 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 




RICHMOND, VA. 




"The marriage of Miss Susan El- 
len Schwartz, Daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Manny M. Schwartz, to Ar- 
nold Alfred Effron,, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Hyman Effron of Blue- 
Tield, West Virginia took place at 
half after twelve, August 16 at 
Temple Beth-El in Richmond. 

Cantor Morris I. Okun officia- 
ted. 

Given in marriage by her fadrer 
the bride wore a gown of peau de 
soie fashioned with an embroi- 
dered raised flower design of seed 
pearls and lace. Her veil of impor- 
ted illusion fell from a crown of 
matching seed pearls and lace. 



MRS. ARNOLD ALFRED EFFRON 

Photo by Wendell Powell 

She carried a bible with an orchid 
and stephanotis. 

Honor attendants were Mrs. 
Richard A. Fishkin of Philadel- 
phia, matron of honor, and Miss 
Susan Jaye Effron of Bluefield, 
maid of honor. Bridesmaids were 
Miss Dale Michi Frankel of Rich- 
mond and the Misses Elaine Beth 
and Vivian Lyn Effron of Blue- 
field. Junior bridesmaid was Miss 
Ellen Geri Gajrfinkle of Silver 
Spring, Maryland, Lt. Frank Lu- 
cius Pinney III of Quantico, was 
best man. Ushers were Mr. Stephen 
Curtis Schwartz and Mr. John Jay 
Schwartz of Richmond. Mr. Mi- 
chael Lewis Sherman of Baltimore, 



Mr. Stanley Raymond Nelson of A reception was held at Temple 

Princeton, West Virginia. Mr. Ro- Beth-El. 

land Cornelius Luther III <>l Blue- After a trip to Puerto Rico and 

field and Mr. Jack Samuel Hirsch the Virgin Isles, the couple will 

of Richmond. live in Richmond. 

R@anoke, Va. Beth Israel Sisterhood 

MRS. M. K. GOLDSTEIN, Correspondent 



Our congratulation to Mr. 
Terry Brenner on his graduation 
from Michigan State. 

U. S. Y. has been active during 
the summer here in Roanoke. In 
August our IT. S. Y. group was 
host to Camp USY on Wheels 
with a dinner and services at 
Green Hills Country Club, the ev- 
ening of the "Wheelniks" arrival, 
and a skit and discussion following 
services at the Synagogue the 
next morning before their depar- 
ture. 

Also in August, Cliff Weckstein, 
president; Ginny Kurshan, vice 
president; Ira Katz, 2nd vice-presi- 
dent: and Anne Sacks, past presi- 
dent and regional chairman repre- 
sented the Roanoke Chapter of 
USY at Leadership Training In- 
stitute, at Camp White Mountain, 
High View, West Virginia. We're 
sure they gained ideas and in- 
spiration to benefit our own chap- 
ter. 

The deepest sympathy is ex- 
tended to Mrs. Carl Fremed on 
the loss of her mother, and to Mrs. 
Phillip Aarons on the loss of her 
grandmother. 

Miss Carole Wendy Grossman, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
I. Grossman of Roanoke, was mar- 
ried Sunday, August 23, to Arnold 
N. Baker, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jo- 
seph Baker of Revere, Mass. 



5724-5725 LUACH J 964-1965 

Chanukah Nov. 30 

Purim March 18 

Passover April 17 

Shavuous Jane 6 



The ceremony was held at the 
Hotel Roanoke with Rabbi Haim 
Kemmelman officiating. The 
bride was given in marriage by 
her father. 

Mrs. Michael J. Levine of Re- 
vere, Mass., sister of the bride- 
groom was honor attendant. Also 
attending were Miss Penny Gross- 
man of Roanoke, sister of the 
bride; Miss Linda Grescher, Roa- 
noke: Miss Susan Flax, Van Nuys, 
Calif., cousin of the bride; and 
(Please Turn to Page 25) 



Window Cleaning 
Contractors 

for 

• OFFICE BUILDINGS 

• INDUSTRIAL PLANTS 

• NEW CONSTRUCTION 

• SHOWROOMS 

• BANKS 

• OFFICES 

Also Brick and Stone Cleaning 



DIAL 

MI 4-7265 

Insured Service 



CUT RATE 
Window Cleaning 



F. W. BUCKLEY, Manager 
First and Byrd Sts. Richmond 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



11 



American Notables 

Solomon Nunes 
Carvalho 

By Harry Simonhoff 



John C. Fremont ranks among 
ihe most colorful figures in Ameri- 
can history. Teacher, civil engi- 
neer, surveyor for railroads, and 
army officer, he eloped with jessie 
Benton. the talented literary 
daughter of Missouri's senator, 
then a top leader in national poli- 
tics. Thereafter Fremont became 
an explorer on a par in daring 
with Daniel Boone, Kit Carson 
and those adventurers who pene- 
trated trackless country never be- 
fore trodden by white man. 

There was also in his make-up 
an element of the irrational that 
sometimes got him into trouble, 
but also won him everlasting fame. 
But for Fremont, California might 
not have been a part of the U.S.A. 
His unorthodox conduct clashed 
with the army authorities. He 
was court-martialed and found 
guilty. By this time his popularity 
was such that President Polk found 
it necessary to pardon him. He 
had purchased a tract of land on 
which gold was subsequently 
lound. Instead of earning millions, 
this land was lost after protracted 
litigation. In 1850 he was sent to 
represent California in the U. S. 
Senate. 

One day in August 1853 this 
Byronesque leader with plenty of 
personal magnetism met and in- 
vited Solomon Nunes Carvalho to 
join his new expedition for ex- 
ploring the far west into Califor- 
nia. Carvalho succumbed to Col. 
Fremont's charm and immediately 
consented. This was surprising in 
I 38-year-old aesthete, who had led 
a sheltered life, and who had writ- 
ten a treatise on the Biblical ori- 
gin of the universe, entitled The 
Two Creations. Born in Charles- 
ton, he had in his 20th year set up 



as a portrait painter and had re- 
ceived a silver medal from the 
South Carolina Institute for his 
Moses Receiving the Tablets of 
the Law on Sinai, which was de- 
stroyed in 1838 when the Beth 
Elohim Synagogue burned down. 
Fortunately Carvalho had drawn 
a sketch of its interior so that 10- 
day we can still see the "spacious 
and elegant" Synagogue described 
by LaFayette and dedicated in 
1794 before Gov. Moultrie and 
his large entourage of military and 
civilians. But his best known paint- 
ings are the portraits of Rabbi 
Isaac Leeser, the leader of Ameri- 
can Orthodox Jewry, and Thomas 
Hunter, the founder of Hunter 
College in New York. 

It also seems strange that Fre- 
mont should have selected a sensi- 
tive artist to join his party of ten 
Indians,, two Mexicans, and five 
Americans for an expedition that 
called for the toughest kind of 
physical and moral fibre. But Fre- 
mont was born in Savannah and 
studied at the College of Charles- 
ton. Evidently he recognized the 
loyal, impulsive, hardy adventu- 
rous nature of Carvalho and put 
on his persuasive charm to win 
over a fellow Southerner, whom he 
understood and appreciated. Be- 
sides being a painter, Carvalho 
was expert in handling the recent- 
ly invented daguerreotype photo- 
graphy, never before utilized in 
explorations. 

Autumn was well advanced by 
the time the expedition got under 
way. Winter is obviously not the 
season for climbing the Rocky 
Mountains. The planning and 
timing reveals the queer streak in 
Femont's make-up, the imnracti- 
cal knight-errantry that fails to 



provide sufficient food against 
starvation. 

Month after month the heroic 
band blazed its vanishing trail thru 
dense forests in ice and snow. 
Winding alongside the majestic 
mountains, a slip on the narrow 
ice frozen path might plunge man 
or beast into the deep valley or riv- 
er beds far below. Food supplies 
dwindled; the explorers had to 
kill their pack horses and fry the 
meat in melted tallow candles. 
When a beaver was shot, or a por- 
cupine killed, the starved men 
celebrated a holiday feast. Finally 
all beasts of burden were con- 
sumed, and there was danger of 
cannibalism among the dessperate 
hunger-crazed crew. 

Carvalho was second in com- 
mand and a favorite with the 
tough-minded group. No hardship 
could weaken his confidence in 
or loyalty to his chief. He writes, 
"While suffering from frozen feet 
and hands, without food for 2-1 
hours, traveling on foot over 
mountains of snow, I have stopped 
on the trail, made pictures of the 
country, repacked my materials, 
and found myself frequently with 
my friend Egloffstein, who general- 
ly remained with me to make ba- 
rometrical observations, and a 
muleteer, some five or six miles 
behind camp, which was reached 
only with great expense of bodily 
as well as metal suffering. The 
great secret, however, of my untir- 
ing perserverance and continued 
success was that my honor was 
pledge! to Col. Fremont to per- 
form certain duties, and I would 
rather have died than not have re- 
deemed it. I made pictures up to 
the very day Col. Fremont found 
it necessary to bury the whole 




HARRY SIMONHOFF 



baggage of the camp, including 
the daguerreotype apparatus." 

The vice-commander, on one oc- 
casion saved the entire party from 
massacre. A stray horse had been 
shot for food and some Indians 
collected its value. About 30 miles 
further a different band of In- 
dians claimed the horse. The Utes. 
had good horses, were well armed 
with bows, arrows, rifles, and 
greatly outnumbered the explor- 
ers. Fremont saw the perii and' 
resorted to strategy. He knew his 
lieutenant to be a crack shot, and 
gave him an order in secret. 

Carvalho started gun practice 
with a Colt six-shooter and hit the 
bull's-eye six times. Cleverly shift- 
ing revolvers, he invited the chief 
to try his skill with a pistol which 
the Indians thought had already 
fired six times. The only guns the 
red men knew needed reloading 
after each shot. Amazed that the 
whites had a weapon that could 
shoot indefinitely, the Indians 
withdrew and went their way. 

Conditions became desperate. 
Malnutrition brought on scurvy 
and diarrhea. Their emaciated 
bodies wrapped in tattered shreds, 
scarcely had sufficient strength to 
drag over the snow that might cov- 
er a hollow deep ravine. One of 
the band died of starvation and 
exposure. When all hope began 
to abandon even their indomitable 
leader, help came unexpectedly 
from a Mormon outpost. Carvalho- 
was taken to Salt Lake City. With 
rest, food and care, he gradually 
regained health. He remained for 
a time with the Mormons and did 
a painting of Brigham Youngs 
their governor. 

(Please Turn to Page 43 > 



The, American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



Conservatives UNITE 
SUPPORT 

DICK OBENSHAIN 

For Congress 
Third Congressional District 



Barry Goldwater cannot reverse the liberal 
trend of the Democrats unless he has a Repub- 
lican House of Representatives. Dick Obenshain 
is the only candidate in the Third District who 
will vote to organize the House under conserva- 
tive Republican leadership. 

BARRY GOLDWATER 

needs 

DICK OBENSHAIN 



12 YEARS 



EXPERIENCE 
SENIORITY 
SERVICE 




HE GETS THE JOB DONE 

RE-ELECT 

Joel T. Broyhill 

Your Congressman 

10TH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT OF VIRGINIA 



THE PREACHER OF LUBNO 

By Dr. H. Rabinowicz 



The king of the Maggidim, 
Rabbi Jacob B. Wolf Kranz (1741- 
1804), was popularly known as the 
Dubner Maggid. His contempor- 
aries, Rabbi Jonathan Ebbershutz, 
Rabbi Eliezer Fleckles and Rabbi 
Judah B. Bezalel, were outstand- 
ing preachers Rabbi Krantz oc- 
cupied posts in Messeritz, Zolkiev, 
Wollawa, Kalisch and Zamosc. He 
has come down to posterity as the 
Maggid of Dubner, a town in Vol- 
hynia where he spent 18 years. He 
was the most popular preacher of 
his generation. Even Rabbi Elijah 
B. Solomon, the Wilna Goan 
(1720-1797) enjoyed his company 
and delighted in his homilies. He 
made use of the Mashal-the par- 
able, the homely illustration to 
drive home his lesson and through 
them a niche in the hearts of his 
people. A few examples of his 
methods will suffice. 

We read in Deuteronomy (Chap 
ter XIII) "All his word which I 
commend you, ye shall observe to 
do: thou shalt not add thereto 
nor diminish from it.' The Dub- 
ner comments "We can well un- 
derstand the anxiety of the Law- 
giver letst the people diminish 
from it and fail to observe one of 
the 613 commandments. What, 
however, is the purpose of stres- 
sing 'Thou shalt not add? Is there 
harm in being over meticulous in 
the fulfilment of God's Law?" 
With a Mashal he illuminated the 
Biblical passage. A man once asked 
his neighbor for the loan of a pot. 
On the following day, the bor- 
rower gratefully returned two 
pots. "Why are you giving me 
two pots? Surely I only gave you 
one." "The pot you gave me 1 ," 
was the rejoinder, "gave birth to 
another pot." Some time later the 
same man borrowed a bowl, and 
again he returned two with the 
explanation that the bowl begot 
another one. Eventually he asked 
for the loan of a pair of expensive 
silver candlesticks. Some time elap- 
sed and the precious objects were 
not returned. Anxiously the lend- 
er inquired for them. "My friend," 
he was solemnly told "I regret to 
inform you that the candlestcks 
are dead." "My candlesticks are 
dead! How can inanimate objects 
die?" Well, you believed that the 
pots and the bowls had given 



birth to pots and bowls; you can 
also believe that candlesticks are 
mortal. Similarly," concluded the 
Dubner Maggid "If one adds to the 
Laws, there is the danger that one 
might eventually detract from 
iheni." 

On Rosh Hashonah and Yom 
kippur, the Dubner brought home 
to his listeners the true signifi- 
cance of the " Days of Awe." 
There was once a peasant who 
lived in the country. He was 
simple , unsophisticated, entirely 
unworldly. Once he ventured to 
visit the city of Minsk. He felt 
almost intoxicated with the sights 
of the big town, the houses, the 
shops; a new world was opening 
before his very eyes. Suddenly he 
observed a man beating a very 
large drum. On inquiring, he was 
told that a fire had broken out in 
the town.. The peasant was greatly 
impressed. With all his available 
resources he purchased a big 
drum, and returned happily to his 
native village. The local villagers 
were a thirst for news. He was over- 
whelmed with questions and 
many earnestly and persistently 
solicited for his impressions of 
town life. The peasant, however, 
was not responsive. Nothing would 
induce him to part with his newly 
acquired knowledge. Eventually 
he said: "Wait till a fire breaks 
out. I have a new method for 
putting out fires." His wish was 
fulfilled sooner than he had dared 
to hope. A fire broke out in the 
village. The inhabitants of the 
village were about to rush for 
buckets and water. To their a- 
mazement, they were obstructed by 
the peasant. 'I have a new way of 
putting out fires' he exclaimed. 
He brought out his drum and in- 
cessantly began to beat it. Natur- 
ally the entire village was burned 
down. The peasant then realized, 
alas too late, that the drum was 
merely a method of arousing the 
people and that by itself it is 
powerless and no avail. Similarly," 
continued the Preacher "it is not 



BUY 
ISRAEL BONDS 
NOW! 



— ■ 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



IS 





The largest enrollment in the 19-year history of B'nai B'rith 
Hillel Foundations' annual summer institute attended at Camp 
B'nai B'rith in the Poconos. Students from 126 campuses had 
challenging 1 questions and comments in seminars and group 



discussions that probed for a mature understanding of Judaism.. 
Teddi Kern of Kansas University (left) is typical of the inquiring- 
student. Israel Ambassador Avraham Harmon, guest .'ecturer 
with the 22 -member faculty, ponders a thoughtful answer* 



enough to beat your breasts on 
Yom Kippur and to recite 'For the 
transgressions' that we have trans- 
gressed . . . we have to become 
truly penitent." 

On another occasion, he used 
another mashal. There was once 
a timber merchant, a Jew, who was 
blessed, as was customary then, 
with a very large family. He would 
buy his wood on credit from a 
wholesaler in Danzing and every 
year before Rosh Hashanah would 
go to his creditor to pay him and 
to take a new stock on credit. This 
was his custom for many years. 
Then once a calamity overtook 
him and his entire stock was burn- 
ed down. The man was in a great 
dilemma. He was faced with the 
prospect of starvation; he could 
neither pay back his debts nor 
find the courage to ask his cred- 
itor for a new supply. The vision 
of his starving children and de- 
manding wife gave him courage. 
He went to his creditor and burst 
into tears. He told him that he 
was not in a position to repay him 
nor did he feel justified in asking 
for new credit. He was, however, 
pleasantly surprised when he was 
told that his entire debt would be 
remitted and that a new stock 
would given him. Overjoyed, the 
man stopped at an inn and told 
the people that, as a result of his 
tears and supplications, his 
(Please Turn to Page 45) 



m 



§• 

it 



©IFF 



w 



to introduce new 
Old Mansion package 



Same delicious blend of world's finest 
coffees— rich in high grade Colombians, 
the most costly coffee grown anywhere on 
earth! Stock up now on OLD MANSION 
COFFEE— instant and regular— during this 
big "new package" introductory sale! 

THANK GOODNESS FOR COFFEE-AND OLD MANSION FOR GOODNESS! 



IldMansiok 



14 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



S** 3 ^- MONTALDOS ^^^S 




UNWANTED HAIR? 
Electrolysis Is The Answer 

WRITE OR CALL FOR FREE BOOKLET 

MARIAM MINAS1AN, Eledwlogist 

115 Freeman Road Richmond, Va. 

Opening Evenings by Appointment 
Phone 353-6444 



POLLARD and BAG8Y 

INCORPORATED 
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 
IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 
1009 E. Main St. Dial MI 3-9011 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



THE JOHN F. KENNEDY PEACE 
FOREST IN ISRAEL 

By A. Schreiber 



On the hallowed ground where 
Par Kochba waged his last gallant 
battle for Judea's freedom two 
thousand years ago, the John F. 
Kennedy Peace Forest will rise 
within the green confines of the 
American-Israel Freedom Forest, 
planted by the Jewish National 
Fund and dedicated to peace and 
the bonds of friendship that link 
the two nations. 

For the Jews of America, no 
tribute to our martyred President 
could be more fitting and endur- 
ing than this living symbol of his 
greatness as a champion of peace 
throughout the world. 

The Kennedy Forest, when com- 
pleted, will comprise millions of 
trees, each to be a living verdant 
symbol of the freshness of vision 
and the inspiration our late Pres- 
ident brought to the White House. 
The lofty monument, which will 
be erected after a national com- 
petition in which Israel's leading 
architects will submit designs, will 
be located on a broad natural 
plateau overlooking the city of 
Jerusalem, with the blue Mediter- 
ranean visible on a clear day. A 
huge supporting wall, encircling 
the monument, will provide the 
framework for fifty tall columns, 
each, representing a state of the 
Union. 

Plans also call for a subterra- 
nean chamber to be built into the 
mountain which will contain a 
bust of the late President illumi- 
nated by a Ner Tamid (Eternal 
Light). In front of the bust, a pul- 
pit will contain a Memorial Book 
wherein visitors will inscribe their 
names. On the walls of the cham- 
ber will be carved some of the 
late President's most memorable 
utterances. Visitors will leave this 
hallowed place through a garden 
of trees, which will symbolize the 
verdant and eternal nature of this 
memorial. 

A broad highway to be known 
as the John F. Kennedy Memorial 
Parkway, will be built by the Is- 
rael Government to make the Ken- 
nedy Peace Forest readily accessi- 
ble to the many thousands of ex- 
pected visitors. 

The cornerstone laying of the 
memorial will be held with appro- 



priate ceremony this forthcoming 
November 22nd, marking the first 
anniversary of the assassination of 
the President. The unveiling of the 
memorial is scheduled to take place 
on the Fourth of July, 1965, in the 
presence of two thousand Ameri- 
can and Israeli leaders. 

Plans for the impressive tribute 
to a great leader were formulated 
by Max Bressler, President of the 
Jewish National Fund of America, 
and Levi Eshkol Prime Minister 
of Israel, during a recent visit to 
Israel by Mr. Bresler. The prime 
minister had issued a statement of 
support and participation in the 
Kennedy memorial. Declared Mr. 
Eshkol: "The President John F. 
Kenndy Peace Forest in Israel's 
Freedom Forest will serve as a 
notable tribute to the memory of 
a great American and a world 
statesman. With this project you 
ar forging still another link in the 
chain of projects symbolizing the 
friendship between the peoples of 
the United States and Israel 

"As a valiant seeker for peace 
and the rights of men, your late 
President was an outstanding ex- 
ample of this enduring friendship. 
The people and the government 
of Israel will be singularly honored 
to be associated with this tribute 
to his everlasting memory." Mr. 
Eshkol pledged that the Govern- 
ment would utilize its fullest 
resourcs to erect a monument wor- 
thy of the fallen leader, for whom 
he expressed a deep and abiding 
affection. 

It seems highly appropriate that 
the Jewish National Fund along 
with great multitudes of Ameri- 
cans should honor the late Presi- 
dent in this tangible, yet symbolic, 
manner, for John F. Kennedy had 
long been a champion of the Fund. 
While president, he had declared 
that "the Jewish National Fund 
represents one of Zionism's most 
constructive achievements in hu- 
man welfare and social develop 
ment." Just three short weeks be- 
for his cruel and untimly end, the 
President had expressed his sup- 
port of the American Freedom 
Forest in Israel, which, he declared 
"both cements the bond between 
Israel and the United States and 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



15 




Rabbi Joseph B. Giaser, Vice Chairman of the Commission for the Pre- 
servation of Pioneer Jewish Cemeteries and Landmarks of the Judah Magnes 
Museum of Oakland, California, and his sons, Simmy and Mike, place the 
plaque marking the restoration and rededication of the historic Jewish 
Cemetery of Placervilie, California, which was first used during the Gold 
Rush. Participating in the ceremony are Vic Koplin, Noble Grand Humbug 
of E Clampus Vitus, a California pioneers* organization; Hal Altman of 
Sacramento, Chairman of the Commission; and Dr. Albert Shumate, Presi- 
dent of the California Historical Society. 



serves as an important reclamation 
effort." 

The pioneering role of the Jew- 
ish National Fund in reclaiming a 
ravaged land and in afforesting 
the gaunt hills of the Jewish 
Homeland was of deep significance 
to our great President. It recalled 
to him the great westward move- 
ment of reclamation and settle- 
ment in the United States in the 
middle of the last century. He saw 
in Israel and the United States 
many parallels, and the youthful 
spirit in him responded with deep 
understanding to the burgeoning 
problems of the lusty infant State 
of Israel. 

In an address delivered in New 
York City in September, I960, the 
President stated: 

"There have always been skep 

1 tics scoffing at the possibility of 
making deserts bloom and rocky 

I soil productive. In this regard, 
our own country as a nation and 
Israel have many parallels — in the 
diversity of their origins, in their 
capacity to reach the unattainable, 

i in the receptivity to new ideas and 

i social experimentation. 

"The Jewish National Fund, 
which for forty-seven years fore- 
ishadowed the existence of . an in- 
dependent Jewish state and as- 
sembled long in advance a perpe- 
jtual trust in land for the Jewish 
(people, symbolized this magnifi- 
'cent achivement. Just as our own 
West has sustained progress against 
!the impacts of serious farm de- 
gressions, crop failures, credit cri- 
sis and droughts, so, too, Israel 



has had to exist on narrow margins 
of survival, on a constant climate 
of hostility and outside danger. 
Yet it has endured and its integrity 
remains unimpaired, and this suc- 
cess can be in a large measure at- 
tributed to the Jewish National 
Fund." 

A series of Kennedy Peace 
Award Dinners, sponsored by the 
Jewish National Fund, which will 
be held throughout the nation 
beginning this fall, will serve not 
only to recall the greatness of 
John Kennedy, but will allow 
Americans who loved and respect- 
ed him to translate their thoughts 
and their emotions into the con- 
structive and enduring form of the 
John F. Kennedy Peace Forest in 
Israel. 



Deputy Premier Abba Eban has 
left Israel for a goodwill mission 
to Mexico, Venezula and Colum- 
bia at the invitation of the gov- 
ernments of those countries. The 
purpose of the visit was said to be 
further fostering of friendly rela- 
tions between Israel and Latin 
America. 



Do Your Part! 
Contribute to the North 
Carolina Horn* 1 for the 
Jewish Aged 





Greenlife 

t& ^^^^^^^^ 

GREENLIFE Plant Food is the only plant 
food with a 100% organic pine bark 
base . . . and other products of the new Green- 
life fertilizer series embody the same organic 
pine bark principle for a slow and uniform re- 
lease of plant nutrients in lawn and garden use. 

Ask your distributor about Greenlife Plant 
Food, Azalea Food and Rose Food . . . non- 
toxic, fragrant and easy to handle. Also Green- 
life Pine Bark Mulch and Greenlife Soil Con- 
ditioner . . . products that look neat, fight 
weeds, hold moisture and protect plants from 
temperature changes. 

All manufactured by Greenlife Products 
Company, of West Point, a subsidiary of — 




MANUFACTURERS OF KRAFT PULP AND PAPER 

WEST POINT, VIRGINIA 



16 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



VOTE FOR EXPERIENCE 

• VOTE FOR A VOICE 

INSTEAD OF AN ECHO * 




ELECT 



DAVID E. STATTERFIELD, III 

TO CONGRESS 

THIRD CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 
Tuesday, November 3rd, 1964 




Mail saving hours are all the 
time! Remember it's regular sav- 
ing that accomplishes results 
and mail-saving is the perfect 
system to keep yourself on a 
program. 

m CURRENT RATE, PER ANNUM 

*f JO ON ANY ACCOUNT 

Security Federal Saving 
and Loan Association 

Sixth & Franklin Sts Richmond, Va. 



I JEWIS! 



IG ADULTS WANT 



OF THE JEWISH COMMUNITY 




By Dr. Harry Specht 



Jewish young adults have very 
little investment in formal Jew- 
ish religious and educational in- 
stitutions. This no doubt arises 
from the child-centered focus of 
Jewish community life todav and 
the social basis of that community 
life. The young adult is no longer 
the child around whom so much 
Jewish religious and educational 
activity revolves; neither is he yet 
one of the parents who plan and 
sponsor these activities lor the 
children. The greatest interest of 
the young adult lies in the social 
institutions, and it should come as 
no surprise to find that the ma- 
jority of Jewish young adults 
make almost exclusive use of so- 
cial activities in their Jewish as- 
sociational life. 

In our interviews with young 
adults the Jewish component of 
the Jewish Community Center ap- 
pears to have a much greater sig- 
nificance to them than one might 
have expected. There appears to 
be very little content in the Cen- 
ters' programs for young adults 
which could be considered dis- 
tinctively Jewish, and with lew 
exceptions the young adults de- 
sired no change in this regard. 
But the fact remains that the 
young adults who use the Center 
clearly view the agency as fulfill- 
ing important needs for them as 
Jews. Respondents describe the 
Center as a "Jewish" agency which 
provides them with an opportun- 
ity to "socialize with Jews" and 
opportunities to enjoy "Jewish cul- 
ture and religion." These words 
appear in their descriptions of the 
Centers' functions and purposes 
with an unmistakably high fre- 
quency. Repeatedly, they defined 
the function of the Center as that 
of "bringing Jews together," and 
"having Jewish boys meet Jewish 
girls." 

Although the major interests of 
Jewish young adults in regard to 
Jewishness apears to center on the 
development and maintenance of 
social ties with other Jews, this is 
not necessarily the full meaning 
which Jewishness has for them. 
The majority do anticipate that 
they will have other kinds of ties 
to the Jewish community when 



they are married and are parents, 
more important than this, even 
in light of their present minimal 
connection with Jewishness, there 
appears to be a felt need among 
Jewish young people to associate 
with one another. This need for 
association with other Jews ap- 
parently exists apart from, or in 
addition to the needs created by 
the fact that Jews are still exclud- 
ed from some institutions of the 
general American community. 
While some agencies (e. g. Jewish 
Vocational Services and Jewish 
Community Centers) arose in part 
because Jews were denied employ- 
ment opportunities or social ac- 
tivity in the general community, 
the desire for communal associa- 
tions among Jews appears to per- 
sist even after this denial largely 
ceases to be a reality. 

Contrary to the beliefs of many 
Center workers, Jewish young 
adults appear to be generally com- 
fortable about their Jewishness. 
While they have little interest in 
Jewish educational or religious ex- 
periences, an extremely large pro- 
portion of those interviewed seek 
opportunities through which they 
can develop and maintain rela- 
tionships with other Jewish voting 
adults. It is their singular interest 
in social ties to other Jews which 
is often misinterpreted as a nega- 
tive response to their Jewishness, 
although, there can be no reason 
to expect their interests to be 
otherwise. 

In our analysis of available pop- 
ulation we found that the most 
readily accessible population for 
Centers is the group of young, 
lower-educated young adults. The 
interests, values and attitudes of 
this group conflict with and repel 
the larger available (but not as 
accessible) population of medium- 
age young adults (21 to 27 years 
old) which is better educated and 
more cosmopolitan. Examples of 
the differences between these age 
levels, (and education levels) can 
be found in the sizes, purposes and 
goals of the groups they attend, 
in their attitude toward their 
Jewishness, and in their attitudes 
toward different wavs of meeting 
(Please Turn to Page 66) 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish "TIMES-OUTLOOK 



17 



HILLEL IN NORTH CAROLINA 



RABBI JOSEPH H. 

A most ambitious program oi 
Hillel activities during September 
helped launch what promises to be 
one of our most active program 
years. Opening of the year events 
at each of our campuses were de- 
signed in such a way as to provide 
maximum opportunity for new 
Jewish students to meet one an- 
other in an informal, relaxed at- 
mosphere. 

Traditionally — the Hillel year 
opens with the first Sabbath wel- 
come service in honor of incoming 
freshmen. Again this year, these 
opening services were held around 
the state: September 12 in Greens- 
boro, Sept. 18th in Chapel Hill, 
Sept. 25th at Duke, and opening 
services at N. C. State are sched- 
uled for October 2. The students 
themselves plan and' develop these 
religious services, and the student 
Hillel officers extend a personal 
welcome to new students and of- 
fer a preview of the year to come, 
stressing areas where new students 
can become actively involved in 
our Hillel program. 

Actually — the process of wel- 
coming new students to Hillel be- 
gins long before they formally en- 
roll and register at the University 
in September. Over the summer — 
incoming freshmen receive person- 
al letters of welcome from the Hil- 
lel officers and are sent an attrac- 
tive brochure outlining the open- 
ing events of the year, and extend- 
ing a personal welcome on behalf 
of die Rabbi and the officers. 

As the students arrive on cam- 
pus. Hillel "old timers" meet them 
and help them to get adjusted to 
campus life. For example on Sep- 
tember 13th, our Hillel leaders at- 
tended the Chancellor's reception 
for new students and then escorted 
them and their parents to the buf- 
fet supper at Hillel House sched- 
uled for later that afternoon. In 
this way we try to add a "personal 
touch" and to come to know stud- 
ents as individuals. 



LEVINE, Director 




RABBI JOSEPH H. LEVINE 

Shortly after the new students 
become settled in the campus life, 
each is extended a personal invita- 
tion to meet for an hour with the 
Hillel Director and become ac- 
quainted. This "freshman inter- 
view" forms a vital link between 
Director and students, and should 
a problem arise during the course 
of his college career, the student 
will feel he has met the Hillel 
Director personally, and is more 
eager to share his problem. 

During October th° program 
will branch out into the various 
facets and levels that always char- 
acterize a Hillel Foundation: Stu- 
dy classes and seminars, Sabbath 
services and Oneb Shabbat pro- 
grams, mixers and dances, brun- 
ches and Sunday supper programs. 
We always hope that all our Jew 
ish students in North Carolina will 
make every effort to avail them- 
slves of this program of activities; 
and we always appreciate the in- 
terest of parents in encouraging 
their sons and daughters to take 
part in Hillel functions. 



Do Your Part! 
Contribute to the North 
Carolina Home for the 
Jewish Aged 



24-HOUR TRUCK SERVICE 

MAINTENANCE LEASE OPERATING 



SALES 
107 W. Canal Street 



PHONE MI 3-9173 

Richmond. Va. 



RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 




PRESCRIPTION 
SERVICE 

PROMPT DELIVERY 
IN WEST RICHMOND 



WESTWOOD 

Westwood Shopping Center 
5805 Patterson Ave. 

Dial AT 8-1933 



LAFAYETTE 

1011 Lafayette Street 

Dial EL 5-1777 



CRESTVIEW 

Crestview Shopping Center 
6516 Horsepen Road 

Dial AT 8-2831 



BEVERLY HILLS 

Beverly Hills Shopping Center 
Patterson Ave. at Ridge Road 

Dial AT 2-4231 



SUBURBAN 

Suburban Shopping Center 
2369 Staples Mill Road 

Dial EL 8-4929 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 





OfJ^erd the finest 



RICHMOND'S 
MOST MODERN DAIRY 



And other 

Dairy Products 



DIAL RICH. 

EL 5-1745 

Milk Available In Famous Pure-Pak 

Prompt, Courteous p aper Cartons From Your Favorite Dealer 

Delivery 

1600 ROSEN EATH ROAD 



B 



INC. 




"EVERLASTING BEAUTY IN MONUMENTS' 

HENWOOD & WILSON 

Designers and Manufacturers of 
GRANITE and MARBLE MONUMENTS— MEMORIALS 

413-415 S. Cherry St. DIAL MI 8-7340 Richmond, Va. 



18 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



SEASON GREETINGS 

HOFFMANS 

HOMEMADE LUNCHES 

1422 Commerce Rd. 

Tel. BE 2-3598 
RICHMOND, VA. 



REFORM RABBIS AND INTERMARRIAGE 



By Robert Appel 



WILLOW 
LAWN 
CLEANERS 

Willow Lawn 
Shopping Center 

AT 8-1596 

RICHMOND, VA. 



FOURSQUARE 

Termite Control 
Pest Control 

Serving- Richmond 
Since 1928 

Stop 15 Nine Mile Rd. 
Highland Springs 

RICHMOND, VA. 

RE 7-8077 



Chesterfield Auto 
Parts Co. 

Buyers of Wrecked 
Automobiles and Sellers 
of Used Parts 

FRANK W. WEBBER, 
Owner 

Dial BE 2-2379 

5111 Old Midlothian Pike 

RICHMOND, VA. 



Not long ago, the Orthodox 
Rabbinical Council of America is- 
sued an appeal to Reform rabbis 
not to perform marriages between 
Jews and non-Jews. The Orthodox 
rabbis coupled the appeal with a 
warning that such marriages, us- 
ually termed intermarriages, were 
a grave threat to the continuity 
of the Jewish group. 

When an Orthodox rabbi ac- 
cuses a Reform rabbi of diluting 
Judaism, the situation at hand is 
a polemical dispute, depending 
for its validity on the acceptance 
of the Orthodox viewpoint. But 
when one Reform rabbi accuses 
another of an act which is admit- 
tedly a threat to the continued 
formation of Jewish families, a 
real issue is joined. 

One phase of the debate is the 
known fact that a large number 
of such marriages are performed 
under secular auspices. Since jus- 
tices of the peace are not required 
by law to record the religious ad- 
herence, if any, of couples coming 
to them for this service, there is 
no reliable information on how 
many mixed marriages are per- 
formed by them, just as there is 
little trustworthy information on 
the total number of mixed mar- 
riages taking place in the Ameri- 
can society. Estimates of the num- 
ber of marriages of American 
Jews to non-Jews, without conver- 
sion to Judaism, range from ten 
per cent to four times that figure, 
but the fact is that no one really 
knows the dimensions of the sit- 
uation. 

Still, obviously some of these 
marriages are performed by rabbis 
and just as obviously Orthodox 
and Conservative rabbis refuse to 
perform them and some Reform 
rabbis do not refuse. 

All this makes the indictment 
of such rabbis by a Reform rabbi 
of more than passing interest. Rab- 
bi Joseph Klein, a leading figure 
in the Reform rabbinate, not only 
has accused his fellow Reform rab- 



bis of aiding in the growth of such 
marriages but has also appealed 
to the Jewish layman to take ac- 
tion to stop the practice. 

Rabbi Klein was one of the 
speakers at a symposium on the 
problem in New York City spon- 
sored by the American Jewish 
Congress. Conceding he had no 
statistical information to prove the 
point. Rabbi Klein nevertheless 
expressed his belief that "in those 
communities where there are rab- 
bis who will officiate at an inter- 
marriage, the rate of intermarriage 
is considerably higher than in 
ihose communities where no rabbi 
will officiate." 

He cited a case of a couple that 
had managed to induce their son 
to break off with a non-Jewish 
girl. However, the girl, who work- 
ed in Washington, D. C, found 
a rabbi who agreed to a wedding 
without conversion. Rabbi Klein 
commented: "The son's argument 
was that if a rabbi was willing to 
officiate at an intermarriage, that 
there could be nothing wrong with 
it from the point of view of Ju- 
daism and he could not under- 
stand why his parents, who were 
far from being the most pious of 
Jews, should raise such a storm 
of objection." 

Rabbi Klein contended also that 
"the rabbi, after all, more than 
anyone else in the community, is 
the official spokesman for and re- 
presentative of, Judaism, and how 
can anyone argue against nup- 
tial, arrangements. His participa- 
tion alone gives it Judaism's stamp 
of approval." 

A particularly disturbing fact, 
Rabbi Klein added, was that once 
a rabbi solemnizes an intermar- 
riage, he becomes "trapped" for 
the rest of his rabbinic career. 
Even if he wants to end his par- 
ticipation in such marriages, he 
finds it impossible to do, if he 
stays in the same community. 

Rabbi Klein raised the question 
as to why some of his rabbinical 




YOUR LOCAL DISTRIBUTORS OF 
Quality Dairy Products 

Farmers Creamery 
Company, Inc. 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



WESTHAMPTON 
FLORIST . . . 



I 



320 Libbie Avenue 
RICHMOND, VA. 

Specializing in 
Artistic Weddings, 
Decorations of All Types 

Dial AT 2-2460 

Mr. & Mrs. 
F. N. Hie kerne 11 



laus 

r 1 




FRITO -LAY, inc. 

1827 N. Hamilton Street 
RICHMOND, VA. 
Manufacturers of 
Lay's Potato Chips 
Fritos — Corn-Chips 



Richmond 
Launderers 
& Dry Cleaners 

We Specialize in 
Dry Cleaning and 
Laundry Service 

Dial BE 2-4547 

1901 Hull Street 

Pick-up and Delivery Service 

RICHMOND, VA. 



J. A. Starke 

PLUMBING & HEATING 
CONTRACTORS 

Repairs and Remodeling 

Oil Burners - Gas Fired 
Boilers 

EL 8-1134 
1621 W. Broad St. 
RICHMOND, VA. 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish, 1 1MES-OUTLOOK 



19 



Richmond, Virginia Sisterhood 
Temple Beth Israel 

MRS. KENNETH W. ROJAS. Correspondent 

i the many projects Sister- members accepting various jobs 

in Sisterhood. It was quite., hu- 
morous and everyone enjoyed . % 
muchly. The slate o! officers re- 
main the same for the coming year 
with the exception of correspond- 
ing secretary. This; office has been 
filled by Mrs. Dave Molleri. J 

We of Sisterhood, as well as 
the fewish Community, have been 
saddened by the sudden death of 
Mrs. Mary R. Klein. Mary was a 
past president of Sisterhood as 
well; ai a member of other organi- 
zations "and was at the time of 
her death president of the Grand 
Group. Our sincere condolence to 
her entire family. Also our deepest 
sympathy to Mrs. Frank Frieden- 
berg on the loss of her sister and 
Mr. Sam Brodsky on the loss, of 
his father. 



hood has undertaken for the year, 
we have found the time For still 
another one. For the first time 
in Richmond, we will present a 
Yiddish .Vmerican film series. The 
first of the films will be shown Oc- 
tober 3rd in the Social Hall. It 
will be "Monticello Here We 
Come" with Menasha Skulnick and 
Michael Rosenberg and is a musi- 
cal revue about' the Catskill 
Mountains. Also shown at this 
time will be The Singers of Israel. 
All of these films have English 
subtitles. We expect a tremen- 
dous Crowd as everyone is very 
enthusiastic. 

, A-; delightful skit written by 
Mrs. Sam Rabbins was presented 
at our opening meeting on Sept- 
ember 17. It was entitled "Jobs 
For Everyone" and was a satire on 



ATTENTION! WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS! 
Is your Sisterhood or Hadassah taking advantage of this easy fund- 
raising plan? Obtaining subscriptions tor THE AMERICAN JEWISH 
TIMES-OUTLOOK is an easy way of raising money for your projects 
or general fund. Mail in your list of suscriptions your workers sell. 
We will send our a check in full for 50% of the total amount. You do 
not have to collect. We will bill them. Address The American Jewish 
Times-Outlook, 530 Southeastern Building, Greensboro, N. C. 




Featured at the American-Israel World's Fair Pavilion is this sculpture 
called "Together!", created by Zvi Geyra and depicting six heroic figures 
straining to fit together two huge water pipes— symbolic of Israel's striving 
to make the desert bloom. 



Highland Park 
Pharmacy 

2929 Second Avenue 

Dial MI 3-1847 
RICHMOND, VA. 



TARRANT 
PRESCRIPTION 
DRUGGISTS 

MOTORCYCLE DELIVERY 

Foushee and Broad 
MI 3-3469 Richmond. Va. 



PEST CONTROL 




Surety- Banded 
TERMITE CON 



Serving 



Headers' of this 
magazine for 87 years . . . 

Joseph W. Bliley 

. FUNERAL HOME. 

Conveniently Locatec 
Third & Marshall Streets 
Richmond, Virginia 

AMPLE PRIVATE 
PARKING SPACE 




EANES and CO. 

Plumbing -Heating 

PROMPT SERVICE 
FAIR CHARGES 

DIAL EL 3-4170 

Night Calls: MI 8-7538 

Specializing in All Kinds of 
Repair Work 



1305 W. Main Street 
RICHMOND, VA. 



Season s 
Greet inq 




Est. 1931 



KANE 



Dial MI 9-054 



PLUMBING - HEATING 
STOKERS - OIL BURNERS 
403 E. Laburnum Ave. 



AIR-CONDITIONING 
KITCHEN EQUIPMENT 
RICHMOND 22, VA. 



EAGLE TRITPLEX 

BURIAL 
VAULTS 

Manufacturerd by 

JOSEPH L. 
BURRUSS 

4001 Mechanicsville Pike 
RICHMOND, VA. 

Phone MI 8-1022 



Ted Lansing 
Supply Company 

School & Aspen Avenue 
(Off Staples Mill Road) 

Distributor of 
Certain-Teed Roofing and 
Other Quality Building 
Materials 

Telephone CO 6-2490 
RICHMOND, VA. 



30 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



OTHER SUBURBAN STORES: 

• 3345 W. Cary Street 

• 5608 Patterson Avenue 

• 401 Ridge Road 

• 5071 Forest Hill Avenue 



Plant: 2920 West Broad 
Dial 353-1281 
City Wide Delivery Service 



• Malvern and Broad Sts. 
RICHMOND, VA. 

Bradley's Willow Lawn Store 
Open 7 'till 9— Saturday 'til 6 



CHANGING STYLES IN JEWISH FORUMS 



1 AARROW 

Rent - Alls 

HICHMONITS RENTAL DEPARTMENT STORE 
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



2367 Staples Mill Road 
5065 Forest Hill Avenue 



EL 9-2408 
232-782' 



WE RENT MOST ANYTHING 
Party Banquet Needs — Hospital Equipment 



Atlantic Electrical Supply Corporation 

1900 N. Hamilton St. Richmond, Va. 

Lighting Headquarters Since 1929 

One of the largest lighting fixtures showrooms in the United States 




Try Our Golden Circles Bread 



Baked 
While 
You 
Sleep 



BREAD AND CAKES 

AMERICAN BAKERIES CO. Richmond, Va. 



Richmond 
Glass Shop, Inc. 

Distributors for 

• LUMINALL PAINTS 

• Finest-in-Finishes 

• Glass for Furniture Tops 

• Safety Glass for 
AUTOMOBILES 

814 West Broad Street 
Tel. MI 3-7394 




Sally Bell's 
Kitchen 

708 W. Grace St. 
Richmond, Va. 
Dial MI 4-2838 
Delicacies for the Home, 
Picnics, and Parties 

• Parking Facilities 

• For Our Customers 



L D. JOHNSON'S SONS 

Roof Repairing a Specialty 
1407 W. Cary St. RICHMOND, VA. Dial EL 5-2911 



By Dr. Samuel D. Freeman 



The forum programs of Jewish 
Community Centers throughout 
the country have undergone some 
remarkable changes during the 
past decade. It is still true how- 
ever that the newspaper headline 
of today may be the topic of the 
Center's forum tomorrow. It is 
still true that program chairmen 
seek bigger and more well known 
names. But names and topics have 
changed wih the times. Today for 
example, people are interested in 
trends in intermarriage and its ef- 
fect on Jewish survival. They are 
also interested in the Ecumeni- 
cal Council and its impact on the 
relationship of the Catholic 
Church and Judiasm or they are 
interestested in present religious 
currents in Israel (only because of 
the headlines). These are the kinds 
of topics which events of the day 
bring to the fore in the minds of 
Center forum planning commit- 
tees. What has occupied them to a 
remarkable degree is the current 
Negro revolt in America and what 
has amazed audiences is the mili- 
tancy with which Negro speakers 
now address Jewish audiences. 
They are rudely shocked to find 
how little they know about the 
tenor of the thinking of the atti- 
tudes of the new Negro intellec- 
tual. On the other hand this en- 
counter has proven equally edu- 
cational for the speaker too. He 
learns that he cannot think of the 
Jewish community as a monolith. 
While he may talk to a syna- 
gogue group and devote all his 
attention to his complaintsi against 
the behavior of some Jews, he finds 
that the Jewish Community Cen- 
ter platform resembles a commu- 
nity "town hall" and that he must 
address himself primarily to a 
white audience. 

The kinds of questions raised 
in the discussion period give the 
speaker clues to audiences' con- 
erns and thus becomes part of his 
education, too. This audience is 
now a much more select group 
that it used to be. Ten years ago, 
it was easier to assemble an audi- 
ence. Today, with the number of 
good discussion programs on TV 
on the increase, it is more difficult 
to draw the attention and interest 
of people, many of whom are sat- 
isfied with the passive relationship 



which the TV medium imposes. 
We now have a more highly moti- 
vated, more highly educated, more 
intelligent group which seeks to- 
test its points of view in a face-to- 
face encounter with an authority 
who may not be as well-known as 
the personality they see on TV 
but who may nonetheless be as 
well qualified. 

They are not as well known be- 
cause the size of a lecturer's fee is 
generally related to the demand 
for his time. Centers today are 
more willing to arrange for lecture 
programs for smaller audiences 
but they are not, therefore, able 
to spend as much for the lecturer. 
In selecting their lecturers there- 
fore, Centers have thus had to rely 
more on the reports and reactions 
to lecturers who have appeared 
for other Jewish organizations and 
which are assembled by the JWB 
Lecture Bureau. In addition, local 
resources are now drawn upon to 
a much larger extent, for the very 
same reason— smaller audiences. 
And these local experts are highly 
qualified. 

They are being drawn upon, too, 
because of the growing interest in 
public affairs discussions. National 
and international affairs effervesce 
into all organized community 
groups. And the Center has been 
no exception. The question of the 



THE 



Davenport 



INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Established 1848 



Managers 




Brokers 



Dependable Insurance 
Coverage 

1111 East Main St. 
Telephone MI 8-1671 
RICHMOND, VA. 

Loss Adjusting - Fire 
Protection & Casualty 
Engineering 
Insurance Surveys 
Special Service 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



21 




Israel's Finance Minister Pinhas Sapir (left foreground) is shown with 
Dr. Joseph J. Schwartz, Vice President of the Israel Bond Organizatic 
(center), and Samuel Rothberg, National Campaign Chairman (right), as 
they toured the Ashdod port area in Israel where construction of the first 
stage of huge new deep water harbor is now nearing completion. 



admission of China to the United 
Nations, the rise in delinquency, 
the change in family relationships, 
the turmoil in Africa, the Middle 
East "powder keg," find their way 
into forum discussion programs 
and there has been a significant 
increase in the number and the 
quality of these forums. Centers 
have, through a consistent concern 
with this interest on the part ol 
the membership, developed a core 
of forum-goers and an awareness 
in the community that the Center 
will inevitably reach practically 
every topic of major concern to 
humanity. 

This growth has developed ra- 
ther easily when compared with 
the Jewish aspects of the program, 
where the Center has had more 
difficulty in reaching its potential 
audience. For in this area of its 
concern, it is not being aided by 



Seaton For He at sit' 

OIL-COAL 

• Burner Sales & Service 




• Budget Pay Plan 
W. E. SEATON SON, INC. 
Phone 358-0475 
RICHMOND, VA. 



all the mass media as it is in the 
field of public affairs. For exam- 
ple there are issues which are of 
paramount inportance to the Jew- 
ish community such as "Should 
the play 'The Deputy' which is 
critical of the late Pope Pius, be 
presented on Broadway by Jewish 
producers?" A concern for this 
question is a reflection of a con- 
cern for the welfare of the total 
Jewish community, but it does not 
seem to excite the interest of those 
who plan forum programs. 

On the other hand there is a 
steady interest in Jewish literature, 
even though a good portion of this 
interest is with the image of the 
Jew in contemporary fiction. Cen- 
ter members do read, and form 
opinions on how they view the 
treatment of Jewish characters, 
which creates a natural bridge be- 
tween them and the Center which 
seeks their attendance. While not 
in the same category in terms of 
numbers, the a?3plicability of Ju- 
daism and Jewish law to modern 
life also continues to interest audi- 
ences in many communities. Some 
topics have been so overworked by 
fund raisins, ag-encies that they 
must be avoided by Center forums, 
in whatever aspsect they are to be 
discussed. For example, if a Cen- 
ter were to consider a discussion 
of Israel's economv (ivnmct of the 
Arab boycott, industrial develop- 
ment, etc.) there would be a reluc- 
tance on the part of the committee 

(Please Turn to Page 65) 



When everything must be — Just So 




FASHION CLEANERS — CUSTOM LAUNDERERS 

10,000 Square Feet of Free Parking 
Drive-In Car Service 

4501 W. Broad Street 2 Stratford Hills 

1102 Ridge Road RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



BRIDAL PORTRAITS 
AND CANDIDS ARE 
OUR SPECIALTY 



phone EL 8-4826 
WENDELL B POWELL STUDIO 



3201 GROVE AVENUE — RICHMOND. VA 




Dot's Pastry Shop 

3136 W. Cary Street 
RICHMOND, VA. 
DIAL EL 8-2011 

Baker of Fancy Pastries 




An Eloquent 
Remembrance 

FLOWERS 
MI 4-2321 



1/ 304 North 6th St. 

Our Only Location In Richmond 



THOMAS G. 

POWi 



Sti'' >^crj to 

Marvin dollar j,, Inc 

Manufacturer! o} 

Orthopedic and Surir* aJ 
Appliances, Artificial Limbs 

Dial MI 3-8656 
414 W. Broad Street 
RICHMOND, VA. 



SKILLED NURSING CARE 

AGED ♦ 
INVALIDS 



24 Ho urs Daily Professional Supervision 

CHRONICALLY ILL 

• Nutritious Food by Trained Dietitian 

• Automatic Litter-size Hydraulic Elevator 

• Sprinkler System Throughout Building 

• Trained Staff of Nurses and Orderlies 
ernard Maslan, Administrator 





Terrace 
Nursing Home 

2112 Monteiro Ave., 
Richmond, Va. Ml 3-2777 



22 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1961 



ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 



TAKE IT EASY 

Discover how much 
time you can save 
for lazy living by 
paying bills with 
First National 
checks! 



FIRST 
NATIONAL 
EXCHANGE 

BANK 




1 



OFFICES IN BEDFORD • BLACKSBURG • BRISTOL • LEBANON 
MARION • RICHLANDS • ROANOKE • SALEM • WYTHEVILLE 

MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 




DISTRIBUTORS OF 




FUEL OIL FOR HOME 
AND INDUSTRY 



Day and Night 
Delivery 



DIAL DIamonj 5-S.-G6 
2677 ROANOKE AVE. S.W. ROANOKE, VA. 



CHOOSE 




better eating 

RAIN DO 





Product of 

RAIKTBO BREAD CO. Roanoke. Virginia 



JEWS IN SPAIN 

By Ben G. Frank 



LISBON - Three young girls 
stood on the bimah in the syna- 
gogue at 59 Rue Alexandre Her- 
culano and each recited in both 
Hebrew and Portuguese several 
>f 1 he Ten Commandments. 

A tew months earlier and a few 
hundred miles away in the Jew- 
ish synagogue at 19 Calle Pi/arro, 
Madrid, Spain, several girls chant- 
ed Hebrew prayers in a colorful 
and. dignified exercise. 

The ceremony, of course, was 
ihe P>at Mitzvah which in 1964 
was inaugurated in the two Jew- 
ish communities of the Iberian 
Peninsula. 

In Libson, Rev. Isaac Toledano 
explained thusly: 

"We felt it was a good idea for 
the future mothers to know some- 
thing about Hebrew prayers, a 
bit of Jewish history and the 
meaning of festivals." 

In both Portugal and Spain, 
devout Catholic countries, Jew- 
ish communities which make up 
a minute segment of the popula- 
tion are fighting for survival. 
When you are one of about 700 
Jews out of a total population of 
nine million as in Portugal or one 
of 5,000 out of. a total population 
of 29 million as in Spain, it is not 
very hard for young people to as- 
similate and intermarry, accord- 
ing to Jewish leaders here. There- 
fore, Jewsh Community officials, 
search for every means to instill 
Jewish tradition into its youth. 

And the reaction of the two 
Tewish communities toward Cath- 
olic influences show up even in 
ceremonies like the first Bat Mitz- 
vah held in May in Lisbon. 

For example, the three girls 
who participated in the ceremony 
wore blue not white dresses. 

Rev. Toledano explained that 
in the late spring when the Bat 
Mitzvah was held, the Catholics 
make communion for their daugh- 
ters and they all wear white dress- 
es. 

The streets of Lisbon, he said, 
are full of girls in white dresses. 
"We did not want to be like the 
Christians," he added. 

Of course, in both communities, 
it was not easy to initiate the new 
ceremony, a popular American 
iradition. 



Dr. Elias Baruel, vice president 
of the Jewish Community in Lis- 
bon, said a hazan, who has since 
returned to France, germinated 
the idea several years ago. At first, 
Dr. Baruel related, members of 
the executive board asked: "Why 
do we need it? The ceremonv is 
a Christian tradition." 

But then one of the synagogue 
gabais visited Brazil and saw the 
Bat Mitzvah. He returned to Lis- 
bon and encouraged the group 
to adopt the ceremony. In Spain, 
a similar debate was held before 
the Bat Mitzvah was started. 

The first Bat Mitzvah (lass in 
Lisbon was convened last year. 
The girls learned to read Hebrew, 
were taught the meaning of Jew- 
ish holidays and learned the 
"Shma Yisrael," the Ten Com- 
mandments and the 13 principles 
o f the faith by Maimonides. 

Just before the ceremony, how- 
ever, the girls had to pass an oral 
examination on Jewish customs 
and prayers. They were tested by 
members of the executive board. 
The three passed. 

Finally, the big day arrived. 
Several hundred members of the 
Lisbon Jewish Community gather- 
ed in the synagogue on the warm 
Shabbat afternoon. The ceremony 
began. 

The girls first said the "Shma 
Yisrael" and the program con- 
tinued with recitations. 

The hazan, Rev. Toledano, add- 
ed a spiritual and festive air to 
the Bat Mitzvah by rendering a 
few selections. 

Afterwards, a reception was held 
by the parents in the decorated 
synagogue garden. Gifts were pass- 
ed out and refreshments served. 

If one talked to the members 
of the community that day. they 
indicated that the community had 
conducted an important event. 
They seemed to be saying that 
though small, the Jewish Com- 
munity in Portugal would survive. 



fturcft furniture 



■*J SUNBUt SCHOOL CHAUS 
ffiS Mon<i4octvr«d In •*»' 
PHI Ict.r, «f ImwrnmlUm. 



fr«« CataUa 




SCHOOL EQUIPMENT CO., IlK 
377 W. Main, It mono. V« 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



8? 



Newport News, Va. 

MUS. MARTHA B. SHAPIRO, Correspondent 




Group of Campers at Camp Kadima, Newport News Jewish Community 
Center. 



Mrs. Alan Gordon, chairman of 
the Day Camp committee, an- 
nounced at a Board meeting of the 
Jewish Community Council that 
the 1964 Camp Kadima program 
was one of the finest conducted in 
the community. Mr. Jim Wilson, 
band director at the New Port 
News High School, served as di- 
rector of the camp and has been 
recommended to begin planning 
for the 1965 operation. 

Eddie Cohen, Summer teen-age 
director, was responsible for the 
arrangement of weekly socials. 
The youth of Newport News Jew- 
ish community Center served as 
hosts to the Trenton, N. J., Balti- 
more, Md., and Harrisburg, Pa. 
teens and tweens during the sum- 
mer. 

One of the most successful Al- 
lied Jewish campaigns in the past 
10 years has recently been conclu- 
ded with the $100,000.00 goal 
over subscribed. The community 
owes a debt of gratitude to Walter 
Segaloff, chairman, along with his 
co-chairmen, Marvin Mazur and 
William Roos. A determination on 
the part of the three chairmen, 
who are in their thirties, to raise 
maximum funds for the 40 local, 
national, and overseas agencies, 
was responsible for the success of 
this year's campaign, which raised 
15 per cent over and above the 
1963 drive. Approximately 100 
workers assisted the campaign 
leaders. Mrs. Daniel Schlosser and 
Mrs. Marvin Mazur served as co- 
chairman of the Women's Divi- 
sion and Sandye Cohen and Nor- 
man Olshansksy were co-chairmen 
of the Youth Division. 



Ben Becker, chairman of Cash 
Collections, along with a corps of 
25 workers, have been busily en- 
gaged in conducting an all-out ef- 
fort to obtain balances due on out- 
standing pledges. Assisting My. 
Becker are: Messrs. Louis Aronow, 
Kenneth Arch, Albert T. Brout, 
Jack Berman, Milton Becker, Ben 
Epstein, Jonah Gold, Marvin Ma- 
zur, Dr. Bernard Morewitz, L. J. 
Richman, Jr., Jack Rubin, Dr. 
Phil Salasky, S. J. Silverman, Jack 
E. Smith, and Mesdames E. J. 
Binder, R. D. Binder, Maurice 
Block, William Diamonstein, Phil- 
lip Fox, Jonah Gold, Bertha Gor- 
don, Harry Penn. 

Hiram Wolf, chairman of the 
Jewish Community Center sit? 
committee, announced that a num- 
ber of areas are being considered 
for the erection of a new Jewish 
Community Center. The present 
Community Center Property has 
been sold to a group of people who 
are planning to erect a high rise 
apartment at the present Center 
site, fn the meanwhile all youth 
activities are continuing under the 
direction of Joseph Shapiro, pro- 
grams are being planned, and vol- 
unteers for all age groups are 
being selected. 

Mrs. Irving Berlin, chairman of 
the Jewish Community Center 
Chamber Music committee, and 
Mrs. Marvin Mazur, chairman of 
the JCC Film Classics Club, have 
called meetings of their commit- 
tees in order to make plans and 
present programs for the coming 
season. In the past years both cul- 
tural programs have been well re- 
ceived and and a successful year 
is again anticipated. 




VOTE FOR and ELECT 

BILL HOPKINS 

TO CONGRESS 



YOUR DEMOCRATIC 
NOMINEE 



A Strong Voice 
For 

The Sixth District 



Tuesday, November 3rd, 1964 



24 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October. 196} 




Roanoke s 
Leading 
uneral Director 
Economi al- 
Dependabi. 



If 



JOHN M. 

OAKEYhc 

PHONE Diamond 1-4451 



Bank with Security 

Security National 
Bank 

of Roanoke 
ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 

• 

Member Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corporation 

For All Your Personal and 
Commercial Banking Needs 

Savings Accunts, Personal Loans, 
Personal Checking Accts., Busi- 
ness Loans, Business Checking 
Accts., Automobile Loans, Safe 
Deposit Boxes, Boat and Appli- 
ance Loans, 24 Hour Depository, 
Real Estate Loans, Travelers 
Checks, Home Improvement 
Loans, Bank By Mail, Industrial 
Equipment Loans. 




^7 



SEASON'S GREETINGS 



General Motor Lines 

Satisfactory 
MOTOR FREIGHT SERVICE 



526 ORANGE AVENUE, N. E. 
ROANOKE, VA. 



• Roanoke, Va. 

• Fries, Va. 

• Martinsville, Va. 



• Galax, Va. 

• Glasgow, Va. 



• Stuart, Va. 

• Covington, Va. 

• Independence, Va. 



THE JEWISH HERITAGE 



Coleman's 

Restaurant 

• Good "Home- 
Cooked" Foods 

Air-Conditioned 

W. H. COLEMAN 
Owner 

BEDFORD, VA. 



MICK 

• OR • 

MACK 

STORES 

Are the Fine Food 
Stores in Roanoke 



By Dr. S. 

the question has been put to 
me: What is lasting in the Jewish 
heritage? I shall answer in a true 
Jewish fashion, with asking anoth- 
er question. What do you mean 
by "lasting?" 

To me "lasting" is someihing 
which has endured tor a long time 
and still endures, something that 
is vital, that has been function- 
ing for a long period and is still 
functioning in our lives today. 

But then one must ask one more 
question: Functioning t o w a r d 
what end? 

To me, the answer to this ques- 
tion is simple enough: For Jew- 
ish heritage to be functioning in 
our Jewish lives today, it must be 
working in the direction of pre- 
serving Jewish continuity. To me, 
this is the test. To me the supreme 
value of a Jewish heritage lies in 
its power to preserve and continue 
a Jewish life everywhere and 
especially on American soil. 

Thus, we have our criterion 
with which we approach the Jew- 
ish heritage. It remains for us to 
apply it to the whole realm of 
Jewish heritage from Father Abra- 
ham on to our own day. 

It stands to reason that in ap- 
plying this principle of selectivity 
to the whole of the Jewish heri- 
tage, we are bound to run afoul 
of the traditionalists and funda- 
mentalists, who insist on the pres- 
ervation of the totality of our Jew- 
ish heritage, regardless of its ra- 
tionale, time and place. We shall 
have to take what is given. There 
is no way of pleasing those who 
wish to stand still when we desire 
to go ahead. 

We proceed now to apply our 
test of functionalism, based on 
Jewish continuity to our oldest 
Jewish heritage, as embodied in 
the Bible, the Talmud and medie- 
val Jewish literature. What do we 
find? 



Margoshes 

First and foremost, the idea and 
ideal of the unity of the universe 
and of mankind. Long, long be- 
fore science had discovered the 
unifying principle underlying all 
of nature and of human nature 
as well, our prophets and sages 
proclaimed to an unbelieving 
world the doctrine of monotheism. 
Four thousand years later, Albert 
Einstein, in the twilight of his 
life, worked diligently on a mathe- 
matical equation under which 
there would be summed up all 
the phenomenae in the universe. 
He did so in the firm conviction 
that somehow everything in nature 
underlies one law. 

The oneness of the universe 
and of humanity has definite and 
strong implications which Jewish 
tradition was quick to discern. If 
all God's children are made in 
God's image, there is sanctity and 
human dignity inherent in every 
man, woman and child, irrespec- 
tive of race and creed, religious 
and non-religious belief. When we 
ponder the storm that has recently 
blown up over the question of 
civil rights for all Americans, re- 
gardless of color, we can see the 
enormous distance mankind, and 
the American people in particular, 
have to travel to reach the goal 
fixed by our Jewish tradition thou- 
sands and thousands of years ago. 

These are only a few, very few, 
of the ideas and ideals of our an- 
cient heritage, with which modern 
civilization is straining hard to 
catch up. I could enumerate 
many others. Their chief value 
from our point of view lies in the 
fact that they function in our own 
lives and that, because they give 
us a sense of dedication to the 
welfare of humanity and at the 
same time a feeling of strong ad- 
herence to our own tradition, they 
are important factors in strength- 

( Please Turn to Page 63) 



Your Best Clothes Deserve The Best Cleaning 



AND 



DRY CLEANING and DYEING 

502 M™ST. N.W. ROANOKE .VIRGINIA 



*★***★*★ 





HE 

BEST 

CLEANING 
DIAL DI 3-2465 



H. C. Baker 
S^les Co. 

Distributor of 
Radio Parts and Sound 
Equipment 

JOHNS-MANVILLE 
Blown Rock Wool Insulation 

19 Franklin Rd. . ^ Roanoke, Va. 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



25 



ROANOKE, VA. 

(Concluded from Page 10) 




MRS. ARNOLD N. BAKER 



Miss Barbara Weckstein, Roanoke, 
who was flower girl. 

The bridegroom's brother-in- 
law, Michael J. Levine ol Revere, 
served as best man, and ushers 
were Phillip Yanotsky and Leo- 
nard Yanofsky, both of Marble- 
head, Mass.; Max Baker, Everett, 
Mass.; and Bernard Grossman, 
New York City, uncle of the bride. 

Prior to her marriage the bride 
was honored on several occasions 
including a betrothal dinner given 
by the bridegroom's parents; a 
shower given by Miss Lin la Dres- 
cher;; a shower was given by Mrs. 
Norbert Weckstein and Miss Bar- 
bara Weckstein; a brunch with 
Mrs. Kurt Lerner and Mrs. Harold 



Brownstcin as hostesses; and a din- 
ner given by Mr. and Mrs. Sidney 
Katz. 

The bride attended Westhamp 
ton College and is a student at 
Roanoke College where she is a 
member of Alpha Phi Sorority. 
The bridegroom is a graduate of 
the University of Maine where he 
was a member of Tau Epsilon Phi 
fraternity. 

The couple will live in Roanoke. 

Haim Kemmelman, rabbi of 
Beth Israel Synagogue for the past 
years has left to take a pulpit in 
East Bru iswick, New Jersey. The 
congregation wishes him much 
success. 



Brown Morrison 
Company 

Fine Printing . . - 

Office Supplies 

LYNCHBURG, VA. 



McKee Funeral Home 

INCORPORATED 

Funeral Directors 
24-Hour Ambulance Service 

Phone ME 2-3466 
MARTINSVILLE, VA. 



mmm 



( Former. y Faub^rV 




FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Lynchburg, Va. 



LYNCHBURG - ROANOKE, YA. 



1 1 



Central Virginia s own 
full -service bank 

FIDELITY 

NATIONAL BANK 

Altavista — Amherst — Brookncal — Brookville 
Lynchburg — • Madison Heights — Paistburg 



EXCLUSIVELY 



For Complete Eye Care: 
Consult Your EYE PHYSICIAN 
Then See Your GUILD OPTICIAN 

A. G. Jefferson 

Ground Floor Allied Arts Bldg. Lynchburg, Va. 




o 
p 

T 
I 

C 
A 
L 



VI 7-8875 



FUEL OIL FOR HOMES AND INDUSTRY 

LYNCHBURG 
OIL COMPANY, Incorporated 

2459 Campbell Avenue 



SALE 



R. R, QUICK, Owne 



REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 
SALES — RENTALS - LOANS 




Quick, Realtors 

32 West Campbell Ave./ Roanoke, Va. 



Roanoke Ready-Mix Concrete Corp. 

Buy Concrete the Clean Way 
NO FUSS — NO MUSS — IT COSTS NO MORE 

S. Jefferson St. ROANOKE, VA. Phone DI 4-6617 



26 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



Norfolk - Newport News 
Hampton - Petersburg, Virginia 



"The Place to Save" 
"The Place to Borrow" 



NORFOLK FEDERAL 
Savings & Loan Association 

239 Main St. NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 

7420 Granby St. NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 

600 Court St. PORTSMOUTH, VIRGINIA 

105 Janaf Shopping Center NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 
2008 Cromwell Drive NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 



H. D. OLIVER 

Established 1875 




FUNERAL DIRECTOR 
Colonial and Shirley Avenues Dial Norfolk MA 2-7353 

NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 




CITIZENS MARINE 
JEFFERSON BANK 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 

• WASHINGTON AVE. at 25th STREET • NEWMARKET SHOPPING CENTER 
• WARWICK SHOPPING CENTER • SHERWOOD SHOPPING CENTER 

Serving the Peninsula 72 Years 



DyDee Wash 



NORFOLK DIAL 
MADISON 5-0243 



| 424 CATALPHA AVE. 
HAMPTON, VA. 
CHestnut 4-2041 

As a member of the National Institute of Diaper Service, our diapers 
are under "National Laboratory Control" — periodically checked 
by chemists — bacteriologists — to maintain 100 per cent safety. 

Only this diaper service ... no other . . . brings you Baby Talk. 




COAL -.- FUEL OIL 

PRINTED METER DELIVERIES 
PHONE CH 4-8484 NEWPORT NEWS, VA 



NORFOLK, VA. 



MRS. WILLIAM SCHWARTZ, Correspondent 



The Past Presidents of Nor- 
folk's Jewish Community Council 
have chosen Joseph (Buddy) Stre- 
litz as "Young Man of the Year." 
A plaque will be given to Mr. Stre- 
litz at the Annual Meeting of the 
Jewish Community Council on 
November 8, 1964. Mr. Strtelitz is 
Treasurer of the Jewish Commu- 
nity Council, and last year headed 
the Collection Committee. He has 
long been active in the United 
Jewish Fund and takes a leader- 
ship part in the affairs of Congre- 
gation Ohef Sholom. The award 
carries with it the pleasure and 
responsibility for attending the 
Council of Jewish Federations and 
Welfare Funds General Assembly 
of the United Jewish Appeal An- 
nual Conference. 

All Jewish organizations in the 
Norfolk community are anticipat- 
ing a thorough and interesting 
program compiled by Ephraim 
Spivek, Exec. Director of the Jew- 
ish Community Council and Mrs. 
SpiVek. "Fri" and Use attended 
the UJA Leadership Mission to 
Israel this summer and have 
brought back a fund of informa- 
tion, of human interest stories and 
a collection of more than 300 color 
slides. They and 85 other members 
of the Mission were fully able to 
realize and understand the concept 
of the intricate workings of UJA 
Funds through the Joint Distribu- 
tion Committee go to needy Jews 
in foreign lands or for emigration 
to Israel, the United States, and 
other free western democracies. We 
hope to be able to write of some of 
the highlights of this Mission trip 
in later issues of the Outlook. 

Ohef Sholom Sisterhood will 
hold its opening luncheon meet- 
ing on Oct. 21st. The meeting and 
program will be a welcome to 
Rabbi and Mrs. Harold D. Hahn, 
and to all new members. A native 
of Philadelphia, Pa., Rabbi Hahn 
matriculated at Temple University 



Gratz Hebrew College, Hebrew 
Union College, served as Chaplain 
in (he United States Air Force in 
Germany and France later at 
Casablanca. Rabbi Hahn comes 
to Ohef Sholom f rom Michigan's 
oldest Jewish Congregations, the 
Temple Beth El of Detroit. 

At Temple Israel's Men's Club 
First Annual Donor, Robert C. 
Gleischman was unanimously cho- 
sen '"Man of the Year". Mr. Glei- 
schman devotes his time and ef- 
forts to the Temple's USY activi- 
ties. Youth Commission and UJF. 
Mr. Gleischman is a Past President 
of Norfolk's B'nai B'rith and serves 
on the Board of Directors of Com- 
munity and Council. 

B'nai Issrael Sisterhood disclo- 
ses plans for the year to include a 
Luncheon and Card Party, the 
Annual Donor Dinner, a Carnival, 
and a Sisterhood Sabbeth. Their 
first meeting on October 20th, 
honoring new members will be 
a musical skit entitled, "My 
Daughter, the Program Chair- 
man". 

The busy ladies of ORT held 
an Art Auction on September 27th 
with paintings donated by local 
artists and collectors. The ORT 
Thrift Shop is run on a permanent 
basis and manned by ORT mem- 
bers. 

Council of Jewish Women an- 
nounces that they are providing 
scholarship to three Jewish stud- 
ents in Norfolk. This year, the 
Council will alter its format and 
hold four general meetings and 
hold Study Groups during the re- 
maining months. 

Norfolk's Chapter of Hadassah 
dedicated its first meeting of the 
season to new members. Mrs. L. 
David Stark, Chapter President 
presented a Convention Report of 
the National Convention of Ha- 
dassah held in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. 



OVER A CENTURY OF SERVICE 

J. T. MORRISS & SON, INC. 



Funeral Directors 



Adams and Wythe Sts. 
REgent 3-8511 
PETERSBURG, VA. 



W. Broadway & 9th Ave. 
GLenview 8-8516 
HOPEWELL. VA. 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



21 




Screen Star Carrol! Baker (center) receives honorary membership in 
Hadassah, the Women's Zionist Organization of America, from Mrs. Nathan 
D. Perlman, Hadassah's national membership chairman, as Mrs. Jacob H. 
Karp, member of the National Board of Hadassah, looks on at left. Miss 
Baker was honored in recognition of her devotion to Israel and numerous 
communal causes. 

A MAI FOR ALL SIMONS 

By Sheldon E. Elster 

Rabbi Elster, who was for two years the Jewish chaplain at Fort Lee, 
Va., is now the rabbi of Congregation Ohev Zedek, Youngstown, Obio. 

— The Editor 



For Jews ever) where the call of 
the shofar on Rosh Hashanah 
marks the beginning of a New 
Year, as it does on military posts 
throughout the world where 
American Jews are on duty. Rut 
the daily 6 A.M. bugle call and 
thunderous boom of a cannon 
that signal the dawn of a new day 
on a military post also usher in an 
amazing number of daily activities 
reported in The Daily Bulletin 
at Fort Lee, Va. Almost every day 
there is some announcement of 
an activity for Jewish personnel. 
A military post offers the entire 
gamut of community life to its 
residents — cultural, educational, 
recreational, athletic and social. 
Religious life is only one element 
in the daily routine of military 



W. D, ROWE CO, 



E. W. MYERS, Pres.-Treas. 




Monuments of Distinction 

2322 N. Main St. 
DANVILLE, VA. 



personnel and their dependents. 

Jewish community life on a mil- 
itary post centers around the Jew- 
ish Chapel, which offers all the 
normal activities of a civilian con- 
gregation: religious services, ele- 
mentary and adult Jewish educa- 
tion, a social life for married and 
bachelor personnel and Jewish 
cultural programs. The Jewish 
Chapel is more than a congrega- 
tion: it is a community of Jev/s in 
its own right. All Jewish person- 
nel are automatically, and with- 
out cost, members of the Chapel 
whose program is directed by the 
J WB-endorsed and served chap- 
lain assigned to the Post. Besides 
being the military counterpart of 
the civilian congregational rabbi 
the Jewish military chaplain serves 
as a jack-of-all-trades, and as mas- 
ter of all, as well as counselor, 
moral leader and character build- 
er to servicemen of all faiths. He 
in fact, a man for all men and 
for the Jews and their commun- 
ity, a man for all seasons. 

The advent of the High Holy 
Days is always an inspiring time 
of the Jewish year on the military 
post. The telephone constantly 
brings the eternal question: When 
are the holidays? Can I get a pass 
t<"< go home? What time are ser- 
vices? Where can I buy a round 
challah? Will the commissary 
carry honey? 

(Please Turn to Page 51) 



HARRISONBURG - MARTINSVILLE 
DANVILLE - PORTSMOUTH, VA. 




The Light 
refreshment 
for modern living 




now i& Pepsi 

for those mho think young 



psi 



SHENANDOAH'S PRIDE 

... DAIRY PRODUCTS 

The Valley of Virginia 
Cooperative Milk Producers Association 
HARRISONBURG, VIRGINIA 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

ot Martinsville and Henry County 
• Martinsville • Fieldale 

Collinsville © Druid Hills © South Office 



BRENNAN 

^literal |3Hmm % 



Directors and Embalmers 

EXport 7-3851 

711 Washington St. 
PORTSMOUTH, VA. 




HIIAI 

3800 King St. 

Portsmouth, Va. 
Phone EX 3-2621 

* Monuments 

* Cemetery Lettering 

* Craftsmanship 

* Garden Furniture 



28 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK October, 1964 

Beth Meyer Synagogue, Raleigh, N. C 



MRS. OSCAR LEGUM, Correspondent 



COMPLETE PEST CONTROL 

free Inspection & Estimates Without Obligation 



Locally DIAL I - 

Owned 8 Operated j sSZ-'-Jo.i I 




SILVER FISH ANTS RATS - MICE ROACHES MOTHS 

GUARANTY EXTERMINATING CO., Inc. 

5221 Hillsboro St. Raleigh, N. C. 



MORGAN'S CABINET SHOP 

CUSTOM BUILT KITCHEN CABINETS, 

OUR SPECIALTY 
New or Remodeling — Free Estimates 

3121 Nathan Dr. RALEIGH, N. C. 787-4161 



A. LEONARD RHYNE CO. 

EVERYTHING FOR THE OFFICE 
New - Used - Rentals 

Interior Decorating Service at No Extra Charge 

341 E. Franklin Ave. GASTONIA, N. C. Dial UN 4-1421 



CITY LUMBER COMPANY 

BUILDING MATERIALS FROM FOUNDATION TO ROOF 
Serving Gastonia Since 1920 
733 N. Marietta St. Gastonia, N. C. Dial UN 7-7208 



NORMAN'S SHELL 
SERVICE STATION 

Automotive - Road Service 
2117 E. Ozark Avenue 
867-9290 Gastonia, N. C. 



Cal°Tone 
Paints' Inc. 

Manufacturers of 
The Very Best in Paints 

310 S. West St. Dial TE 4-7721 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Village Pharmacy 

Raleigh and Eastern N. C.'s 
Finest 

Franchised Barton's 
Candy Dealer 

2010 Clarke TE 4-1347 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



WRENN-PHARR 

Boys' Store 

Young Men's and Boys' 

OUTFITTERS 

428 Daniels St. Dial TE 2-2530 
Cameron Village 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



"Quality Is Our Specialty" 
ROBERT TALLEY, Mgr. 

McAdenville 
Nursery 

INCORPORATED 
Complete Landscaping & 
Nursery Service 

Nursery & Greenhouse Located 
in McAdenville, N. C. 

824-4481 or 865-2157 

McAdenville, n. c. 




ROBERT STEVEN RUBY 

The Bar Mitzvah of Robert Ste- 
ven Ruby, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard S. Ruby, was celebrated 
at the Shabbos Services, Friday 
evening, September 11th and Sat- 
urday morning, September 12th, at 
Beth Meyer. Robert conducted the 
entire Shabbos Service and ren- 
dered a beautiful Kiddush, using 
the traditional Kiddush cup pre- 
sented to him by Mrs. N. f. Green, 
president of Beth Meyer Sister- 
hood. 

Following the Shabbos service, 
Robert was honored by his parents 
at an Oneg Shabot reception in 
the Assembly rooms of the Syna- 
gogue. The receiving line was 
composed of Robert, his parents, 
his sister Barbara, grandparents. 
Mrs. Bertha Ruby, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Hyman Greenberg. 

On Saturday morning, the Bar 
Mitzvah boy again conducted th? 
entire regular Shabbos service and 
chanted his Haftorah in the pre- 
sence of a large congregation of 
relatives and friends. On behalf 
of the congregation, Mr. Asher 
F.delstein, president of Beth Mey- 
er, presented Robert with a prayer 
book, and Mrs. Richard S. Ruby, 
superintendent of the Religious 
School presented her son with a 
gift from the School. A seated Kid- 



Italian Foods 

9 Steaks 

• Pizza to Go 

• Imported Wines 

Dial TE 4-2086 
For Reservations 

Banquet a?id Party Facilities 

Villa Capri 
Restaurant 

3625 Hillsboro 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



dush was given in the Assembly 
rooms for the entire congregation 
after the Shabbos services. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ruby were hosts 
again in honor of their only son 
on Saturday evening at a Cocktail 
Part) and Dinner Dance at the 
Plantation Inn, for close fricn.ls 
and relatives. 

On Sunday morning, Mr. and 
Mzs. Oscar Leg t ;m, entertained 
the family and out of town guests 
who cm j to celebrate with thj 
Rub\ family for their Simcha, at 
a Brunch in Robert's honor. 

Among those who came to cele- 
brate with the Ruby's on this 
happy occsaion were Mr. and Mrs. 
Hyman Greenberg, grandparents 
from Brooklyn, N. Y.; Dr. and 
Mrs. Albert Greer and daughter 
Adrain, Haddfield, N. J., Dr. and 
Mrs. Sheldon Greer, Bryan and 
Cori, Miami, Fla. uncles and aunts; 
Mr. and Mrs. M. Greenberg, 
Bronx, N. Y., great uncle and 
aunt: Mr. Harry Fink, Detroit, 
Michigan, great uncle; Mr. and 
Mrs. M. Shapiro, Miami. Fla., Mr. 
and Mrs. Sam Fink and daughter, 
Durham, cousins, and Miss Rosa- 
lind Legum, of New York. 

Visitors to our Synagogue fami- 
' lies lor thi Holidays were Mr. and 
Mrs. B?n Weinstein of Brooklyn, 
visiting their daughter and family, 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Schwartz; 
and Mr. and Mrs. I. Merl of Tarry- 
town, N. Y., visiting their daugh- 
ter and family, Mr. and Mrs. Stan- 
ley Schneider; Mrs. Louis Schlan- 
ger of Charlotte, visiting her 
daughter Mr. and Mrs. Emil Gold- 
smith. 

We wish a speedv recovery to 
Mr. Ben Rose and Mr. Louis 
Greenspon who are hospitalized. 

It was indeed good to see the 
students of the local colleges wor- 

(Please Turn to Page 41) 




MODERN 

Texaco Serv. Sta. 

ROAD 
SERVICE 

Charles Pendergraf, 
Owner 
We Specialize in 

MAJOR AUTO REPAIR 

Engine Overhaul 
Tune-Ups 
Complete Brake Service 
Transmissions 
Wheel Balancing 
158 E. Chatham 467-1214 
CARY, N. C. 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 



29 



Around Greensboro 




MRS. MARK N. PERLIN 



Judith S. Shallant, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Shallant, was 
married to Dr. Mark N. Perlin, 
son of Mrs. Louis Perlin, and the 
late Dr. Perlin, of Richmond, Va. 
at Temple Emanuel on the night 
of September 26th. Rabbi Joseph 



Carriage jmuise 



). 




prepared by a European 
Chpf 
HOURS 
Tues. Thru Fri. 
11:30 Ti'l 2:00 
5:30 Till 9:00 
Sat.— 6 PM-10 P.M. 
Sun.— 12-2 P.M. 
4608 W. Market St. Ext. 
GREENSBORO— 299-1307 



Asher officiated. A reception at 
Starmount Forest Country Club 
lollowed the ceremony. 

Bridesmaids were Mrs. Jay Le- 
\ine, Atlanta, Ga.; Mrs. William 
Gorelick, of Charlotte, N. C; and 
Mrs. Arlin Ruby of Richmond. 
Va. sister of the bridegroom. 

Best Man was Arlin Ruby, bro- 
ther-in-law of the bridegroom and 
the ushers were David Shallant, 
brother of the bride; Arthur Wil- 
son of Atlanta, Ga.; Morton Kes- 
sler of Jacksonville, Fla.; Dr. Jules 
Levin of Baltimore, Md.; Dr. Rob- 
ert Berlin of Atlanta, Ga.; Win- 
field Gartner of Atlanta, Ga. 

After a honeymoon trip to Mia- 
mi Beach, Fla. the couple will live 
at 918 D McAlway Rd., Charlotte, 
N. C. 

The bride will be a computer 
programmer for J. P. Stevens & 
Company and the bridegroom is 
practicing dentistry in Charlotte. 

The Art Shop, one of Greens- 
boro's longest established stores, 
was taken over on July 1st by 
Stanley T. Dolin. 



GREENSBORO, N. (. 



Gate City Savings & Loan 



Established 
1903 

OFFICERS 

J. H. SPEARMAN, President 
KEMP C. CLEND^NIN, Vice-President 
BANK WILSON, Vice-President 
LESTER L. CARTER, JR., V-President 
ROBERT L. BRADY, Vice-President 
JACK W. LEE, Vice-President 
DAVID N. POWELL, Treasurer 

108 S. Greene Street 
Phone BR 5-9566 
Friendly Shopping Center 

Phone 292-2444 

GREENSBORO, NORTH 



ASSOCIATION 

DIRECTORS 
CHAS. A. HINES 
Chairman of the Board 

LLOYD C. AMOS 
W. H. ANDREWS, JR. 
KEMP C. CLENDENIN 
KARL K. GARRETT 
P. T. HINES i , , 
ALBERT S. KEISTER 

MOSE KISER 
DIFFEE H. LAMBERT 

J. F. STEVENS 
J. D. WILKINS, JR. 

CAROLINA 




THE 
YEAR 



'ROUND" 



WARREN'S TOYLAND 

LAWNDALE SHOPPING CENTER 

2168 Lawndale Dr. GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 274-3551 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



!EI 



WELDING SERVICE 



CHAS. W. RIERSON - Co-Owners - FLOYD RIERSON 
18 Years Experience 

Dial 275-5826 

919 Church Street Greensboro, N. C. 




RIC 



Contractors & Engineers 
Residential — Commercial — Industrial 
Electric Service 
Wiring — Fixtures — Electrical Radient Heat 
1421 Battleground GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 275-4544 



30 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



You'll Save Money Buying Your Floor-Coverings 

from 

HODGE CARPET (0. INC. 

ORIENTAL & DOMESTIC RUGS 

"Over 30 Years Experience" 

Expert Repairing and Cleaning 

Carpet Laying - Mothproofing - Storage - Binding 
Satisfaction Guaranteed or No Money Accepted 

720 West Market Street 

Greensboro, N. C. Phone 273-4859 



Bring Your Prescrpitions To Eckerd's 

Creators of Reasonable Drug Prices 
2 STORES 

Northeast Shopping Center Friendly Shopping Center 

E. Bessemer & Summit Ave. Friendly Road 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Ralph J. Golden Insurance Agency 

We Feature the New 
B'nai B'rith Disability Insurance Plan 

ALSO, FIRE - CASUALTY - GROUP - LIFE 
INSURANCE 

108 K Northwood St. Dial BR 5-3400 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Mitchell-Dixon Office Supply Co., Inc. 

Business Equipment and Supplies 

418 W. Market Street GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 273-6988 



SEE THE NEW 1964 CHEVROLET 

Traders Chevrolet Company, Inc. 

SALES — SERVICE 

215 E. Market St. GREENSBIRO, N. C. Dial 272-2146 



C. J. KERN - CONTRACTOR 

COMMERCIAL - INDUSTRIAL 

21 Beard Building Phone 272-2008 

272-0177 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 




Golda Meir, Minister for Foreign Affairs of the State of Israel, launched 
the Fall campaign for Israel Bonds in Los Angeles, where she urged the 
fullest support for the Israel Bond effort in order to strengthen the country's 
economic development. 



Mr. Dolin has had 15 years 
background in interior decorating 
and home furnishings in Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn. 

The Art Shop boasts the largest 
selection of picture frame mold- 
ings in the Carolinas. There are 
over 1000 patterns in stock at all 
times. Other items stocked are 
Non-Glare Glass, Prints, Original 
Oils, Etchings, Engravings con- 
sidered to the tops in their field. 

The Art Shop does much com- 
mercial framing for banks, in- 
surance companies, schools, libra- 
ries, in addition to regular retail 
business. 

Mr. Dolin is a member of Beth 
David Synagogue. 

Lucy Jane Soffer was married 
to Charles Sidney Blankstein of 
Washington and Greensboro, N. 
C, on September 20th at the Lotos 
Club in New York City. Rabin 
Joseph Asher of Temple Emanuel, 
Greensboro, officiated. 

The bride is a daughter of Dr. 
and Mrs. Louis J. Soffer, who re- 
ceived afterward at the Lotos Club. 
The bridegroom is a son of Mr. 
and Mrs. George Blankstein of 
Greensboro. 

The couple will live in Washing- 
ton., where the bridegroom is an 
attorney in the Office of General 
counsel, National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration. He is a 
graduate of the Riverside Conn- 
trv School, New York, University 
of North Carolina at Chapel ITill 
and Harvard Law School, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

The bride graduated from Field- 
ston School here and Grinnell Col- 
lege in Iowa. 

The bride had Susan Pierce 
for maid of honor. The bride- 



groom had the bride's brother, 
Dr. Richard Soffer, for best man. 

The community extends its 
sincerest sympathy to Sam Prago 
on the passing of his father, Louis 
Prago, in Philadelphia on Sep- 
tember 15. 

Also to Mrs. Lawrence Cohen 
on the passing of her sister, Sheila 
Stern, in Miami, Florida. 

We would appreciate 
Suhsi ribcrs wjtifyhig us 
of i limine of address. 



BUY RIGHT 

at the 




super markets 

Stores Located at 
1609 Madison Avenue 
4703 High Point Road 
2803 E. Bessemer Avenue 
1320 Glenwood Avenue 
403 Tate Street 
2113 Walker Avenue 
900 Gorrell Street 

Liberty Road at Pleasant 
Garden Road 

3700 Lawndale Drive 

Stokesdale, N. C. 

2212 S. Ashe Street 

Guilford, N. C. 

Pleasant Garden, N. C. 

Kernersville, N. C. 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



Si 



Weidon— Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

LOUISE FAKBER, Correspondent 



-yy. yy^yy.yy.'yy yy. yy. y .-yy, yy yyyy yy -yy .yy.yy yy yy yy y ■ yy. yy. yy~- yy. yy- yy*y- 

t We have moved to 224 Commerce Place 



Temple Emanu-El, Weidon, 
North Carolina, was the scene 
this Saturday, August 29, of the 
Bas Mitzvah of Helen Joan Dia- 
mond, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Hy Diamond, of Warrenton. This 
was but the second Bas Mitzvah, 
in the synagogue's 50-year long his- 
tory. Bas Mitzvah is the girls' 
equivalent of Bar Mitzvah, 
the age of a youngster's achieving 
religious majority and becoming 
religiously a full-fledged member 
of the Jewish community. From 
that point on, a Bar and Bas Mitz- 
vah may be counted toward a 
minyan, a quorum for public wor- 
ship. 

Bas Mitzvah climaxes a period 
of intense training in Hebrew, To- 
rah and Hebrew liturgy. Being a 
member of the only Jewish family 
living in Warrenton imposed spe- 
cial difficulties in Helen Dia- 
mond's case in acquiring this 
learning. For each lesson she had 
to be driven almost 100 miles to 
secure instruction at the hands of 
Dr. William B. Furie, Executive 
Director of the Circuit Riding 
Rabbi Program of the North Car- 
olina Association of Jewish Men 
and Spiritual Leader of the Wei- 
don Congregation, Temple Ema- 
nu-El, which services Jewish fami- 
lies of Weidon, Roanoke Rapids, 
Warrenton and Jackson, North 
Carolina and Emporia, Virginia. 

On the eve of her Bas Mitzvah, 
Friday, August 28, Helen Diamond 
conducted almost the entire Friday 
evening service, including the 
chanting of the kiddush, the bene- 
diction over the sacramental wine. 
Her mother, Ruth Diamond, 
opened the service with a reci- 
tation of the blessings for the kind- 
ling of the Sabbath lights. On 
Saturday morning, Lee Diamond, 
brother of the Bas Mitzah, led in 
the conduct of the preliminary 



College Drive In 

Specializing in Bar-B-Q 
& Steak Sandwiches 



All Bread Toasted 
Catering To Party Service 
Plenty of Parking Space 

Country Ham - A Specialty 

2025 E. Market BR 2-9351 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



service. Cantor for the balance 
of the Sabbath morning service 
was Mr. M. Reuben Kesner, new 
circuit rider for the communities 
of Jacksonville, Lumberton, White- 
ville and Wallace. The Torah 
was read by Dr. Furie, who also 
delivered the Bas Mitzvah charge. 
Miss Diamond received special 
gifts from the Temple, its Sister- 
hood and the North Carolina As- 
sociation, following her delivery 
of a Bas Mitzvah address. 

Guests attended the Bas Mitzvah 
frcm New York, Baltimore and 
many communities of Virginia 
and North Carolina. The Dia- 
monds entertained their guests 
with a collation following the Fri- 
day evening and Sabbath morning 
services. Mr. Ellis Farber, of Wei- 
don, is President of Temple 
Emanu-El, and Mrs. Harry Freid 
is President of its Sisterhood. 

THOMPSON-ARTHUR WINS 
CAROLINAS SAFETY 
AWARD 

Word has just been received 
from the Carol inas branch, AGC 
that the Thompson-Arthur Pav- 
ing Company of Greensboro, 
North Carolina has won the fol- 
lowing awards for the 1903-64 
Accident Prevention Program of 
Carolinas branch AGC: 

I. One year award — 1st Place, 
Highway Division, Group A (over 
500,000 man-hours exposure). 2. 
Ten year award — 3rd Place, High- 
way Division (over one million 
man-hours exposure). 

The Thompson-Arthur Paving 
Company's record is based on the 
association's yearly accident pre- 
vention program running from 
July 1st through June 30th each 
year. The company accumulated 
a total of 791,686 manhours with- 
out a lost time disabling injury 
for a frequency of zero and a se- 
verity of zero during this period. 

According to the accident rates 
furnished by the National Safety 
Council the 1963 national frequen- 
cy for the highway construction 
industry was 24.6 and national 
severity rate was 2,997. 

Awards will be presented to 
the company at the 44 th Annual 
Convention of Carolinas Branch 
AGC to be held at the Boco Raton 
Hotel 8c Club, Boco Raton, Flori- 
da, December 13th through 16th 
1964. 



HALL - KIMES JEWELRY CO. 

Specialists in Jewelry Engraving 

224 Commerce Place GREENSBORO, N. C. 272-1310 $ 

■x^vt^^t^^.^«^^«^^;^3e^«<?v.^fc^^«^^e^^t^w^"«c;?Tt^it^v^K^>t^'x y yy-yy^yy^yy^^ 



YANSTORY CLOTHING CO. 

"Why Not Buy The Best?" 
Men's and Boys' Clothing 
Jefferson Bldg. GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 275-2807 



Kirkman's Airport Transportation 

AVIS RENT - A - CAR SYSTEM, Licensee 

Phone 299-0131 Phone 275-7939 P. O. Box 3014 

Greensboro - High Point - Winston-Salem Airport 
Office: O. Henry Hotel — Greensboro, N. C. 



Open from 7 a. m. to 11 p. m. 
every day 
Dial 273-6835 

HOTEL PHARMACY 

0. Henry Hotel Bldg. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Expert Shoe Repairing 

Syke's Shoe Shop 

LESTER LAWRENCE, Owner 



DIAL 274-2272 



For Pick-Up and 
Delivery Service 
105 N. Greene Greensboro 



SEASON'S GREETINGS 

GRANTHAM 
HARDWARE CO. 

Dial 273-2873 
1152 Battleground Avenue 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



GREENSBORO 
Rubber Stamp Company 

Iiubber Stamp Manufacturers 
24-Hour Rubber Stamp Service 
520 Walker Ave. Dial 272-571*: 

GREENSBORO, N. C 



ger W, L 

General 
Contractor 

Dial 273-4651 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 




Hatley's 
Upholstery Shop 

All Types of 
Furniture Upholstering 

Dial 273-0122 
3511 E. Market Street 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



UPTOWN 
STORAGE GARAGE 

S. W. WILLIAMS, Proprietor 
GAS — OIL — TIRES 
OPEN ALL NIGHT 

Automobile Storage — 24-Hour 
Service — Day and Weekly Rates 
Washing-Polishing-Lubricating 
Battery and Tire Sales & Service 
Road Service 
301 North Elm Street 

Dial BR 2-4577 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



BABY DIAPER 
SERYIC! 



Safety through Service 

An ideal gift for 
Expecting Mothers 

Serving Central 
North Carolina 



32 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1 964 



nil ^ 


"We Lease Anything" 




CARS 




TRUCKS 


Q$ leasIng company 


EQUIPMENT 


m 

317 N. Elm Street 


Greensboro. N. C. 



Paul S Oliver, 
Inc. 

Commercial & Industrial 
Painting 
Industrial Coatings 

Member of 
"Painting & Decorating 
Contractors of America" 

1129 Westridge Road 

Phone CY 9-2808 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



PROMPT, COURTEOUS SERVICE 

Dial 272-5112 




Two-Way Radio-Dispatched Taxis 

Blue Bird Taxi, Inc. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 




Charcoal 
Steaks 



Seafood 

Italian 
Specialties 



Catering to 
Parties 



Private Dinning 
Room 
Seats 125 



Dancing in 
Cape Cod Room 
, Music By 

%. Sid Hellier 



1720 Battleground Ave.— 272-0537 
Greensboro 



PAINTING 
CONTRACTOR 

Spray Painting 

Commercial - Industrial 
Residential 

Licensed & Insured 
DIAL BR 4-2336 

L. F. McCaskill, Jr. 

221 Florence 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 




CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS 

] 07 West Gaston Street 
Dial 274-9764 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 




Kttijltt 

^Products 



Janitors' Supplies 

"If it cleans, we have it" 

BUILDING AND 
FLOOR MAINTENANCE 
SPECIALISTS SINCE 1945 
Call Us for Free Survey of 
Your Maintenance Needs 
and Instructions for 
Your Personnel 

FREE LOCAL DELIVERY 

Dial 272-7294 

"32 E. Sycamore 



FOR EVERYTHING IN; 




BURLINGTON, N. C. 



Area Code 919 
584-3811 




Queen Ratna of Nepal (center) is shown during a recent visit to Ha- 
dassah's Alice Seligsberg Vocational High School for Girls in Jerusalem, 
accompanied by Mrs. Isaac Olshan, wLe of Israel's Chief Justice, who is 
chairman of the Hadassah Council in Israel. The Queen was escorted by 
Israel's Women's Army Lieutenant Ruth Eytan, daughter of Walter Eytan, 
Israel's Ambassador to France. 

What's Bothering Jews of America! 

By Alfred Dobroff 



what's bothering jew in a.? dobrot 
As consultant on Jewish Communi- 
ty Center Planning lor the Nation- 
al Jewish Welfare Board, 1 have 
visited many Jewish communities, 
large and small, from one end of 
the United States to the other, in 
the last couple of years. The nature 
of my assignment permitted me to 
talk with and get to know large 
numbers of the leaders and mem- 
bers of these Jewish communities. 
One cannot help but draw Irom 
this experience some broad gene- 
ral impressions about the concerns 
of the American Jew in the nu- 
clear age. These impressions are 
a composite of the expressed atti- 
tudes and actions of Jews in our 
land brought togther into a 
thread of disquietude that weaves 
its way through Jewish communi- 
ties from the tip of Main to San 
Diego. 

The phrase that best defines 
these concerns is "the thread of 
ambivalence" of the American 
Jew. "Webster tells us that "ambi- 
valence" means a "simultaneous 
attraction toward and repulsion 
from an object, person or action." 
The social psychologist, in the 
rare occurrence of using less lan- 
guage than Webster to describe 
a psychic phenomena, describes 
ambivalence as "feeling two ways 
about something." 

It is this latter definition that 
best describes the composite Ame- 
rican Jew. He is an individual that 
feels two ways about the forces 



of society operating about him He 
wants, but he doesn't want; he 
strives, but then tries to deny or 
rationalize the striving. In short, 
he is in a tug of war with himslf, 
the groups o r which he is a part, 
the America which he cherishes, 
the community to which he be- 
longs. 

The ambivalence seems to be 
(Please Turn to Page 49) 



HOWARD E. CARR 

Manager 
Greensboro Agency 
Jefferson Standard Life Ins. Co. 

301 Battleground Ave. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



PICTURE 
YOURSELF IN 

EUROPE 

Wonders never cease in Europe. 

And with so much to see, you 
certainly don't want to spend 
your time standing in ticket 
lines or looking for hotels. 

That's where we can help you. 
For we're specialists at tickets, 
tours, timetables, passports, per- 
mits and reservations. We'll 
even remind you to bring your 
camera! 

Call us today — for prompt, 
personalized professional travel 
service. 

MEMBER 




LUCAS 
TRAVEL AGENCY 

Dial 272-0111 
116 A North Greene St. 
GREENSBORO, Nr 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



33 



(CEiarlotfe Temple Israel Sisterhood 

MRS. H. N. FRIEDMAN, Correspondent 



A film, "The Life of Emile Zo- 
la," was presented in the social hall 
on Saturday evening Aug. 29. Re- 
freshments were served by the sis- 
terhood. 

At 11:30 p.m., in the sanctuary, 
Mr. Ike Ashendorl installed the 
new President of our Temple Dr. 
David Citron, all the officers and 
board of trustees. Mrs. Philip Wi- 
dis, sisterhood President and Mrs. 
Jerome Madans were also installed 
with the group, as representatives 
to the Temple board. After mid- 
night we had "Selihot" services. 
Rabbi Michael Hecht and Hawaii 
Robert Shapiro officiated. 

It's good to hear the sound of 
young voices again in our Reli- 
gious School. 

More little ones are coining in- 
to this world, to lake the places 
of those who grow up and leave 
for college. 

Mazal Tov to Mr. and Mrs. Nor- 
man Silverman on the birth of a 
daughter Alyson Jo. 

Beverly Mona, is the new born 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gerald 
Sirikoe. 

Ma/el Tov to them and to th ■ 
proud grandparents Mr. and Mrs. 
E. I. Sinkoe.and Mr. and Mrs. 
L. A. Gollick. May those children 
be of great joy to their loved ones. 

Donald Shapiro, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Gabe Shapiro and Lance 
Marc Berger, son of Mr. and Mrs. 




★ TV SPECIAL * 



$5 



00 



PER DAY 



NO MILEAGE CHARGE 
from 

(9:00 AM to 4:30 PM) 

ASK ABOUT OUR 

WEEKEND SPECIAL 

332-2233 

732 N. TRYON ST. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Leonard Berger, became "Bar 
Mitzvah" this month. 

We wish both families Mazal 
Tov and joy from their sons. 

Gongratulations to Mr. Melvin 
Shapiro, son of Mrs. Sh^ppard 
Shapiro on his recent marriage to 
Miss Jane Doris Cantor, daugh 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Myron Cantor 
of Scarsdale, New York. 

Mr. Fred Rosoff, son o! Mr. and 
Mr. and Mrs. Kalmsn Rosoff o! 
Rock Hill, S. C. was recently mar- 
ried to Miss Stephanie Block ol 
Baltimore Md. We wish both cou 
pies much happiness. 

Mr. William Herbert Ashendorl 
and Mr. Stanley David Kornfeld, 
have passed this year's bar exami- 
nation in Raleigh, N. C. 

Congratulations and good luck 
to them. 

Our deepest sympathy goes to 
Mrs. Eugene O'ddberg en th? p is- 
sing of her grandmother Mrs. Do- 
ra Halpern. To Mrs. Herman Le- 
vine who has lost her father Mr. 
Jacob Blirmin of Cuba. And to 
Mrs. Martin Leventhal on th j loss 
of her stepfather Mr. Irving Rol- 
ler of Brooklyn New York. 



Plain Talk 

(Concluded from Page 6) 
(arried on the shoulders of this 
loyal and devoted citizen who gave 
his entire resources for the forces 
of freedom." 

Larry remembered a lesson oul 
ol Sunday school, as giv.m him out 
of the Book of Acts o\ th? New- 
Testament. Said h~ in th" last par- 
agraph of his oration: "We musl 
meet our challenge in the words 
of Peter in the Acts of the Apostles 
of Jesus and as were exemplified 
in the life of Haym Salomon: 'Such 
as I have, I give.' " 

Well, that was the end of Lar- 
ry's oration. He had been the first 
speaker and we three judges had 
nine other high school boys to lis- 
ten to. Oh, they were all good 
speeches . . . speeches about George 
Washington and Thomas Jeffer- 
son and Samuel Adams and about 
the Boston Tea Party and Vallev 
Forge . . . but the judges remained 
under the spell of Larry Hall's 
Haym Salomon to the end. 
We quickly decided that Haym 
Salomon had told the best story of 
the meaning of America. Larry 
Hall won first prize. 



CHARLOTTE, N. C 



RICHARD REALTY, INC. 

RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL & INVESTMENT 
PROPERTY 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 



1415 E. Boulevard 



Phone 334-6869 



CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 




IHIM®®US • vMMfm 

SUPER MARKETS, inc. 

FINE FOODS 

Charlotte, Castonia, Moorcsville, Newton, Hickory, Morganton, 
Lincolnton, Kannapolis, Co nelius, Forest City and Kings 
Mountain, North CaroLna , rccck Hill and Lancaster, South 
Carolina. 



CAROLINA RESTAURANT SUPPLY CO. 



Complete Restauran', Supplies & Equipment 



2020 N. Tryon 



CHARLOTT N C. 



376-5602 



H. AND S. LUMBER CO. 

Lumber and Building Prod;:e x s 
Millwork 

520 Dowd Road CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Dial FR 0-7761 



PIC n PAY 



FOR THE 
ENTIR-E FAMILY 



3 Charlotte, N.C Locations 
1403 Central Ave. 3440 Wilkinson Blvd. 5110 S. Blvd. 
GREENSBORO: 2804 Bessemer Ave. - 2922 High Point Rd. 

Free Parking 
Nationally Advertised Brands at Low Prices 
Quality — Styles Galore 
"Wear 'em to Compare 'em" 
Also in N. C: Gastonia - Kannapolis - Winston-Salem - Concord 
Fayetteville - Burlington - Raleigh - Jacksonville - Hickory - States- 
ville - Asheville (Sky City) - Lexington and Shelby. In South 
Carolina: Columbia - Cayce - Charleston - Greenville and Anderson. 
In Georgia: Atlanta and Augusta. In Tennessee: Johnson City 
Morristown - Kingsport and Greeneville. Also in Salisbury, Md. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



CHARLOTTE TEMPLE BETH EL 

DORIS M. HELLMAN, Correspondent 



JORDAN SYSTEM & FORMS, INC. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Continuous Carbon Forms — Invoices — Purchase Forms 
B/Ls — Voucher Checks — Printing 



3745 N. Davidson St. Dial 333-0303 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Night 523-8308 
Manufacturers 



Night 537-2400 
Repair Service 



Schachner Leather & Belting Company 

and 

Charlotte Leather Belting Co., Div. 

"Schachner Belting Makes a Good Machine Better" 
2601 W. Boulevard Dial 392-5351 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 28203 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



Carolina Delivery Service, Inc. 



1336 S. Graham 



Dial 333-5196 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



BLUE NOTE LOUNGE 

ENTERTAINMENT — DINE & DANCE NIGHTLY 
Dial 334-9064 Charlotte, N. C. 1421 Morehead 



LEDER BROS, Inc. 

Nine Complete Modern Department Stores 
Everything in Ready-to- Wear 

"Shop With Confidence, Wear With Pride" 



Whiteville, N. C. 
Clinton, N. C. 
Jacksonville, N. C. 
Smithfield. N. C. 



Rocky Mount, N. C. 
Concord, N. C. 
Marion, S. C. 
Loris, S. C. 



Mnin Office: Whiteville, N. C. 



May everyone be blessed with a 
Healthy Happy, and Prosperous, 
New Year! L'Shono Tova Tiko- 
sevu! 

At the annual meeting of the 
Central Conference of American 
Rabbis held in Atlantic City, New 
Jersey, Rabbi Gerber was elected 
to the Executive Board for a two- 
year term. The CCAR is the na- 
tional body of the Reform rabbi- 
nate. 

At the last meeting of the Tem- 
ple Beth El Youth Group the fol- 
lowing officers were elected: Paul 
Breitman — President; David Mon 
tezinos — Vice President; Helen 
Levitt — Treasurer; Helen Garber 
— Secretary. 

The following officers were 
named to head the Brotherhood 
during the coming year. Dr. M. J. 
Lavitan, President; Waller Finkel- 
stein, 1st Vice President; Mark 
Rothman, 2nd Vice President; 
Herman Baumann, Secretary; and 
Jaime Benes, Treasurer. 

We are happy to welcome into 
our congregational family Mr. and 
Mrs. James Montag, Mr. Howard 
Margolis, Mr. and Mrs. Philip 
Arnoff, Mr. and Mrs. Julius Ger- 
ber, and Mr. and Mrs. Juluis Co- 
hen. 

Mazel Tov to Mr. and Mrs. Ho- 
ward Glazier on the engagement 
of their daughter, Barbara. Con- 
gratulations to Dr. Robert B. Yu- 
dll upon his election to the presi- 
dency of the Charlotte Society of 
Eye Physicians and Surgeons. Mr. 
and Mrs. Maurice Neiman became 
grandparents for the second time 
with the birth of Jennifer Ellen. 
Congratulations to Mrs. Sidney 
Kosch upon winning awards for 
Best Photograph (still life compo- 
ssition) and Best Photographic the- 
sis at Central Community College. 



"We Cater to Those Who 
Care" 

Carolina Auto 
Upholstery Co. 

• Tailored Seat Covers 

• Convertible Tops 
Complete Interior Trim 

139 W. Morehead— ED 2-3998 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Sincerest condolences to Hilda 
Kirsner on the passing of her fa- 
ther, Raphael, and brother. Edgar 
Malever. may the souls of dear 
ones be bound up in the bond of 
eternal life. 

Congratulations to Irving 
Richek on his election 10 the 
Board of Directors of the Char- 
lotte Bridge Association and to 
Ernest Reinstein on his election to 
the presidency of the Charlotte 
Bridge Association. 



Do Your Part! 
Contribute to the North 
Carolina Home for the 
Jewish Aged 




Manuel G. Batshaw, immediate 
past president of National Associa- 
tion of Jewish Center Workers and 
for last 10 years executive director 
of Jewish Community Center of Es- 
sex County, N. J., who has been 
named to new post of director of 
national services of National Jewish 
Welfare Board. 



POUND & MOORE 
COMPANY 

"If it's for the Office — We Have If 

304 S. Tryon St. Dial FR 5-7751 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



FOR EXPERT 

MOVING 




Fidelity Van & 
Storage Co., Inc. 

200 West 29th Street 

Dial 334-5316 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



85 



EDITORIALS 

l Concluded from Page 5) 

several which are organized and conducted under contract to 
the U. S. Government in the nations of Africa, and the train- 
ing, with United Nations participation, of teachers from the 
Congo, from Iran and from 18 African states. 

"How to be equally effective in Bombay as in Paris, in 
Rome as in Rio de Janeiro, in Tel Aviv as in Teheran, is the 
challenge," states the Yearbook. Yet ORT meets it year in and 
year out with adaptability and imagination. 

For example, ORT schools long ago gave up emphasizing 
the socalled traditional Jewish trades, such as tailoring and 
carpentry. Today's Jewish youth do not yearn to follow in 
their father's vocational footsteps. Nor is there much future in 
such occupations. Instead, the ORT curriculum bristles with 
a course in automation in Paris, telecommunications in Mo- 
rocco, refrigeration in Israel, electronics in Milan. 

ORT continues to fight the war on poverty as it has for 
more than eight decades. It does so with a creative approach to 
basic human needs, and one that has brought skills, employ- 
ment and higher living standards to 500,000 of our people 
since the end of the Second World War. 



Wilmington, N. C 



JOHNSON 
TRIMMING SHOP 

Auto Body Repairing 
Convertible Tons Replaced 

306 Castle St. Dial RO 2-9536 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 




'Prescription 
Specialists 



Jarman's Pharmacy 

INCORPORATED 

Your Neighborhood Drug Store 

RO 2-5267 

Surgical Garments — Elastic 
Hose — Drugs — Sundries 
Sick Room Supplies 
1520 Market Wilmington, N. C. 



It's the Service 
That Makes the Difference 

HUGHES BROS. 
FUEL CO. 

(£sso) 
Fuel Oil 

DIAL 627-774 

Metered Trucks 
24 Hour Service 

3522 Market 
WILMINGTON, N. O. 



N.C.AJ.M. To Have 
Regional Meetings 

Mr. Philip Datnoff, President 
of the North Carolina Association 
of Jewish Men announces thai the 
first of a series of lour regional 
Board and General Membership 
meetings of the organization will 
take place on Sunday, November L 
The meetings will be held at the 
Blockade Runner Motel Hotel at 
Wrightsville Beach. 

Board members will meet infor- 
mally Saturday evening, October 
31, and informal session from 9:30 
to 10:30 on Sunday morning 
and from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m. Sunday 
afternoon. A general membership 
meeting will be conducted Sunday 
morning from 10:30 to noon. Fol- 
lowing a Hospitality Hour at 
noon, a luncheon meeting will be 
held a 1:00 o'clock. As a treat fea- 
ture of this session, which will be 
open to Board Members, Associa- 
tion members, their wives and 
friends, a prominent Piedmont 
University educator will be guest 
speaker. He will explain the sig- 
nificance of the Association's con- 
tribution to college education in 
North Carolina by means of the 
Hebrew courses offered to date at 
Catawba, Lenoir Rhyne and Wake 
Forest Colleges, 

Members plan to take advan- 
tage of the recreational facilities 
of the Blockade Runner (inside 
heated pool, nearby golf courses, 
outdoor swimming, etc.) to com- 
bine the business of he Associa- 
tion with pleasure. 



CAROLINA 

SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

INVEST SAFELY — BORROW ECONOMICALLY 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 



202 N. Third St. 



Dial RO 2-8536 



Hanover Shopping Center Branch 



Oleander Drive 



Dial RO 3-7035 



SNEEDEN, INC. 

Air Conditioning 

Refrigeration 

3506 Market Dial RO 3-2828 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



SHINN 
REALTY CO. 

Realtor 

SALES and RENTALS 

Ocean Front Cottages 
and Apartments 

Dial GL 8-3511 

Carolina Beach, N. C. 
307 Lake Park Boulevard 



GAS 

for 

Cooking — Hot Water Heating 
Air-Conditioning 

TIDEWATER 
GAS CO. 

Market and Front Streets 
Dial RO 3-3305 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 



DEAL 
Plumbing Co. 

• Ideal Plumbing & Heating 

• Ideal Repair Service 

Jas. D. Yopp 
Raymond D. Oliver 
Louis W. Creech 
A. B. Sellers 

Day RO 2-7292 

Night RO 2-7450 
126 S. Front 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



Tinga Nursery 

Azaleas - Camellias 

Broad-Leaved Evergreens 

Dial Wilmington 
Dial RO 2-1975 
CASTLE HAYNE, N. C. 



Selected Investments 

STOCKS 
BONDS 
MUTUAL FUNDS 

L. S. Everett Ada H. Kassens 
Insurance Bldg. RO 2-5221 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



36 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



NEW BERN, N. C. 



COMPLETE LINE OF TOP QUALITY LUMBER 

ROOFING & WHITE SIDING — LOWE BROTHERS PAINTS 
DOORS— WINDOWS— MOULDINGS— JOHNS-M &NVILLE PRODUCTS 
WEST COAST LUMBER 

CITY LUMBER CO. 



207 QUEEN ST 



Dial 638-1158 



NEW BERN, N. C. 



NEW BERN BUILDING SUPPLY CO. 

LUMBER — READY MIXED CONCRETE — CONCRETE BLOCKS 

ROOFING — PAINTS — PLASTER — WINDOWS — DOORS 
SAND — BRICK — and OTHER BUILDING MATERIALS 



HIGHWAY 70 WEST 



DIAL ME 7-3143 



NEW BERN, N. C. 



LINWOOD IPOCK & WILLIAM L. FIELDS 

REAL ESTATE BROKERS 

Real Estate Sales and Rentals 
DIAL 637-6663 

1211 B'road New Bern, N. C. 



DARNELL'S GULF SERVICE 

In Business Since 1939 
"SERVICE THAT SELLS" 
502 Broad New Bern, N. C. Dial 637-3177 



R. E. BENGEL SHEET METAL WORKS 

A ir -Conditioning & Heating 
We Specialize In 
GUTTERS — BLOW PIPES — VENTS 
All Types of Sheet Metal Work 

1311 N. Craven Street NEW BERN, N. C. Dial ME 7-3404 



Andersen' 

Drug 



A Dependable Druggist 
Is As Near to You 
As Our 
FREE DELIVERY TRUCK 

Dial ME 7-4201 

901 Board 
NEW BERN, N. C. 



Bailey's Texaco 




Prompt Service 

Minor Auto Repairs 
Open 7 Days 
PICK-UP & DELIVERY 

637-6336 

301 Broad New Bern, N. C. 



Radiators Cleaned 
Rodded - Repaired - Recored 
We Remove & Replace 

DIAL 

MElrose 7-4504 

Docated at Intersection 

Hwys. 55 & 17 
BRIDGETON, N. C. 



GREENLEAF 
PARK FLORIST 

CLUBS - PARTIES - ETC. 

"Free Delivery" 

Weddings - Socials - Hospital 
Arrangements - Funeral Designs 
Permanent & Fresh Flowers 
Gifts and Accessories 

Dial 637-3076 
Nights Dial ME 7-3375 
Located on the Grounds of 
Greenleaf Memorial Park, Inc. 

We Wire Flowers 
River Rd, New Bern,, N. C. 



N. C. Association of Jewish Youth 

CAROL SCHWARTZ, Correspondent 



The North Carolina Association 
of Jewish Ycuth held its annual 
summer conference at Camp Lake 
side in Hendersonville, N. C; Aug- 
ust 19 through 26. 1964. This con- 
ference was truly ihe greatest one 
ever. Mr. Reuben Kesner and Miss 
Ruth Kesner were the directors of 
the conference and they were ab- 
solutely wonderful. Rabbi Schoen-, 
who was the religious director, 
did a marvelous job. The junior 
counselors were Esther Ackennan, 
Nathan Leder, and Freddie Neu- 
wirth. The camp had many inter- 
esting guests, Mrs. Seymour Fein- 
stein, Mr. and Mrs. Dov Kentpff, 
Mr. Morris Spei/man, and Mr. 
Jerry Sternberg. 

Flag raising and morning sji vic- 
es of a typical day at camp. After 
breakfast was a morning lecture 
followed by Israeli dancing and 
committee meetings. There were 
lour overall committees at Camp 
Lakeside. The social committee 
made plans and decorations lor 
the nightly socials. The religious 
committee worked with Rabbi 
Schoen to plan services in which 
all campers participated. The 
athletic committee planned daily 
activities including everyone. The 
newspaper committee planned and 
edited a daily newspaper. Lunch 
was followed by athletics includ- 
ing swimming, skiing;, canoeing, 
tennis, horseback riding, basket- 
ball, baseball, and swimming meets. 
Supper was followed bv evening 
services and a social. There were 
many various intertaining socials 
this year at Camp Lakeside. On 
the first night there was a "gntmq; 
to know you" social with square 
dancing directed bv Mrs. Fein- 
stein. Other nights held in store 
movies, swimming parties, a twirp 
dance, a talent show, games, danc- 
ing, and cook-outs. 

The theme for the summer con- 
ference was the American Tew. The 
speakers presented fantastic pro- 
grams which stimulatd each and 
every camper. Many hours were 
spent in interesting discussions. 
The Sabbath was observed with 



services, an Oneg Shabbat. and 
Havdallah services. 

At the banquet the last night 
the new officers were installed. 
They are: President: Penni Acker- 
man; Vice-President: David Eklen; 
Secretary: Carole Schwartz; Trea- 
surer: Sherry Segerman; Sr. Sar 
geant-at-arms: Mike Parker; Jr. 
Sargeant-at-arms: Howard Neu 
wirth; and Parliamentarian: Mi- 
chelle Leder. The most outstand- 
ing campers chosen by the camp di- 
rectors are Carol Hyman and Lar- 
ry Neuwirth. After the banquet 
the camp swang to the music of 
the fabulous Ambassadors. After 
the dance was an auction in which 
the camp records were sold. 

This wonderful week in the 
mountains was indeed an experi- 
ence. There was never a dull mo- 
ment and everyone had a terrific 
time. It was a week of culture, fun. 
excitement, and adventure. 



UPHOLSTERERS 

A Complete and 
Thorough Job 

Neuse Forest 
Upholstery Go. 

2207 Cherry Point Road 
Dial ME 7-3073 New Bern, N. C. 



Things go Better 
with Coke 



NEW BERN 

Coca-Cola 
BOTTLING WO ?KS 
INCORPORATED 

135 Middle Street 
NEW BERN. N. C. 



Reduce Your Insurance Costs 
BUY MUTUAL INSURANCE 

H. G. LATIMER & SON, INC. 



f28 Princess Street 

WILMINGTON, N. C, 



Dial RO 2-9606 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



37 




Lef'i to Right: Rainieri Mazilli, President of the House of Representa- 
tives of Brazil, talks with Morris B. Abram President of the American Jew- 
ish Committee and leader of its delegation to South America, in his offices 
in Brasilia. 

Seaboard Meglosi National ¥ousig Judaea 

ROSALIND HOFFMAN, Correspondent 



The summer is over and Sea- 
board's Region Young Judaea's 
twenty five camp returnee's are 
ready and willing to work. They 
wish to pass on the experience and 
knowledge which they gained at 
Camp Tel Yehudah, the National 
Young Judaea Camp in Barryville, 
N. Y. 

On November 6th through the 
8th Seaboard will have its first 
convention of the 1964-65 [udaean 
year in Danville, Va. fudaeans 



CHARCOAL 
HEARTH 
RESTAURANT 

CATERING SERVICE 
FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 

Dial 638-5333 

"One of New Bern's Finest 
Restaurants" 

East Front Street 
NEW BERN, N. C. 



from all over N. C, Va., Washing- 
ton, D. C, Maryland and Delaware 
will attend this convention to be 
held at the Holiday Inn Motel. 
The program will consist of Chu- 
gim, skills, gam?s, services, socials 
and a few surprises. Yes, it teally 
looks as if this will be the greatest 
Convention Seaboard Young Ju- 
daea has ever had and we would 
like to extend a hearty welcome to 
any Jewish teenager who is inter- 
ested in attending. For any infor- 
mation please write to: Rosalind 
Hoffman, 4334 Columbine Circle, 
Charlotte, N. C. 

Last Year Seaboard took major 
steps in its growth and this year 
promises to be more rewarding. 
From Seaboard Young Judaea we 
wish you all a happy and healthy 
New Year. L'Shana Tovah. 



W. C. CHADWICK 

CENTRAL INSURANCE 

214 Clark Building 

Dial ME 7-3146 
Xr \V BERN, N. C. 




First Federal Savings & 
Loan Association 

ALL SAVINGS INSURED 
417 Broad Street 
NEW BERN, N. C 



MAJOR LEAGUE STEAK HOUSE 

STEAKS — CHOPS — SEAFOODS 
FULL COURSE DINNERS 

Wilkinson Blvd. GASTONIA, N. C. Dial 864-2741 



Warner's 
Restaurant 

Specializing in 
STEAKS SEAFOOD 
COMPLETE DINNERS 

Dial ME 7-5062 

515 Try on Palace Dr. 
NEW BERN, N. C. 



DUNSON'S 

FROG POND 
SERVICE STATION 



shell: 

Road Service 
Pick-Up & Delivery Service 
DIAL 637-7695 

"Service is Our Business" 
730 Queen Street 
NEW BERN, N. C. 



HERRING'S 
PHILLIPS 66 
SERVICE CENTER 

Free Road Service 
Within City Limits 
24 Hour Service 
7 Days a Week 
637-6282 

Jet. Hwy. 70 & 17 Sputh 
NEW BERN, N. C. 



17 TRUCK STOP 

Washing - Waging 
Lubrication - Wheel 

Balancing 
Mechanical Repairs 
Car Serviced 

\Smclair] ™&J m 

jm/ / DIESEL 
FUEL 

ROAD SERVICE 

ME 7-6653 
Hwy. 17 South 
Next to Charcoal Steak House 
NEW BERN, N. C. 



CLIFF WIGGINS 
SEPTIC TANK SERVICE 

Pumping - Repairing 
Installing 
Dial ME 7-6993 
Highway 17 
BRIDGETON, N. C. 



IVES OIL CO. 

Automatic Delivery Service 
Dial ME 7-2197 
Fast Delivery Service 
506 Cypress Street 
NEW BERN, N. C. 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



GEORGE STREET 
AMOCO 

Complete Automotive Service 
Dial ME 7-3925 
303 George Street 
NEW BERN, N. C. I 



Awnings - Custom Made 



CO. 

1916 Neuse Boulevard 
NEW BERN, N. C. 



TRENT BRIDGE 
ESSO SERVICE 

Dial 637-6204 
Road Service 
All Service Work . , s 
Pick Up & Delivery 
203 E. Front New Bern, N. C. 



"Dine on The Waterfront" 
A Complete Seafood Menu 
Dial ME 7-4131 
Air Conditioned — Ample Parking 

NELSON'S 
SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 
Foot of Middle Street 
NEW BERN, N. C. 



THE FLORIST 

Weddings - Funerals 
Corsages - Churches 
Pot Plants 

Dial ME 7-3071 

1312 Broad 
NEW BERN, N. C. 



Road Service 
Cars Called for & Delivered 
"We Offer Friendly Service" 
7 A.M. -9 P.M. — 7 Days Per Week 
Brake Service 
Dial 638-1305 
HARGETT SINCLAIR 
Neuse Rd. New Bern, N. C. 



GALLOWAY & SONS 
SEPTIC TANKS 

Grease Traps - Septic Tanks 
Dial ME 7-2578 
Bayboro Road 
BRIDGETON, N. C. l 



H. W. RICKS 
66 

SERVICE CENTER 

Dial 638-7685 
Near Craven Co. Hospital 
Neuie Blvd. New Bern, N, C. 



38 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



LDSBORO, N. C. 



FASHION 
QUALITY 
SERVICE 



Serving Goldsboro and 
Eastern Carolina Since 1865, 

GOLDSBORO, N. C. 




Ao„ . ul iviaae-Kite Sunbeam Bread & Rolls 
Made-Rite Bakery Goldsboro, N. C. 



GOLDSBORO MUSIC COMPANY 

Seeburg - AMT - Rock-Ola - Wurlitzer 
Coin Operated Phonographs On ! Rental or Percentage Basis 
D. B. BURNS & L. E. THOMPSON, Owners 
Dial 734-4417 or 735-3301 
112 S. Slocumb Goldsboro, N. C. 



WEIL -CREECH OIL COMPANY 

Distributor (GULfl Products 

Goldsboro, N. C. La Grange, N. C. 



P. H. Haire Refriaeration Service 

Commercial and Industrial 
Refrigeration - Heating - Air Conditioning Service 
1005 E. Mulberry Dial 735-3926 Goldsboro, N. C. 



Rainbow Cleaners & Laundry 

Serving Goldsboro and Area Since 1940 
One Day Service 
503 S. George GOLDSBORO, N. C. Dial RE 4-3307 



CRAWFORD - NORWOOD 



112 S. John Street 



REALTORS 

Since 1892 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



Phone 735-4851 



Prompt Dependable Auto Service 

Ronald Sasser Body Shop 

Body Work - Repairs - Auto Glass Installed 

Dial 735-4721 



1013 S. George St. GOLDSBORO, N. C. 

24 Hour Wrecker Service 




The Jewish Agency's Department of Education and Culture was host 
this summer to hundreds of teachers, principals, communal workers, Bar 
and Bas Mitzvah boys and girls in a series of seminars and conferences on 
the East and West Coast and study tours in Israel. 



Discontent - 

(Continued 

by law for more people will make 
for greater opportunities — wrong. 
Look at the troubles of the so- 
called emerging nations. All of 
these promises and expectations 
are no more fulfillable than the 
patently stupid one of: if you use 
this or that hair tonic, romance 
will be sure to pursue you. No 
wonder then at the agony of our 
discontent. We have been nurtur- 
ed on untruths. What is there left 
to believe. The gods of capitalism 
turn out to be idols. Increased 
production and full employment 
are no cure for discontent. The 
law of supply and demand is not 
to be added as an eleventh com- 
mandment, forgotten or overlook- 
ed by Moses at Sinai, or to replace 
the one perhaps on adultery. 

We Jews do not ignore the need 
for material prosperity, nor do 
we even belittle it. "If there is no 
bread, there is no Torah," we 
read in the Sayings of the Fathers. 
We wish one another a happy as 
well as a prosperous New Year. 
We do not consider poverty or 
deprivation a virtue. But we do 
reject prosperity as being an end 
in itself. 

Man has two sides to himself, 
his body and his spirit. Nourish- 
ment for one is not sufficient for 
nourishment of the other. No mat- 
ter how well fed the body is, the 
spirit can still be starved. And it 
is a starved spirit whose agony 
can be just as painful as a hungry 
body's. We all know that. Haven't 
we heard and repeated ourselves 
the old chestnut a million times, 
— and I hate to repeat it again: 
money does not buy happiness, or 
paraphrasing it: material fulfill- 
ment does not bring contentment. 



Dire Disease 

from Page 11) 

But, somehow, diat is a slogan we 
do not believe. Maybe it is true 
lor the next fellow — but if I had 
his money: oh. what I would do 
with it. How my discontent would 
evaporate. 

I think it is nol that we have 
to learn that the spirit needs to 
(Please Turn to Page 40) 




NURSERY SERVICE 

LANDSCAPING • DESIGNING- - PLANTING 

Contract Grading 
Seeding 
Pruning 

D. J. ROSE, Owner 



For beauty and permanence , 

BORDEN 

FACE BRICK 
BUILDING BRICK 
STRUCTURAL TILE 
DRAIN TILE 



1 














BRICK & TILE CO. 



GOLDSBORO 
RE 4-3771 
SANFORD DURHAM 



■October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



39 



Reform Rabbis and Intermarriage 



(Concluded from Page 19) 



colleagues do oliiciate at such mar- 
riages, starting with the fact that 
the Central Conference of Ameri- 
can Rabbis, the central agency, 
does not bar its members from 
officiating, though it does disap- 
prove of such marriages. 

One reason, he said, was that 
sometimes tremendous pressure is 
put on a Relorm rabbi to do so, 
pressure he cannot resist. Another 
is that rabbis "sincerely believe 
that by doing so, they are prevent- 
ing the couple from developing a 
hostile attitude toward Judaism.'* 

To the latter argument, Rabbi 
Klein retorted that "there is no 
evidence to prove that most mixed 
couples who are married by rabbis 
eventually cast their lot w^f.h Ju- 
daism and the Jewish people.'' In 
his own community, he reported, 
he knows of several such couples 
who became affiliated with church- 
es, while, on the other hand, "there 
are at least a hall-dozen couples, 
not married by rabbis, who have 
joined my congregation and are 
rearing their children in the Jew- 
ish faith." 

Rabbi Klein admitted there 
were other factors in the growth 
of such marriages, particularly 
"the complete freedom young 
American Jews have to meet and 
associate with young non-Jews" 
and "the whole process of assimil- 
ation that is rempant especially In 
isolated Jewish communities." 



Downtown Gulf 

Service Station 

"Your Car Is Our Concern" 

Front End Alignment 
Tune-Ups - Brakes Relined 
Washing - Waxing 
Bearings Packed 
Electronic Wheel Balancing 
Mufflers & Exhausts 
For Road Service 

Dial RE 5-1466 

100 E, Chestnut at S, Center 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



Recognition of such factors, he 
indicated, did not for him mini- 
mi/^ "the role some rabbis are 
playing, or are being forced to 
play, in die ever-growing tide of 
mixed marriage." By doing so, he 
aserted they are "unwittingly be- 
coming a dangerous element in 
the struggle for Jewish survival." 

As for the key question, "What 
is to be done about?" Rabbi Klein 
reported ;i conversation at a con- 
vention in Chicago with a friend 
who was the president of a subur- 
ban congregation in a huge east- 
ern community. The rabbi of the 
congregation was known to offici- 
ate at intermarriages. In the con- 
versation, said Rabbi Klein, he 
was informed that the rabbi was 
no longer with that congregation 
and he asked why. The friend told 
him: "We were petrified and terri- 
fied and that is why he is no long- 
er with us. This man was perform- 
ing 40 to 50 intermarriages a year 
and we were greatly alarmed over 
the damage this would do to the 
Jewish attitudes and loyalities of 
our children." 

Rabbi Klein's prescription was 
that "the best thing that could 
happen would be lor laymen to 
recognize the danger and start 
raising a howl, in much the same 
way as the congregation did when 
the people recognized the peril ot 
a rabbi who allowed himself to 
perform mixed marriages on a 
wholesale scale." 



Price's 




Service Station 

Washing - Waxing 
Oil Change - Brake Service 
Minor Repairs - Atlas Tires 
Batteries and Accessories 
TIRES REPAIRED 
ROAD SERVICE 

Dial RE 4-9911 

301 S, George 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



^DefluUoiity's 

CHARCOAL STEAK HOUSE 

SPECIALIZING IN 

GUARANTEED U.S. CHOICE & PRIME WESTERN B'EEF 
For Reservations — Dial 735-6671 
522 S. George Street Goldsboro, North Carolina 



J. P. TAYLOR C0. r INC. 



Ill E. Holly 



LEAF TOBACCO DEALERS 

GOLDSBORO, N. C. Dial HE 5-1581 



J. H. ASKINS, INC. 

PLUMBING AND HEATING CONTRACTOR 
Air-Conditioning & Heating 

Dial RE 4-4814 GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



Adamsville 
Upholstery Co. 

Foam Rubber Upholstering 
Free Pick-Up & Delivery 
Service 
Free Estimates 

734-4632 

Samples Shown in the Home 

A Fabric for All Types of 
Furniture, Cars & Car Tops 
108 Lee Dr. at Adamsville 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



HOWARD'S 
Esso Servicenter 

u-haul — 

TRAILER (£ SS o) 
RENTAL V 7 

Road Service — 1 Stop Service 
Front End Alignment 
Brake Service — Muffler Service 
Minor Repairs — Tune-Ups 

RE 4-9701 

2007 E. Ash 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



MOTORS 



Rebuilt • Repaired 

•Rewound 

DIXIE ELECTRIC 
MOTOR SERVICE 

Dial RE -V4381 
1005 N. William St. 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



S 

Tire Service, Inc. 

S. John Ext. 

Eastern Carolina's Largest 
Recapping Service 
Passenger & Fleet 
Road Service 
We Loan, Trade or Recap 
While You Wait 
Armstrong Tire Dealer 

Dial 734-2132 

GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



PRICE'S 
SPECIALTIES 

AWNINGS 

ALUMINUM - CANVAS 

735-4921 

1413 Snow Hill St. 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



Residential - Commercial 
Industrial 

Property Management 
Mortgage Loans 
Bonds & Insurance 

L. E, Summerlin 

Realty and Development Co. 

Dial 734-5461 

S. George 
Oak Forest Sales Office 

734-0544 
Nights - Sundays - Holidays Dial 
RE 5-4286 or 735-5139 

GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



Goldsboro 

Builders Supply 
Co., Inc. 

"Your One Stop 
Builders Supplier" 

118 S. Carolina Street 

Dial 734-4071 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



¥AGE 



Dial 734-3002 

Prompt - Courteous - Efficient 

228 N. John 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



<A0 



The j American Jewisn -TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



Personalized 
Hair Styling . . . 

For Your Best Reflection . . . 

Sunrise 
Hair Stylists 

RE 4-3747 

Sunrise Shopping Center 
N. Madison Ave. 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



Town H®yse Inn 

Downtown — Low Rates 

Guaranteed Satisfaction 

TV in Lobby - Air Condition 
If Desired - Single & Double 
Rooms - Weekly Rates 

Near Some of the Finest 
Restaurants 

734-9651 

300 S. Center 
If No Answer Dial 735-6991 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



Please Patronize 



COLONY 
GIFT SHOP 

"A, Gift for Every Occasion" 

116 S. Center St. 

JR. & ANNIE PATE, Owners 

Goldsboro, N. C. 
Phone RE 4-5061 



WALNUT STREET 
NURSERY 

Well Equipped and 
Protected Playground 
602 E. Walnut St. Dial 735-2208 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 

City 

Service Station 

BEST SERVICE IN TOWN 

Phone 735-0939 
Corner Mulberry & John St. 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 

GANT ELECTRIC CO. 

Wiring 
Maintenance & Repair 

1227 N.William Dial 5-2185 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



We Fill Any Doctor's 
Prescription 

Prompt Delivery Service 
*/4 Complete Drug Store" 

Drugs, Sundries and Cosmetics 

Jackson Drug Co. 

A. Jackson, Owner 

Phone RE 4-1622 

400 S. James 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



Dewey Brokers, 

Inc. 

FOUNDERS - MACHINISTS 
MILL SUPPLIES 

Dial RE 4-3411 

..-!:; .GOLDSBORO \\ C. 



Our Advertisers 

GoldsFsoETO Savings 
Ii®an Jls3®sia$s©Bfc 

: ; 130 S. John St. 




ACE 
MOVING COMPANY 

Local and Long Distance 
Moving 

312 N. Center Dial 735-1440 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



HOSPITAL FLORIST 

"OPEN SUNDAY" 
Diai 

.) 734-4415 
812 E. Ashe Across from Hospital 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



WALT'S AUTO SERVICE 

Road Service 
Pick Up & Delivery 

1101 N.William Dial 734-3726 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



Discontent - 
Dire Disease 

(Continued from Page 38) 
be led. I think we have to learn 
how to feed it. We are all aware 
of and adjusted to the fact that 
to acquire material affluence, we 
have to do so by the sweat of our 
brows. That we have to hustle and 
to sacrifice and to worry and to 
compete. We also know that the 
slightest slack throws us back a 
few notches mighty quickly. I 
know of very few people who 
maintain affluence in their spare 
time. Yet, when it comes to 
nourishing our spirits which com- 
prise at least half of our person- 
ality, we are perfectly satisfied to 
spend an occasional moment pick- 
ing up an easy crumb that lies 
conveniently around. Our discon- 
tent are the cries of starved minds 
and agonized souls. They want 
God and a knowledge of Him. 
They want love and the practice 
of it. They want wisdom and an 
enlargement ol it. They want 
peace and the enjoyment of it. 
None of these can be acquired 
on the run. 

Even our so-called escape from 
the rigors of daily living only ag- 
gravates our discontent. They con- 
tain too often the very same ab- 
rasive ingredients that make liv- 
ing so difficult. Competition oa 
the golf course Profit and loss at 
the card table. The creation and 
expression of hostilities as we are 
spectators at a sporting event. And 
now the latest escape: the purpose- 
ful manipulation of hysteria in 
our youngsters at the appearance 
of the Beatles. The excuse we 
hear about that is: well, we were 
no different. Didn't we go ga-ga 
over Frank Sinatra? We did, in- 
indeed. But there isn't that much 
to recommend our generation, in 
the first place. The twist may not 
be worse than the Charleston. But 
I had hoped that we would wish 
to produce a better generation 
than ours, not one that is hist as 
good — and I use the word good 
with much reservation If only we 
could escape to God with she same 
vigor, if only we were to escape 
to the study of philosophy with 
the same earnestness, even with 
half of it, as that with which we 
apply ourselves to the gratifica- 
tion of our bodies, our spirits 
would not be so starved nor would 
they cry out with such discontent. 
You think you cannot live with- 



BRYAN AUTO SALVAGE 
CO., INC. 

Leon A. Bryan 
Used Auto Parts Headquarters 
Mt. Olive Hwy P. O. Box 971 
735-1456 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



A-l SIGN COMPANY 

Specializing in 
SALES & SERVICE 

Dial 735-8974 
1221 N. Williams Street 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



HERBERT'S 
RADIO & TV SERVICE 

Herbert B. Little 
"Dependable Radio & 
Television Service" 

Used Radios and 
Televisions for Sale 



2003 S. Slocumb RE 4-0161 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 




SERVICE STATION 

Complete Car Service 
Open 7 Days 

734-9976 

Slocumb Ext. 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



A Thinking Fellow 
Rides A 



Yellow C 




Dial 734-0815 

24-Hour Prompt 
And Courteous Service 

GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



Worley Typewriter 
Exchange 

156 S. Center St. Dial RE 4-0845 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 

Goldsboro Insurance 
& Realty Company 

"Reliable Insurance Service' 
Fire — Casualty — Bonds 
Dial RE 4-3581 
GOLDSBORO, N. a 

Goldsboro 

Builders of Beauty 

ALL TYPES OF 
ORNAMENTAL PLANTS 
Landscaping Our Specialty 
Raleigh Hwy. Dial RE 5-2820 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



LITTLE'S T.V. 
& RADIO SERVICE 

T.V.-Radio & Phonograph 
Service 

Dial RE 5-0313 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



October. 1 96 j 



/7/c American Jewish 



JTIMES-OUTLOOK. 



41 




Isaac Franco, his wife Judith and son Joseph are shown after landing 
at Idlewild on the last leg of their journey from the Congo for reunion with 
Mr. Franco's brother and family in Atlanta. The Francos had been living 
in Elisabethville for more than 20 years. When trouble erupted in 1960, they 
consulted with a migration specialist of United Hias Service, the worldwide 
migration agency, who had been sent from New York to offer migration 
aid to members of the Jewish community. 



out a car, without a refrigerator, 
without other creature comforts. 
And >ou are probably right. I cer- 
tainly would not want to live with- 
out them. But, you think you can 
live without God, without faith, 
without religious responsibilities, 
without prayer, without gratitude, 
without humility, without justice. 

Well, you're wrong. That's why 
we are so discontented. We have 
no balance. And nature demands 
balance otherwise its component 



JOHN I. ELMORE 
INSURANCE AGENCY, Inc. 

GENERAL INSURANCE 
Day: 523-2113 
Night: JA 3-3226 
131 W. North St. Kinston, N. C. 



parts perish piece by piece. It has 
always been a source of wonder- 
ment to me that when, for in- 
stance, I cut myself, as 1 am sure 
you have done on occasion, very 
slightly, say, on my little finger. 
Well, how often do I use and for 
what significant purpose do I use 
my little finger. But, you soon 
find out the massive discomfort 
it produces, buttoning a shirt or 
holding a toothbrush under hot 
water. It is tbe same thing, when 

(Please Turn to Page 42) 



THE 

DECORATION SHOPPE 

Complete Interior 
Decorating Service 

Dial J A 3-29 54 
103 E. Peyton Ave. 
KINSTON, N. C. 



GRACE'S 
SANDWICH SHOP 

Fresh Daily 
706 N. Heritage 
523-5556 Kinston, N. C. 



i, N. C. 

(Concluded from Page 28) 
Our young college students have 
left for their respective schools, and 
we wish them a good year: Mr. 
Freddy Greenspon, UNC Dental 
School; Barry Greenspoon, to 
Long Island University, N. Y., to 
Tina Rothstein and Nancy Wein- 
stien to NC State; Claudia Buch- 
dahl to UNC-WC, David Buchdahl 
to John Hopkins University, 
among others. 

Rabbi Abe Schoen, the presi- 
dent and the board of trustees of 
the Synagogue, extend best wishes 
to all our friends for a Happy and 
Good New Year. 



"Everything From Foundation To Roof" 

Grady's Building Supply & Hardware 

Russwin Builders' Hardware — Du Pont Paints 
Johns Manville & U. S. Gypsum Products 
514 E. Vernon Ave. KINSTON, N. C. Dial J A 3-2156 



KINSTON, N. C. 



OGLFSBY COMPANY 

GROCERS — FRUIT — PRODUCE 

Wholesale Shopworth Food Stores 

"We Feed a Multitude" 



317 North McLewan 
Telephone JA 3-3108 



Kinston, N. C. 



Ml 




Individual Room 
Controlled Heat 
& Air Conditioning 
Wall-To- Wall Carpeting 

PHONE 527-2171 

Heritage at Peyton Avenue 



Room Phones 
Swimming Pool 
Lounge 
Television 



Kinston, N. C. 




Kinston s Leading Department Store 



KINSTON BUILDING SUPPLY CO. 

A Complete Lme of Building Material 
Get Our Prices Before Buying Anywhere 
400 N. Queen KINSTON, N. C. Dial JA 3-6129 



KING'S SHOPPING COMTEK 

GROCERIES and MEAT 

Restaurant - Dining Room - Barber Shop 
Cafeteria Service - Service Station 
409 New Bern Road (U. S. Hwy 70 East) 
Telephone 527-1168 Kinston, N. C. 



J. H. Evans & Son Construction Co. 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

205 S. Heritage St. KINSTON, N. C. 



JA 3-2557 



Myers-Nonis Plumbing & Heating Co. 

Commercial - Residential and Industrial 
Heating Systems Installed - Maintained 

Route 2, Box 118-H1 KINSTON, N. C. Dial 527-1275 



42 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



JACKIE HOWELL SCHOOL OF DANCING 

TAP — BALLET — BALLROOM 

REASONABLE RATES 
INDIVIDUAL ATTENTION EACH PUPIL 



Discontent - Dire Disease 

(Continued from Page 41) 



1517 West Road 



KINSTON, N. C. 



JA 3-4919 



W. ROY POOLE, INC. 

General Contractor and Real Estate Broker 

COMMERCIAL - RESIDENTIAL 



JA 3-6184 



211 E. Gordon Street 
(Perry - Wooten Bldg.) 



Kinston, N. C. 



BARBECUE LODGE 

For the Most Delicious Barbecue Pork and Chicken 
Prepared Just As You Like It 

Goldsboro Hwy. KINSTON, N. C. Dial JA 7-1279 



MIDYETTE HARDWARE CO. 

Building Materials 
Benjamin Moore Paints — Flinkote Roofing Materials 

111 N. Queen St. KINSTON, N. C. Dial JA 3-3742 



GARNER'S 
FUNERAL HOME, INC. 

Funeral Directors & Embalmers 

W. Peyton - Cor. Mitchell 

JA 3-2124 Kinston, N. C. 



33rd Anniversary 

G. W. CARTER 
TILE COMPANY 

502 E. Vernon Dial JA 3-3587 
KINSTON, N. C. 



EVERETT CONCRETE 



3408 Scott St. 



HUGH P. "DICK" EVERETT 

POURING and FINISHING 

KINSTON, N. C. 



Tel. JA 3-5691 



Hardy Texaco 
Service 

Minor Auto 
Repairs 
Gas - Oil 
Tires - Batteries 
A Complete 
Line of 
Groceries 

ROAD SERVICE 

Dial JA 3-2666 

Richlands Hwy. 
KINSTON, N. C. 




LANDSCAPING 

One of the Most 
Complete Stocks of 

Evergreens Pine Trees 
Camellias Shade & 
Azaleas Beauty Trees 

Rhododendron Hybrid 
523-3658 

Pratt's Nursery 

N. C. Hwy. No. 91-N. Queen St. 
Extension 
2 Miles North City Limits 
KINSTON, N. C. 



Duraclean 
Home Services 

Carpets and Furniture 
Cleaned in Your Home 

523-9512 

1102 Candlewood Dr. 
KENTSTON, N. C. 



Herring Gas 
Service, Inc. 

WHOLESALE & RETAIL 

• Metered Delivery 

• Gas Appliances 

• Gastobac Tobacco Curers 

• Home Heating 

Greenville Hwy. JA 3*6931 
KINSTON, N. C. 



we bruise our souls. Thev <jet to 
be out of order. We don't think 
we use them much, but when we 
hurt in spite of our seeming physi- 
cal well-being, it is our soul that 
hurts. 

If I knew how to feed our spirit 
so that contentment would warm- 
ly spread over us, I would gladly 
tell you. But I don't know for 
sure, myself. But I do know that 
the moments of my greatest con- 
tentment occur when 1 am im- 
mersed in the love of my family 
and friends, when I study the wis- 
dom of the ages, when I share 
whatever talents I possess with 
others and when I see them bene- 
fit from them, and when I catch 
a glimpse of the divine in a good 
deed or in a thing of beautv. Now, 
mind you, I have no hallucinations 
or visions, nor am I more percep- 
tive than you. But, I go conscious- 
ly looking for these things. 1 work 
at it with the same vigor with 
which I work at my job. And just 
as I have moments of discontent, 
but I am certainly not drowning 
in it, I know much contentment, 
too. 

I don't know how many peo- 
ple have told me: Rabbi, I would 
like to come to Temple, but it 
does not mean anything to me. 
I get nothing out of it. I would 
like to get contentment, but I 
can't find it. It isn't here ,you must 
bring it here. There is no deusex 
nihilo: something out of nothing. 
It may be latent within you and 
we can awaken it here. But you 
have to bring it and work at it 
yourself. Again our material world 
has taught us the truth of: there 
ir. no something for nothing. But, 
in the spiritual world we expect 
to get something out of nothing. 
I know others who say: Judaism 
holds no promise for me. What do 
I get out of it in terms of spiritual 
expectation? Other religions have 
fallen into the same trap to which 
materialism has already dragged 
us. They make promises. If you 
believe, then you will be saved. 
But that, too, like the hair tonic 
commercial is not always true. 
Thus, discontentment reigns <"v~n 
within the church. The religious 
revival of fifteen years ago has 
turned into a bust. Judiam 
promises you nothing beyond that 
which you must onerously achieve 
yourself. All it tells you is: that 



there is contentment, but that you 
must create it yourself. I set before 
you this day life and good, death 
and evil. Now, go and soil them 
out yourself. And do it the hard 
way. 

Just look at the difference be- 
tween the duration of the memory 
of a thing learned the hard way 
and that learned easily. The teach- 
er who made you dig for know- 
ledge is better remembered than 
the one who dished it out palat- 
ably. Yet, we want our children 
to learn Judaism the easy way, so 
that they shouldn't have to work 
so hard, so that they should have 
more time for hysterics over the 
Beatles and the watusi. When we 
read the shocking things about 
youngsters using goof-balls and 
barbiturates, all they are doing, 
they are looking for contentment 
in the wrong place. They are not 
motivated to scratch for it, so they 
swallow it the easy way. Why? Be- 
cause we are not teaching them 
how to scratch for it. W r e adults, 
by now, know to live with discon- 
tent and suffer with it, but these 
children don't know how and don't 
want to suffer. This matter of dis- 
content is then not something we 
can ignore, it is the malady of 
our time, more vicious than can- 
cer and more deadly and, unlike 
it, more contagious. Further, it 
has become, together with our 
goodi and ideas, America's most 
effective export. For the world, 
even the most tranquil parts of it, 
have caught the fever of our ma- 
terialism. They want to be like 
us. And the first thing in which 
they become like us is in our dis- 
content. 

We are always shocked to see 
these nations who have received 
such enormous aid from us dem- 
onstrate against us in the streets 
and villify us. But, isn't that just 
like us, to want more, to be un- 
satisfied. To have short memories 
of the good and long memories 
of the things in which we have 
remained unfulfilled? 

(Please Turn to Page 44) 

FRENCH BREAD 

AUNT JENNIE'S 
BAKE SHOP 

CAKES— PIES— ROLLS 

813 N. One*n St. D-'al J \ 3-4611 
KINSTON, N. C 



October. 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



43 




At the 51st annual meeting of the Anti-Defamation League of O'nai 
B'rith, held in New York, Senator Edward M. Kennedy called upon Ameri- 
cans to devote themselves to "the principles for which John F. Kennedy 
lived and to the eradication of the hatred and extremism that took him 
away." Senator Kennedy (center) spoke at breakfast session honoring Paul 
Samplinei' (left) for his leadership and guidance as chairman of the League's 
national campaign cabinet. Dore Senary, ADL's national chairman, made 
the presentation to Mr. Sampliner. 



Solomon Nunes Carvalho 



(Concluded 

As the story of the hazardous ad- 
venture spread, Fremont's reputa- 
tion as a daring romantic explorer 
captured the public imagination. 
Carvlaho enhanced his Colonel's 
fame by writing a book: Incidents 
of Travel and Adventure in the 
Far West; With Col. Fremont's 
Last Expedition Across the Rocky 
Mountains; Including three 
Months' Residence in Utah and a 
Perilous Trip Across the Great 
American Desert to the Pacific. 

In 1856, the newly formed Re- 
publican Party nominated Fre- 
mont for President. But for his 
antislavery views he might have 
defeated the pedestrian James Bu- 
chanan, and the name Abraham 
Lincoln would have remained un- 
known outside of Springfield. 111. 
Carvalho would probably have 
been a member of Fremont's 



from Page 11) 

cabinet. It is not really known. 

At all times Solomon Nunes 
Carvalho remained faithful to 
traditional Judaism. His articles 
in Leeser's Occident reveal con- 
cern over the assimilationist ten- 
dencies in the older strata and the 
leaning toward extreme reform 
in the more recent arrivals. In 
the early days of Los Angeles, he 
helped to form a Hebrew Benevo- 
lent Society for mutual aid and to 
bury the dead. In Baltimore and 
Philadelphia he took a leading 
part in Jewish communal and re- 
ligious life. While not a great ar- 
tist, his paintings are nevertheless 
sought after by collectors. They 
would deem it a fortunate stroke 
to find anything from the brush 
of the dashing artist who achieved 
fame as a pathfinder in a great 
American adventure. 



HENNIS FREIGHT LINES, Inc. 

Telephone: PArk 4-9211 Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Serving — North Carolina. South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, Maryland, 
Pennsylvania. New Jersey. New ''ork. Indiana. Ohio, Michigan. Illinois. 

WITH DIRECT CONNECTIONS TO THE EAST, WEST, 
AND NORTHWEST 




JARMAN 
FUNERAL mn 

24 Hour 
Ambulance Service 

DIAL 
JA 3-5143 

203 E. Blount 
KINSTON, N. C. 



CADILLAC 
OLDSMCBILE 
Sales & Service 

"Standard of the World" 

Massey 
Motor Co., Inc. 

Dial JA 3-61 1 1 

122 W. King Kinston, N. C. 



Carolina Cleaners 
and Laundry 

Complete Laundry Service 

Beautiful Cleaning 

"A Modern Plant for 
Quality Cleaning" 

Dial JA 3-2168 

121 N. Heritage 
KINSTON, N. C. 



FOR FUEL OILS 

DIAL JA 3-3126 

MARTIN OIL CO. 

Distributors of 




PRODUCTS 

KINSTON, N. C. 



Auto Generator 
Slarfer ! 



Alternator and Battery 
Service 
New Batteries 
Starters & Generator 

JA 7-0203 

123 W. Blount 
KINSTON, N. C. 



Skinner's By Pass 




Major 
Repairs 



Wheel Aligning 
Wheel Balancing 
Open 24 Hrs. 

Dial J A 7-1424 

GUY SKINNER, Owner 
1005 W. New Bern Rd. 
KINSTON, N. C. 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



Rider's Florist 

Complete Floral Service 
City Wide Delivery 

Dial JA 3-4353 

611 Abbott 
KINSTON, N. C. 



HOWARD'S 
TIRE SERVICE 

Dial JA 3-4912 
Greenville Hwy. & Park Ave. 
Kinston, N. C. 



Exteirininciiincp Co* 

Complete Pest Control 
429 N. Queen St. Dial 523-3480 
KINSTON, N. C. 



FOSTER REALTY CO., 
INC. 

A Complete Realty Service 
JA 3-2132 
109 E. North Street 
KINSTON, N. C. 



Kinston Shoe Hospital 

QUALITY 
SHOE REPAIRS 

113 E. North Street 
KINSTON. N. C. 



"Say It With Flowers" 

RANDOLPH'S 
FLORIST 

Dial JA 3-4148 
Day or Night 
~ 710 West Vernon Avenue 
KINSTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



44 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



Complete Line of Fancy & Staple 
GROCERIES 
Open Daily To 9 P.M. Including Sundays 

Dial GI 6-6618 

D JIVED HELL SUPER MARKET 



1308 Cokey Road 



Rocky Mount, N. C. 



CHAIR & EQUIPMENT RENTALS 

Banquet & Wedding Gift Tables - Party Supplies 
Folding Chairs - Hospital, Baby & Rollaway Beds - Wheel Chairs 

Most Anything Else You Need 

Highway 301 S. Bypass 442-6013 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



151 S. E. Main 



ROCKY MOUNT OPTICIANS 

RUSH SERVICE 
Ask About Sun Glasses In Your Prescription 
Ralph W. Wallace 
"Visit Us In Our New Location" 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



446-5825 



FLOWERS 

Rocky Mount Floral Co. 

A. R. Weathers 
Art In Flowers 

Greenhouse Shop 
GI 2-4158 

Main St. Store 
GI 6-6006 

430 E. Thomas Street 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



ROCKY MOUNT 

LANES 
RESTAURANT 

Open 24 Hours 
Breakfast - Lunch - Dinner 
Sandwiches 
Businessmen's Lunches 

Free Banquet Facilities 
Dial 442-7676 

Hwy. 301 N. Rocky Mount, N. C. 



Gb A s WiSkins 

Incorporated 

General Agent 
FIRE AND ALLIED 
LINES 

138 Howard St. Dial 6-6171 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



NTON'S 
Auto Paris 

Free Teletype Service 

RAY DENTON, Owner 
We Buy or Sell Used or 
Wrecked Automobiles & 
Trucks 

Dial GI 2-1186 
Call Us Before You 
Buy or Sell 
Tarboro Hwy. 

ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



dial GI (-4141 



Lumber 
Plywood 



Doors & Sash 
DuPont Paints 



Kitchen Cabinets 

CAROLINA 
Building Supply 
Company 

520 S. Grace St. 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



Ed fulhf 
Ess© Servicen 

(€ss^ 

AAA Service 
Mechanic On Duty 
Road Service 

GI 6-7319 

NEW LOCATION 
101 S, Church St. 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



Discontent - 
Dire Disease 

(Concluded from Page 42) 
We have to learn to take the 

long view, assuming that the world 
will not blow itself to pieces in 
the foreseeable future. The ex- 
cuse that we may as well make 
merry while we can, for tomorrow 
will not come, is no longer valid. 
Not all our desires will or can be 
fulfilled. The human dilemma is 
a permanent state and incapable 
of solution either now or ever, no 
matter what the politicians or the 
merchandisers promise. There is 
no escape from life, except through 
death. There is only contentment 
in the Talmudic exhortation, "to 
be joyful with one's lot." Not in 
terms of standing still, but in the 
dynamic sense. That we move 
ahead and pause to catch our 
spiritual breath, before under- 
taking the next step. There are 
philosophical and psychological 
aspects to prosperity. But we rare- 
ly bother to stop and think of 
them. How many times have we 
observed: ever since so and so got 
rich, he has changed. And so he 
has. And as he labored to resolve 
the one dilemma, he must labor 
to resolve the other. But the pros- 
pects are that another dilemma 
will take its place. It is this know- 
ledge which will bring a modicum 
of contentment to us. For it too 
will not be permanent. What 
makes us content today, will leave 
us unsatisfied tomorrow. And hist 
as material prosperity needs to be 
replenished, so must our spiritual 
resources be renewed. 

May this season of religious re- 
awakening serve us to this renewal, 
so that we may be strengthened to 
endure not only the trials which 
the coming year will surely bring, 
but that it may also strengthen us 
to endure the blessings, and 
we use the word "endure" inten- 
tionally, for they too impose bur- 
dens upon us — for which we plead 
this day, and some of which, hope- 
fully, will also be our portion. 



The late Pope Jorn XIII kept a 
diary showing that his predecessor, 
Pope Pius XII, struggled with the 
dilemma of speaking out vigorous- 
ly against the mass slaving of Jews 
by the Nazis. Pope John when he 
was Archbishop Roncalli sought 
to arrange a meeting in 1943 be- 
tween Chief Rabbi Isaac Halevi 
Herzog of Palestine and Pope 
Pius, 



BROWN 
MEMORIAL CO. 

Des gners & Builders 

of Distinctive 
Monuments Since 1910 

GI 2-4271 

Day or Night 
Sunset Avenue Ext. 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



P A I 

ANTIQ! 



ORE'S 
SHOP 



® Antiques 

• Reproductions 

• Accessories 

2800 Sunset Avenue 
Dial GI 2-1298 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



WRIGHT'S 
CHIC -SHACK MOTEL 

Catering to Colored Personnel 
Dial GI 6-9954 
501 Raleigh Road 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 




HOME 

SAVINGS 



and loan association 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 




October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



45 



Wilson Starter & 
Generator Service 

Generators, Starters, and 
Voltage Regulators Repaired 
or Exchanged 
Douglas Batteries 

90 Day Guarantee 

WHOLESALE - RETAIL 

DIAL 243-3347 
212 S. Goldsboro St. 
WILSON, N. C. 



A FRIEND OF 
ISRAEL 
URGES 
"BUY 
ISRAEL BONDS" 



BILL WHITFIELD'S 

Exclusive Cleaners 

725 S. Goldsboro Street 
237-2622 
WILSON, N. C. 



PLEASE PATRONIZE 
OUR ADVERTISERS 



HOME BUILDERS 
SUPPLY CO. 

Lumber — Millwork 
Building Materials 

Black Creek Rd. Dial 243-4225 
WILSON, N. C. 



FOR MUSIC 
in your home 

W. (. REID 
& COMPANY 

PIANOS 
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 

143 S. Main St. 
Dial GI 6-4101 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



The Preacher 
©I Lubno 

(Concluded from Page 13) 
debts were cancelled and he was 
actually given a new supply of 
goods. When one of the people at 
the inn heard this he rushed to 
the benefactor and he too cried 
very bitterly. He exclaimed his 
dire economic plight but was, how- 
ever, given a very small donation. 
The man brazenly remonstrated 
"The men who preceded me cried 
to you, and you were so generous 
and full of human pity. Why, I 
pray you are you so sparing with 
me?" "Well," said the wholesaler, 
"How dare you compare yourself 
to him? He was my reliable cus- 
tomer for many years; he was reg 
ular in his payments; he was hon- 
est, decent and hardworking; now 
that a calamity has overtaken him 
I naturally have to be generous 
and kind. However, I hardly know 
you, a complete stranger to me: 
how can you expect me to give 
more than a small donation?" So 
the Dubner said "Our fathers and 
forefathers were regular customers 
of the Almighty, and if in the 
course of the year, they committed 
sins of either omission or Com- 
mission, they were fully aware of 
(he credits and the dividends that 
(he Almighty owed them. What 
about ourselves? Are we God's 
customers? " 

These were some of the Mesha- 
lim through which the Dubner 
endeavored to bring back the 
children of Israel to their father 
in Heaven. 




Dr. Albert S. Sabin, developer of 
the live virus anti-polio vacine, was 
the speaker at the first National 
Leadership Conference of thel 
Friends of the Hebrew University, 
held in the Sheraton-East Hotel. 



ROCKY MOUNT -WILSON, N. C. 



MR - CARE, INC. 

AIR TAXI AND AIR CHARTER 

Twin Engine Air Ambulance 
Serving Eastern North Carolina 

ROCKY MOUNT MUNICIPAL AIRPORT 



IDEAL PLUMBING CO. 

PLUMBING CONTRACTORS 
State License No. 1288 
PLUMBING AND PLUMBING REPAIRS 
301 HIGHWAY SOUTH 24 3-5290 WILSON, N. C. 



Jones Cooling & Heating, Inc. 



Carrier 



646 S. Tarboro St. 



Contractors for Heating 
& Air Conditioning 

DIAL 243-5813 

Wilson, N. C. 



BOYKIN 
UPHOLSTERING 
SERVICE 

273-1463 
800 S. Goldsboro Street 
WILSON, N. C. 



LOU - ANN 
FLORIST 

Flowers for Every 
Occasion 
306 E. Green St. Phone 243-3930 
WILSON, N. C. 



DIAL 6-8101 

BLUE BIRD 
TAXI 

24 Hour Service 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 



I. W. Th urman <x oon 

North Carolina's Oldest 
Plumbing and Heating 
Contractors 

ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



WILLIAMS TRANSFER 
& STORAGE, INC. 

Agents For 
UNITED VAN LINES 
501 N. E. Main Street 
Dial GI 2-2067 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



Rocky Mount 
Seat Cover Center 

Furniture & Auto Upholstery 
Auto Interior Accessories 

Dial GI 6-9733 
1442 S. Church 



TARBORO STREET 
ESSO 

Complete Automotive Service 
General Repairs 
Dial GI 2-9998 
301 Tarboro 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



ROCKY MOUNT 
MEMORIAL COMPANY 

Designers & Builders 
of 

Distinctive Monuments 

Dial 446-8446 
N. Church Street, Ext. 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



MARSHALL'S 
CONCRETE WORKS, INC. 

Concrete Contractor 

Dial GI 2-4811 
West Mount Drive 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



RILEY'S 
AUTO REPAIRS 

Complete Auto Repairing 
Dial 442-5862 
355 S. Washington 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



46 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



Winsion-Salem, N. C, 




B'nai B'rith Members — Enroll Now for Major Medical Coverage 



OF OMAHA 



INSURANCE CO. 

Rislaarclson ^ffeatey of 

Winston-Salem, Ine. 

NORTH CAROLINA'S LARGEST HEALTH & ACCIDENT AGENCY 

Home Owned 

720 Peters Creek Parkway Winston-Salem, N. C. Dial PA 3-1854 
1856 Pembroke Road. GREENSBORO, N. C. 272-5695 



Staff* 

COMPLETE AUTO UPHOLSTERY — AUTO TOPS 

Dial PA 2-2817 N. Liberty St. Winston-Salem, N. C. 



ELLIS CYCLE CENTER 

SCHWINN SALES & SERVICE 

Repairs on Most Makes Bicycles & Tricycles 
126 N. Marshall Dial PA 2-4109 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



SALEM REFRIGERATION CO. INC. 

We Repair Commercial Refrigeration 
And Air-Conditioners 

1650 Hutton Street Dial PA 4-3431 WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 




WALL - TURNER CO. 



lyvtauiigm HEATING AND AIR-CONDITIONING 

CONTRACTORS AND ENGINEERS 
587 S. Stratford Road. Winston-Salem, N. C. Dial PA 4-0526 



WATSON INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

865-8586 201 E. Franklin Ave. 

GASTONIA, NORTH CAROLINA 



BARLOWE 
Painting Co. 

Over 35 Years Experience 

COMMERCIAL 
INDUSTRIAL 
RESIDENTIAL 

Dial UN 5-2144 
1220 Oakwood Ave. 
GASTONIA, N. C. 




Dial 864-3457 
1626 Wilkinson Blvd. 
GASTONIA, N. C. 



WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

MRS. STANLEY TULMAN, Correspondent 






MRS. MARTIN PAUL ROTHBURG 



Miss Sharon Lyn Taylor be- 
came the bride of Martin Paul 
Rothberg of Tampa, Fla., at 8 
p.m. August 15 at Temple Ira- 
anul. Rabbi David Rose officiated 
Mrs. Rothberg is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Isadore Harry Tay- 
lor of Winston-Salem. She is a 
graduate of Sophie Newcomb Col- 
lege at New Orleans, La., where 
she was vice-president of Sigma 
Delta Tau social sorority, presi- 
dent of the Panhellenic Council, 
secretary of Mortar Board, and a 
member of Kappa Delta Pi educa- 
tion honor society. She was elected 
to phi Beta Kappa. Who's Who 
Among Students in American Col- 
leges and Universities and the 
Tulaiv Hall of Fame. She will 
teach seventh grade English at 
Isidore Newman School in New 
Orleans this fall. 



Mr. Rothberg is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Nathan Rothberg of 
Tampa. He is a cum laude gradu- 
ate of the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences of Tulane University at New 
Orleans, where he was vice presi- 

Your Prescription Headquarters 

Patterson Drug Co. 

City-Wide Delivery 
112 W. Fourth Street 
Dial PA 2-7194 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



BALDWIN 

"SINCE 1862" 
Liberal Trade-In Allowances 

Moxley Piano Co. 

Dial PA 2-7381 673 W. 4th 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



FRANK VOGLER & SONS 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS — AMBULANCE SERVICE 
Dependable Since 1858 
Dial PA 2-6101 Winston-Salem, N. C. 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 
J 



47 



FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



WEIZMANN'S MEMORY HONORED 



POWELL - KISTLER & CO, 

Members of New York Stock Exchange 
and other principle Exchanges 



Listed Stocks 
Mutual Funds 



Over the Counter Stocks 
Bonds 



Dial HE 3-2146 114 Old Street Fayetteville, N. C. 

BRANCH OFFICES: 
Kinston, N. C. Norfolk, Va. Myrtle Beach, S. C. 

Charlotte, N. C. High Point, N. C. 



SAVE WITH PAGE 



Page Wholesale Building Supply 

INC. 

One Price To All — Lumber & Building Supplies 

131 Broad FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. Dial HE 3-2176 



Cape Fear Valley Coaches, Inc. 

CHARTERED BUS SERVICE 

P. 0. Box 368 Dial 485-2137 

FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



Charles Pearsall, Mgr. "Complete Pest Control Service' 

CAROLINA EXTERN! 



Small Monthly Terms to Meet Your Budget 

210 Facility Drive Fayetteville, N. C. 



North Carolina's Oldest Newspaper 



The Fayetteville Observer 



^al^aJieX 18/7 fe&ftjM£> ytf/l? 

Published Six Days Afternoons and Sunday Morning 



Fayetteville Laundry & Diaper Service 

Sterilized Diaper Service — Delivery Twice Weekly 
Diaparene Treated Diapers 
108 Drake FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. HE 2-3898 



Dial 693-3188 
LOUIS WILLIAMS & 
SONS, INC. 

Structural Steel - Chain - Bolts 
Pipe & Columns 

707-727 Seventh Ave. East 
HENDERSONVILLE, N. C. 



SKYLAND BATTERY & 
IGNITION CO. 

Dial 693-6537 
432 Kanuga Road 
HENDERSONVILLE, N. C. 




The Ninth Study Mission of the United Jewish Appeal, headed by 
Joseph Meyerhoff, lays a wreath on Dr. Weizmann's grave during a visit 
to the Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovoth, Israel. 



dent of the Student Union, vice 
president of Hillel, a member of 
the Tulane Honor Board, Alpha 
Epsilon Delta honorary pre-medi- 
cal fraternity and Omicron Delta 
Kappa national honor leadership 
society. He was elected to Who's 
Who Among Students in Ameri- 
can Colleges and Universities and 
Phi Beta Kappa. He will attend 
Tulane Medical School this fall. 

Given in marriage by her father, 
the bride wore a gown of ivory 
peau de soie, with a watteau train. 
Her veil fell from a scalloped 
crown of peau de soie, Alencon 
lace and seed pearls. She carried a 
cascade of phalaenopsis orchids, 
fleur d'amour and lilies-of-the- 
valley. 

Maid of honor was Miss Wendy 
Ludwig of Shaker Heights, Ohio. 
Bridesmaids were Miss Nancy Bur- 
gess; Misss Dale Blomberg of Ashe- 
ville, cousin of the bride; Miss 
Chary Rothberg of Philadelphia, 
Pa., cousin of the bridegroom; 
Miss Marjorie Eisen of Martins- 
ville, Va.; and Miss Margery Held 
of Brooklyn, N. Y. The attendants 
wore gowns of pink satin with 
matching cluster headpieces. They 
carried crescents of pink carna- 
tions and sweetheart roses. 

The bride's cousin, Linda Levin 
of Charlotte, was flower girl and 
Scott Bresler of New Orleans was 
ring bearer. 

Ronnie Rothberg of Tampa 
was his brother's best man. Ushers 
were the bride's brother, Dr. Da- 
vid Taylor of Coral Gables, Fla.: 
Robert Adler, Richard Stein, Mar- 
ty Solomon and Carl Zielonka, all 
of Tampa; and Larry Neuman of 
Lexington, Ky. 



The bride's parents gave a re- 
ception in the ballroom of the 
Hotel Robert E. Lee after the cere- 
mony. After a wedding trip to 
Miami, Fla., the couple is residing 
in New Orleans. 

This summer has seen the mar- 
riage of several of our local young 
people. We would like to welcome 
the bride of Murray Politis, the 
former Miss Kay Bendheim of 
Richmond, Va. The wedding took 
place in Richmond Aug. 15. 

Our most recent newly-weds are 
Bruce Cooper, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Louis Cooper of Winston-Salem, 
and the former Nancy Carlin of 
Charlotte. The wedding took place 
in Chapel Hill Sept. 1. 

Best wishes to all these 1 . young 
couples for a long healthy and 
happy life together. 

Friends and neighbors of Mrs. 
Sam Katzin have been congratulat- 
ing her on the many fine programs 
to appear lately on .national TV 
written by her son-in-law Stephan 
Chodorov. The most recent of 
these was the hour-long program 
Sunday morning, Sept. 6th, titled 
"Out of the Ashes" on CBS. To 
write this most interesting pro- 
gram about the Jews of Holland, 
Steph and Rachel made a trip to 
Amsterdam last month. 

The sympathy of the community 
goes out to Dr. and Mrs. H. M. 

(Please Turn to Page 54) 

Do Your Part! 

Contribute to the North 

Carolina Home for the 
Jewish Aged 



48 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 




Call On Us for Quick Service 
on: 

RING HOLDERS 
BOBBIN SHAFT GEARS 
BOBBIN GEARS 
SPINDLE SHAFT GEARS 

MACHINE AND 
FOUNDRY CO. 
GASTONIA, N. C. 



KLUTTZ 



FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 

MRS. ALEX WAITMAN, Correspondent 



McWillan-Shuler Oil Co., Inc. 

FOR FUEL OIL 

DIAL HE 3-2161 fSHELLj 
Automatic Ticket Printing Metered Trucks >^M/^f 
— Government Inspected — 

708 S. Winslow St. — Fayetteville, N. C. Petroleum Products 



L. B. CLARDY CO. 

Distributors of 
FINE CIGARS AND SCHRAFFT'S 
FANCY CANDIES 
20 Irvine Street Dial CE 2-7324 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 




Your Reliable Realtor 
& Quality Builder 
We Build - Buy - Sell & Trade 
Insurance & Property 
Management 
Commercial & Residential 
J. J. Vick W. C. McPhail 

Eddie Parker Ray Dillard 
Dave Dorsey J. A. Hubbard 



Dial HU 4-1121 



Hubbard 
Realty Co., Inc. 

Haymount Point 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



LET US MAKfi YOUR 
TRAVEL RESERVATIONS 
ANYWHERE JN THE 
WORLD 



CALL 
HE 3-2730 




"Your 
Travel 
Agent" 



VERA BULLA 
Travel Bureau 

Prince Charles Hotel Bldg. 
Fayetteville, N. O. 




FAIRES, INC. 

Mobile Home & Travel 
TRAILER HEADQUARTERS 
Sales — Service — Accessories 
FAYETTEVILLE 
CHARLOTTE JACKSONVILLE 
NORTH CAROLINA 



M. and 0. 

CHEVROLET CO. 

SALES -:- SERVICE 

427 FranK^ St. Dial HE 3-1655 
FA YE .EVILLE. N. C. 



Hamont 
Gull Service 

R. B. GUNTER 
100 Broadfoot Dial HU 4-6241 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



940 on your dial 

WFNC 

Now 10,000 Watts 

CAPE FEAR 
Broadcasting Co. 

FAYETTEVM.I E. N. C. 



Stuart Martin 

Interior Decorator 

Residential — Commercial 
DECORATIVE FABRICS 

CUSTOM CREATED 
• Draperies • Slip Covers 

• Bedspreads • Rugs 
• Accessories 

1218 Ft. Bragg Rd. 
Dial HU 4-2980 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 




MRS. STEPHEN ALAN SUGAR 



Miss Phyllis Friedman, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Friedman 
of Lumbrton, N. C. and New 
York, became the bride of Stephen 
Alan Sugar, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Emanuel Sugar of Lumberton, on 
Aug. 30, in a candlelight ceremony 
at Beth Israel Synagogue. Rabbi 
Henry Ucko and Rabbi Samuel 
Friedman, Wilmington, N. C. of- 
ficiated. Miss Cynthia Friedman, 
sister of the bride, was maid of 
honor. Bridesmaids were Miss San- 
dra Friedman, Hollywood, Cali- 
fornia, Mrs. David Corn of Flem- 
ington, N. J., sisters of the bride. 
Miss Marsha Fleishman of Lum- 
berton, Miss Rosyln Fleishman of 
Fayetteville, Miss Frances Sugar of 
St. Pauls, Miss Cheryl Fleishman 
of Wilmington was junior brides- 
maid. Miss Donna Sugar was flo- 
wer girl and Neil Fleishman and 
Mitchell Sugar were ring bearers. 
Dennis Sugar was his brother's best 
man. Ushers were Daniel Fried- 
man, brother of the bride, Dr. 
David Corn, Stephen Scherman, 
Alan Gutschmit, Hyman Fleish- 
man and Stuart Fleishman. 

The bride's parents entertained 
after the cermony with a buffet 
dinner served in the Center. The 
couple will reside in Lumberton 
following a wedding trip to Puerto 



Rica. Mr. and Mrs. Leon Sugar of 
Fayetteville, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley 
Sugar and Mrs. Joe Sugar of St. 
Pauls, and Mr. and Mrs. Ernest 
Fleishman of Lumberton hosted 
dinner at Bob Kleha's after rehear- 
sal, and Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Fleishman, Mr. and Mrs. Monroe 
Evans, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rul- 
nick entertained with a wedding 
breakfast for the wedding party 
and out-of-town guests. 

Mazel Tov to Mr. and Mrs. Har- 
ry Satisky on the engagement of 
their son Howard to Miss Lynne 
Rothstein of Raleigh. Lynne is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Al Roth- 
stein. 

Heartiest Congratulations to 
Mr. and Mrs. Ronnie Soloman up- 
( Please Turn to Page 70) 



Akers Center 
Barber Shop 

EXPERT SERVICE 

Aker's Center 
GASTONIA, N. C. 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 



49 



What's Borthering The Jews? 



(Continued from Page 32) 



The striving to be like his white 
Protestant American neighbor is 
reflected in all aspects of his social 
and organizational lite, starting 
with the strain on his Judaic value 
system and stretching to the archi- 
tecture of the new synagogue or 
temple. 

One gets the impression that 
there exists an inverse ration of 
size of community to t he degree 
of survival strain. For example, 
this ambivalence is uniquely cri- 
tical and painful as parents face 
the necessity for making decisions 
about their youngsters' dating. In 
the big city, with large numbers of 
potential Jewish spouses, the par- 
ents seem to have less concern 
about intermarriage or teendating 
of non-Jews as compared to the 
parents in smaller Jewish commu- 
nities where the social life, of ne- 
cessity, goes beyond the primary 
ethnic and religious group. The 
open membership country club, 
'or which our defense agencies 
'.oiled so assiduously, leaves the ac- 
culturation door wide open. Once 
the Jew is acceptd into the Green 
Hollows of our land, he then finds 



Moving - 



Local and World Wide 




HALEY 

Transfer & Storage 

Agents of 
ALLIED VAN LINES 



World's Largest — Most 
Trusted Movers 

Storage - Packing - Crating 
Heavy Machinery Moving 

Dial : Day 
882-6320 or 882-9615 
Night: 882-1229 

105 S. Centennial 
HIGH POINT, N. C. 



himself in the anomalous position 
of enjoying his new status but 
at ihe same time wanting his chil- 
dren "not to forget that they're 
Jewish. " 

I have used the country club 
and the teenager to illustrate this 
point. Almost any facet of the life 
of the American Jewish family 
could have served my purpose, for 
the hard-won freedom of the Jew 
to participate in the social, politi- 
cal, professional and business life 
of liis community is accompanied 
by an unexpected Fear. Can a 
people who have survived centu- 
ries of persecution and attack, 
who carried the Book with them 
across the miles and years of wan- 
dering, can we now with equal 
heroism and fortitude survive 
success, Ihe irony of needing a 
substitute for anti-Semitism to 
maintain the bond that makes us 
a people escapes few with whom 
I have talked. 

There are those who welcome 
the "escape-hatch" which the po- 
sition of the few in America seem, 
10 provide and who anticipate the 
disappearance of the Jewish com- 
munity within two generations. 
There are others who appraise the 
situation in the same way and 
fear their conclusion, and there 
are still others who see a parallel 
between the 1960s in Germany. 
"We have it too good, it can't last." 
Whatever the conclusion, the am- 
bivalence about Jewish life in an 
open society is a recurrent theme. 

There is about in our land a 
seemingly chronic Jewish leader- 
ship problem that provides the 
setting for yet another emotional 
tug of war. The early German- 
Jewish leaders of America helped 
settle and Americanize the East 
European Jewish immigrant of 
the 1900s, who then turnd about 
the displaced his benefactors by 
also assuming, in a qualitative way, 
the leadership roles in the short 
space of 50 to 60 years. 

Now we find the first and sec- 
ond generation native-born Jew- 
with his new social position, educa 
tion and middle-class values again 
replacing the immigrant father 
and grandfather. The ambiva- 
lence occurs not only in the feel- 
ing of leadership displacement but 
in the deeper feeling that both need 
each other on the community lea- 
dership level, yet each exhibits 



HIGH POINT, N. C, 




The High Point Enterprise 

DAILY and SUNDAY 
HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 



J. B. WHITE CONSTRUCTION CO. 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 
Distributor for Inland Steel Building Systems 

515 South Hamilton Phone 883-4327 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 



Every drop is fresh off 
nearby farms 



farmers 
dairy 




GRADE A 
PASTEURIZED 
HOMOGENIZED 
-VITAMIN.D . 



DOBBINS ELECTRIC CO. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

RESIDENTIAL — INDUSTRIAL — COMMERCIAL 
Call 888-5226 HIGH POINT, N. C. 412 N. Wrenn St. 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



Southern Motors, Incorporated 

CHRYSLER — PLYMOUTH — VALIANT 
Automotive Sales and Service 

Be sure to see the All New 1965 Chrysler 
Now On Display 



Telephone 882-3375 2100 S. Main St. 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 



50 



The American Jewish, 



1 IMJib-UU 1 LUUK 



October, 1964 



E. E. YOUNTS, 
Inc. 

General Contractors 

725 West Grimes Ave. 
HIGH POINT, N. C. 
Phone 882-8149 



Williams Flowers 
& Gilfs 

4018 N. Main 
HIGH POINT, N. C. 

24 Years of Dependable 
Service for All Occasions 

Phone 888-5011 



Caldwell Stamp 
& Printing Co. 

Rubber Stamps and 

Printing 

209 E. Russell Dial 883-1976 
HIGH POINT, N. C. 



COMPLETE RADIATOR 
SERVICE 

Holt Radiator 
Repair 

203 West Green St. 

Phone 888-5693 
HIGH POINT, N. C. 



R&H 
Insulation Co. 

Insulation and 

Weather Stripping 

Call Day or Night 

888-5628 
882-9200 

Box 5071 High Point, N. C. 



United Waste 
Materials Co. 

All Types of Waste Paper 

Mill Waste - Wiping Rags 
Bagging, Etc. 
Phone 883-5221 
611 S. Hamilton Street 
HIGH POINT, N. C. 



feelings, ol impatience with the 
other. ; How many times one hears 
the. remark from the elder com- 
munity statesman that "It's Lime 
to let the younger men take over." 
Yet often, when the chips are 
down, it's either the money or the 
power of the "older leaders" that 
must be called into the communal 
arena so that the dreams of the 
younger men may become realities. 

A third kind of ambivaience 
the question of whether the race 
is worth the candle - the Jew 
shares with his white, Protestant. 
American neighbor in suburbia. 
Both are plagued with the same 
nagging sell-doubts, the same re- 
view of the ledger ol life, measur- 
ing whether the prize is worth its 
cost. Again, though, the millenial 
o! the Jew seems to operate to add 
some extra decibles to the pain 
he feels. Not by accident is the 
current literature of alienation so 
dominated by the young Jewish 
authors and no dialogue seems 
'cjuite'so poignant as that between 
the successful business man of the 
midwest trying desperately to ex- 
plain to his son in New York thai 
he, too, knows about despair. 

The State of Israel provides 
the fourth item on the agenda of 
ambivalence by the American 
Jew. Interestingly, the specter of 
dual loyalty is not the paradox to 
be wrestled with but the more mun- 
dane and more easily understood 
problem of dividing the philan- 
trophic dollar between local Jew- 
ish social welfare needs and the 
needs of our people overseas. 

Communities have been split 
asunder and one still finds deep 
scars on the hide of some commu- 
nities after "that" allocations 
meeting. And if this were not 
enough for the allocators to wres- 
tle with, we now have rising — 
and quite rapidly — on the fund 
raising horizon, the Jew who must 
decide how to divide his dollar 
between a host of general com- 
munity projects and organizations, 
in addition to his local and over- 
seas Jewish requests. 

It is not only funds which must 
be allocated and which communal 
agencies compete for; bitter battles 
are fought for the time and alle- 
giance of the "leader. " Thus many 
Jews find themselves burdened by 
competing — and sometimes des- 
parate — demands on money, loy- 
(Please Turn to Page 55) 



PURCELL SUPPLY COMPANY 



Carrier 



Plumbing, Heating, and Air 
Conditioning Service 
and Installation 



725 West Green St. High Point, N. C. Phone 882-1411 



Commercial Bankir.g & Insurance 

High Point Bank & Trust Company 

Incorporated 1905 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 



Biackwell Insurance Agency, Inc. 

Insure — Stav Insured & Rest Assured" 



724 English Street 



Phone 888-7932 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 



SUPERIOR SIGN COMPANY 

BUILDERS OF SUPERIOR SIGNS FOR 15 YEARS 

Phone 882-2226 HIGH POINT, N. C. Greensboro Rd. 



MOBIL PAINT STORE 

HIGH POINT'S COLOR CENTER 
A COMPLETE LINE OF PAINTS AND WALLPAPER 

1645 English Street r Phone 882-9327 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 



Ceramic Tile 



Pre Cast Terrazzo 



Marble Terrazzo 

Southeastern Marble & Tile Co., Inc. 

CONTRACTORS 

1233 Montlieu Ave. High Point, N. C. 

S. Taro Phone: 883-1720 - 882-3811 Charles Taro 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



Hall 

Printing Co 




THE BEST IN 
COMMERCIAL PRINTING 
882-2116 Phone 882-1314 
HIGH POINT, N. C. 



HIGH POINT 
CANVAS SHOP 

Awnings — Truck Covers 
Furniture Pads 

335 W. Burton 
Dial 88 8-4306 
HIGH POINT, N. C 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



5] 




Leading - scientists from Israel and the United States addressed the Sixth 
Annual Conference on Science and Technology in Israel and the Middle East, 
held in New York, under the auspices of the American Technion Society, 
which provides financial and technical assistance to Technion, Israel In- 
stitute of Technology, located on Mount Carmel in Israel. Top row, left to 
right, Dr. Morris Ettenberg, Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, Dr. Guido E. 
Hilbert, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Dr. Markus Reiner, one of the 
Technion's leading research scientists. Bottom row, Charles Bartfeld, head 
of the Israel Students Organization in U. S., Dr. Seymour Jeffries, chief 
executive of top American pharmaceutical company and Dr. Amihud Kramer. 



Man For All Seasons 



(Continued from Page 27) 



Prior to the High Holy Days 
pic Jewish chaplain conducts 
special institutes and makes avail- 
able special bulletins. Typical of 
the interest these activities inspire 
is the experience with the challahs. 
No round challahs were in pros- 
pect several days prior to last 
Rosh Hashanah. The wife of a 
dentist stationed at Fort Lee of- 
fered to instruct any interested 
women in the art of baking chal- 
lah. A suprisingly large number 
of girls turned up at her kitchen 
one morning and then spent most 
of the day running between Bre- 
/ak's Bakery and their own homes 
to practice what they had just 
seen demonstrated. Dough began 
fc' rise all over the post. Emer- 
gency phone calls went from one 
Jewish home to another. A frantic 
search was made for containers 



large enough to hold a challah 
lecipe that called for 10 cups of 
flour. Brand new plastic garbage 
pails saved the day. Even at 11 
P.M. the dentist's wife was still 
racing around Fort Lee to help 
solve challah-baking problems. 

The golden challahs that dec- 
orated Jewish tables at Fort Lee 
on Rosh Hashanah gave the Jew- 
ish military families a greater feel- 
ing of Yom Tov because they had 
been involvd in the preparations. 
Two other military wives, both in 
their twenties, spent a day in the 
kitchen of a home at a nearby 
Federal reformatory up to their 
elbows in chopped herring to pre- 
pare for the Jewish Chapel's 
l:reak-the-fast dinner. 

At Sukkot, a committee of the 
Chapel's Jewish Women's Guild 
was busy decorating the Sukkah. 



ASHEVILLE 
BALLET SCHOOL 

Home Of 
Asheville Ballet Guild 
90 y 2 Patton Avenue 

252-9636 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



BUY ONE 
GET ONE FREE 

MARY CARTER'S 
PAINTS 

Dial 254-7955 
49 Coxe Avenue 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



ARCADIA DAIRY FARMS 



651 Haywood Road 



AL 2-1991 



West Asheville 

Asheville, N. C. 



heville, N. (, 



HENDERSON CONSTRUCTION CO. 

• CONSTRUCTION • REMODELING 

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL 



Dial AL 2-5163 
Wentworth Rd., Rt. 5, Box 350 



Asheville, N. C. 



Carl N. Bean Tile & Marble Co. 

CLAUDE E. BROCK, Owner 

ASPHALT - CERAMIC - TERRAZZO 

DIAL AL 3-5591 

3 Beaver Valley Road Asheville, N. C. 



R. L Miller 
Plumbing Co, 

Specialist in 
New Construction 

18 Yrs. Exp. Work Guaranteed 
Commercial & Industrial 
Maintenance 
BIDS WELCOME 
N. C .State License 2178 

Dial 667-1481 
Holbrook Road 
ENKA, N. C. 



ASHEVILLE 

Union Bus Station, Inc. 

Information — 
Tickets & Tours 
Via Carriers Listed Below 

Greyhound Lines 

Trailways 
Independent Lines 

253-5353 

33 Coxe Ave. 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



Asheville 
Bowling Center 

Open Bowling 24 Hrs. A Day 
Reduced Trices To Students 
Till 6 P.M. 
Free Instruction 
Pro-Shop 
Ball Drilling & Repairing 
At Intersection of Hwy. 70 and 
Hwys. 25-19-23 North 
51 Merrimon Ave. 

252-2429 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



Bennett's Motel 

Four Blocks from Downtown 

Restaurants Across Street 

Private Heated Pool 
Free TV - Air Conditioned 
Inn Room Coffee - Family 
Units - Carpets 

On Hwys. 19-23-25 & 70 N. 
107 Merrimon Ave. 254-5306 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



S. W. HARRINGTON, INC. 

New — Used — Rebuilt 
MACHINERY — MOTORS — MILL SUPPLIES 

Acetylene and Electric Welding 
71 Thompson, Biltmore Dial AL 3-4752 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



ALBERT HERMAN 



PAINTING 

11 Lakeshore Drive 



PAPERING & DECORATING 

I 1 AL 2-8442 Asheville, N. C. 



52 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 10,64 



NEWBRIDGE 
SERVICE 

Arnold Dorsey, Owner 
Road Service - Repairs 
Mechanic on Duty 
Complete Auto 
Repair Shop 
Motors - Transmissions 
Generators - Starters 
Tune-Ups - Brakes 
Radiator Repairs 
252-9530 



1475 Merrimon Ave. 
Newbridge 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



at 



WHITT'S 

ESSO SERVICE 

Formerly Owen's Esso 




We Steam Clean Motors & Chassis 
7:00 A.M. - 9:00 P.M. 
Sundays 8:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M. 
ROAD SERVICE 
"Your Car Is Our Concern" 

252-9506 
Haywood Rd. & Roberts 
130 Roberts 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



CARLYLE E. SNUFFER 

BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

Crestwood Lane 
Phone 667-3025 
ENKA, N .C. 



PISGAH CAFE 

Dining Room & Curb Service 

139 Patton Ave. 
Phone 252-9425 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



BEN'S 
AUTO SERVICE 

Transmission - Auto Repairs 
McDowell St. at Southside 
Phone 252-9775 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



ASHEVILLE 
TRUCK SERVICE 

TRUCKS REPAIR 
& SERVICE 



252-5380 



Asheville, N. C. 



OPEN KITCHEN 

Catering - Private - Business 

941 Riverside Dr. 
252-9277 Asheville, N. C. 



Viviane Woodard 

COSMETIC STUDIO 
"Beauty Has A Thirst 

For Moisture" 
No Lady's Wardrobe is 
Complete Without 
Viviane Woodard Cosmetics 
Everything A Lady Needs . . . 
In Any Shade 
Free Demonstrations 
Inquire About Our 
Home Demonstrations 
The Cosmetic Approved 
By The Society of Make-Up 
Artists 
Now Allergenic 

254-3145 
104 Westgate Shopping Center 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



MUFFL 



Guaranteed 
For As Long As 
You Own Your Car 
FAST - FREE 

15-Minute Installation ! 
LIFE TIME GUARANTEE 

Muffler Shop 

(Next to Eddie Joyner's) 
1050 Patton Ave. AL 3-5682 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



JARRETT'S 

PRESS, INC, 

COMMERCIAL AND 
ADVERTISING PRINTERS 

Quick Service 

23 S. Lexington Ave. 

Dial AL 3-6131 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



GRAY REALTY & 
INSURANCE CO. 

Rentals - Sales 

Insurance 
41 Montford Ave. 
253-1626 Asheville, N. C. 



TOMMY'S ESSO 
SERVICE STATION 

AL GARLAND, New Owner 
100 Montreat Road 
669-8851 Ashevlile, N. C. 



THE MILLER 

PR T NTING CO. 

, Printers — Lithographers 

Binders 
15 Rankin Ave. AL 3-2366 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



Driving by the Chapel one could 
sec strollers, toddlers, playpens, a 
store-ful of toys and lots of little 
teeth biting into fruit and vege- 
table', meant for hanging — not 
to mention the patter of little 
feel, under ladders. Who can for- 
get the scene at the housing area 
during Hal Hamoed when the 
Jewish chaplain visited many 
homes with an ethrog and lulav 
and joined with individual fami- 
lies in reciting the prayers to 
achieve fuller understanding and 
appreciation of the festival. 

What is Simhat Torah anywhere 
in the world without flags and 
apples and treats? Fort Lee's Jew- 
ish Chapel left nothing for the 
Jewish army brat to desire, either 
on Simhat Torah or on Hanukah. 
The Jewish Women's Guild tries 
constantly to offer GI children 
the most meaningful Jewish, ex- 
periences, especially at holiday 
time. The special gifts provided 
by Serve-a-committees of JWB's 
Womn's Organizations' Services 
are the highlights of Purim and 
Hanukah parties. Last year a 
menorah was made from a mortar 
shell casing and bullet shells from 
an M-l rifle. Where else but on 
an Army post would the majority 
of the members of a Jewish com- 
munity unite on the first night of 
Hanukah for an outdoor candle- 
lighting ceremony — the Menorah 
being produced by the Post En- 
gineer — and a song-fest? Not 
everything is for the children. 
The adult Jewish community cel- 
ebrated Hanukah at a dinner and 
midnight dance held at the local 
synagogue. At affairs like these 
the tight bonds uniting our com- 
munity are reaffirmed. 

On a military post, too, the 
birth of a new baby in the Jewish 
community is always a wonderful 
experience as evidence of the com- 



Since 1930 

Duraclean Rug & 
Unholsfery 

Clears 

is the ONLY carpet and 
upholstery cleaning service 
ever to receive 
3 famous seals! 
HERB JOHNSON, Owner 
Free Estimates 
Day or Night 254-3878 
68 Greeley W. Ashe 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



munity's growth. When there is- 
a brit, everyone is invited, and 
everyone comes, even non-Jewish 
company commanders and senior 
officers. The entire community 
comes to the Jewish Chapel 
on S h a b b a t when a new 
baby girl is named. At a Bar Mitz- 
vah service not too long ago we 
welcomed the commanding gen- 
eral and his wife to the Jewish 
Chapel. Some well-meaning mem- 
ber of the congregation handed 
the general a pink yarmulka. This 
was the same general who had 
told me, on my first official call, 
about his experiences as a "shab- 
bos gov" in Boston. 

What does the Jewish chaplain 
do, people ask. He finds an apart- 
ment for a young couple and their 
infant who have just arrived from 
Boston and have no place to live. 
(Please Turn to Page 61) 




R. Sargent Shriver, Director of 
the United States Peace Corps, to- 
gether with Mrs. Shriver, were co- 
chairmen of the Israel Independence 
Ball, held on June 7 at the Sherar 
ton Park Hotel in Washington, D. C 



ASHEVILLE 



r 



GUARANTEED WELDING 
"Satisfactory Service Since 1919' 
13 Southside Dial AL 3-8191 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



Floor Covering Co. 

21 Broadway 
Dial AL 3-3411 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



Fred Mutton's 

Esso 
Service Station 

76 Biltmore Ave. Dial AL 2-9882 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



October j 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



53 



CHARLESTON, S. C. 



Lasi year's Outstanding Charles- 
ton Jewish Woman will head the 
United Fund Individual Division 
campaign, which began Sept 21. 

Mrs. David S. Goldberg, mother 
of three and an active participant 
in civic affairs, was named to the 
position by Thomas E. Thornhill, 
Torch Drive chairman. 

David Furchgott, a son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Max Furchgott, 19 Tar- 
leston Drive, South Windermere, 
has returned from the Union of 
American Hebrew Congregation 
Camp-Institute at Cleveland, Ga., 
where he was elected president of 
the Southeast Region of the Na- 
tional Federation of Temple 
Youth. Mr. David Shulman a son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Shulman 
of Byrnes Down, was elected to the 
office of treasurer. 

Mrs. Margot S. Freudenberg of 
107-F Ashley Ave. attended the 
Congress of Physical Medicine and 
Rehabilitation in Boston. 

We would like to take this op- 
portunity to extend congratula- 
tions and best wishes to the young 
couples and their families on re- 
cent weddings. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Shorago 
now of Miami, Fla. Mrs. Shorago 
is the former Phyllis Rundbaken, 
daughter of Pearl and Abe Rund- 
baken. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jay Feinberg of 
Baltimore. Mrs. Feinberg is the 
former Judith Hyatt of Baltimore, 
and Jay is the son of Minnie and 
Morris Feinberg. 

Mr. and Mrs. LeRoy Rosenberg 
of Fort Hood,, Texas. Mrs. Rosen- 
berg is the former Cheryl Binder 
of Gastonia, N. C, and LeRoy is 
the son of Jennie and Harry Ro- 
senberg. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joel Doobrow of 
Charleston. Mrs. Doobrow is the 
former Phylis Levy of Augusta, 



ROBERT W. TURNER 
AGENCY 

Real Estate & Insurance 
744-7431 
3983 Rivers Avenue 
CHARLESTON HEIGHTS, S. C. 



Ga., and Joel is the son of Gussie 
and Louis Doobrow. 

Mr. and Mrs. Merwyn Rabino- 
witz of Atlanta, Ga. Mrs. Rabino- 
witz is the former Lynn Rachelson 
of Atlanta and Mervyn is the son 
of Rosalie and Louis Rabinowitz. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Rundbaken, 
now of Jacksonville, Fla. Mrs. 
Rundbaken is the former Linda 
Blum of Sumter and Paul is the 
son of Pearl and Abe Rundbaken. 

We bring good wishes and con- 
gratulations to Shul Secretary 
Sam Rosen and his wife, Brenda, 
on the birth of their first child, 
Adam Jamie, and to the grand- 
parents. Joan and Walter Fox wel- 
comed their fifth child and second 
daughter, Jennie Rachel. To them 
and the grandparents, a hearty 
Mazel-Tov. 

Mazel tov to Mr. and Mrs. L. 
LeRoy Silverstein on the engage- 
ment of her daughter, Ellaleah 
Coplan to Nickie Bluestein, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Bluestein 
and grandson of Mrs. Bessie Blue- 
stein. 

BAR MITZVAHS 

Mjazel-tov to Marshall Berry, 
whose Bar Mitzvah took place ear- 
ly this summer. Also, to Jeffrey 
Levinson our heartfelt congratu- 
lations. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel L. Bar- 
shay, of Summerville, S. C, an- 
nounce the engagement of their 
daughter, Miss Elizabeth Rai Bar- 
shay, and Mr. Jerry Irwin Kaylie 
of Brooklyn, a son of Mr. Sam Kay- 
lie and Mrs. Tess Kaylie, both of 
New York City. 

Miss Barshay, a graduate of 
Summerville High School, atten- 
ded the University of Alabama and 
the University of South Carolina. 

Mr. Kaylie was graduated from 
Eastern District High School and 
is a student at New York City Col- 
lege. 

Our heartfelt sympathy is exten- 
ded to the family of the late Ber- 
tie Berlin, widow of Sam Berlin. 
May they be comforted in their 
grief. 



Open 11 A.M. to 10:30 P.M. Week Days 
11 A.M. to 9:30 P.M. Sundays 

VIC'S GOLF RANGE 

Professional Lessons by Appointment 
Folly Road CHARLESTON, S. C. Dial 795-2350 



CHARLESTON, S. C. 



Avey Brothers Service Centers 




flsso] 



"Two Locations To Serve You" 

ROAD SERVICE 

Open 7 Days — We Give S&H Green Stamps 

Wheel Balancing - Brake Service 
Tune-Ups - Free Pick-Up & Delivery , . 

744-6042 

PalmeUo Shopping Center at Airport Road Charleston, S. C. 



Martin's Esso Servicenter 

Complete Tune-Ups 
Minor Repairs 
Brakes Adjusted — Road Service 
7 A.M. to 9 P.M.— 7 Days Weekly 
O. L. MARTIN, Owner 
501 Maybank Hwy. 795-0747 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



BRAILSFORD'S METAL WORKS 



ciDELCO 



HUTIMS 

COOLINCl 



1338 Fretuell St. 



HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING 

SHEET METAL — ORNAMENTAL IKON 
N. CHARLESTON, S. C. Dial SH 4-1819 



GAMBLE'S AMERICAN SERVICE 

Minor Auto Repairs - Pick-Up & Delivery 
Road Service 
We Give Top Value Stamps 
4525 Rivers Avenue 744-9195 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



iJohn 




EST. 1816 



Continuous Service 
for 75 Years 

Dial 722-8371 
150 Wentworth St. 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



Spivey's 
Electric Service, 
Inc. 



Motor Rewinding & 

Repairing 
New & Used Motors 



16 Cumberland Dial RA 3-5309 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



RUTH'S FLORIST 

A Distinctive Floral Service 
766-7964 
1644 Savannah Hiway 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



FOLLY ROAD 
SERVICENTER 

Auto Repairs 
Dial 795-9950 
897 Folly Road 
CHARLESTON, S. C. , 



niton's Sinclair 
Station 

Open 7 Days A Week 
Trained Mechanic Always 
On Duty 
General Repairs 

747-9256 

3303 Rivers Ave. 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



The American Jewish JIM KS-( ) L'TLOC )K 



Qctober, 1964 



GREENVILLE, $. C. 



McCARLEY & CO., INC. 

Member of the New York- Stock Exchange \ 

Inquiries Invited 

Asheville, N. C. . Charlotte, N. C. 

Hickory Jr N. £. - ., ........ >,r Greensboro, N. C. 

Charleston, s! C. " Columbia, S. C. 

• , Dial QE 2^5621 S. C. National Bank BJdg. Greenville, S. C. j 
. . . L 

I LEWIS ALUKAHDER 

BUILDER 

Distinction of Design 

• ft • . Nij.-.n'i.h/: . ■>.-;.';.■},:]! „ 

Homes by, 1 Lewis Alexander, fq— (, Standard, of Quality 

CHurchill vj.'102!(j 1 

?t--VU.-#? V ..-..!: -j,- . 

143 Dellwood Dr. v> , Greenville, S. C. 



GARY'S BOARDING HOUSE 

ROOM & -BOARD - STEAM HEAT , FAMILY STYLE MEALS 

LIVING ROOM AND TV ' PRIVILEGES 
802 "E. Washington Greenville^ S. C. CE 2-8034 



ALLSTATE LANE3"' /FUN CENTER 

32 Lanes - 12 Billiard Tables - Air Conditioned - Free Parking 

Free Nursery Service - Food Center - Bowling Equipment 
Cedar Lane Road Greenville^ S. C. 246-1661 



WILHETE'S CATERING SERVICE 

RECEPTIONS - PARTIES - BANQUETS 
"We Furnish 'Everything" 
239-4584 . 'j ■ 

207 Worley Road Greenville, S. C. 



ASHLEY'S HEARING AID CENTER, INC. 

W. E. "BILL" ASIfLEY, Consultant 
1 , 
Authorzied Distributor TELEX 

9 Lewis Plaza Greenville, S. C. Dial 239-6385 



Marjorie Palmer 
School of Dance 

Completely Air Conditioned 
Free Parking 
Classes for Children of all Ages 

Professional Instruction 
Ballroom - Physical Fitness 

Tap - Acrobatic 
Ballet - Musical Comedy 

Modern Jazz 
For Business or Residence 

244-3555 or 244-4959 
Lake Forest Shopping Center 
GREENVILLE, S..C. 



PLAZA 
House of Beauty 

Air Conditioned 
COMPLETE 
Beauty Service 

Hair Styling - Cutting - Tinting 
Featuring Dermetics Cosmetics 

Dial 235-1031 
Edith R. Sumner, Owner 
Open Evenings 
by Appointment 

2107 Augusta Road 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 



John Roberts 

FLORAL CO. 

We Carry Every — 
— Blooming Thing 
Complete Floral Service 
Corsages - Weddings 
Funerals 
We Carry A Complete Selection 
of Artificial Designs 

232-8269 
Nights, Sunday & Holidays 
239-6433 

2223 Augusta Rd. 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 



Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

(Concluded from Page 47) 
Dillabough upon the recent death 
of his father Dr. A. H. Dillabough. 

Visiting Rabbi, during the High 
Holy Days for tlr Beth Jacob Con- 
gregation was Rabbi Milton Fried- 
man, who is a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, Gratz Col- 
lege and is presently a junior at 
the Jewish Theological Seminary 
in New York. In addition to Con- 
ducting the complete, service... he 
also acted most ably as Cantor 
for the Congregation. 

Holiday services at Temple 
Emanuel were, as usual, con- 
ducted by Rabbi David H; Rose. 



Williamsfton, N. C. 

MRS. IRVING M. MARGOLIS, 
Correspondent 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Scheib and 
children, Rochelle and Joseph, 
Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Scheib and 
daughter, Eva, all of Windsor have 
returned from a visit with rela- 
tives in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard Margolis 
and children, Rachel, Beverly, 
Kerry, and Alan, of St. Louis, Mo., 
were guests of his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank J. Margolis. Mr. 
and Mrs. Norman Arenwald of 
New York City were also guests 
of her sister, Mrs. Margolis, and 
Mr. Margolis. Later, Mr. and Mrs. 
Margolis visited her brother and 
sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Milton 
Bloom at Virginia Beach. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Pittman at- 
tended the wedding of her niece, 
Miss Jody Breen, to Ramon Saul 
Franko at Ahavath Achim Syna- 
gogue in Atlanta, Ga. The bride's 
father, Emanuel Breen, is a na- 
tive of Rocky Mount, N. C. Dur- 
ing the past month, Mr. and 
Mrs. Irving M. Margolis have had 
as their guests various members of 
their family: Mrs. Jacob Levy of 
Rocky Mount, Dr. and Mrs. Gary 
R. Smiley and children, Steven 
and Karen, of Chapel Hill. Mr. 
and Mrs. Alan S. Fields of Dur- 
ham, and Mrs. Louis Novey of 
Miami Beach, Fla. 



Don't Forget! 
Contribute to the North 
Carolina Home for the 
Jewish Aged 



Thomasson 
Bros. 

ci eaners & Laundrv 

Dial 235-8581 
101 Augusta St. and 
1303 E. Washington St. 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 



PRUE HUFF ESSO 
SERVICENTER 

Complete Radiator Repairs 
1438 Augusta Rd. 
232-4220 Greenville, S. C. 



J. B. Forrest Co. 

Appliance & Heating Repairs 
Electrical Repairs 
and Contracting 

Residential & Commercial 

DIAL 
244-0796 
19 N. Acres Drive 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 



"THE ORIGINAL 

Ye Olde 
Fireplace 

STEAK HOUSE 

S. Pleasantburg Dr. 
(291 By Pass) 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish, TIMES-OUTLOOK 



55 



Greenville - Spartanburg, S. (, 



LEWIS DETECTIVE AGENCY 

Insurance Investigation - Industrial - Employment 
Internal Security - Guard Service - Civil - Tracing 
Stokes Building ', GREENVILLE, S. C. 233-8455 



For Fuel Oil 
DIAL CR 7-2231 



Dave Newell's 



W. D, Trotter 
Body Shop 

1 Body & Fender Specialists 
Auto Painting 
Color Matching 
On Any Make Or Model 
All Work Guaranteed 
24-Hour Wrecker Service 

dial 585-2081 

155 Central 
SPARTANBURG, S. C. 



PINE STREET ESSO 
SERVICENTER 

Complete Auto Service 
215 S. Pine 
Phone 582-9324 
SPARTANBURG, S. C. 



INGRAM'S GENERATOR 
& ALTERNATOR 
SERVICE 

Rebuilt-Repaired-Exchanged 
White Avenue 
582-0516 Spartanburg, S. C. 



SMITH - OUZTS 
Drug Stores 

No. 1—582-3411 

No. 2—583-8424 
No. 3—583-6315 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 



FOR BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS 
See 

RUSS GAFFNEY 

FLORIST 

410 E. Main St. Phone 582-6922 
SPARTANBURG, S. C. 

BELL LAUNDRY 

A Complete Laundry Service 
To, -Fit Every Family 
and Every Purse 

448 Marion Ave. Dial 583-8668 
SPARTANBURG, S. C. 



Carolina Foundry 
& Machine Works 

Founders & Machinists 

CAST IRON — BRASS 
ALUMINUM 

Service & Quality Since 1927 

S. Church Extension 
Dial 582-4504 
SPARTANBURG, S. C. 



What's Borthering 
The Jews? 

(Continued from Page 50) 
aky and service. Often the move- 
ment into leadership role in the 
general community is accompa- 
nied by a weakening of ties to the 
Jewish community. The leader 
thus feels conflicting loyalties and 
frequently there is an undercur- 
rent c»f hostility toward him among 
those who labor solely or prima- 
rily in the Jewish communal vine- 
yards. 

The Jew who assigns first pri- 
ority to the Health and Welfare 
Council and to the Community 
Chest is a defector in the eyes of 
those for whom there is no cause 
other than the Jewish Community 
Center, the Synagogue, or the 
Federation. The Health Welfare 
Council Board member can, on 
1 he other hand, regard the Center 
volunteer as parochial and narrow 
in approach. President Johnson 
ended a recent address warning of 
the danger of narrowing our hori- 
zons to the fellowship of neigbor- 
hoods before we broadened our 
horizons to the wider universal 
brotherhood. 1 took these words 
;is a reflection of the difficulty 
each of us faces as we are beset 
by many demands on our hearts 
and our minds. 

A final impression is (me that 
concerns the religious leaders of 
our American Jewish community 
and, I am told, also worries the 
minister and priest in regard to 
their flocks. Synagogue member- 
ship (and the number of new syn- 
agogues), like church membership, 
is at an all time high. However, 



(Please Turn to Page 58) 




Dr. Dina Fietelson, of Jerusalem, 
200th recipient of a National Council 
of Jewish Women scholarship, has 
arrived here for graduate study. 



Joe A. Foster 
Oil Co., Inc. 



Metered 
Delivery 
Service 




GREENVILLE, S. C. 



SEABORN 
PLUMBING CO. 

General Plumbing Contractor 

2916 Anderson Road 
239-8417 Greenville, S. C. 



MEDICAL ARTS 
PHARMANCY 

Complete Drug & Prescription 
Service ■ 

407 Vardry 
at Vardry Medical Ct. 
232-1534 Greenville, S. C. 



TOM JENKINS ESSO 
SERVICE & GARAGE 

Road Service .. . 

2335 E. North Ext. 233-9615 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 



HERMAN JONES ESSO 
STATION 

Complete Auto Service 
1002 Laurens Road' 

Phone 233-9373 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 



Sinclair Station 

"The Man to Call in 
An Emergency" 
Complete Car Service 
Minor Auto Repairs 
ROAD SERVICE 
PICK-UP & DELIVERY 
Serving the Sherwood Forest Area 
U-HAUL TRAILERS 
239-6849 
(Legrand Blvd. at 291 By-Pass) 
S. Plea^antburg Dr. 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 



"25 Years Experience" 

HUDGENS 

PAINTING 

& DECORATING SERVICE 
Residential - Commercial 

Fully Insured 
Day or Night Call 
239-2867 
101 Donnybrook Ave. 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 



COOPER'S 
SUPER MARKET 

City Wide Delivery 
1629 E. North 
233-2773 Greenville, S. C. 



BAKER BUILDING & 
REMODELING , 

No Job Too Large Or Small 

21 Neal Circle 

244-6027 Greenville, S. C. 



JOE SMITH ORNAMENTAL IRON 

"Free Estimates" 

1601 Reidville Road ' Call 582-2743 

Railings - Brackets - Columns - Patio Covers 
Carports - Flower Boxes 
SPARTANBURG, S. C. 



Mrs. Allen L. Rogers, Pres. ' Vernon W. Patterson, Jr., Vice-Pres. 

COFIELD & ROGERS, INC. 

General Insurance Agents 

112 W. Dunbar SPARTANBURG, S. C. Phone 582-1243 



56 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



Columbia - Myrtle Beach, S. C. 



COLUMBIA, S. C. 

MRS. BERNARD LADEN, Correspondent 



AAA 
Home Cleaners 

ALL TYPES CLEANING 

Rugs 

Upholstered Furniture 
Wall to Wall Carpets 
WALLS & CEILINGS 
MACHINE CLEANED 
Floors Cleaned 
and Polished 

AL 3-5188 

806 Pavillion 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



The 

CLIPPER 
SHIP INK 

OFFERS THE FINEST 
IN COASTAL DINING 

Home of The Original 
Charcoal Fireplace 

Shore Dinners 
Lobster Pool 

Diner - American Express 
Carte Blanche 

Package Liquor Store 
On Premises 

Organ Music 

Dial 236-2424 

JOHN LOUD, Owner 
10 Miles S. of Myrtle Keach 
GARDEN CITY, S. C. 



CROWSON-STONE 
PRINTING CO. 

PRINTERS 

LITHOGRAPHERS 
819 Main St. Dial AL 3-7523 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



JAMES COLLINS 

PAINTING CONTRACTOR 
Sober - Reliable Workmen 
448-6055 
Bay Street 
MYRTLE BEACH, S. C. 



COMMERCIAL STATIONERS, INC. 

Phone 253-4052 
COMPLETE OFFICE OUTFITTERS 

764 Meeting Street West Columbia, S. C. 

Supplies - Furniture Equipment 

Serving the Columbia and Pee Dee Area 



Painting & 
Decorating 

FLOOR SANDING AND 
REFINISHING 

"No Job Too Small 
No Job Too Large" 

Established 1946 

Residential - Commercial 
Industrial - Institutional 

We and Your Property 
Are Fully Insured 

Free Estimates 

L. W. CLARK 

Dial 448-6108 

ANYTIME 
301 South Myrtle 
MYRTLE BEACH, S. C. 



Ceramic 
Supply Co. 

Marion Martin, Owner 
635 Broadway Extn. 

Dial 448-5147 



Complete Line of Ceramic 
Supplies 

Wholesale - Retail 
Greenware, Glazes, Slip 

Free Parking in Rear 

MYRTLE BEACH, S. C. 



The wedding of Miss Susan 
Sherman, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Louis Sherman of Washing- 
ton, D. C. and Ben Ellis Laden, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Bernard La- 
den of Columbia, took place Sun- 
day, August 16th at 4:30 P. M. at 
Washington Hebrew Congrega- 
tion. Rabbi Oerstenfeld officiated. 

Miss Barbara Sherman, sister of 
the bride, was maid of honor. 
Bridesmaids were Shirley Laden, 
sister of the groom, Ruth Sher- 
man, Louis Bogen and Linda Sen- 
nett, cousins of the . bride. 

Manuel Carbello of Newark, 
New Jersey served as best man. 
Ushers were Michael Sherman, bro- 
ther of the bride, Samuel Laden, 
brother of the groom, Alan Kahn, 
Peter Tomlinson, Roger Norton 
and Mark Addelman. 

A seated dinner followed the 
ceremony. 

Mrs. Laden is a graduate of Vas- 
sar College. 

Mr. Laden was graduated from 
Princeton University and has com- 
pleted one year of graduate study 
at Johns-Hopkins University, Bal- 
timore Maryland. 

Upon return from their wed- 
ding trip to Canada, the couple 
will reside in Baltimore. 

The late Rabbi Abraham Her- 
son of the Beth Shalom Synagogue 
was honored in two separate cere- 
monies Sunday, August 30th by 
the members of the Congregation. 

A, monument to the memory of 
the late Rabbi was dedicated at 
the Beth Shalom Cemetery at a 
service presided over by his succes- 
sor, Rabbi Murray Gershon. 

Following rites at the cemetary, 
a portrait of the late rabbi was 
unveiled at the Educational Build- 
ins: bv Mrs. Herson and her daugh- 
ter. Diane. 

Presiding at the unveiling were 
Henry Hammer, president of the' 
svnaeoeue. He was asssited by Mrs. 
Henrv Hammer, president of the 
auxiliary. The congregation do- 
nated the portrait. 

Principal speaker was Abe Tho- 
rny of Sumter, 9. C. who painted 
the portrait and who donated his 
artist services. He was a personal 
friend. 

Durinsr the ceremonv. Mrs. Her- 
son was presented a certificate of a 
memorial to Rabbi H°rson which 
has b^n placed in Israel. The pre- 
sentation was made by Ben Stern, 



who served as president of the sy- 
nagogue during Rabbi Herson's 
tenure. 

Mrs. Ted Solomon headed the 
memorial committee and intro- 
duced the principal speaker. 

The Beth Shalom Congregation 
held a reception for Rabbi and 
Mrs Murray Cershon on the even- 
ing of August 23rd in the Social 
Hall of the Synagogue. Mrs. Leo- 
nard Balser was chairman and deli- 
cious homemade cakes were pro- 
vided by the Daughters of Israel. 
Decorations were by Mrs Jeff Sun- 
shine. 

A spaghetti dinner was spon- 
sored by the B'Nai Brith Men at 
the Center on. August 27th to kick 
off the bowling year. 

The B'Nai Brith Women Mem 
brship luncheon was held on Sep- 
tember 2nd at the Center. An 
originial skit by Mrs. Donald Mos- 
kovitz "Music Gal" was presented. 

The B'Nai Brith Fair Booth 
will open October 12th through 
24th. This is their major fund 
raising event of the year and 
all are asked to help. 

Bagels, cream cheeze and lox 
were enjoyed by those brave 
enough to withstand the inclement 
weather for Slichot services Aug- 
ust 29th. Mrs. Charles Miller was 
in charge of food. 

Irwin Kahn has been named 
president of the United Commu- 
niy Services of Lexington and 
Richland Counties. He has been 
a member of the board for three 
years and a member of its housing 
committee. He has served in the 
Pacesetter and Large Firms divi- 
sions in recent United Fund Torch 
Drives Prior to 1954 when the Uni- 
ted Communiy Services was estab- 
lished; he also served on the 
board of Directors of the Com- 
munity Chest of Columbia. 



Adair Standard 
Service Station 

Wrecker Service 
Mechanic on Duty 
Front End Alignment 
Electronic Tune-Up 

Hours 6 AM-11 PM Daily 
7 AM-10 PM Sunday 
Corner of 
Taylor Blvd. & Berry Blvd. 
3500 Taylr Blvd. 363-9290 
LOUISVILLE, KY, 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 



57 



Mayel Tov to Mr. and Mrs. Al- 
an Gould upon the birth of a son, 
Isidore — to Capt. and Mrs. I. 
Nezvesky (Claire Gottlieb) upon 
the birth of a daughter,, Debra 
Rose. 

Among those receiving the oath 
of attorney for admission to the 
S. C. Bar were: Samuel B. Freed 
and Alan M. Osterweil. 

Monroe Mayer has taken spe- 
cialized training in Cub Scout 
Leadership at the Philmont Volun- 
teer Training Center in north- 
eastern New Mexico. 

A plaque was unveild to the 
memory of the late Ben Arnold 
at the Boys Club. The gift of Mr. 
Arnold enabled the members of 
the Boys Club to own their own 
home and will be called the Ben 
Arnold Memorial Building. 

Our wishes for a speedy recovery 
go to Rabbi David Karesh, Mrs. 
Paul Circus, and Nathan Berry. 

The Columbia Chapter of Ha- 
dassah's gala Opening Tea, honor- 
ing prospective new members 
along with all other members, took 
place on Wednesday, September 
23, 1964, at the Columbia Jewish 
Center. "Hello Ladies", an original 
musical written by Mrs. Marshall 
Katz, was the focal point of the 
afternoon. Starring were, Mrs. 
Claire Kline; Mrs. Roy Mitchell; 
Mrs. Ivan Gottleib; Mrs. George 
Gottleib; Mrs. William Forstsat; 
Mrs. Robert Fechter; and Mrs. 
Marshall Katz. 

Arrangements and decorations 
were by Mrs. Oscar Seidenberg; 
Mrs. Leonard Bogen; and Mrs. 
Charles Miller. 

Hadassah's officers for the 1964- 
65 term are as follows: President; 
Mrs. Morris Kline; Vice President 
of Programming, Mrs. Marshall 
Katz; Vice President of Fund 
Raising, — Mrs. Harold Miller: 
Vice President of Educaion — 
Mrs. Bernard Lapidus; Vice Presi- 
dent of Membership — Mrs. Mick 
Lourie; Treasurer — Mrs. Emil 
Gross: Financial Secretary — Mrs. 
Abe Zalin; Recording Secretary — 
Mrs. Norman Arnold; Correspon- 
ding Secretary — Mrs. Ben Pearl- 
stein. 

The Columbia Chapter of Ha- 
dassah will meet on Wednesday, 
October 14, 1964, at 10:30 A.M. at 
the Columbia Jewish Center, 1540 
Trenholm Rd. It will be the an- 



nual paid up membership brunch 
sponsored by Hadassah's Board 
Members. Mrs. Florence Perlman, 
prominent National Membership 
Chairman, will be the guest speak- 
er. Mrs. Perlman came to this post 
from Hadassahs Medical Organi- 
zation, of which she was chairman 
and is familiar with all aspects of 
Hadassah's work. All members are 
urged to attend and participate in 
a most unusual and interesting; 
program. 



Fayetteville, N. G. 

(Concluded from Page 48) 
on the birth of a son on Aug. 10th. 
and to the grand-parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Jerry Soloman and great- 
grandmother, Mrs. Minnie (Ed- 
win) Fleishman. 

Maze! Tov to Dr. and Mrs. Al- 
bert Waitman of New York City, 
upon the arrival of a daughter on 
Sept 5; ditto the grand-parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Alex Waitman. 

Ros'i Hashonah has come and 
gone and the beauty and appeal of 
th melodies we sang are still with 
us. Our services were made more 
beautiful than ever by Cantor Gall 
of New York. Rabbi Ucko was 
assisted also by A. M. Fleishman, 
Gerald Waitman, and Joel Fleish- 
man. 

What a good feeling to have on- 
ly pleasant news at this writing. 
May the New Year bring to all of 
us good health, prosperity and a 
lasting world peace. 




Samuel D. Leidesdorf, 82-year-old 
communal and philanthropic leader, 
has received the American Jewish 
Committee's 1964 Herbert H. Leh- 
man Human Relations Award. Mak- 
ing the presentation at a dinner, held 
at the Hotel Plbza, is Jacob Blau- 
stein, industrialist of Baltimore and 
Honorary President of the American 
Jewish Committee. 



ANDERS 


ON PETROLEUM CO 




FUEL OILS 




CA 5-8276 


401 Glenn 


Anderson, S. C. 



Richard Ruh! 
Refrigeration Co 

AIR CONDITIONING 
HEATING 

"Sales and Service" 

207 W. Church 

Call 225-7441 or 226-6251 

ANDERSON, S. C. 



LAUGHRIDGE'S 

Complete Outfitters For Men 
and Students 



226-3406 
140 N. Main Anderson, S. C. 



ALLEN RADIO and 
TV SERVICE 

Color - Black & White 
20 Years Experience 
2072 S. Preston 634-1912 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 



E. P. GRIFFIN ELECTRIC 
SEWER CLEANING 

E. P. Griffin 
4824 Dover Rd. 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 



E. H. WELLS CONCRETE 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Commercial & Industrial 

305 Lyndon Lane 895-2172 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Thomas 
Shell 



Road Service 
Pick-Up & Delivery 

Mechanic on Duty 

Motor Tune-Up 

COMPLETE BRAKE SERVICE 
Open 6:00 A.M. -11:00 P.M. 
Sunday 9:00 A.M. -9:00 P.M. 
Located Across From Mall 
BILL THOMAS, Owner 
5001 Shelbyville Rd. 896-9221 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 



REAL ESTATE 

Sales - Leases 
Loans 
INSURANCE 
Dial CAnal 5-5461 

— Established 1907 — 

LOUIS S. HORTON 

Bleckley Blvd. 
ANDERSON, S. C. 



Batson Oil Co. 

FUEL OILS 

Radio Dispatched Trucks 

834-9019 
TRAVELERS REST, S. C. 



BILL TUCKER, INC. 

Complete Remodeling and 
Alterations 

4308 Topaz Ct. 447-8873 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 



SATISFACTORY 
SANITATION CO. 

Wesley Walker 
5131 Johnsontown Rd. 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 



SMITH'S TEXACO 

Complete Auto Service 

272-6584 
Hwy. 17 at Windy Hill 
MYRTLE BEACH, S. C. 



A Friend 
of The State 

of Israel 
Urges You 

TO BUY 
ISRAEL BONDS 



58 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



Chattanooga - Knoxville, Tenn 



What's Bothering The Jews? 



J. Avery Bryan Company, Inc. 

Funeral Directors — Ambulance Service 

141 McCallie Ave. Dial AM 6-2131 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



R. P. Scott Contracting Co. 

Excavating - Grading - Paving - Piling 
Sewer & Waterworks 
1801 Polk CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 267-9582 




COMMERCIAL MEN WELCOMED 

LAKEVIEW MOTEL 

31 Modern Air-Conditioned Units 
Free TV & Phones in Rooms — Grade A Restaurant Adjoining 
6133 Chapman Hiway US 441 - Dial 577-7621 for Reservations 
KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



JACKSON STUDIOS 



2022 Cumberland Avenue 
PORTRAIT & COMMERCIAL 



248-5788 



Middlesboro, Ky. 



RAFFAEL 
SALON OF BEAUTY 

High Style Fashion 
Serving Lake Vista-Lake Hills 
6234 Bonny Oaks Drvie 
892-0533 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



McKEE MOTEL | 

6400 Kingston Pike, S.W. 
Phone 588-3545 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



TRI-STATE PLUMBING - HEATING & 
ELECTRICAL SUPPLY CO. 



248-1710 



531 E. Lothbury Ave. 



Middlesboro, Ky. 



Ruby's 
House Of Beauty 

Ruby Pendergrass, Owner 
East Chattanooga 

Complete Beauty 

Service 

Cutting - Styling 
Permanents - Hair Coloring 

Ample Parking 
2116 Wilder 629-0367 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



Floors - Patios 
Waterproofing 
Sidewalks - Curbs & Gutters 
Driveways 
Residential & Commercial 

687-2321 

Tom Emmett Concrete 
Pouring & Finishing Co. 

4800 Jenkins Road 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



(Concluded 

the large synagogue membership 
does not seem to reflect any deep 
and broad religious commitment. 

The Martian who might land in 
suburbia on Friday night or Sat- 
urday morning, would, after ad- 
miring the uniquely beautiful re- 
ligious edifies and peering inside 
at the empty pews, ask, "Why so 
much for so few," Why does the 
Jew build so much and so many 
and then attend in overwhelming 
numbers only on the High Holy 
Days or the big fund-raising din- 
ner dance that will help pay off 
the mortgage? 

Similarly, Jewish Community 
Center membership is at an all- 
time high and the post-war period 
has seen beautiful new Centers 
built in scores of communities. 
Yet, our professional literature 
abounds with articles expressing 
continuing struggles to define pur- 
pose, to devise programs which 
will "attract" the member, to 
question our relation to other 
Jewish agencies in the community 

Knoxville Temple 
Beth El 

A special word of thanks to 
confirmand Bernie Sisman for tak- 
ing over the Shofar this year. He 
blew the Shofar so expertly and 
with such dignity and aplomb that 
it would seem he had been practic- 
ing all year. 

Our new Junior Choir will par- 
ticipate in Services, Saturday morn- 
ing, October 3. We are all excited- 
ly anticipating this first public ap- 
pearance of these dedicated young 
people. More than twenty have 
attended rehearsals and would like 
more of their friends to join them. 

The Sisterhood would like to 
express "Special Thanks" for the 
generous contributions from Mr. 
Edward Reich, Mr. and Mi s. Her- 
bert Brody and Mr. and Mrs. Laz- 
arus Scott to the Junior Choir. 

Ada Averbuch, Fannie Stein and 
Rose Mark headed the Jackpot 
Dinner which was a most success- 
ful (financially and socially) open- 
ing affair. 



from Page 55) 

as a whole. Nor are the Synagogues 
and Centers alone. In every com- 
munity I visit, people tell me of 
proliferation of Jewish communal 
organizations and everyone lists 
"over-organization" as a major 
problem. I sense in these discus- 
sions a fear that we have substitu- 
ted organization for heart; form 
for substance; secular goals for the 
ethics which guided our ancestors. 

I also have the impression that 
American Jews are wrestling with 
these questions both formally in 
discussion group and the Syna- 
gogue class on contemporary Jew- 
ish life and, informally, at the din- 
ner party discussion and the bridge 
table. And therein, I believe, lies 
our strength and our hope. For if 
the past tells us anything, it tells 
us that our people have been able 
to clevlop institutions and patterns 
that have provided both the me- 
chanisms through which we have 
effected social change in a planful 
way, and the vehicle for the trans- 
mission of the eternal verities 
which have been our contribution 
to the history of civilization. 



Do Your Part! 
Contribute to the North 
Carolina Home for the 
Jewish Aged 



ALLEN LUMBER CO. 

1 Block West Of 
Chappell's Dairy- 
Polar Bear Avenue 
248-5682 
MIDDLESBORO, KY. 



SHARP'S MOTEL 

3 Miles N. of Cumberland Gap 
Pineville Pike 
Phone 248-3447 
MIDDLESBORO, KY. 



MORGAN'S 
DRUG STORE 

Your Rexall Store 
Kentucky Avenue 
Phone 337-3041 
MIDDLESBORO, KY. 



We Have Everything 
For The Builder 

Martin 
Builders Supply 

We Will Supply All Materials 
or Build Your Home to 
Your Specifications 

Dial 2-4621 Rutledge Pike 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 



59 



BROWN BROS, 
Contractors 



Concrete 
Roads 
Driveways 
Parking Lots 



Excavating 
Grading 
Sewers 
Surfacing 
Asphalt 

Crushed Limestone 
Dial AM 7-6642 

1701 Central Avenue 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



Earleene's 
Salon of Beauty 

Serving Brainerd Area 
Permanents - Hair Coloring 
Manicuring 

Open Evenings 
by Appointment 
— Parking Lot in Rear — 
Mrs. Earlene Brooks, Owner 

629-2666 

5317 Brainerd Rd. 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



ESTES 
GULF SERVICE STATION 

Open 24 Hours 
Road Service Mechanic On Duty 
201 Cherokee Blvd. 266-9212 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



Please Patronize 
Our Advertisers 



WELCOME NEWS 

to users of 

BUCK 
DRAUGHT 

You Can Now Get 
This Famous Laxative 
In TABLET Form 
Just Ask For 

BLACK 
DRAUGHT 
Tablets 



Chattanooga, Tenn. 

The following have recently be- 
come affiliated with Mizpah 
Congregation: Mr. Paul Berz, Mr. 
Morton Center, Mr. and Mrs. A. 
L. Gaines, Mr. and Mrs. Morris 
Gold, Mr. Howard Levine. 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald A. Lind, 
Mr. and Mrs. James M. Lindsey, 
Mrs. C. G. Maisel, Mr. Robert 
Royal, Mrs. Flora Shaw, Mr. and 
Mrs. David Winer. 

The first session of Mizpah Re- 
ligious School for the year 1964-65 
was held Sunday, September 13. 
Children assembled in the Temple 
for a brief service. Following the 
Temple service, they adjourned 
to their respective classes, to be 
registered and given their school 
text books. 



Formation of an Indian Friends 
of Israel Society in New Delhi, 
coupled with assertion that "the 
need of the hour is to extend the 
hand of friendship to the people 
of Israel," was disclosed in a state- 
ment which said that the founding 
f igures of the new group are Frank 
Moraes, noted author and editor 
of the Indian Express, and Shiva 
Rao, popular Indian journalist. 

Formation of the group was 
hailed by Atal Bihari Vajpai, 
rightwing member of Parliament, 
who said there are times when he 
feels "sorry for not maintaining 
ing drplomatic relations with Is- 
rael" and that he would "like the 
friendship between the two coun- 
tries to grow and develop." Es- 
tablishment of diplomatic rela- 
tions with Israel was also urged by 
Acharya Kripalani, Socialist 
leader. 




Dr. Morton Siegel has been named 
director of the United Synagogue's 
Department of Education and Com- 
mission on Jewish Education, execu- 
tive dir^ct«»- Rabbi Bernard Segal 
has announced. 



Chattanooga, Tenn, 



Title Guaranty & Trust Co. 

"Across Street from Court House" 

SOUTH'S OLDEST TITLE CO. 
Since 1891 

Insured by Lloyds of London 

617 Walnut CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 266-4167 



Town and Country Restaurant 

STANDARD OF EXCELLENCE 

"Home of the Bottomless Salad Bowl" 
North End of the Market Street Bridge 

On U.S. 27 N. Phone 267-8544 110 N. Market 

For Quick Meals or Snacks Visit the 

LONG HOHN RESTAURANTS 

New Location 821 McCallie Avenue 
129 N. Market— 266-9229— Open 6 A.M. -12 Mid. Signal Mtn.— 886-3682 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



Chattanooga Title Ins. Agency, Inc. 

Complete Real Estate Title Service 
Representing Title Ins. Co. of Minnesota 
711 Walnut CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 267-1201 



QUICK DEPENDABLE 

AMBULANCE 

Emergency 

Private 

• Oxygen Equipped 

# Trained First Aid Attendants 



SERVICE 



• Out of Town Trips 
(Special Rates) 

# Prompt County Wide Service 

Air Ambulance Service 



24 HOUR SERVICE 
AIR CONDITIONED 



266-6114 



RVICE CO.. INC. 



1022 McCallie Avenue 



Chattanooga, Tenn. 



ABC ELECTRIC CO., INC. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 
WIRING & REPAIRING 

Industrial - Commercial - Residential 

Dial 698-8575 or 877-6140 or 624-9694 
1131 E. Main Chattanooga, Tenn. 



60 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



R H STEAKS 



Member of 
Carte Blanche 
Diners Club 
American Express 



266-4364 



(At the Foot of 
Lookout Mountain) 



RANCH HOUSE 
RESTAURANT 

3701 Broad 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



kkk REALTY COMPANY 

J. D. WADE, JR. and ALICE WADE 
405 High - 265-1338 — Nights & Sundays dial - 624-4427 
CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



AVOKDALE UPHOLSTERING CO. 

UPHOLSTERING — REFINISHING — REPAIRING 

We Carry a Complete Line of Upholstering Fabrics 
OUR PRICES SELL — OUR QUALITY TALKS 
Dial MA 2-0847 Chattanooga, Term. 2720 Dodson Ave. 



CLAYBORN AMBULANCE SERVICE 



24 HOUR SERVICE 

300 N. MARKET STREET 



267-9274 



Chattanooga, Tenn. 



DAWN PRODUCE COMPANY 

Fresh Dressed Poultry — Strictly Fresh Eggs 
1835 Kerr Dial AM 6-0351 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



East Brauierd Ess© Searoice S^tion 

ROAD SERVICE — MECHANIC ON DUTY 
BRAKE SERVICE — TUNE UP — TIRES — BATTERIES 

Open 6:30 A.M. - 9:00 P.M. 
8016 E. Brainerd Rd. CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 892-9901 



M0RN1NGSIDE CHEMICAL CO., Inc. 

Textile Chemicals and Softeners— Dyestuffs and Mornitex Products 



2205 Holtzclaw Ave. 



Dial 622-2702 



CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



266-0525 



THE ELLIS RESTAURANT 

MAINE LOBSTERS — STEAKS 

Family Operated Since 1908 
1433 MARKET 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 



DUNCAN ELECTRIC CO. 

Electric Light and Power Wiring 
Installations for Industrial - Commercial - Electric Heating 

Electric Wiring Repairs 
Nights & Sundays Dial 698-3032 - 877-2728 - 698-7006 
1801 E. 23rd CHATTANOOGA, TENN. Dial 62&-1418 



Have Fun, Ladies 

(Concluded from Page 7) 
de vive in your voice. You are 
better-groomed and better-dressed. 
You are, in fact, a better repre- 
sentative of the human race than 
you were before you said your 
first "Yes," to the first "will you?" 

Would you change any of it? 
I don't believe you would. It isn't 
that the organization owns you, 
but because you have become part 
of one of the better experiences 
of Jewish living. There is no way 
you can explain this without 
sounding like The Dedicated Soul, 
and you are much too sophisticat- 
ed for that appellation. Then 
again, you might have been a 
Helpful Hannah, or a Self-Thera- 
pist, or even, Heaven forfend, a 
Misguided Misfit. It doesn't mat- 
ter. Your community gives thanks 
every day for each and everyone 
of you. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

(Concluded from Page 8) 
Neil Simons, brother of the 
bridegroom, was best man. 
Groomsmen were Ralph Schnee- 
weiss, Alan Cohen and Joel Co- 
hen of Hartford, Conn., Randy 
May and Aaron May from Wil- 
mington, and Albert Levite of Hia- 
leah, Fla. Edward Levite, cousin of 
the bride, served as ring bearer. 

Following a reception at the Sy- 
nagogue, the couple left for a wed- 
ding trip to Florida. They will 
make their home in Hialeah, Fla.. 

Mrs. Simons attended Peace 
Junior College where she was a 
member of Sigma Phi Kappa. 
She also attended Wilmington Col- 
lege. Mr. Simons attended the Uni- 
versity of Miami where he was 
a senior member of DeMolav. 

Just a few days following the 
wedding of their granddaughter 
Rhoda, Mr. and Mrs. B. May cele- 
brated their 58th wedding anni- 
versary at a dinner given by Mr. 
and Mrs. Aaron May. Exactly this 
time last year we congratulated the 
Mays on their anniversary and the 
Bar Mitzvah of their grandson 
Leonard, and we are happv to once 
again wish them a double Mazel 
Tov. 

Do Your Part! 
Contribute to the North 
Carolina Home for the 
Jewish Aged 



EXCAVATING 
& GRADING 

We Specialize In 
Top Soil - Gravel & Sand 

877-3351 

JIMMY WALKER 
EXCAVATING CO. 

4714 Dayton Blvd. 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



COAL 

Stoker - Egg - Lump 
A Coal for Every Purpose 

ED SHERRILL 

266-1556 

If No Answer Dial 266-8891 

Sherrill Coal Co. 



415 N. Market 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



Gilbert's Yard & 

Driveway 
Buildina Service 

Topsoil— ( Cultivated ) 
Building Stone Retaining 
Walls 

Fill Dirt - Gravel - Cinders 

Grading 

3100 Riverside Dr. 
If no answer call 



622-0123 
629-5194 



CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



C. T. KEENER PLUMBING 
& HEATING CO. 

CONTRACTING 
REPAIRING 
Residential - Commercial 
Industrial 
121 Market Dial 267-6536 

CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



RIVERVIEW 
HAIR FASHIONS 

Styling - Coloring 
Permanents - Wigs 

1101 Hixson Pike 265-0256 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



HOLMES TELEVISION & 
APPLIANCE CO. 

For All Makes and Models 
3332 Ringgold Rd. 629-50^8 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN. | j 



October, 1964 



the American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



61 



A Man For AH Seasons 

(Continued from Page 52) 



He provides the wife of the deputy 
post chaplain with a recipe for 
fried matzo. (He later gets word 
from the deputy chaplain saying 
he is sick of fried matzo.) He listens 
to the sad parents of a young air- 
man who tell of their son's intend- 
ed marriage to a local non-Jew- 
ish girl. He writes out the name of 
an eligible Jewish girl from a 
nearby community and gives it 
to an eligible young lieutenant 
from Pennsylvania. He asks the 
commissary officer about how 
much Passover food will be stock- 
ed this year. He registers a com- 
plaint with the local school author- 
ities concerning a Christmas ob- 
servance in the public schools after 
the daughter of a Jewish Air 
Force sergeant has asked, "why 
can't I go to Jesus' birthday party?" 

He provides Yiddish word lists 
to a non-Jewish colonel who wants 
to learn Yiddish, and then hears 
about Jewish lieutenants at the 
Quartermaster School stunned to 
hear their colonel yelling "Gib 
zich a shokkel." (Shake a leg.') He 
teaches the cantillation for the 
Haftorah to a young Army obste- 
trician who is awaiting the mo- 
mentary arrival of a new addition 
to his family. What does the chap- 
Iain do? 

And what is the Jewish Chapel 



TOWNE 

HAIR FASHIONS 

by Mary Lee Linville 

"Where Hair Styling is 
An Art" 

DIAL 

482-1042 
47 Term. Ave. Oak Ridge, Tenn. 



Anderson County 
Adjustment Co. 

COMPLETE COLLECTION 
Service & Adjustments 

HELEN M. HANDLEY, 
Owner & Mgr. 

Dial 482-1765 

Town Hall Building 
OAK RIDGE, TENN. 



where the Jewish chaplain makes 
his headquarters? The chapel is 
a synagogue where services are held 
Friday evenings. Shabbos mornings, 
on the holidays and when someone 
needs a minyan. A minyan is easy 
—just call the dental detachment 
where 10 Jewish dentists are wait- 
ing. The chapel is a catering estab- 
lishment where Oneg Shabbats 
offer a taste of home to the boys 
and outlets for creative cookery 
for Jewish wives. It is also the 
scene of the bachelors' monthly 
brunch, a training ground for 




Miss Miriam R. Ephraim, one of 
the country's best known social 
workers, who will retire as director 
of Program Services of the National 
Jewish Welfare Board (JWB) in 
1965 after 20 years of service. 



JIM'S 

TV & APPLIANCE CO. 

482-2821 
9224 Oak Ridge Hwy. 
OAK RIDGE, TENN. 



JOLLY CAB CO. 
OF OAK RIDGE 

DIAL 482-1126 
127 Bus Court 
OAK RIDGE, TENN. 



MILLER 
REFRIGERATION CO. 

Commercial - Residential 
483-5761 
Grove Center 
OAK RIDGE, TENN. 



NELL S. CARPENTER 
INSURANCE AGENCY 

483-3004 
901 Oak Ridge, Turnpike 
OAK RIDGE, TENN. 



OAK RIDGE, TENN 



MARTIN FUNERAL HOMES 

"36 Years of Friendly, Sympathetic Service" 
FUNERAL HOMES AT 



Oak Ridge, Tennessee 

Tel. 483-4341 

Lake City, Tennessee 
Tel. 3118 



Clinton, Tennessee 
Tel. 457-1515 

LaFollette, Tennessee 
Tel. 562-7452 



DODSON MOVING & STORAGE CO. 

LOCAL & LONG DISTANCE 



WORLD-WIDE SERVICE 
STORAGE - PACKING 

ATLAS 

Van-Lines, Inc. 



Call For Free Estimates 
DIAL 
483-9618 



Warehouse Road — Warehouse E-7 



Oak Ridge, Tenn. 



DODD FLORIST 

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
Member of FTD Under New Management 

Jackson Square Dial 483-5664 Oak Ridge, Tenn. 



HELEN DAVIS BEAUTY SALON 

Specializing in Lamp Cutthig & Hair Shaping 
Individual Hair Styling Permanent Waves 
S. Manhattan Avenue Dial 483-1833 

Woodland Shopping Center — OAK RIDGE, TENN. 



HOSKINS 


HOSKINS 


DRUG STORE 


SERVICE DRUG STORE 


483-3957 


483-1314 


Jefferson Circle 


Jackson Square 


Near Garden Apts. 


Broadway & Georgia 


OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE 



Modern Recapping & Tire Sales 

RECAPPING & REPAIRING — NEW & USED TIRES 
Wheel Balancing All Work Guaranteed 

294 Midway Road OAK RIDGE, TENN. 483-6861 



BARGER TRANSFER & 
STORAGE CO. 

Bonded - Insured 
483-4660 
Warehouse Road 
OAK RIDGE, TENN. 



INTERIORS BY 
MARIE WILDE 

Residential - Commercial 
482-1631 
Jackson Square 
OAK RIDGE, TENN. 



PERSONAL SERVICES CO. 

Technical & Office PJacements Job Resumes 
Typing Services 
DIAL 483-1457 

Town Hall Oak Ridge, Tenn. 



€2 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 



AIR CONDITIONERS REPAIRED 

Prompt Service on Any Type Air Conditioner - Heat Pumps 
Heating Plants - Duct Work 

24 Hour Service — Over 15 Years Experience 

255-8905 

WILLIAM WHITE 
Air Conditioning & H@iting S 



517 4th Avenue, S. 



Nashville, Tennessee 



ACKLEN PARK PHARMACY 

FREE DELIVERY 

Your Complete Druggists 
STEVE WALKER^R. Ph. 



3201 West End Avenue 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 



298-3383 



CHARLES & RAY HAIRSTYLISTS 

Located in Belle Meade Plaza 
For the Finest in Hair Fashions - Hair Color Artists 

Belle Meade Plaza 291-8344 
NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 



Nashville Baby Sitting Service 

CITY WIDE 
Competent Ladies for Baby Sitting 
Maternity, Vacation & Convalescent 
Experienced Sitters for All Occasions 
Character References 
Mrs. Ann Holland, Owner 

852 Belton Dr. - 298-4167 — If no answer dial - 297-3201 
NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 



PHILLIPS - ROBINSON CO. 

FUNERAL HOME 

'We Pride Ourselves on our Care for Your Loved Ones' 
262-3312 

2707 Gallatin Road — Hendersonville Chapel 
HENDERSONVILLE, TENNESSEE 



REMODELING - BUILDING - REPAIRING 

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL & INDUSTRIAL 

Phone 256-7220 or 256-7967 

RICHARDSON LUMBER COMPANY 

2190 Nolensville Road Nashville, Tenn. 



eligible male cooks. 

The Jewish Chapel is a library 
where servicemen can find ma- 
terial on the traditions of our peo- 
pel. The chapel is a place to come 
to when one wants quiet and a 
moment to think. It's hard to 
think in a noisy barracks amid 
the constant blare of transistor 
radios. The chapel doors are al- 
ways open. Lights always burn 
there arid all are welcome. A 
young man reading in the light 
of the Ner Tamid told me it was 
the only quiet place in the neigh- 
borhood where he could study his 
Catholic catechism! 

The Jewish Chapel is all things 
to all people. Want a kiddush cup, 
a talith, a Jewish book? Make one 
phone call to the Jewish Guild 
Gift Shop. II you want a memzzah 
you make two calls — one to the 
"ill shop and the other to the 
Jewish chaplain to arrange for a 
brief ceremony traditional lor the 
occasion, and for Fort Lee. 

With the military constantly on 
the move, mezuzzahs are a con- 
stant business. But even steadier 
is the business of saying hello and 
good-bye. Each new arrival is of- 
ficially welcomed into our ranks 
by a personal visit from the Jew- 
ish chaplain. At that time a Jew- 
ish information card is filled out. 
The following Friday night the 
newcomer is presented at services 
by his sponsor, a member of the 
chapel congregation who is ap- 
pointed official welcoming- agent 
and host. The newcomer is then 
given a Bible, a special prayer 
book and other materials prepar- 
ed at Fort Lee. This kit includes 
home services for the Sabbath 
evening meal, for the holiday 
tables and special materials for 
the major Jewish holidays. If the 
new arrival is married, his wife is 
welcomed at the next monthly 
meeting of the Jewish Women's 



Martin's 

Ambul( 



Air Conditioned 
— Oxygen Equipped — 

Service from Any Hospital 

Out of Town Trins 
Anywhere - Any Time 
Serving White Population of 
Nashville Over 50 Years 
Dependable Service 

291-0610 

209 Louise Ave. 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



Guild. 

The Army wife's price is really 
far above rubies. She is a wonder- 
ful creature. Especially admirable 
is the large number of Jewish wives 
I have observed who have kept 
their homes Jewish and their chil- 
dren conscious of their heritage 
throughout their husbands' tours 
of duty in the United States, Wes- 
tern Europe, the Far East and 
(hardest of all) while their hus- 
bands were away on hardship] 
tours in Korea and Vietnam. 

The women of the chapel con- 
tribute much time to it. They 
learn to read Hebrew; they study 
in our adtdt education classes; 
they type and edit our bulletins 
and participate in every aspect of 
chapel life. They send clothing 
to a girls' orphanage in Israel. 
They have made matzo covers by 
the dozen; decorated Army issue 
metal plates into elegant Seder 
plates, and made cups worthy of 
Elijah from dime store crystal. All 
of this was done to make our 
community Seders festive as well 
as educational. They cooked po- 
tato salad by the tub, and chickens 
by the crate for the chapel's an- 
nual picnic. They have done all 
this in addition to opening their 
homes so that single Jewish boys 
can find some semblance of home 
(Please Turn to Page 70) 



Madison 
Employment 

Agency 

OFFICE - SALES 
CLERICAL ■ TYPISTS 
BOOKEEPERS-DOMESTIC 
HELP - NURSES 
BABY SITTERS 

DIAL 865-0886 
If No Answer Dial 865-0883 
1179 Gallatin Rd. Madison 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



Neely's Paint 
L Body Shop 

Body & Fender 
Repairing 

Commercial Truck 
Painting & Lettering 

SIDNEY NEELY, Owner 
1 Block Off Murfreesboro Rd. 

91 Polk Ave. 256-5056 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



(y( lober, u)64 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



68 



The Jewish Heritage 



( Continued 

cuing the chances oi Jewish sur- 
vival and Jewish continuity. 

The ancient Jewish heritage is 
■only part of our total Jewish heri- 
tage. We still have to consider the 
heritage bequeathed us by Ash- 
kenazi Jewry, which, for close to 
1 thousand years, has been the 
mainstay of Jewish development 
in the world. Again, 1 can only 
point to a number of vital ele- 
ments in that tradition that still 
function in our life, making for 
Jewish survival and Jewish con- 
tinuity. 

I single out, because of its 
special importance, the Jewish re- 
verence for learning. On top of 
the social pyramid in the "shtetl," 
whence our parents came and 
where East European jewrv con- 
structed its spiritual powerhouse, 
stood not the strong man, not the 
rich man, but the Rabbi, the learn- 
ed man. The consuming ambition 
of parents was to train their chil- 
dren to become rabbis. It was cus- 
tomary for wealthy Jewish families 
to choose a learned young- man 
of the Yeshiva as a husband lor 
their daughter. Our contempo- 
rary sociologists, marveling at the 
exuberance and the brilliance of 
the Jewish intellectual achieve- 
ment of our days and the days 



MANPOWER, INC. 

For The Very Best In 
Temporary Help 

1700 Haye St. 254-8372 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



from Page 24) 

past, attribute them to the old 
ghetto custom of marrying brains 
with riches, thus aiding the trans- 
mission of high mental ability 
irom generation to generation 
through the process of natural 
selection. 

And well may they marvel at 
the extraordinary phenomenon! of 
Jewish intellectual attainment. At 
the portals of the modern period, 
in the life of humanity, there 
stand four intellectual giants, all 
fews: Disraeli, Marx, Freud and 
Boas. Together they have revolu 
tionized the life and thought of 
humanity. 

Jews account for an infinitesi- 
mal part of 1% of the total number 
of human beings in the world. 
Their percentage of all xMobel 
prize winners, admittedly the in- 
tellectual leaders of humanity, 
amount to 11%. i n the United 
States, high school sophomores can 
try for college scholarships on the 
basis of competitive examinations. 
Jews account for 3% of the total 
population of the United States 
Their percentage of all scholar- 
ship winners is well over 60 % . 

The percentage of Jewish stu- 
dents in the colleges and the uni- 
versities of this country is three 
times as high as the average 
American. 

All these figures point to a high 
respect for learnings, as well as a 
high intellectual achievement, 
proving once again that the ele- 
ment in the Jewish tradition, ex- 



CHURCH STREET 

SINCLAIR 
SERVICE STATION 

2 Mechanics On Duty 
Road Service 
1501 Church 242-9503 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



Mid-State 
Pharmacy 

Our Pill Wagon Delivers 
City Wide 
Prescriptions 
Sick Room Supplies 
2010 Church 254-1094 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



SNELLING & 
SNELLING 

World's Largest 
Personnel System 

1719 West End Blvd. 254-5974 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 




Mrs. Joseph Willen of New York 
City, President of the National 
Council! of Jewish Women, has been 
named to the Board of Governors 
of the American National Red Cross 
as a member-at-large, E. Roland 
Harriman, ARC chairman, has an- 
nounced. 



Burroughs' 
Florist 

"We Give Top Value Stamps" 
L. O., ETHEL and 
BOBBY BURROUGHS 

298-5579 

Nights Dial 292-7841 

'Flowers for All Occasions" 

Over 50 Years Experience 
4511 Charlotte Avenue 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



Qualified 
Baby Sifters 

We Step In While You Step Out 

By the Hour, Day or Week 

Mrs. Richard Roberts, Owner 
4303 Lealand Lane 
298-4192 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



Coke & Council 



Service Station 

Road Service 
Open 24 Hours 
Mechanic On Duty 
DIAL 291-7693 

3427 West End Avenue 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



Tuscuhim 
FLORIST, INC. 

"For those Not Content 
with the Ordinary" 
Distinctive Arrangements 
FLOWERS 
FRUIT BASKETS 
For All Occasions 
City Wide Delivery 

832-7730 

If No Answer 832-1990 
If No Answer 832-0796 
4722 Nolensville Road 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



Sanders Transfer & Storaae Co. 

LOCAL & LONG DISTANCE MOVING 

Over 69 Years Experience 
DIAL 256-5684 2507 Bransford Avenue 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 1101 Grundy Street 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



BEAUTIFUL BODY WORK 
AUTO & TRUCK 
Repairing & Painting 

Wreck Rebuilding 
Insurance Estimates Made 
All Work Guaranteed 
Wrecker Service 

256-0373 

McKinney's Paint 
& Body Shop 

22 Fairfield 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



AUTOMATIC 
TRANSMISSIONS 

Specialists on 
All Makes & Models 
Easy Terms 
Over 

26 Years Experience 

Dial 832-6550 
LES WHITE, Owner 

Tennessee 
Transmission 
Shop 

4539 Nolensville Rd. 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



Brown's 
Church Street 
Shell Service 

DOWNTOWN 
Road Service 
Free Pick-Up & Delivery 

Mechanic 
Major & Minor Repairs 
Tires - Batteries - Accessories 
1300 Church 256-0227 
256-9645 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



CITY 
Auto Salvage Co. 

228-2586 

AUTO & TRUCK PARTS 
& LATE MODEL CARS 
Trucks & Jeeps 
Bought & Sold 

2533 Dickerson Rd. 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



64 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



SAYA 


m 


!AI 


\, GEORGIA 



LYMUS BROWN, SR. 

PAINTING CONTRACTOR 

RESIDENTIAL & OFFICE BUILDING 

Free Estimates 

Dial 355-4751 Savannah, Ga. 6908 Howard Foss Dr. 



KEYWARD GROOMS CONSTRUCTION 

PERSONAL SERVICE 

Custom Building and Alterations 
To Your Plans Or Ours — Only Quality Materials Used 

Dial 354-3128 Day or Night 

Located at Montgomery Cross Roads — At Corner Of Old Montgomery 

"Free Estimates" 

Route 3, Box 1 Savannah, Ga. 



PEST CONTROL 

We'll Rid Your Home Of Termites 
Also - Spiders - Bedbugs - Ants - Rats - Mice 
Roaches - Silverfish - Moths - Bees - Fleas 
TERMITE CONTROL 

All Work Guaranteed - L P C O No. 7 
Terms Available — No Cash Required 
Inspection & Estimates Without Obligation 

E. F. Johnson Exterminating Service 

25 Years Experience 
2110 Indiana Ave. Call AD 4-7500 

SAVANNAH, GA. 



Central Motors Machine & Parts 

Complete Automotive Garage and Machine Shop 

510 W. 31 St. Dial 236-5707 Savannah, Ga. 



BEATON'S PHILLIPS 


"66" 


SERVICE STATION 




Gas — Tires — Oil — Lubrications 


2215 West Broad 232-9261 


Savannah, Ga. 



SCOTT'S 
FURNITURE REPAIR 

Specializing in Cane Bottom 
Chair Repairing & Recaning 

234-1814 

636 E. Park Ave. Savannah, Ga. 



D. B. WIGGINS IRON WORKS 

20 Years Experience — All Types of Iron Works 
1008 W. Bay - 236-8153 Nights, Sunday & Holidays - EL 4-4498 
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



J. W. SAPP 
GARAGE 

Complete Auto Repairs 
236-2374 
306 Hwy. 80 Savannah, Ga. 



lolling the intellect, is still very 
much alive in our Jewish set-up 
throughout the world, including 
the United States. 

Another portion of our Jewish 
tradition worth emphasizing is the 
proverbial Jewish tendency to- 
wards liberalism in politics and 
social thought. 

It is well known that Jews play- 
ed a great role in the political 
and social revolutions of modern 
times, beginning with the revolu- 
tion in Germany of 1848 and in- 
cluding the two Russian Revolu- 
tions of 1905 and 1917. What is 
perhaps less well known is the 
penchant of the average Jew for 
liberal movements. In the United 
States, where they constitute an 
important section of the popula- 
tion of the big cities, the jews 
have invariably cast their vote on 
the side of liberalism, often turn- 
ing the tide in favor of liberal 
candidates, as it was the case in 
1 960, when John F. Kennedy was 
elected by a small majority. 

These are but a few fragmentary 
parts of a long Jewish heritage 
stretching over 4,000 years. They 
will still constitute the matrix of 
contemporary Jewish life. They 
still are part and parcel of the 
hopes and aspirations ol all for- 
ward-looking men. 

If the Jewish heritage is not to 
be lost, and is to continue to func- 
tion in the life of the Jewish peo- 
ple and humanity, there must be 
inheritors ready and eager to carry 
forward the great tradition that 
has been bequeathed us. This poses 
a challenge to our youth, just as 
it places an obligation on us to do 
what we can to transmit our heri- 
tage to our children and children's 
children. 



Savannah, Ga. 

Henry Belasko began his career 
as Cantor at Congregation B'nai 
B'rith Jacob with the High Holy 
Day services. 

Arthur W. Solomon Jr. has been 
named as the acting executive di- 
rector fo 500 For Progress. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Arun- 
del announced the engagement of 
their daughter, Tanya Caro, to Dr. 
Herbert Barclay Goodman of Sa- 
vannah, Ga. 

The bride-elect was graduated 
from Norwich Academy and Beck- 
er Junior College, Worchester, 



Car (are 
Servicenter 

Tires- Batteries-Accessories 
Complete Brake Service 
Expert Tune-Ups 

Dial AD 2-5653 
2100 Montgomery St. 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



AAA Floor 
Sanders 

Floor Sanding & Finishing 
Cleaning & Waxing 

FREE ESTIMATES 

G. Norman 

88 Pine Valley Road 

355-2724 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



Buy an Israel Bond! 



SCHUMAN'S TEXACO 
SERVICE STATION 

Dial 234-6165 
12 Bull St. Savannah, Ga. 



Thunderbird 
Motel 

SWIMMING POOL 
& SUN DECK 

Air Conditioned - Telephone & 
TV - Family Units - Wall-To- 
Wall Carpeting - King Size Beds 
If Preferred - Restauants Near 

By - Open Year Round 
— 42 Ultra Modern Units — 
Luxury Living 
Economy Rates 
Your Hosts, 
Stanley and Mildred Fulghum 

AD 4-3496 

3 Miles S. on U.S. 17 & U.S. 17A 
Ogeechee Road 

VISIT OUR NEW 

Thunderbird 
Inn 

Dial 232-2661 

611 W. Oglethorpe St. 
(Plaza) 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



65 



Carter Floor 
Surfacing Co. 

Installation 
In or Out of Town 

Tile - Hardwood Floors 

Servicing - Finishing 
Cleaning - Waxing 
Free Estimates 
All Work Guaranteed 
W. H. "Bill" Carter 
754 E. Duffy AD 4-5897 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



RUBBER STAMPS 

IMMEDIATE SERVICE 
Marking Devices - Seals 

Corporation Supplies 
Shipping Room Supplies 
Signs - Stamps - Badges 
Stencils 

Dial 233-0678 

Manufactured In Savannah 
By . . . 

Eastern Supply Co, 

HARRY M. REINHARD, 
Owner 
2112 Drayton St. 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



Earl Ginn's 

Takeouts 

Seafood - Chicken 
Hamburger Steaks 

1 1 :30 to :30 Tue. thru Sun. 
Closed Mondays 
Public and Private Dining 
Rooms Available 
2800 Skidaway Rd. 

EL 4-5411 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



Nursery 



Thorough Pre-School 
Training Emphasis On 
Preparation for First Grade 

Transportation Furnished 

8406 Marcus Place EL 5-5973 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



SAVANNAH 
SEPTIC TANK SERVICE 

AD 4-2765 
2 Gilbert Ave. Savannah, Ga. 



J. D. WILLIAMS 
GULF SERVICE STATION 

AD 2-9110-1408 Montgomery 
354-9128-8408 White Bluff Rd. 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



Harrison 
Monument Co. 

QUALITY MONUMENTS 

At Reasonable Prices 
Carter B. Harrison, Owner 
Visit Our Display Near 
Bonaventure Cemetery 
At Thunderbolt, Ga. 

305 Bonaventure Rd. 

236-1290 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



T. J. Hopkins, Inc. 
Electrical Contractor 

Wiring - Fixtures 
Repaid - Appliances 
HOTPOINT - GIBSON 

AD 4-6606 
1002 Montgomery St. 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



Andrew King 
Roofing & Sheet 
Metal Works 

New Roofing 
Roof Repairing & Painting 

2031 New Mexico 

AD 6-6484 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



IN BUSINESS SINCE 1907 

LOUIS C. 

MATHEWS 

FRESH SEAFOOD 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dial ADams 2-1141 

518 W. Broad 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



Mass., where she received an as- 
sociate of science degree. She is a 
member of Sigma Tau Upsilon 
sorority. She is employed at Mount 
Zion Hospital, San Francisco, 
Calif, in the pathology depart- 
ment. 

The future bridegroom is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Abraham 
Goodman of Savannah. He re- 
ceived his bachelor of arts degree 
from Emory University and M. D. 
degree from the Medical College 
ci Georgia. He is a member of Al- 
Pi Delta Epsilon, Phi Sigma and 
Alpha Pi Omega honorary frater- 
nity. 

He served his internship at the 
U. S. Public Helath Service Hos- 
pital, New York, and is in military 
service as lieutenant commander 
at the Public Health Hospital in 
San Francisco. 

The wedding is to be held Sun- 
day, October 18, in New York City 
after which the couple will reside 
in San Francisco. 

Mark Gottesman, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. James Gottesman, "was 
bar mitzvah at Congregation B. B. 
Jacob. 

Robin Michael Sherman, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Myer Sherman, 408 
East 46th Street, was bar mitzvah 
at Agudath Achim Synagogue. 

Arthur Leon Cooper, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Sol Cooper of SO E. 67th 
St., was bar mit/vah at B. B. Jacob 
Synagogue. 

Percy T.. Paderewski, 58, native 
Savannahian and a former mem- 
ber of the Savannah Bar, died in 
Sarasota, Fla., after a short illness. 




W 



Abba S. Eban, Deputy Prime Min- 
ister of Israel, was principal speaker 
at the opening dinner session of a 
history -making two-day conference 
I oil the United Jewish Appeal Scp- 
| temper 24, at New York City's Bilt- 
| mere Hotel. 



AUTO PARTS 

Complete Line of 
New Auto Parts 
For All Makes & Models 

CENTRAL 

Tire & Storage Co. 
Dial AD 6-9876 

241 Drayton 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



Ed & Lester 

Carter s 
Service Station 

Wash - Wax - Lube - Tires 
Tubes - Batteries - Accessories 
Tune-Ups - Repairs 

ROAD SERVICE 

Pick-Up & Delivery 

Dial 355-9175 

130 W. Derenne Ave. 
at Montgomery 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



SEVEN-ELEVEN 
MINIT STORE 

Your One Stop Store 

355-4607 

1 Montgomery Crossroads 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



Phillips 
Upholstery Shop 

Any Type Upholstery 
For Automobiles - Boats 
Furniture 
Boat & 
Convertible Tops 

232-2172 

455 Montgomery St. 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



Tim Waddell 

Residential - Commercial 
Industrial 

Interior & Exterior Painting 

FREE ESTIMATES 

AT J, WORK GUARANTEED 

109 Brady AD 2-3573 

SAVANNAH, GA. 



66 



The American Jewish TlMES-OUTLOOk 



October, 1964 



ATLANTA - SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



Jewish Young Adults 

(Continued from Page 16) 



DANCE SHELL SERVICE 

MINOR TUNE-UPS 
ROAD SERVICE — FRONT END WORK 

PICK-UP & DELIVERY 




"Service Is Our Business' 
ATLANTA, GA. 



2174 N. Druid Hills Road 
At Expressway 
636-0411 



CURTIS AMERICAN SERVICE 

GRANT PARK AREA 
Harold B. Curtis, Jr., Owner 
Minor Repairs 



448 Boulevard, S.E. 



Atlanta, Georgia 



FLORAL FAIR, INC. 

Fine Flowers — Friendly Service 
DICK TIMMONS, Mgr. 



2968 Druid Hills Rd. N.E. 



ATLANTA, GA. 



Dial 636-7569 



Kiddie - Land 

NURSERY SCHOOL 

Serving Lakewood Heights 
and Southeast Section 

Children of All Ages 
Transportation Furnished 
Supervised Play in 
Divided Groups 

MA 2-0860 

1668 Oak Knoll Cir., S.E. 
ATLANTA, GA. 



Otis Johnson's 
Garage 

ROAD and WRECKER 
SERVICE 

General Auto Repairs 
Motor Tune-Ups 
Low Overhead 
Reasonable Rates 

1889 Butler Ln ME 4-5509 

DECATUR, GA. 



EVE'S 
SALON DE BEAUTE' 

Complete Beauty Service 

ME 4-2733 
2171 Briarcliff Rd., N.E. 
ATLANTA, GA. 



CHUCK'S 
GULF SERVICE 

MR. CHUCK SUTTLES 

606 Stewart Ave., S. W. 
ATLANTA, GA. 



POUNDS GARAGE 

E. W. (Rooster) Pounds, 
Owner 

AUTO REPAIRING 

Decatur - Avondale 
& Dekalb County 

Specialising in 
Tune-Ups & 
Automatic Transmission 
Repairs 
Dial DR 7-6528 
6 Lake St., Avondale Estates 
ATLANTA, GA. 



Brookhaven 

Pharmacy 

J. T. WEATHERSBY 
Registered 
DRUGGISTS 
PRESCRIPTION 
SPECIALISTS 

We Deliver 
4001 Peachtree Road, N.E. 
CE 3-6701 
ATLANTA, GA. 



dates and the kind of dates they 
want to meet. 

The medium-age group, the sub- 
group which is least "connected" 
to local institutions (such as the 
Center or the synagogue) is also 
the most affluent subgroup. It is 
best able to make use of a variety 
of resources under private, com- 
mercial or communal sponsorship. 
We attribute their mobility and 
their lack ol "connectedness" with 
local communal institutions to a 
number of factors — involvement 
with educational institutions, ser- 
vice in the Armed Forces, involve- 
ment with professions and to the 
family-centered quality of life in 
the suburban Centers which tends 
to offer little to the unmarried 
young adult in the way of social 
opportunities. 

This medium-age group is also 
the most numerous of the avail- 
able young adult subgroups. The 
members of this group are, in a 
sense, a large consumer market 
lor which the Centers and a host 
of other "producers" ol services 
for young adults are in competi- 
tion. These other producers of 
services include private promoters 
of Lonely Hearts Clubs and massive 
social dances, as well as social 
agencies such as fund-raising or- 
ganizations, synagogues and Jew- 
ish Community Centers. Social 
welfare services such as Centers 
have not traditionally viewed 
themselves as having to "compete" 
for clients. Therefore, the Center 
plays a cooperative role with these 
other producers, offering- to co- 
ordinate services and avoiding 
overt competition. At the same 
time, most of the other producers 
are hard at work grabbing their 
share of the market. 

In our analysis of demographic 
data we find no evidence that 
there has been a Jewish popula- 
tion explosion, in the United 
States, but even if there has been 
a Jewish population explosion, we 
would still expect that in the next 
decade the number of Jewish 
young adults who use the Centers 
will be less than it is today be- 
cause of social factors such as 
earlier marriages, more people 
marrying, education, military ser- 
vice and the generally high mo- 
bility of this population. However, 
the factor which has had the great- 



est impact on the participation 
patterns of the Jewish young adult 
population has been the educa- 
tional experiences of this age 
group. Estimates of 62 % of Jew- 
ish young people between 18 and 
!!1 years of age attending college 
are probably conservative and 
there is some evidence that the 
proportion may be 75% or more. 
The geographic mobility of young 
adults in general is high, but it is 
even higher among Jewish young 
adults because of their high edu- 
cational level and the occupation- 
al patterns of a highly-educated 
population. 

The courtship activities of voting 
adults is one of the most interest- 
ing and significant problems dealt 
with in the study. One factor which 
influences the structure and pro- 
gram of all young adult social 
groups and organizatons is interest 
in opportunities for courtship. 
The term "courtship opportuni- 
ties" refers to activities such as 
dances and cocktail parties which 

Do Your Part! 
Contribute to the North 
Carolina Home for the 
Jewish Aged 



THE 
BOAR'S HEAD 

Continental Cuisine 

AD 3-7150 
1 N. Lincoln Savannah, Ga. 



GEORGE H. CARTLIDGE 
IGNITION SERVICE 

Dial 234-2321 
11 Liberty Savannah, Ga. 



TRACY O. DIXON, 
INC. 

Grading Contractor 

354-4571 
2219 Fernwood Ct. 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



MARY'S FASHION AIRE 

Your Beauty Is Our Business 
354-5735 
4502 Waters Ave. 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



October, 1964 

Ire specifically designed lo enable 
males and females to meet. Of 
course, such opportunities exist in 
lay activity, from playing poker 
to serving on a planning commit- 
tee, so long as one person present 
is of a different sex from the 
others, but these activities are not 
planned to be courtship activities. 

The general response of Center 
professionals and many other 
community leaders to courtship ac- 
tivities for young adults was found 
to be overwhelmingly negative — 
attitudes ranged from derisive and 
disapproving to antagonistic. Mass 
dances and other kinds of activi- 
ties which attract young adults in 
large numbers are viewed with 
disdain and they are considered to 
he inappropriate for Center pro- 
gramming. Center professionals 
place great stress on programs 
which contain educational, cul- 
tural and social value qualities. 

This negative response of the 
Center to courtship activities ap- 
pears to create a gulf between the 
Center and the young adult, dis- 
couraging participation by this 
group in Center programs. Al- 
though a large percentage of un- 
married Jewish young adults seek 
the kinds of courtship opportuni- 
ties that can be offered to them 
at Centers, they are discouraged 
I))' the attitude of Center person- 
nel to this need. Their desire to 
participate in courtship activities 
o their own choosing (and their 
lack of interest in Center-condon- 
ed programs) is defined as "self- 
centeredness' and "immaturity" by 
many Center workers. 

Closely related to courtship is 
the need of most young adults to 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



67 



BLAIR 

Construction Co. 

Driveways 

Patios 
Sidewalks 
Concrete Driveways 
Asphalt Driveways 

798-3994 

Meadowbrook Drive 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



"circulate" — to find social me- 
chanisms which will enable them 
to meet new people easily and 
quickly, both dates and friends. 
This need is particularly intense 
for a highly-educated population 
because of their high degree of 
mobility (in both the geographic 
and social-psychological sense). In 
this regard also, Jewish young 
adults find the response of the 
Center to this aspect of their needs 
negative and unrewarding. 

A special problem for the Cen- 
ter is found in the older unmar- 
ried young adult, the individual 
over 28 years of age. This is a 
small part of the total national 
population, but it is composed of 
an extremely large proportion of 
people who will never marry. This 
never-marrying population is gen- 
erally unwelcome in social agen- 
cies which are not prepared to 
meet their special requirements, 
and many desperately need ways 
in which to participate meaning- 
fully in the social and cultural 
Hie of their community. 




Dore Schary, national chairman of 
the Anti-Defamation League, stated 
that upwards of $14 million is spent 
annually by the Radical Right and 
its Extreme Conservative allies. He 
said that this figure may rise to 
$25 million during 1964 and added 
that lunatic fringe organizations 
which include religious and racial 
bigotry in their extremist views, will 
add $1.5 million to the sum available 
for current attacks upon the demo- 
cratic system. 



Starters — Generators 

Magnetos 
E xchanged — Repaired 

HECK BOSWELL 

Auto Electric 
Company, Inc. 

125 Sand Bar Ferry Rd. 
Dial PA 4-1745 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



OPHIE La GARO^fER 

BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

"Builder of Quality Homes" 
ALTERATIONS — ADDITIONS 
RE 3-2510 

Augusta, Ga. 



2106 Greene 



JEFF TERRELL 

PAINTING CONTRACTOR 



COMMERCIAL & INDUSTRIAL 
RESIDENTIAL 



Dial PA 2-5693 



Augusta, Ga. 



ROBERT W WILSON 

ROOFER & TINSMITH 

Over 20 Years Experience 
SPECIALIZING IN REPAIRS 
PA 4-3384 

1129 - 12th Avenue Augusta, Ga. 



CARTER 
ELECTRIC CO., Inc. 

Electrical Contractors 

724-8201 
1503 Hicks Augusta, Ga. 



E. E. WALLACE 

WALLPAPER & PAINTING 
CONTRACTOR 

PA 4-8653 

1 Hale Augusta, Ga. 




BELL OIL CO. INC, 

Jobbers of Shell Products 
Telephone PArk 4-5572 



20341/2 Savannah Road 



Augusta, Ga. 



GEORGE R DeMORE 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

RESIDENTIAL — COMMERCIAL 
17 Years Experience 
RE 3-4744 

2704 Hazel St. Augusta, Ga. 



68 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



GEORGE W. BROWN 



CONTRACTOR 



GRAVEL — FILL DIRT — SAND 
SEWERS — WATERLINES — SEPTIC TANKS 
Complete Installations 
DITCH DIGGING — CONCRETE WORK 
TRUCK — TRACTOR — BACKHOE RENTALS 



733-0167 



215 Hightower Drive 



Martinez, Ga. 



COLBERT CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Residential — Commercial 

FREE ESTIMATES 
Specializing in Masonry Work 

20 Years Experience 
PA 4-3452 

2011 Agnes St. (Turpin Hill) Augusta, Ga. 



Medical Center 
Motel 

INC. 

45 UNITS 

AIR CONDITIONED 
TELEVISION 

PA 2-4828 

1480 Gwinnett St. 

AUGUSTA, 



University 
Motel 

SWIMMING POOL 

68 UNITS 

FREE TV 
AIR CONDITIONED 
ELECTRIC HEAT 

724-8204 

1410 Gwinnett St. 
GEORGIA 



CHARTER SERVICE — ANYWHERE, ANY TIME 
LEARN TO FLY— PERSONALIZED INSTRUCTIONS 



Augusta Aviation, Inc. 



REgent 3-8970 
REgent 6-9512 



AUGUSTA, GA. 



Daniel Field 
Since 1940 



A. D. WRIGHT 

PAINTING CONTRACTOR 

Interior and Exterior — Floor Sanding 
RE 6-9092 

2278 Pund Avenue Augusta, Georgia 



BOWERS EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

SALES - SERVICE & PARTS 
Your Johnson Motor & Boat Headquarters 

Telephone RE 6-1479 

2518 Dean's Bridge Road Augusta, Georgia 



OTIS G. (ARTLEDGE, JR. 

BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

QUALITY CONSTRUCTION WITH 
PERSONAL ATTENTION 

Dial 733-5840 



Bel Air Road 



Evans, Ga. 



Changing Styles 
in Jewish Ferums 

(Continued from Page 21) 

changing styles in Jewish forums— 
to include the topic because the 
various fund raising groups had 
presented Israel as a general topic 
in their mass meetings, even 
though the specific topic may not 
havr: been touched on, certainly 
not in the way in which a forum 
program would present it. The 
committee would simply act on 
the basis of their past experience 
in attempting to elicit audience 
interest. 

This is not the case however in 
a crisis situation. An Arab erup- 
tion over the new water pipeline 
in Isreal will spontaneously arouse 
an over-riding interest in Israel 
and the specific issue. Israel, too, 
plays a most important role as the 
focus for Jewish music- and dance 
activities. The scintillating' and 

o 

joyous character of its folk art 
seems to be more appealing to a 
new generation of American Jews 
for whom the East European scene 
is altogether too esoteric, and Is- 
raeli artists arrive in sufficient 
number and variety in the United 
States. Our problem is to select 
those which meet minimal stan- 
dards of performance quality. 

Occasionally one fivds an effort 
to compress what is content for 
a lifetime of study into a series of 
three or four lectures. Program 
planners are caught 1> (ween the 
interest on the part of their con- 
stituency in a course in Jewish 
history, for example, and the un- 
willingness of the adult to make a 
commitment to attend iwenty or 
forty sessions. A number of ways 
have been found to meet this prob- 




Rabbi Meir Felman, spiritual lead- 
er of Congregation Judea Center, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. was chairman of 
the convention of the Rabbinical 
Council of America, held at Pine- 
ville Hotel, Fallsburg, N. Y. 



Bowman's 
Service Station 

Complete Auto Service 

Tires ~ Tubes - Batteries 
Road Service 

PA 2-9171 

1201 12th Augusta, Ga. 



GUY B. COX 

PAINTING 
CONTRACTOR 

733-0230 

Wrightboro Road 
P. O. Box 379 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



SNIDER'S 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Industrial Wiring 
& Service 

824-9566 
Route 1 824-9566 
JACKSON, S. C. 



W. E. BELL 

Building Contractor 

Specializing in 
Insurance Losses 
Restoring Fire 
Damage 



Home Building 

Itemized Estimates 
Furnished 

736-1892 

MARTINEZ, GA. 



October, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



69 



lem. One way is to separate the 
course of Jewish history into logi- 
cal periods and to handle these in 
a series of short courses. Another 
is to consider each session as a 
separate and complete entity so 
that those who are unable to at- 
tend every session do not feel that 
they are therefore unable to par- 
ticipate. Another is to select certain 
turning points or crises in Jewish 
history and to present this sampl- 
ing in three or four sessions, as a 
precursor to a subsequent full 
blown course. 

The speakers who are sought 
for these lecturers must be the 
outstanding authorities on each 
subject, or at least that is how 
program committees view their 
responsibility. Second best will not 
do. They recognize that the names 
of the lecturers will not be known 
to most of the audience, but they 
must have a lecturer whose list of 
achievements will impress the 
membership. Fewer and fewer 
Jews today know who the out- 
standing personalities in Jewish 
life are. And in a sense, part of our 
educational job is to acquaint our 
people with them. The receptions 
which are organized after the lec- 
ture in some measure achieve this 
purpose. 

The Jewish Community Center 
of Scranton, Pa., does even better 
than that. With an eye for the 
building of positive Jewish atti- 



UNITED VAN LINES 
PA 4-7569 

Local - Long Distance 



Augusta Transfer 
& Storage Co. 

828 Fenwick 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



MOTELS 

Modern, Comfortable Units 
COOKING ALLOWED 

Dial RE 3-9163 

Dixie Court 

2249 Milledgeville Rd. 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



tudes among its youth, it arranges 
for dinners prior to lorum pro- 
grams to which the speaker is in- 
vited to join with a high school 
age group. These youth thus have 
an opportunity to socialize with a 
new kind ot "hero", in the hope 
that some displacement of the 
actor-athlete hero image will make 
room for the Jewish intellectual 
hero image. 

ingenuity in human relation- 
ships is to be seen, too, in the pio- 
neering efforts of synagogues and 
Centers in some communities 
where the bond of common inter- 
set in adult Jewish education 
makes possible jointly sponsored 
forum programs. One wonders how 
long it will take for the leadership 
of these institutions to recognize 
that assimilative cultural forces 
and lime are working against 
Jewish survivalists. Jointly spon- 
sored forums are not the panacea, 
but they represent the direction 
in whish adult Jewish educators 
will have to look, if they are to 
affect the balance of cultural 
forces. 




Abraham Feinberg, prominent 
New York businessman and philan. 
thropist, who made a family gift of 
a million dollars for a Graduate 
School at the Weizmann Institute 
of Science in Rehovoth, Israel. The 
Feinberg School awarded its first 
PH.D. to an American-trained scien- 
tist, Dr. Benjamin S. Benjaminov. 



Austin 
Ornamental Iron 
Works 

E. C. Cave F. V. Austin 

PArk 4-3840 

RAILINGS - COLUMNS 
FIRE ESCAPES 

916 Fenwick 
: AUGUSTA, GA. 



Fleming 
Beauty Salon 

Serving Fleming Heights 
and Vicinity 
Air Conditioned 
Bleaching - Tinting 
Individual Hair Styling 
Mrs. Estelle Stewart, Owner 

798-5330 
Evenings by Appointment 
2527 Peach Orchard Rd. 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



EDWARDS 
Top & Body Works 

"Satisfaction is Our Success" 
AUTOMOBILE REPAIRS 
AUTO PAINTING 
24 Hr. Wrecker Service 

Specializing in 
Sports Car Repairs & Fibre Glass 
Body Repairs - Hand Tailored 
Seat Covers & Auto Tops 

Dial PA 2-8517 

904 Reynolds 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



Roy Garrard 
Electrical 



Commercial & Industrial 

A utomatic Control 
Wiring A Specialty 

Serving Augusta and 
Surrounding Areas 
Over 20 Years Experience 
2024 Gardner RE 3-4419 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



FLOOR SURFACING 

"Open Your Doors to 
Beautiful Floors" 

By 

Jack H. Tudor 

Sanding - Finishing 
and 
Installing Tile 
All Work Guaranteed 
Estimates Cheerfullv Given 

RE 3-2248 

Hardwood & Pine Flooring 

2102 Telfair 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



giiiiiiuiiiniiwiiiiuuiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiim 

COLUMBIA DECORATING SERVICE 

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL 

I All Work Guaranteed — Free Estimates 

I RE 6-8984 | 

I Lewiston Road Evans, Georgia I 

iiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiuowiiHiiiiii 1 mi iiiiiiiiiiiiiii.'iiniiiiimiiiiiininiiniiiiiuiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii iiiiiiiiim: iiiiiiiNii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiuiiui 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



Hardsn's Machine 
WeWing Shop 



MACHINE SHOP 

Complete Machine 
Service 
Repair Work of All Types 
24 Hr. Emergency Service 

2114 Peach Orchard Road 
PA 2M7937 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



J. C. Stockton 
& Son 

BUILDER FOR OVER A 
HALF CENTURY OF 

DISTINCTIVE HOMES 

Residential & Commercial 

1316 Wilson RE 3-5131 
If no answer dial RE 6-5549 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



Sander's Truck 
Transportation 
Co,, Inc. 

Light & Heavy Hauling 
Serving Ga., S. C, Tenn., 
N. C, Va., Md., & Pa., Ala. 
DIAL 722-5493 
Nights 824-1004 
Gwinnett St. Ext. 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



Augusta 
Piano Exchange 

Buy - Sell - Trade 

New & Used Rebuilts 

Tuning & Repairing 

625 15th PA 4-3900 

Nights Dial RE 3-0487 
Across from Sears 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



70 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



October, 1964 



AUGUSTA - STATESBORO, GA. 



ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

AUTOMOTIVE 
SERVICE 



Safchi 
Auto Service 



1215 Reynolds 
DIAL PA 2-0088 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



R. C. HEARD 

TRUCKING CO. 

736-9780 
Dennis Rd. Martinez, Ga. 



Neon & Billboard 

Outdoor Advertising 
Sales and Rentals 
Plastic and Metal Letters 
Crane Service 
Free Estimates 

764-5649 

If No Answer Call 764-3746 

Dixie 
Neon Service 

Laircey St. Statesboro, Ga. 



REEVES ELECTRIC 
WORKS & SUPPLY CO. 

722-5537 
1202 Reynolds Augusta, Ga. 



COLONIAL 
UPHOLSTERING CO. 

Modern & Antique 

PA 4-7819 

2047 Milledgeville Road 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



Southern Welding 
& Machine Co., Inc. 

1789 15th St. 733-9483 
. AUGUSTA, GA. 



Kenan's Print 
Shop 

Welcome to Kenan's 
764-2514 
25 Siebald Statesboro, Ga. 



NELL'S 
BEAUTY SALON 

DESIGNERS OF SMART 
COIFFEURS 
COMPLETE BEAUTY 
SERVICE 
Air Conditioned 
Phone RE 6-8308 
for appointments 

Free Parking 
2114 Central Ave. 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



EDNA BADER 
COIFFURES 

722-4568 
Southern Finance Bldg. 
Room 312 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



AUGUSTA 
BLUE PRINT CO. 

Photostat Prints 
722-4371 
15 8th St. Augusta, Ga. 



University 
Reweaving Co. 

Damaged Garments 
Rewoven 
724-3341 

1209 Railroad Ave Augusta, Ga. 



Hensley's Florist 

Free Delivery - Open Sunday 

733-0224 
1525 Dade Augusta, Ga. 



GI Auto Parts 

Wholesale & Retail 

RE 6-2593 

iy 2 Miles E. of Gate 1 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



Henry E. Etterle 

Building Contractor 

Rt. 1, Box 76 736-8317 
(Hickory Dr.) Evans, Ga. 



JOHNSTON INSURANCE 
& REAL ESTATE 

28 Siebald 764-5010 
STATESBORO, GA. 



Advertising Index 

PAGE " PAGE 



Adair Standard Elenr'c Ser. Sta. 58 

Aker's Center Barber Shop _ 48 

Allen Lumber Co _ . 58 

Allen Radio & TV Service 57 

Anderson Petroleum Co 57 

B 

Barlowe Painting Co. _ 46 

Batson Oil Co. 57 

Joel T. Broyhill 12 

C 

Chesapeake Corporation 15 

City Lumber Co. - - — 28 

L. B. Clardy Co. - 48 

Cut Rate Window Cleaners 10 

D 

Dixie Bedding Co. ..... Inside back cover 

F 

First Federal Savings & Loan 

Association ... Inside front cover 

G 

Giant Foods — 3 

Gill's Coffee - 3 

E. P. Griffin Electric Sewer 

Cleaning Co 57 

H 

Harrison Realty Co. _ 46 

Hennis Freight Line 43 

Hopkins for Congress Committee 23 

Louis S. Horton Co, Inc. 57 

Hotel Roanoke _ Inside front cover 

Jackson Studios - 5 *f 

Johnson Democratic Headquarters 4 
Ii 

H. G. Latimer & Son - — 36 

Laughridge's *>' 

Levin Brothers — — *» 

Mc 

McAdenville Nursery _. 28 

M 

Major League Stesk House __ — 37 

Marian. Minsian — — 14 

Martin Builders - — jjjj 

Modern Texaco Service Station ._. - 28 

Montaldos— Richmond, Va. — — 14 

Morgan's Drug Store - — 58 

N 

Norman Shell Service Station .. - 28 
O 

Richard D. Obenshom — 12 

Old Mansion Coffee 1J 

P 

62 

9 



Phillips-Robinson Co. 

Piedmont Airlines — — 

Poff Campaign Headquarters 

Inside front cover 

Pollard & Bagby — — 14 

R 

Republican Party of Virginia 

A. Leonard Rhyne - --■ 

Richard Ruhle Refrigeration Co. 

S 

Satisfactory Sanitation Co. 

Dave E. Satterfield 

Security Federal Savings & Loan 

Association J° 

Sharps Motel - y± 

Skyland Battery & Ignition Co. 4f 

Smith Texaco Service . o ' 

Snider's Electric Co. 68 

Southern Dairies •> 

A Man For All 

Seasons 

(Concluded from Page 62) 
Our emphasis is not on one 
group at Fort Lee. We take good 
care of the single boys. Each 
month a station-wagon load heads 
up the turnpike to Richmond to a 
dance at the Jewish Community 
Center. On other occasions the 
)x>ys visit the Center and the Jew- 
ish young ladies of Richmond on 
their own. Our bachelors' group 
includes men of many talents — a 
semi-professional folk dance in- 
structor, a cantor/ a guitar player. 

Try to reach the Jewish Chapel 
on the phone! It's all but impos- 
sible. Stopping by is 'the quickest 
way. The men leave the chapel 
having undertaken another pro- 
ject, volunteering to conduct a 
service, agreeing to contribute 
another dollar to UJA, promising 
to attend the next adult educa- 
tion class or perhaps just telling 
themselves, I'm glad to be a Jew. 



Taylor & Sledd 3 

Thomas Shell Service 57 

Tri-State Plumbing Co. .:_ _> 58 

Bill Tucker, Inc. 57 

V 

Virginia Democrats for Goldwater 

& Byrd Back cover 

W 

Watson Insurance Agency 1.. 46 

E. H. Wells Concrete 

Construction Co. ._ _. 57 

Louis Williams and Son — 47 

VIRGINIA 

Danville : i ...27 

Hampton - 26 

Harrisonburg 27 

Lynchburg 25 

Martinsville .27 

Newport News _ _26 

Norfolk . 26 

Petersburg 26 

Portsmouth _ 27 



Richmond 
Roanoke 



Asheville 
Charlotte 
Fayetteville 
Goldsboro _ 
Greensboro 
High Point 

Kinston 

New Bern . 
Raleigh 



NORTH CAROLINA 



-17-21 
22-25 



_..51-52 

-33-34 

47-48 

38-40 

29-32 

_ 49-50 

41-43 

_ 36-3-7 

_1 28 

44-45 

35 

45 



Rocky Mount — 

Wilmington _ 

Wilson 

Winston-Salem _ 46 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston _ 53 

Columbia — .57-58 

Greenville 54-55 

Myrtle Beach 57-58 

Spartanburg 55 

TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga — 68-60 

Knoxville — -— 58 

Nashville - - 62-63 

Oak Ridge -'- - -61 

GEORGIA 

Atlanta — -- - 66 

Augusta 67-70 

Savannah 64-68 

Statesboro 70 



Grimes 
Jewelry Co. 

23 S. Main 764-3323 
STATESBORO, GA. 




MALT LIQUOR 

BV MATIOMAL. 

M&M Distributing 
Company 

345 Hale Street 
PA 2-6963 Augusta, Ga. 




Full size (54")— Firm 
—Regular length (75"). 





Full size (54")— Firm 
-Extra length (80";. 



Full size (54")— Extra Firm 
-Extra length (80"). 



For the ultimate in healthful support and lasting com- 
fort, coordinate your Perfect Sleeper Mattress with a 
matching Perfect Sleeper box spring. 



Check these quality features in 
every Perfect Sleeper Mattress: 

• Comfort quilted ... no hidden buttons or 
tufts. 

• Serta 6-turn hourglass coils for relaxing com- 
fort plus firm support. 

• Exclusive Sertaliner ribbon 

springs work with coil springs $7Q50 

to distribute your weight even- £ %J each 
ly for head-to-toe support. Mattress or 

J r Box Spring. 



life! 



Made by a Serta Associate 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Serta 



SERTA OF NORTH CAROLINA 

DIVISION OF DIXIE BEDDING COMPANY, INC. 



GREENSBORO, 
NORTH CAROLINA 



SOUND Government Needs SOUND 



LEADERSHIP 



That Is WHY Many THOUSANDS Of 

Virginia Democrats 



Will VOTE 

Senator Barry 

GOLDWATER 

for 

PRESIDENT 



On NOVEMBER 3rd For 





Senator 



HARRY F. BYRD 

for Re-election for 

U. S. SENATOR 




WE Must Show By Our VOTES in NOVEMBER That We Demand Simple Honesty and Integrity 
of All Men in Government. This is the Urgent Duty of ry Citizen and Should Come Ahead of 
Party Politics, Personalities, and All OTHER Issue? A 

■4^ > 

A Virginia DEMOCRAT Who Votes for Senator GOLDWATER foi \ ^es NOT Affect 

His Right to Vote For Senator HARRY F. BYRD and Other Candidate^ e/ /& ^a Democratic 
Party in This and Future Elections. This is a Right Safeguarded for YOL^% °r Law, as Of- 
ficially Interpreted by the Attorney General of Virginia. 

Virginia Democrats for GOLDWATER u u BYRD 




505 East Franklin Street 



(Phone 648-1683) 



CLEM D. JOHNSTON, State Chairman 



Richmond 19, Virginia 
THOMAS C. BOUSHALL, Treasurer 








UNDER 

NORTH CAROl!»\ ASS 



"A ' 



m 



The Circuit Riding Rabbi Bus, Project of the North Carolina Associa tion 
Of Jewish Men, Visits ^Seymour Johnson Air Force Base 



November 196 




VOTE FOR EXPERIENCE 

• VOTE FOR A VOICE 

INSTEAD OF AN ECHO 



• • • 




ELECT 

DAVID E. STATTERFIELD, III 

TO CONGRESS 

THIRD CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 
Tuesday, November 3rd, 1964 



What's Up Downtown? 




At long last, we've moved into our new building at Broad 
and Third. We are thrilled with it, of course. We think you 
will be too. And although we're ready to serve your savings 
and home loan needs there now, we want to be completely 
ready before we have our grand opening celebration. Among 
other things, our temporary building has to be torn down 
and our parking lot expanded and beautified. Watch your 
newspaper for our grand opening dates. 

FIRST 
FEDERAL 

SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 
OF RICHMOND 



In your heart, you 
know he's right 

Vofe for 

BARRY GOLDWATER 



Tuesday, November 3, 1964 



(Political advertisement paid for by the Republican Party of Virginia — Robert J. Corber, Chairman) 





VOLUME XXIV • NOVEMBER 1964 



EDITORIALS- 



NUMBER 3 



Chester A. Brown, Editor 



Eddie Cantor 

In the lives of many of us there are times when a laugh 
would have as much therapeutic value as a dose of medicine. 
Those of us who were fortunate to have lived through the best 
years of the late and lamented Eddie Cantor will temper our 
sorrow at his passing with the realization of how much plea- 
sure he had given us and the rest of the world. 

In practical retirement since 1953, he was immeasureably 
grieved at the passing of his wife, Ida, to whom he had been 
I deeply attached. He had passed his retirement years continuing 
; with his many charities, and also continuing to encourage 
young men and women to develop histrionic talents. Over the 
years, he had given similar encouragement to Dinah Shore, 
: Eddie Fisher. Deanna Durbin and Bobby Breen, to mention 
just a few. 

Born Izzy Iskiwich on January 31, 1892, in the lower East 
I Side of New York city, he entered show business in an amateur 
j night contest at the age of 16. Thus began a career in the field 

of entertainment that saw him go from singing waiter at Coney 
I Island, through burlesque, vaudeville, musical comedy and 

radio, emerging as a top performer in each field. 

Mr. Cantor's memorial will be the love and esteem in 
jwhich he was universally held by his fellow Americans. No 
greater tribute can a man ask. 

Another Milestone In American 
Jewish History 

For the past 20 years, Dr. Samuel Belkin, president of 
Yeshiva University, has carved a distinctive place in history for 
ihimself and for the institution, America's oldest and largest 
university under Jewish auspices, now in its 78th year. The 
distinguished rabbinic scholar, educator, and author granted 
Semicha (Ordination) to his 72nd rabbi on March 8 when the 
Rabbi Isaac Eichanan Theological Seminary conducted its 
Torah Semicha Convocation for 28 young men who enter the 
rabbinical field. 

No one, it is believed, has ordained more rabbis than he. 

Semicha, which is the highest authority in Jewish learn- 
ting, dates back to the transfer of leadership from Moses to 
Joshua. Only orthodox rabbis attain this degree in Jewish 
studies, after many years of intensive and arduous study of the 
Talmud and Jewish law. 

For Dr. Belkin, Yeshiva University, and the American- 
Jewish community, this is a milestone. In its 67-years, the 
Rabbi Isaac Eichanan Theological Seminary has granted 
3emicha to over 1 ,000 rabbis — men who are serving in pulpits 
throughout the country, in military and civilian chaplaincy, 
in education and welfare, and in positions of leadership in the 
Jewish community. Of prime importance is the fact that the 
722 rabbis who were ordained by Dr. Belkin represent a 
generation of American-born scholars steeped in the rich 



traditions of Judaism's noble intellectual heritage and who are 
dedicated to its perpetuation and enhancement. 

Dr. Belkin has many other accomplishments to his credit, 
a record of achievement which is perhaps unmatched in the 
annals of higher education. Under his leadership, Yeshiva Uni- 
versity established the nation's first medical school under Jew- 
ish auspices: the nation's first woman's college under Jewish 
auspices; and graduate schools of social work, education, and 
science. For 20 years, Dr. Belkin has not lost sight of the fact 
that education and Jewish survival go hand-in-hand. 

It is hoped that the time is not too far off when the leader- 
ship of the Jewish community will learn to attach the same 
significance to this lifeline of our faith. 

Honor To Whom Honor Is Due 

One of the foibles of our American way of life is found 
in a tendency to wait until a man has shed his mortal 
shackles before according him any credit that might be due 
him for any contribution he might make in the direction of 
improving the lot of his fellow men. How much better it 
would be for all concerned if we were to deviate from this 
dubious practice and give due accolade to the recipient while 
he could still smell the roses and hear the plaudits. 

Such a pleasing departure occured on October 18th, in 
Charlottes' Temple Israel when 300 relatives and friends from 
far and near gathered to pay tribute to Charlotte's leading 
citizen, I. D. Blumenthal. Following the dinner, which recog- 
nized his 70th birthday, the various achievements of the hon- 
oree were recited, and in addition we were let into the secret 
of his many other unheralded and unsung activities that made 
him worthy of the honor accorded him. 

A man can be considered fortunate if his name is identi- 
fied with one outstanding achievement in which he has played 
a part. Indeed, most of us traverse this universe in the time 
allotted us, without making headlines for any good reason. 
Therefore it is a man beyond other men who can point to 
several accomplishments. 

As a prime mover in such outstanding accomplishments 
as the Circuit Riding Rabbi Project, the Institutes of Juda- 
ism at Wildacres, the North Carolina Home for the Jewish 
Aged, to name a few, I. D. Blumenthal has well earned the 
right to be considered North Carolina's finest contribution to 
American Jewry. 

In acknowledging the tributes and the gifts that were 
presented by Temple Israel and the North Carolina Associa- 
tion of Jewish Men, Dick displayed his characteristic humility. 
He has been accorded many honors in the past, but it was 
evident that he was deeply moved by the occasion. 

We echo the sentiments of all who were privileged to* 
attend this fine event when we say "I. D., May You Go From 
Strength To Strength." 



The American Jewish Times-Outlook, published monthly at 530 Southeastern Build tng. Greensboro. N. C. Chester A. Brown. Editor: David Bernstein, General Manager; 
Nathan Kessler. Manager, Virginia Office, Florence Byers. Virginia News Editor; Broad Grace Arrade, Richmond, Virginia. Member Seven Arts Feature Syndicate, Inc. J3.00 
>er year payable m advance. Seconc-Class Postage paid at Greensooro, X. C. Tne views expressed by contriDutors are not necessarily those of the publishers, out may 0« 
published in tne interest of freeaom of the press. The American Jewish Times -Outi.oojc is owned and eaitea solely as an independent enterprise and is not a Jewish com- 
munity undenalcing 



4 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



November, 1964 



PLAIN TALK B ? alfred segal 



Editorials __ 

Plain Talk — Alfred Segal 

Jacob Issaac's Attempt to Desalinize Sea Water — 

Harry Simonoff __ _. ._ 

Why Science Looks to the Future — Rabbi Samuel Umen 
Hillel in North Carolina — Rabbi Joseph H. Levine 

A Mother in Israel — Anita Engle 

Woman's Eyeview — Marianne Zeitlin 

The Visitors — Martin Silver ~ 

North Carolina 

Winston-Salem — Mrs. Stanley Tulman . ... 

Weldon-Roanoke Rapids — Louise Farber . 

Around Greensboro — ■ Mrs. William R. Fields 

Rocky Mount — Mrs. Arnold J. Kridel 

Jacksonville — Mrs. Jules Segerman 

Wilmington — Mrs. Daniel Retchin 

Fayetteville — Mrs. Alex Waitman 

Williamston — Mrs. Irving M. Margolis — 

Whiteville — Mrs. Martin Bernstein 

Statesville — ■ Mrs. Milton Steinberger _ 

Charlotte — Temple Israel Sisterhood — ■ Mrs. H. N. Friedman 

Charlotte Temple Beth El — Mrs. M. R. Bernstein 

Charlotte B'nai B'rith Women _. 

Raleigh — Congregation B'eth Meyer — Mrs. Oscar Legum 

Virginia 

Newport News — ■ Mrs. Martha B. Shapiro 

Southwest Virginia B'nai B'rith — Mrs. S. J. Lenette 

Richmond Business & Professional Hadassah 

Roanoke Beth Israel — Mrs. H. K. Goldstein 

Lynchburg _ - 

Norfolk — Mrs. William Schwartz 

South Carolina 

Columbia — Mrs. Bernard Laden 



GREEN CORNER 

It's in the city known as Green 
Corner". You may never before 
have heard of Green Corner. I 




ALFRED SEGAL 



hadn't either until the recent day 
when I met one of its inhabitants 

v. '.: ::: 1 . '::.!. cr.II Mr. Shabbosdec- 
kel. 

Our talk was of this and that 
and finally it came to the subject 
of change that has occurred in 
Jewish life in the U. S. A. . . .so- 
cial change, that is. 

"It's all so different," Mr. Shab- 
hosdeckel began, "and my town of 
'Green Corner offers as interesting 
an example as any. Let me tell 
you about Green Corner. I'm 
bringing the subject up because 
Xve just been taken into the 
fashionable Jewish country club of 
Green Corner. It carries the lovely 
name of Lilynook. 

""Mind you, Segal, I'm not mak- 
ing proud boast of being a new 
member of Lilynook. I can take 
■this social promotion without a 
rswelled head because, you see, be- 
sides having such high social stand- 
ing, I keep my head even higher 
.. . . toward the stars, you might say. 
In other words, I am a sort of 
philosopher as well. So I'm telling 
you all about Lillynook philoso- 
phically and historically. It's all a 
story of what has been going on 
in Green Corner's Jewish life, and 
in Jewish life all around the 
country . . . since the time, Ion?, 
lonqf agro when mv grandpa and 
grandma . . . they've gone up to 



heaven . . . came over here from 
Lithuania." 

Mr. Shabbosdeckel went histo- 
rically into Jewish life at Green 
Corner as it was lived when his 
grandparents arrived there early 
in the I880's. 

The Jewish population of Green 
Corner then was practically all of 
German origin . . . German Jews 
who, through all the years before, 
had come up high in the world . . . 
people big in business and nobly 
active in the philanthropic activi- 
ties of all of Green Corner. There 
was little or no philanthropy re- 
quired by the Jews of Green Cor- 
ner then; our German Jews were 
practiclaly all well-to-do. They had 
already founded the Lilynook 
Country Club. 

"They were fine people; they 
sensed their social duty as soon as 
the heavy Jewish immigration be- 
gan to flood into Green Corner 
in the 1880's. They formed com- 
mittees to look after the immi 
grants; they found a place in a 
house for Grandpa and Grandma, 
bought the furniture; they paid 
the rent for the place until Gt and- 
pa began earning enough as ped- 
dler. He went from house to house 
with a big bundle of notions on 
his shoulders. 
"That all had to do with the good 
religion of the German Jews of 
Green Corner. They had built a 
lovely temple, but their religion 
was beyond the temple in doing 
all that goodness for grandpas, 
grandmas, and all those other im- 
migrants out of Eastern Europe. 

"Socially, of course, they didn't 
mix with them, as is the way of 
human life generally. We all pick 
our company, and I myself never 
get mad when I hear of some non- 
Jewish organization that doesn't 
take in Jews. That's not at all 
important enough to worry about. 

"Socially, our good German 
Jews stuck exclusively to their Li- 
lynook Country Club of Green 
Corner. Not even all German 
Jews coidd get in there and, as for 
all East European immigrants, 
thev couldn't even dare dream of 
belonging to Lilynook. Thev were 
content to make a living, to bring 
up their children in the ways they 
should go. mavbe to save a little 
money. My own grandpa felt so- 



cailly successful enough because he 
had time early each morning to 
go to the synagogue before h 
piled his peddler's pack on his 
back." 

M r . Shabbosdeckel p a n s e d 
to contemplate all the 
changes that have taken place 
in Jewish life in Green 
Corner since then ... in the lives 
of immigrants and also at Lilynook 
Country Club . . . "Yes," he went 
on, "most of those immigrant 
grandmas managed to bring up 
their kids on the way they should 
go; they moved from tenements 
into houses of their own; they saw 
their sons through college to be- 
come doctors and lawyers, or they 
set them up in successful busines- 
ses. 

"Yes, here was a good new so- 
cial set growing up in the Jewish 
life of Green Corner. Some of 
them could afford to be ambitious 
enough to look up even to the 
height of Lilynook Country Club, 
toward becoming members there. 

"But, you know, Segal, how ex- 
clusive social life can get to feel. 
It likes to set up a high wall to 
keep others out, so those inside 
the wall can feel bigger. So it was 
at Lilvnook. Wh^n prosoerous 
descendants of the 1880 immigrant 
applied to get into Lilvnook. they 
were turned awav at first. 



3 
4 

5 
8 

10 
11 

12 
20 



6 
6 
17 
18 
18 
19 
22 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
31 



7 
7 
7 
7 
14 
15 



30 " 



"Mind you, Segal, I'm not find- 
ing fault;; my philosophy so well 
knows all human nature. In fact; 
some years ago I myself applied to 
get into Lilynook but was turned 
away, because, as I was told by my 
Lilynook friend who had handled 
my application, my ancestors had 
come over here on too recent a 
ship, as immigrants. 
'"But now, on second application, 
I'm finally in Lilynook. You see, 
there has been so much change in 
the Jewish life of Green Corner. 
So many of the East European im- 
migrants have become well o'd . . . 
big men in business . . . big men in 
the professions. The good old Ger- 
man population has dwindled 
away bv reason of death. The 
membership of the old temple 
which the Germans founded is 
now largely of the later immigra- 
tion. 

"Well, only last month, one day 
I entered Lilynook for the first 
time . . . and what do you know? 
Most of the members who were 
there that day I recognized as des- 
cendants out of the East European 
immigration. That's what's hap- 
pened in Jewish life." 

I asked him: "Mr. Shabbosdec- 
kel, in just what state is Green Cor- 
ner?" 

"It's all over the U. S.." he 
replied. 



November, 1964 The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 

Jacob Isaac's Attempt 
To Desalinize 
Sea Water 

By Harry Simonhoff 



The shortage of fresh water 
is becoming a problem in man) 
lands as the population grows and 
industry expands. Thus it should 
cause little surprise that President 
Johnson created a mild sensation 
when in 1963 at the New York 
dinner of the Weizmann In- 
situte he declared that the U. 
S. A. would join with Israel in 
seeking an economic process to 
extract salt out of sea water. It is, 
therefore, quite timely to recall 
that Jacob Isaacs of Newport at- 
tempted to interest President 
Washington and Secretary of 
State Jefferson in his invention of 
desalinization. 

Immediately before the Revolu- 
tion, Newport,, Rhode Island, be- 
came one of the most prosperous 
cities in all the thirteen English 
colonies. A small group of Jewish 
merchants contributed greatly, if 
not chiefly, towards making New- 
port a most important trade cen- 
ter, with New York trailing as a 
seaport. One of the lesser business 
men of this group was Jacob 
Isaacs who, however, could own a 
brigantine. Back in 1759 he was 
prominent enough to sign a joint 
letter with Aaron Lopez, Isaac 
Hart and Jacob Rodrigues Rivera 
appealing to the New York breth- 
ren for funds to build the New- 
port synagogue, which subsequent 
ly became famous. 

In 1772 Isaacs met with rever- 
ses, was declared insolvent and 
receded into obscurity.. After the 
war, he offered to build vessels 
with the best workman obtainable 
in Rhode Tsland or Massachusetts. 
He opened an insurance office and 
tried brokerage but couldn't eret 
anywhere. His difficulty in mak- 



ing a living is a commentary on 
the decline of commerce in New- 
port. But a more important cause 
of his personal decline lay in his 
absorption with the invention of 
a process to extract salt out ol sea 
water. 

Gorge C. Mason narrates in his 
Reminiscences of Newport that 
when President Washington visited 
Newport in the summer of 1790, 
Jacob Isaacs presented him with 
a "bottle of water extracted from 
ocean water, so free from saline 
matter as to answer for all com- 
mon and culinary purposes of 
fountain and river water." The 
historian goes on to say that "the 
President was pleased to express 
himself highly satsified therewith." 

Evidently Isaacs felt encouraged. 
In the spring of the following year 
he petitioned Congress, sitting in 
Philadelphia, that he had discov- 
ered a way of converting salt wa- 
ter into fresh water by a method so 
simple that vessels at sea could 
easily process sea water and use it 
for drinking and cooking. He of- 
fered to reveal the secret to thf 
U. S. A. for whatever compensa- 
tion the government should con- 
sider adequate for the time, effort 
and money he had expended on 
the invention. The House of Rep- 
resentatives referred the petition 
to the Secretary of State, Thomas 
Jefferson, in whose judgment on 
thinp-s scientific everyone had 
confidence. 

Tefferson took the matter seri- 
ouslv and calM in the t^ree b«>st- 
known American scientists of the 
dav; Dr. David Rittenh^use. Pr«<;i- 
d°nt of the American Prdlosonhi- 
cal Societv. TV. Oiso°r Wictnr, 
professor of Chemistry at the Col- 



lege of Philadelphia, and Dr. 
Hutchinson, professor of Chemis- 
try at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. With his usual thorough- 
ness the Secretary of State went in- 
to all previous experiments on the 
subject, from Lord Bacon through 
the various men of science in the 
16th, 17th and 18th centuries: he 
examined closely the findings of 
scientists in his own time. 

The experiments went on for 
two days but did not prove satis- 
factory. In order to give Isaacs a 
fair chance Jefferson was willing 
to work at any time from five in 
the morning to twelve at night to 
suit the convenience of the scien- 
tists. He devoted lour additional 
days and was present at all the 
experiments. Congress had ad- 
journed for the summer and reas- 
sembled at the end of October 
1791. The Secretary of State 
sent to the House a long report, 
which detailed each experiment 
and stated: 

"The distilled water in all in- 
stances was found on experiment 
to be as pure as the best pump 
water of the City: its taste indeed 
was not agreeable, but it was not 
such as to produce any disgust. In 
fact, we drink in common life, in 
many places, and under many 
circumstances, and almost always 
at sea a worse tasting and proba- 
bly a less wholesome water." 

Jefferson had crossed the Atlan- 
tic and knew from exnerience how 
disaoreeable the drinking and 
cooking water on ships could be. 
OrnS'narilv he would have been 
imn^ss^d with the results of the 
experimentation bv Tacob Isaacs 
as was President Washington. But 
the Secretary of State had gone so 



5 




HARRY SIMONHOFF 



deeply into the matter he was evi- 
dently disappointed that Isaacs 
had not progressed beyond the 
findings of the scientists of his 
day. He, therefore, declared in the 
report: "On the whole, it is evi- 
dent that Mr. Isaacs' mixture pro- 
duced no advantage, either in pro- 
cess or result of the distillation." 

What was particularly appeal- 
ing in the Isaacs method was the 
simplicity of its mechanism. A 
still for distilling water might be 
set up with such utensils as are 
found on any ship. Jefferson went 
on to advise: "Since the subject 
has been brought under observa- 
tion, it should be made the occa- 
sion of disseminating its know- 
ledge generally and effectually 
among the seafaring citizens ol 
the United States . . . Let the 
clearance for every vessel ... be 
printed on a paper; on the back 
thereof, shall be printed account 
of the essays, which have been 
made for obtaining fresh from 
salt water . . . describing the 
methods which have been fc\urid 
to answer for constructing extem- 
pore stills of such implements as 
are generally on board of every 
vessel, with a recommendation, in 
all cases where they shall have oc- 
casion to resort to this exp p di<«it 
for obtaining water, to publish 
the result of their trial in some 
gazette ... in order that others 
mav, bv th^ir success, be encour- 
aged to make similar trials, and 
be benefitpd bv anv imnnyvements, 
or new ideas, wnich may occur to 
them in practice." 

The reoort was read in Con- 
gress. Someone rm r1 " a motion a"d 
it was tabled. This endM the 
work of vpqrs and Tarob Tsaacs 
died in 1798 at an advanced age. 



f, 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



November, 1 964 




WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

MRS. STANLEY TULMAN, Correspondent 



Installation ceremonies of Tem- 
ple Emanuel Officers and Board 
Members were held on Friday 
night, Sept. 1 1 (Shabbat Shuva) 
in the course of the Service. Of- 
ficers installed were: Dr. I. Mes- 
chan — President, Philip Micha- 
love — 1st Vice Prsident, Dr. Nor- 
man Su:kin — 2nd Vice President; 
Irving Gendell — 3rd Vice Presi- 
dent; Ellis Berlin — Secretary; Mrs. 
Phil Robin - Treasurer. Those 
installed as Board Members for a 
two year term were. Fred Burk, 
Harris Clein, Mrs. Louis Cooper, 
Robert Saks, Dick Taylor and Hy 
Temin. Best wishes to all for a 
most successful term. 

A program titled "Those Won- 
derful Years" was given at the 
luncheon meeting of the Winston- 
Salem Chapter of Hadassah on 
Sept. 23 at Temple Emanuel. The 
script for the program was written 
by Mrs. Alice Solomon, Mrs. Ema- 
nuel Katzin and Mrs. Lewis Wol- 
Iberg. It traced the milestones in 
ihe history of Hadassah against 
the background of 20th century 
world affairs. Members who mo- 
deled fashions depicting styles of 
-each decade since 1900 were Mrs. 
'George Green, Mrs. I. A. Schafer, 
TVIrs. David Rose, Mrs. Moe Hor- 
owitz, Mrs. Bernard Ness, Mrs. Al 
"Roseman and Mrs. Max Muller. 
Bob McHone of WSTS Radio was 
narrator, and Mrs. Hy Temin ar- 
ranged and directed the program. 
She was assisted by Mrs. Phil Mi- 
<chalove and Mrs. Joe Reznick. 

Prior to the program, Mrs. Lew- 
is Wolberg, President of the Chap- 
ter, spoke of the great accomplish- 
ments of Hadassah and the ever- 
present need for more volunteer 
workers to carry out its present 
commitments in America and Is 
rael. Mrs. Gerald Licker, Member- 



ship Chairman introduced and an- 
nounced a total of nine new mem- 
bers. 

Members of the Luncheon Com- 
mittee were: Mrs. Melvin Brooks, 
Mrs. Moe Slovis, Mrs. Robert Sos- 
nik, Mrs. Lonard Clein, Mrs. My- 
ron Wagmeister, Mrs. Bernard 
Myers, Mrs. David Fineberg and 
Mrs. I. I. Cohen. 

Mazal Tov to grandmother (for 
the 7th time now) Anne Teichman 
on the birth of a son, H. Merrick, 
to Stuart and Darlene Teichman 
of Greensboro. 

The Sisterhood of Temple 
Emanuel held its annual Harvest 
Donor Lunchon on Wednesday, 
October 7th at the Temple. Chair- 
men were Mrs. Jack Waldman and 
Mrs. I. I. Cohen assisted by Mrs. 
Ben Clein, Mrs. Jack Manton, 
Mrs. Sam Jacobson, Mrs. Phil Mi- 
chalove, Mrs. Edward Kurtz and 
Mrs. George Seklin. The yellow 
tablecloths added a bright touch 
of autumn to the room and blen- 
ded with the rust and gold of the 
floral centerpiece on the dais. 
Mrs. Richard Backer presided and 
introduced guests and newcomers. 
An original musical skit titled 
"Half A Loafer" was presented 
with the following cast: Mrs Ber- 
nard Myers, Mrs. Phil Michalove, 
Mrs. Al Roseman, Mrs. Herbert 
Brenner, Mrs. Harris Clein, Mrs. 
Lonard Clein, Mrs. David Rose 
and Mrs. Bernard Ness at the pia- 
no. 

The past month has been a busy 
one for Bar Mitzvahs. Two took 
place at Temple Emanuel: Mark 
Robert Meyers, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Bernard Meyers, on Sept. 18; 
and Stephen Muller, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Max Muller, on October 
2nd. The parents of both boys 
(Please turn to Page 15) 



I 




A dance grcup from Yomi Day Camp of the 92nd Street YM-YWHA in 
New York were among performers at the United States Pavilion at the New 
York World's Fair, during the program of YM-YWHA Youth Day at the 

Fair. 




IF YOU c 
BELIEVE A MAN'S 
HOME IS HIS CASTLE, 
HOW COME YOU DON'T 
HAVE A MATTRESS BY 



KINGSDOWN 



AVAILABLE AT BETTER 
FURNITURE STORES 
EVERYWHERE 



November, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



7 




Newport News, Va. 

MRS. MARTHA B SHAPIRO, Correspondent 




Leaders of one of the most successful campaigns for Allied Jewish 
Appeal. The goal of $100,000.00 was oversubscribed. Left to right are Marvin 
Mazur, chairman of general solicitations; Walter Segaloff, general chair- 
man; William Roos, Initial gifts chairman. 



The Jewish Community Center 
Crand Club opened the season 
with Mr. John Colao, Director ol 
the National Council of Senior 
Citizens, as guest of honor. Mr. 
Colao, presented the local club 
with a charter of membership to 
the National Council. Mr. Samuel 
A. Mirmelstein introduced the 
guest and Mrs. Rose Garfinkel 
and Mrs. Belle Ruben served as 
hostesses at this meeting. 

The Monday morning sewing 
and bandage class is now in pro- 
gress with Mrs. Morris Gottiieb, 
advisory to the Club, in charge. 
A luncheon is served following 
the sewing session. 

Art and sculpture classes began 
the first of October with Louis 
Rosenfeld from Hampton Insti- 
tute as instructor. Classes are held 
weekly for beginners and ad- 
vanced students and all those in- 
terested in joining the classes are 
invited to get in touch with the 
Center as soon as possible. 



Mr. Ted Bare has taken over 
the Youth Program at the Center 
Competitive basketball is in pro- 
gress at this time for all teen agers 
with Sidney Becker, David Ellen- 
son, and Bobby Ruben serving 
as Captains. Basketball leagues 
lor boys 9-11 years and boys, 11-13 
years, will meet on Tuesday and 
Wednesday Evenings at 7:00 p. m. 

Plans are in progress for Satur- 
day evening socials, including Soc 
Hops and United Nations Dance. 

Mrs. Irving Berlin, chairman ol 
the Jewish Community Center 
Chamber Music Society, has an- 
nounced the program for the com- 
ing season. The first concert will 
feature the Bach Society on No- 
vember 8, which consists of eight 
musicians and are dedicated solely 
to presenting the works of Tohann 
Sabastian Bach. The second con- 
cert will present the Old Domin- 
ion Piano Quartet on Sunday, 
February 21, 1965. There are four 
artists in the group with Cary 
McMurran at his Mozart piano. 



On Sunday, April 25, the Feldman 
Quartet will be presented. This 
group was founded 18 years ago 
by the late I. E. Feldman of Nor- 
folk, violinist, teacher, and out- 
standing student of Chamber Mu- 
sic. 

Every Sunday afternoon is Fun 
Day at the Center and all young- 
sters are invited to join the vari 
ous groups. Alfreda Alexander 
will be on hand again to instruct 
in Arts and Crafts. 



S. W. Va. B'nai B'rith 

MRS. SIDNEY J. LENETT, 
Correspondent 

Mazeltov to Ethel Sherman, 
formerh ol Pulaski, Va. whose 
marriage to David Epstein of New 
York City was announced recently. 
The happy couple are living in 
New York at present. 

Four o( our young people at- 
tended the District 5 B'nai B'rith 
Youth Organization Convention 
in Camp Osceola at Henderson- 
ville, N. C. this summer. They 
were: Marsha Lenelt, Danny Carp, 
Byron Shankman and Stephen 
Lenett. All of them had a wonder- 
ful time and learned a great deal 
from this fine experience. 

A number of our people did 
some travelling this summer: Mrs. 
Leo Shankman and son Eric 
spent a good part of the summer 
with her family in Canada. Mr. 
and Mrs. Carl Carp and family 
travelled through Jamestown and 
Williamsburg. Mr. and Mrs. Mar- 
vin Lenett and family went to 
Richmond, Washington, and Vir- 
ginia B p ach. Dr. and Mrs. Al Linn 
and family were in New York for 
two weeks, and visited the World's 
Fair sevral tim°s. Mr. and Mrs. 
SMney Lenett visited in Philadel- 
phia and Atlantic C'tv, and also 
got to the World's Fair. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Ba^r and 
children of Mt. Airy, N. C. have 
moved to Asheville, N. C. We 



wish them the best of luck in their 
new home. 

Mrs. Nathan Potolsky of C-alax, 
Virginia has been very ill at Duke 
Hospital in Durham, N. C. Our 
sincere wishes for a speedy recov- 
ery. 

Our deepest sympatry is exten- 
ded to Mrs. Al Linn of Wytheville, 
Va. on the loss of her father. 



Eschmond,, Va. 
Business and 
Professional Group 
Ol Hadassah 

MISS SHIRLEY GOLDSTEIN 
f nrresponder.i 

Business and Professional Group 
of Hadassah meeting was held on 
October the fourteenth at 8:15 
P. M. at 5100 Monument Ave. A 
fashion show was given and nar- 
rated by Mrs. Edith Tillis. 



Sisterhood Temple 
Beth Israel 
Roanoke, Va. 

MRS. JOSEPH YOSAFAT, 
Correspondent 

The educational department 
of Beth Israel Synagogue has re- 
sumed operations for the new year. 
Co-superintendents, Mr. Polk 
Manko and Mr. Kurt Lerner, 
along with a full staff of dedicated 
teachers, hope to make this school' 
year a rewarding one. Junior con- 
gregation services have also re- 
sumed, and we trust this will be a 
a year of increased activity for our 
youthful worshippers. The follow- 
ing new Junior Congregation of- 
ficers were recently elected. Joan 
Lerner, president; Andy Kaplan,, 
vice-president; Neil Lutins, secre- 
tary; and Gary Manko, treasurer- 
(Please turn to Page 20) 



We would appreciate 
Subscribers notifying us 
of change of address. 



8 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



November, 1964 




now itb Pepsi 

for those mho think young 

Pepsi-Cola Bottlers of Virginia 



WHY SCIENCE LOOKS TO THE FUTURE 
AND RELIGION TO THE PAST 

By Rabbi Samuel Umen 



Science through research is con- 
stantly outmoding itself. The in- 
vention of today is superseded by 
an improved one tomorrow. Pro- 
gress is continuous in the material 
world. The secrets of the Universe 
are myriad. Every new break- 
through spells victory tor men 
over nature. Each step forward 
leads to further adventures of the 
mind into the unknown. The satis- 
faction of discovery is boundless; 
the promises of findings are titil- 
lating. The scientific eye is there- 
fore focused on the future. 

The la«t word in the realm of 
science is yet to be heard, and the 
ear of the scientist is ever attuned 
to hear it. Past wisdom is tested, 
tried, and where found wanting 
is expanded and deepened. The 
process is inexhaustible, ceaseless. 

Every scientific discovery, every 
invention, brings untold benefits 
to the individual, to the nation 
and the world. All aspects of life 
are enhanced through scientific 
progress. Science amply, tangibly, 
rewards man for his efforts. Thus 
man is actuated to reach out for 
new objectives, new exciting goals. 

In the realm of the spirit, in the 
field of religion, the story is quite 
different. Here, little if anything 
new can be expec ted. In this area 
of life, we are compelled to refer 
to the past. For in religion, the 
last word had already been spoken. 
Nothing can be added to it. noth- 
ing can be detracted from it. Who 
could add anything to these words: 

It hath been told thee O man, 
what is good 

And what the Lord doth re- 
quire of thee; 

Only to do justly, and to love 
mercy, 

and to walk humbly with Thy 

God" (Michah 6:8). 
or to this exhortation: 

Take thou away from Me the 

noise of thy songs; 
And let Me not hear the melody 

of thy psalteries. 
But let justice well up as waters, 
And righteousness as a mighty 

stream (Amos 5:23-24) 
or to this one: 

Have we not all one father? 
Hath not one God created us? 
Why do we deal treacherously 



every man against his brothers? 
. . . (Malachai 2:19) 

The noblest principles that man 
is to live by have been proclaimed 
aeons ago. What is expected in re- 
ligion is not new precepts, but 
that the old be heeded, be accept- 
ed, be tried. 

Unlike science, instead of offer- 
ing something, religion asks some- 
thing of man. It asks for commit- 
ment. Commitment, means sacri- 
fice; it means giving up time; it 
means parting with wealth; it 
means suffering inconvenience. 
As it is said, "And Thou shalt love 
the Lord thy God with all thine 
heart, with all thy soul and all 
thy might. (Deut. 6:5). 

The reward for commitment, 
the return for living a life based 
on the Eternal Law, cannot be 
exchanged in the market place 
for anything material. It only af- 
fords one a good feeling when he 
is doing what is just, right, and 
proper. Most people, therefore, 
seek material rather than spiritual 
gain in conquering nature and 
being victors than conquering hu- 
man nature and being what ap- 
pears to be losers. 

Hence, religion, the moral law, 
remains a challenge which few 
choose to accept. "The law is holy, 
the command is holy, just, and for 
our good. But then I am a creature 
of the flesh ... I do not act as I 
want to act: I cordially agree with 
God's law, so far as my inner self 
is concerned but then I find quite 
another law in my members (the 
body), which conflict with the law 
of my mind." The challenge of 
religion is so frightening to most 
people, that they who accept it 
are frequently described as saints 
and pietists by some, fools and 
madmen by others. 

If the lofty doctrines of religion 
remain mere ideals, which man's 
heart warmly accepts but his mind 
strongly rejects, how can we ac- 
count for the social progress man 
has achieved through the ages? 

Is not the goodness present in 
the world due to man's obedience 
of the moral law? 

Instead of being guided by re- 
ligion, man is taught by history, 
wars, and its concomitant evils, 



November, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 



9 




Two associate justices of the United States Supreme Court and ten 
Jewish communal leaders will be honored by The Jewish Theological Semi- 
nary oi' America at two events to be held on Sunday, November 15. 

At a special afternoon convocation at the Seminary, Mr. Justice Wil- 
liam J. Brennan, Jr., will be the recipient of the honorary degree of Dot tor 
of Laws in recognition of his application of "the profound and precise in- 
sights of morality and ethics through law" in his service to "that great body 
of clients, the American people." 

Tribute also will be paid at the convention to Mr. Justice Arthur J. 
Goldberg, who will be formally installed as chairman of the Board of Over- 
seers of the Seminary. The post previously was held by the late Herbert H. 
Lehman. 



hate and its consequences, poverty 
and its resuits, disease and its ef- 
fects, all contributed through the 
ages and contribute now in the 
process of refining and humaniz- 
ing mankind. 

History, better experience, leads 

toward improved labor conditions, 
toward better relations between 
the different races, better educa- 
tional facilities, and international 
institutions for settling disputes be- 
tween the nations. In all these 
areas of achievement, religion, can 
claim only a small share. 




Yell get tlT , 
MOSrfrom 



Coast to 
Coast f" 




Stop at any of our • 

modern 

MILNER 

hotels 

conveniently located 
THROUGHOUT America! 



s 5.50 Per Day Includes: 

• FREE TELEVISION • AIR- 
CONDITIONING • TILE BATH 

WALL-TO-WALL CARPETING 
MODERN FURNISHINGS 

• NEWLY DECORATED ROOMS 

• COMPLETE HOTEL SERVICE 

TV 

Beautiful MILNER MOTELS 

invite you to check their accommodations 
with your friendly Milner hosts . • • rafts 
vary in different localities. 

Groups and individuals contact our Sales]!! 
Dept. for reservations, brochures and fj 
credit cards. . '. write to:. 

MILNER HOTELS! 



US26 Centre Street 



Detroit 26, Mich. 



Had religion exercised its in- 
fluence in these spheres of human 
activity, much more would have 
been accomplished, much sooner 
and with much less misery, pain 
and suffering. 

Whatever good man requires 
for his well being, for his surviv- 
al, he fights for. So it was in times 
of antiquity, so it is today, and 
no doubt will continue to be. That 
is why the prophet cries out to 
the world, "Not by might, nor by 
power, but by my spirit, saith the 
Lord of hosts" (Zechariah 1:6). 

"The Counsel of the Lord stand- 
eth forever" (Ps. 33.11). It beckons, 
it pleads, it urges. It is a com- 
mand uttered in the past for all 
time and it is as fresh, as timely, 
as the scientist's future discovery. 
Only when men will find them- 
selves committed to truth, to love, 
to justice, to beauty, to brother- 
hood, to a society under divine 
Universal Law will the religionist, 
like the scientist, be forced to look 
for something higher, nobler, more 
challenging to live for, be com- 
mitted to and make sacrifices for. 

"The precepts of the Lord are 
right, rejoicing the heart the com- 
mandment of the Lord is pure, 
enlightening the eyes. The fear 
of the Lord is clean, enduring 
forever: the judgments of the Lord 
are true, righteous altogether." 



BUY THAT 
ISRAEL BOND 
NOW! 




VOTE FOR and ELECT 

BILL HOPKINS 

TO CONGRESS 



YOUR DEMOCRATIC 
NOMINEE 



A Strong Voice 
For 

The Sixth District 



Tuesday, November 3rd, 1964 



10 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



November, 1964 




Mail saving hours are all the 
time! Remember it's regular sav- 
ing that accomplishes results 
and mail-saving is the perfect 
system to keep yourself on a 
program. 

m ftf CURRENT RATE, PER ANNUM 
*f /O ON ANY ACCOUNT 

Security Federal Saving 
and Loan Association 

Sixth & Franklin Sts. Richmond, Va. 




THE NO. 1 NAME IN 



MILK 











» 




i 




> 



COTTAGE 
CHEESE 




ICE CREAM 




Sealtest Foods - Southern Division 



VIRGINIA 



COLLINSVILLE 

DANVILLE 
HARRISONBURG 
NEWPORT NEWS 



NORFOLK 

PETERSBURG 
RICHMOND 
ROANOKE 



NORTH CAROLINA 



ALBEMARLE 
ASHEVTLLE 
BREVARD 
BRYSON CITY 
CHARLOTTE 
DURHAM 
ELIZABETH CITY 
FA YETTE VILLE 
GREENSBORO 



JACKSONVILLE 
MOREHEAD CITY 
RALEIGH 
ROCKY MOUNT 
SALISBURY 
WHITEVTLLE 
WILMINGTON 

WILSON 
WINSTON-SALEM 



HILLEL IN NORTH CAROLINA 

RABBI JOSEPH H. LEVINE, Director 

October has seen the settling 
down of the H i 1 lei program into 
the normal routine and pace of 
activities, plus some unusual high- 
lights and creative innovations. 
Fall planning Board Meetings 
were held at the various schools, 
Sabbath Worship Services and sup- 
per programs for the new students, 
and graduate activities got under 
way on our various campuses. Sup- 
per classes and study groups b?gan 
to meet and students began to 
lead regular Friday night services 
and offer sermonettes. The tradi- 
tional lox and bagel brunches got 
under way at the various schools, 
bringing noted faculty speakers 
for cultural programs and other 
related activities. 




Under the capable leadership of 
our newly elected Chapel Hill 
president, Jim Ross, from Sharon, 
Massachusetts, a vigorous new Hil- 
lel Student Council has begun 
multi-faceted approaches to work- 
ing with UNC freshmen. These 
will include social, as well as cul- 
tural and educational activities. 
With deferred fraternity rush go- 
ing into effect in Chapel Hill, Hil- 
lel has a unique opportunity to 
provide the Hillel House as a 
social center and meeting ground 
lor Jewish students to meet one 
another and to get to know one 
another. We have taken serious 
recognition of this challenge and 
opportunity, and we are grateful 
for the fine spirit of cooperation 
among our Hillel Board of Trus- 
tees, which has enabled us to en- 
hance our building facilities so 
as to provide a more conductive 
framework for our programming. 

The Duke Hillel Executive 
Board, under the leadership of 
Jerry Kronenfeld from Hender- 
sonville, North Carolina, has re- 
cruited an unusual number of 
new membership registrations and 
has outlined an ambitious pro- 
supper study courses. 

The first program for the new 
year was held at North Carolina 
State on Friday, October 2. Imme- 
diately a group of interested stu- 
dents .went to work planning 
forthcoming brunches and other 
activities. 

In typical fashion, the Greens- 
boro Hillel group has been a bee- 



RABBI JOSEPH H. LEVINE 

hive of Hillel activity this year. 
Our Hillel president, Linda Stein, 
from Durham and her group of 
officers have really made the new 
students feel very much at home 
and have started their usual spir- 
ited and enthusiastic endeavors. 

One of our price goals this year 
is to interpret the Hillel program 
more to the community and anoth- 
er goal is to bring about more jo- 
int inter-Hlilel activity among the 
various campuses. To this end, 
a joint Hillel Cabinet supper meet- 
ing was held on October 1 1 in 
Greensboro, which gave student 
leaders from all schools in North 
Carolina an opportunitv to meet 
one another and discuss common 
objectives. 

Perhaps the outstanding high- 
light of the October program cal- 
endar was the first lecture on the 
Second Annual Program of the 
Rosa B. Weinstein Memorial Lec- 
tures on Religion. We had the 
high privilege on October 20 of 
listening to a stimulating lecture 
by Professor Mordecai M. Kaplan 
of the Jewish Theological Semina- 
ry on "The Meaning of God for 
the Modern Jew." An enthusias- 
tic group of interested students 
and Jewish people from all over 
the state gathered together to lis- 
ten to this unique and provocative 
presentation. Subsequent lectures 
this year of this type will be held 
on the Duke University and 
Greensboro campuses, as well. 



BUY TH AT 
ISRAEL BOND 
NOW! 



November, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



11 



A MOTHER IN ISRAEL 

By Anita Engle 





ANITA ENGLE 

I imagine that when the famous 
London diarist, Samuel l'ep^ s, 
was a child, he must have been 
very much like my 10-year-old 
David. David has an insatiable in- 
terest in public figures, and an itch 
to be everywhere where anything 
is going on. 

The other day his father took 
him to the Rubin Academy of 
Music, just around the corner 
from where we live, to see about 
enrolling him for flute classes. He 
returned ecstatic. There were no 
classes for his age-group at the 
moment, but he had found his 
spiritual home. A big beautiful, 
new building with interesting- 
looking people coming in and out 
all the time, and something going 
on in every room. Best of all, the 
building was being officially open- 
ed at the end of the week, and 
President Ben Zvi was going to be 
there! It didn't take much plead- 
ing to convince me that it was 
in my line of duty, as a mother 
who was interested in her child's 
development, to see that he got 
to the opening somehow. I was 
not uninfluenced by the fact that 
I have, like most of us in Israel, 
an intense interest in the fabulous 
Sam Rubin. 

By the time I got around there 
it was Thursday noon— four hours 
before the opening. Of course 



these was no tickets left. I could 
get into the Press section, but chil- 
dren were absolutely excluded. 
The crisp young secretary had a 
heart. She finally write me out a 
special Press ticket admitting 
David as well. "Just go right in, 
no matter what they say," she told 
me. 

And that is what we did. David 
found himself seated among the 
gentlemen of the Press, with a 
better view of the speakers' table 
and the President's arm chair than 
many of the V.I.P.'s. I decided 
that I might as well make use of 
him, and asked him if he had 
any impressions. "My first impres- 
sion," he said, "is that I hope no- 
body tall comes and sits in the 
chair in front of me." 

It was very pleasant sitting there 
in the garden at the back of new 
Academy. The building has a 
classic simplicity, given grace by 
the large, rounded platform which 
enables the lovely grounds to be 
used for open-air concerts. The 
beige stone was the color of honey 
in the golden Jerusalem afternoon. 

The program itself was, I regret 
to say, boring. The heads of high- 
er education in Israel all saying 
the same thing, but at astonishing 
length. One blight on an other- 
wise very nice country. None of 
our heads seem to have the as- 
surance which enables them to get 
up, offer a conventional but sin- 
cere sentence of greeting, and then 
sit down. 

The President, in his cozy chair, 
had a little snooze. His is no 
easy job. He probably has two or 
three official openings every week. 
Mrs. Ben Zvi had caused a start 
of surprise when she arrived in the 
heat of the afternoon, muffled up 
to the chin in a bulky two piece 
suit cut on loose lines. She is far 
too practical a woman to let her 
(Ple;ase turn to Page 13) 




An Eloquent 
Remembrance 

FLOWERS 
MI 4-2321 




304 North 6th St. 

Our Only Location In Richmond 



RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 




PrtliSCRIPTION 
SERVICE 

PROMPT DELIVERY 
IN WEST RICHMOND 



WESTWOOD 

Westwood Shopping Center 
5805 Patterson Ave. 

Dial AT 8-1933 



LAFAYETTE 

1011 Lafayette Street 

Dial EL 5-1777 



CRESTVIEW 

Crestview Shopping Center 
6516 Horsepen Road 

Dial AT 8-2831 



BEVERLY HILLS 

Beverly Hills Shopping Center 
Patterson Ave. at Ridge Road 

Dial AT 2-4231 



SUBURBAN 

Suburban Shopping Center 
2369 Staples Mill Road 

Dial EL 8-4929 










iron 






iHjf 


l«« r 

xUoOf (ml joe 




' irT'nnnrr 



DIAL RICH. 

EL 5-1745 



Offers the finest 

JtflLK 



RICHMOND'S 
MOST MODERN DAIRY 



And other 

Dairy Products 

Milk Available In Famous Pure-Pale 
Prompt Courteous p aper Cartons From Your Favorite Dealer 

Delivery 

1600 ROSEN EATH ROAD 



fat* 

M 



S 



INC. 



AARROW 



Rent-Alls .. 

RICHMOND'S RENTAL DEPARTMENT STORE ~ 
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 

2367 Staples Mill Road EL 9-2408 

5065 Forest Hill Avenue 232-782^ 

WE RENT MOST ANYTHING 
Party Banquet Needs — Hospital Equipment 



12 



The American Jewish TIMES OUTLOOK 



November, 1964 




Always 
Remember 

MEYER 
RAMBLERS 

COST LESS 



If you are economy-minded See Us!!! 

MEYER RAMBLER 



3318 W. BROAD ST. 



PHONE EL 8-3846 



BRIDAL PORTRAITS 

AND CANDIDS ARE 
OUR SPECIALTY 



phone EL 8-4826 
WENDELL B POWELL STUDIO 



3201 GROVE AVENUE — RICHMOND, 



WESTHAMPTON 
FLORIST . . . 



320 Libbie Avenue 
RICHMOND, VA. 

Specializing in 
Artistic Weddings, 
Decorations of All Types 

Dial AT 2-2460 

Mr. & Mrs. 
F. N. Hickemell 



EAGLE TRITPLEX 

BURIAL 
VAULTS 

Manufacturerd by 

JOSEPH L. 
BURRUSS 

4001 Mechanicsville Pike 
RICHMOND, VA. 

Phone MI 8-1022 




Dot's Pastry Shop 

3136 W. Cary Street 
RICHMOND, VA. 
DIAL EL 8-2011 

Bakn of Fancy Pastries 




"EVERLASTING BEAUTY IN MONUMENTS" 

HENWOOD & WILSON 

Designers and Manufacturers of 
GRANITE and MARBLE MONUMENTS— MEMORIALS 

413-415 S. Cherry St. DIAL MI 8-7340 Richmond, Va. 



§ Woman's Eye-View 

§ By Marianne Zeitlin 



I h;ive always had a sort spot 
in my heart for the American-Is- 
rael Cultural Foundation for the 
simple reason that it was while 
I was an employee of this organi- 
zation that I met my husband 
over a decade ago. At that time 
the offjces were housed in an old, 
ramshackle brownstone building 
on 71st Street and neither the de- 
caying walls which no amount of 
paint could conceal or the bleak- 
ness of a once-proud neighbor- 
hood gone to seed could dim the 
sparkle and excitement which 
prevaded the atmosphere. Today 
Israel has just celebrated its Bar- 
Mitzvah year, and soon, no doubt, 
we'll be hearing about its adoles- 
cent problems, but personally I 
will never forget the thrill of those 
early days of its infancy with the 
attendant feeling that the world 
was our oyster . . . oops I mean 
gefillto fish of course. Suddenly, 
after only 2,000 years of labor 
agony, the new state was born 
and with the laying down of the 
arms all the Jewish governmental 
agencies, barely tolerated by the 
British, were given official recog- 
nition and status. Into that dusty 
old brownstone, relic of a bygone 
age, came all the representatives 
of the arts from the vital, pulsat- 
ing land of Israel, from music, 
painting, sculpture, theatre, dance 
and literature. 

Among the myriad of memor- 
able events sponsored by the AICF, 
I remember particularly the din- 
ner celebrating Israel's statehood 
where Leonard Bernstein made 
an unforgettable speech, the es- 
sence of which was that now a 
Jew could afford to be second- 
best; he no longer had to be at 
the top of his class; the first Music 
Under the Stars at Brooklyn's old 
Ebbets Field (now the site of a 
new apartment project) and the 
dinner for a mental health advis- 
ory project at which Danny Kaye 
urged the illustrious gathering of 



psychoanalysts and psychiatrists to 
'release yourselves of the $10 bill 
in your pockets — you'll probably 
lose it on the way home'" — much 
to the dismay of the dinner or- 
ganizers who were hoping for 
more substantial donations from 
the assemblage. 

Through the years I have al- 
ways taken an interest in the pro- 
jects of the AICF which could be 
best summed up by the old adage 
"man does not live by bread 
alone." That this organization has 
also been aware of the lesser- 
known fact that an artist cannot 
live by his art alone has been 
substantially indicated by the help 
they have extended to gifted in- 
dividuals in their scholarship pro- 
gram . 

Today the program is many- 
faceted and includes partial sup- 
port for forty cultural projects in 
Israel, including orchestras, thea- 
tres, museums, conservatories of 
music, art schools and dance 
groups. It is also under the aegis 
of this enterprising organization 
that such priceless art treasures as 
the Jacques Lipchitz and Sir 
Jacob Epstein collections of orig- 
inal plasters and the Billy Rose 
Art Garden have found their per- 
manent home in Israel. Their 
latest understaking is for the estab- 
lishment of fifty new cultural cen- 
ters in Israel, the first of which 
will be named for Herbert Leh- 
man and will be erected in the 
village of Isfiya, whose popula- 
( Please turn to Page 16) 

Deputy Premier Abba Eban of 
Israel, speaking in Spanish at a 
joint session of the Colombian 
House of Representatives and 
Senate, in Bogota, voiced the view 
that his country and the countries 
of Latin America could increase 
their cooperation both in the ser- 
vice of peace in the Middle East 
and in joint development pro- 
grams. 



24-HOUR TRUCK SERVICE 

MAINTENANCE LEASE OPERATING 



SALES 
107 W. Canal Street 



PHONE MI 3-9173 

Richmond. Va. 



November, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 



13 



A MOTHER IN ISRAEL 

(Concluded from Page 11) 
interfere with her State, the President's 



social duties 
health. She got her own back an 
hour later, at five, when Jerusa- 
lem's temperature takes a sudden 
drop, and the smartly decollete 
ladies began to purple in their 
chairs. She is far too practical a 
woman to let her social duties in- 
terfere with her health. 

There was one person who didn't 
seem bored. In fact she looked 
more starry-eyed every time a 
speaker described the beautiful 
new building. This was a slim, 
spirited woman, the pianist Yoche- 
ved Dostovsky, who is administra- 
tive director of the Rubin Acad- 
emy of Music. She organized the 
first, musical classes which develop- 
ed, through various stages, into 
this magnificent new institution. 
This was the first time that Jeru- 
salem's students of music were able 
to meet together in one place. 
'That never stopped them from 
studying, though, even during the 
seige of Jerusalem," she declared. 
"Sometimes they had to have their 
lessons outside, but they had les- 
sons." 

And then at last what we had 
been waiting for the whole after- 
noon happened. Sam Rubin got 
up and spoke. He looked the per- 
sonification of everything you see 
advertised in the best magazines. 
That extra zip; the poise and 
nerve ease; the luxury cruise tan; 
the magnificent flash of white 
teeth in what must be one of the 
most attractive smiles in America. 
And the indubitable ability to 
make friends and influence peo- 
ple. On top of all this, Mr. Ru- 
bin spoke with a combination of 
simplicity and sinceritv that ap- 
pears to be his own special blend. 
The American Ambassador, Mr. 
Lawson, (and he wasn't the only 
one) sat and watched him, fasci- 
nated. 

At the end of the ceremony a 
new, wine-colored satin flag was 
hoisted alongside the flag of the 



the Tresident's flag, and 
the Stars and Stripes. It was then 
that I saw the look on Mr. Ru- 
bin's face which I liked most of 
all. An expression of solemn hu- 
mility as he watched the wine 
colored flag unfurl against the 
blue Jerusalem sky, revealing the 
cription in golden letters "The 
Rubin Academy of Music." 




USE CHRISTMAS SEALS 
FIGHT TB 
AND OTHER 

RESPIRATORY DISEASES 






Rabbi Morris Adler, of Congrega- 
tion Shaary Zedek, of Detroit, Mich, 
in speaking at the B'nai B'rith Com. 
mission on Adult Education's annual 
meeting, held at the Hotel Baltimore 
in New York City, gave it as his 
opinion that adult study is the most 
significant development in the 
American Jewish Community in the 
past decade. 




It's the year 
to take the 
key and see 

Test drive a brand new 1965 Commonwealth Ford Today ! 
Home of the aF<5JRZDab/e Fords 

COMMONWEALTH FORD 

VIRGINIA'S LARGEST AUTO DEALER 

2000 Block West Broad St. EL 5-7841 



WESTBROOK ELEVATOR MFG. CO. 

RICHMOND, VA. • DANVILLE, VA. 

NEW INSTALLATIONS & SERVICE ON 

• BUSINESS 

• COMMERCIAL 

• RESIDENCE 




Richmond, Va. 
Danville, Va. 



EL 3-7441 
SW 2-7234 



LEVATORS 



2015 Roane St. 
410 Spring St. 



CRUISING IS FUN! 

Why Not Try It This Winter? 

Sail with your own group — or alone — you'll 
meet new people — make new friends, and en- 
joy the finest vacation ever. Join in a full 
program of activities or just relax on sun- 
bathed decks. Living at its best while visiting 
fascinating ports of call. 

CARIBBEAN — MEDITERRANEAN 
AFRICA — AROUND THE WORLD 

See us now for details and reservations 

^ PLAN NOW FOR EUROPE IN 1965 

C. O. ALLEY TRAVEL AGENCY 

708 E. Grace RICHMOND, VA. Dial 643-0126 




SKELTON BROS. OIL CORP. 



3012 MECHANICSVILLE PIR' 

• HEATING OILS 

• HEATING EQUIPMENT 



RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 

► GASOLINE 



Phone 643-9087 
24 Hours Daily 




MOTOR OIL 



AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT 



SERVING THE METROPOLIS RICHMOND AREA AND THE 9 ADJOINING COUNTIES 
WITH THE FINEST IN PETROLEUM PRODUCTS AND HEATING SERVICES 



14 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



November, 1 964 



Danville, Va. 



Annie Beyer School Of The Dance 



135 Watson 



DANVILLE, VA. 



SWift 2-9106 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



LARAMORE CONSTRUCTION 


CO., INC. 


EXCAVATING CONTRACTOR 




STREET AND ROAD 




Dial 793-1032 




220 River Street 


Danville, Va. 



LARGE SELECTIONS OF 
SAMPLES TO CHOOSE 
FROM 

Custom Built Sofas & Chairs 
Antique Furniture 
Furniture Refinishing 
Custom Upholstery 
Furniture Rebuilt 
Draperies & Slip Covers 
Dial 793-0195 

Decorator Shop 

U pholsterers 

215 Watson 
DANVILLE, VA. 



Johnson's 
Riverside Drug, 

INC. 

PRESCRIPTIONS 

Rexall Store 
I - INTEGRITY 
D - DEPENDABILITY 
L - LEADERSHIP 

Free Delivery 
Curb Service 
Dial SW 3-1611 
2384 Riverside Drive 
DANVILLE, VA. 



DIAPER SERVICE 

Deodorized Containers 
Furnished 

Dial SW 3-5533 

If No Answer Call SW 3-5872 
Twice Weekly Service 
Same Diapers Returned 
Medically Approved 

Snow White 
Diaoer Service 

2380 Riverside Drive 
DANVILLE, VA. 



Gus W. Dyer, Jr. 

General Contractor 

Residential - Commercial 
Homes Built to Order 
Quality Workmanship 
Dial SWift 2-4264 

240 Mt, View Avenue 
DANVILLE, VA. 



WALKERS AUTO & 
FURNITURE UPHOLSTERY 

Quality Work at 
Lowest Prices 

793-8100 
810 S. Main Street 
DANVILLE, VA. 



Dewey Cooke 

Home 
Improvements 

Room Additions - Remodeling 
Aluminum Siding - Roofing 
Plumbing - Heating 
Cement & Block Work 

CUSTOM BUILT HOMES 

Free Estimates 

Nothing Down - Easy 
Financing - Up to 20 Years 

Dial 793-3197 

DANVILLE, VA. 



LYNCHBURG, VA. 

After the long summer rest the 
new year is starting with a bang- 
big budget, big plans and lots of 
work for all. 

First— the Fall Rummage Sale 
was held on Sept. 30th, Oct. 1st 
and 2nd: clothes and household 
goods were very much in demand. 

Despite all our plans for aiding 
our Temple financially and car- 
ing for such things as organist, 
Sunday School Teaching etc., we 
ladies of Sisterhood have one even 
more important duty; all the im- 
portant roles we perform in aid- 
ing the Temple pale before our 
duty of being a guiding light and 
an example by attending Friday 
night services regularly. Let's try 
and start the New Year off pro- 
perly. Remember, Friday night is 
Temple Night — always a re- 
warding experience. 

HIGH HOLY DAY CHOIR 

High Holy Day music was again 
provided b\ a choir of four under 
the direction of Mr. Crane Calder. 
Singing with Mr. Calder were his 
wife, Florence Vickland, Mrs. 
Henr\ Hallstrom and Mr. Roger 
Dickens. Accompanying the quar- 
tet on the organ was our regular 
organist, Mrs. Alex Teass. 

Mr. Abe Cohen, who has been 
a member of the Lynchburg City 
Council for 12 years, has been 
elected Vice-Mayor. 

Tom Katman is now Dr. Kat- 
man: he recently received the de- 
gree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

Sheldon Friedman was awarded 
a scholadship to attend the Na- 
tional Science Foundation Sum- 
mer Institute program at the Uni- 
versity of Va. 

Elliot Schewel has been elected 
vice-president of the Friends of 
the Lynchburg Public Library, a 
unit recently established to bring 
into being a free public library 
for our city. 

(Please turn to Page 27) 



AROUND 




Rabbi Hyman Tuchman (left) and 
Gad Cohen (right) have been named 
Consultants of the Department of 
Education and Culture of the Jew- 
ish Agency for Israel. 




RELY ON 

PIEDMONT 

. . . for convenient, com- 
fortable flight service 
linking 68 cities. Sched- 
ules are tailor-made 
for business travel. 
Excellent service is also 
offered to many famous 
vacation and resort 
areas. 

Next time you take 
a trip along the Route 
Of the Pacemakers, en- 
joy Piedmont's friend- 
ly service, convenient 
schedules and modern, 
comfort-conditioned 
planes. Join the people 
who rely and fly on 
Piedmont Airlines! 




PIEDMONT 
AIRLINES 

home office and operations base: 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 



November, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



15 



NORFOLK, VA. 

MRS. WILLIAM SCHWARTZ, Correspondent 



Many state and local dignitaries 
attended the mammoth ground 
breaking ceremonies for the Beth 
Sholom Home's new building held 
on October 18th, 1964. All seven 
Jewish communities of Virginia 
affiliated with the Home were 
represented at this auspicious pro- 
gram in Richmond. Plans and 
specitications were prepared b\ 
Brundage and Cohen, Norfolk ar- 
chitects. It is hoped that with 
the new building, the Home will 
be able to accommodate those on 
the active waiting list. 

"Best B'nai B'rith Girl of the 
Year" is the title awarded to Miss 
Edith Blumenthal, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Victor Z. Blumen- 
thal. Edith has been a member of 
the Dr. Kruger Chapter of B'nai 
B'rith Girls for three years — has 
served as recording secretary and 
treasurer of her chapter and is 
currently the creativity chairman. 
A member of the Spanish National 
Society, Science Club and Debat- 
ing Team, she will graduate from 
High School in June and plans to 
attend an out-of-town college. 
Edith represented her chapter at 
annual District 5 B'nai B'rith 
Youth convention held in North 
Carolina. 

President of the Norfolk Jewish 
Community Center, Marvin Simon 
and Personnel Chairman, Kurt 
Rosenback announced the ap- 
pointment of Allen Feld, ACSW as 
Program Director and Mrs. Lona 




Roanoke's 
Lea dimy 
Funeral Director 
Economi^l- 
Dependabit 

JOHN M. 



■ I l«flt« tm 



OAKEYnc 

PHONE Diamond 3-4451 



(Concluded from Page 6) 
entertained in their honor at a 
reception following the Friday 
night services. Nathan Mark Shu- 
limson was Bar Mitzvah on Satur- 
day morning, October 10th, at the 
Beth Jacob Synagogue. He is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Shu- 
limson. After services, a luncheon 
was served in Nathan's honor to 
celebrate the occasion. 



Gruber, Director oi Children's 
Activities. 

Mar) Krukin, President of the 
Golden Age Club, announced that 
(he Golden Age Club participated 
in a Program Workshop for Senior 
Citizens in Richmond. A panel 
discussion on programming was 
presented by Club Advisor, Mrs. 
.Max H. Kurt/. Mr. Allen Feld, 
Program Director of the Center ac- 
companied the ladies. 

The Hebrew Academy of Tide- 
water anounced the appointment 
of their new Principal, Rabbi 
Morton Weil who was born in 
Germany, educated in Israel and 
comes to Norfolk from Adas Yesh- 
rus Synagogue in Augusta, Geor- 
gia. A kindergarten class has been 
added at the Academy and has al- 
so announced the formation of a 
High School for advanced Hebrew 
students. 

The Annual Brith Sholom Fol- 
lies was presented on October 24th 
and proved to be bigger and bet- 
ter than ever. Members of Brith 
Sholom took part in the rollicking 
chorus. 

Ladies Auxiliary of Jewish War 
Veterans, Old Dominion Post No. 
158 held their annual Membership 
meeting in October. New mem- 
bers attending for the first time, 
learned that TWV is the oldest 
veterans organization in the U. S. 
and that it's services include ser- 
vice to hosoitalized veterans as 
well as service to the community, 
country and Israel. 

Temple Israel announces its 
annual Chanukah Bazaar will take 
place on Sunday, November 29th, 
the eve of Chanukah. A fun-day 
for voting and old is anticipated. 

Temple Emanuel Sisterhood of 
Virginia Beach held its annual I 
"Welcome Membership Coffee" 
in October at the Temple and all 
members as well as newcomers 
were in attendance. 



LYNCHBURG -ROANOKE 
Newport News-Portsmouth, Ya. 





FUEL OIL FOR HOME 
AND INDUSTRY 



Day and Night 
Delivery 



DIAL Diamond 5-8866 
2677 ROANOKE AVE. S.W. ROANOKE, VA. 



EXCLUSIVELY 




For Complete Eye Care: 
Consult Your EYE PHYSICIAN 
Then See Your GUILD OPTICIAN 

A. G. Jefferson 

Ground Floor Allied Arts Bldg. Lynchburg, Va. 



o 
p 

T 
I 

C 
A 
L 



BRENNAN 



Directors and Embalmers 

EXport 7-3851 

711 Washington St. 
PORTSMOUTH, VA. 



Scrvine . . . 

Readers of ihU 
magazine for 87 years 

Joseph W. Bliley 

FUNERAL HOME 

Conveniently Locatec 
Third & Marshail Streets 
Richmond, Virginia 

■ I ample pan \ ri. 

U 1 r "TiTCiNG sr v i 



ilfflllli 



COAL -:- FUEL OIL 

PRINTED METER DELIVERIES 
PHONE CH 4-8484 NEWPORT NEWS, VA 



TARRANT 
PRESCRIPTION 
DRUGGISTS 

MOTORCYCLE DELIVERY 

Foushee and Broad 
MI 3-3469 Richmond. Va. 



Brown Moyr'sosi 
Company 

Fine Printing . . 

Office Supplies 

LYNCHBURG, VA. 



16 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



November, 1964 




Carrier's 
Tree Service 

Surgery - Pruning - Topping 
Transplanting 

Trees - Shrubs - Hedges 
Spring & Fall Clean Up 
All Year Maintenance 

Free Estimates 
"For Information Call" 
669-4272 
1205 Norfolk Ave. 
BRISTOL, VA. 



J. R. GIBSON 
SUNSET MOTEL 

HWY. HE SOUTH 
New and Modern - TV 
Air Conditioned 
Fine Food 

14 Mile from Speedway 
41/2 Miles Out of Bristol 
MR. & MRS. J. R. GIBSON 
Bluff City Hwy. 764-3133 
Bristol, Virginia 



C. L. Tolley Home 
Improvement 

Guaranteed Workmanship 
on Alterations & Additions 

Aluminum Siding - Roofing 
Storm Windows & Doors 
Gutters 

669-5217 

802 Page Street 
BRISTOL, VA. 



ANDERSON 
COAL CO. 

We Vacuum Clean Furnaces 

669-8751 
70 Commonwealth Avenue 
BRISTOL, VA. 



GOINS 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 
General Contractor 

668-3005 
1205 Rhode Island Avenue 
BRISTOL, VA. 



IRA W. RANKIN 
BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

669-3447 
4965 Lee Hwy. R.F.D. 1 

BRISTOL, VA. 



Peter Pan Pastry 
Shoppe, Inc. 

Your Specialty Bake Shop 
Home Owned & Operated 

669-8171 

DAN DRINKARD, President 

507 Cumberland St. 
BRISTOL, VA. 



Stardust Motel 
& Restaurant 

New Modern Tile Baths 

with Tub & Shower 
Glenn E. Almany, Owner 
669-2178 
TELEPHONES - TV 
AIR CONDITIONED 
FAMILY UNITS 
East 

(Just Outside City Limits) 
1973 Lee Hwy. 
BRISTOL, VA. 



Statement of the ownership, management 
etc., required by the Acts of Congress of 
August 24, 1012 and March 3, 1933, of The 
American Jewish Times Outlook, published 

mor+Hv at Greensboro, N. C, for October 
1 , 1964. 

Stnte of North Carolina 
County of Guilford 

ss: 

Before me, a Notary Public, in and for the 
State and County afore Paid, personally apear- 
ed David Bernstein who. having been duly 
sworn according to law, deposes and savs that 
he is the Business Manager of The American 
Jewish Times-Outlook, Inc., and the following 
is, to the best of his knowledge and belief, a 
true statement of the ownership, mnnnjrement, 
etc., of the aforesaid publication for the date 
shown in the above caption, required by the 
Art of March 3, 1933, embodied ns Section 
o37. Postal Tans aril Regulations, printed 
on the reverse side of this form, to-wlt: 

1. The names and addresses of the pnhllsher, 
editor, managing editor, and business managers 
are: 

Publisher, The American Jewish Times-Ont- 
lonk. Inc.. 530 Sonfheastem Bid?., Greensboro, 
N. C. Editor, Chester A. Brown, Country Hub 
Apartments. Greenshoro, N. C. Business man- 
ager, r>avid Bernstein, 408 N. Mendenhall St., 
Greenshoro, N. C. 

2. The owner 1s: (It owned by a corporation, 
its name and address must he stated and al- 
so immediately thereunder the names and ad- 
'ire-ses of stoHrhoMe-s owning or holding 1 
percent or more of total amount of stock. If 
not owned hy a corporation, the names and 
addresses of the indi-idnal owners must be 
ariven If owned by a pa-tnersh1p or other un- 
incorporated firm, its name and address, as 
well as that of each individual member, must 
he given.) The American Jewish Times-Out- 
look. Inc., David Bernstein, 108 W. Avondale, 
GreenslMiro, N. C. 

3. That the known bondholders, mortgages, 
and other security hoMors owning or holding 
1 per cent or more of t "tal amount of bonds, 
mortgages, or other securities are: None. 

4. Paragraphs 2 and 3 include, in cases 
where the Stockholder or securitv holder ap- 
pends upon the books of the ' companv ns 
trustees or in any other fiduciary relation, 
the name of the perso n or corporation for 
whom such trustee is acting: al=o the state- 
ments in the two paragraphs show the af- 
fiant's full knowledge and belief as to the 
circumstances and conditions under which 
stnM-holders and security holders who do not 
appear upon the lKV'ks of the company ns 
trustees, hold stook ami securities in a capacity 
other than that of a bona fide owner. 

B. The above nnmher of conies of each issne 
of this publication sold or distributed, through, 
the mails or otherwise, to paid subscribers 
during the 12 months preceding the date shown 
ahove was: (This information required by the 
a- . ~r .t..-„ n incr. t-o winded )n „], state- 
ments regardless of frequency of iss"el. 2375. 

n \ rtrt rtPTtN<!TF:TN 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 9th 
day of October, 1904, Bernice L. Pierce. 
(My commission expires January 20th, 1965). 




Examining inscription on a tomb stone in the Nagasaki, Japan, Jewish 
cemetery which was lost to memory for some 40 years are (left to right) 
Airman 2/Class Max Markovitz; Chaplain Marvin Tokayer, U.S. Air Force; 
Yosef Hassin, Chancellor of the Israeli Embassy in Tokyo; Airman 1/Class 
Stefan Skoll. With the aid of the congregation and rabbi of the Tokyo Jew- 
ish Community Center, the Americans cleaned and beautified the cemetery, 
which Chaplain Tokayer found after months of searching. 



Young Judaea 

ROSALIND HOFFMAN, 
Correspondent 

Danville Convention is coming 
up fast, kids. It promises to be 
one of the best ever held. It will 
be on November 6th-8th. at the 
Holiday Inn Motel in Danville 
Virginia. The theme of the con- 
vention is "The People of Israel — 
Who They Are and Where They 
Come From." Registration blanks 
are being distributed throughout 
the clubs in the Seaboard Region. 
We hope everyone will be able to 
attend this great convention. 

Charlotte, N. C. has wonderful 
news! We now have three levels 
of Young Judaea — Junior, Inter- 
mediate and Senior. Heading the 
new Senior group is President Phi- 
lip Wallace. I think they deserve 
a pat on the back for this achieve- 
ment. Their first meeting was a 
discussion on "dual loyalty," it 
proved to be a very interesting 
night. 



status. But the spirit that recog- 
nized the need to help sustain 
our social and cultural heritage 
which, perhaps more than any 
other factor was the mainstay that 
kept the Jewish nation intact in 
spite of its dispersal, shines more 
brightly than ever. 



Do Your Part! 
Contribute to the North 
Carolina Home for the 
Jewish Aged 



Women's Eye-View 

(Concluded from Page 12) 
tion is mainly made up of Druz 
and Christian Arabs. 

Well the old brownstone on 
71st Street has long since become a 
memory and the American-Israel 
Cultural Foundation is now locat- 
ed in the plushier environs of 15 th 
Street and Fifth Avenue with its 
branches in Chicago and Los An- 
geles, as befitting its expanded 



FIGHT TB 
AND OTHER 
RESPIRATORY 
DISEASES 
WITH 

CHRISTMAS SEALS 





STATE STREET 
COAL COMPANY 

Prompt Delivery Anywhere 

669-8832 
907y 2 State Bristol, Va. 



November, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



17 



Arouhd Greensboro 

MRS. WILLIAM RIFIELBS, Correspondent 



GREENSBORO, N, C. 



Congratulations to William Ste- 
ven Herman, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Herman, on his Bar 
Mitzvah Friday August 28 and 
Saturday August 29th, 1964. 

Mazel Tov to Judith Meyers, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Morris 
Myers, who celebrated her Bat 
Mitzvah Friday October 2 and 
chanted her Haftorah. 

Ma/el Tov to Barbara jane Kay, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lee 
Kay, who chanted her Haftorah 
Friday, October 9 on the occasion 
of her Bat Mitzvah. 

Congratulations to Jack Good- 
man, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 
Goodman, who was called to 
the Torah on the occasion of his 
Bar Mitzvah Saturday, October 17 
a 10:00 A. M. 

Ma/el Tov to Mr. and Mrs. Ken 
Schneiderman upon the birth of 
twin sons, Lawrence and David. 

Ma/el Tov to Mr. and Mrs. 
Arnold Saxon on the birth of a 
daughter. Congratulations to 
Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Leich- 
inan on the birth of a son, 
H. Merrick: to Drs. Ronald and 
Jutta Hahn on the birth of their 
daughter, Silke Clara in German): 
to Mr. Kagen on the birth of his 
great-grandson Aryeh Leore in 
Israel; to Mrs. Rebecca Myers on 
becoming a great grandmother. 
The parents are Mr. and Mrs. 
Howard Silber of Washington, 
who had a daughter September 
25th; to Dr. Irwin Acker for his 
outstanding work in the field of 
Podiatry; to Ronnie Kaplan, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Abe Kaplan, for his 
outstanding efforts for Carolina 

Good Furniture at Reasonable 
Prices 

BURTNER 
FURNITURE CO. 

Established 1921 
312 S. Elm St. Phone 272-8417 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



football; to Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Pearhnan on winning S750.00 
worth of furniture in a local con- 
test and also winning two steak 
dinners; to Barry Frahm, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Frahm, on 
his recent engagement to Miss 
Sharon Kellam. 

Hie entire congregation ol Beth 
David Synagogue offers sincere 
sympathy to: Mrs. Meyer Leader 
whose lather, Abe Krieger, died 
Juh 25 in Eastern, Pa.; Bill Wald, 
whose father, Oscar Wald, died 
June .HO in New York: Mrs. Harry 
Berkelhammer and Mr. Moe 
Mandelkorn on the death ol their 
mother. Mrs. Rose Mandelkorn, 
August 6, 1964; Mrs. Sam Young 
on the death of her father, Mr. 
Harry Brody, August 7, 1964; Mrs. 
Sidney Wolvik and Mr. Seymour 
Sierachik on the death of their 
mother, Mrs. Rebcca Sierachik, 
July 24, 1964; Mrs. Elias Morde- 
chai, on the death of his uncle, 
Mr. Nahaum Matsa; Mrs. Rose 
Massel on the death of her mo- 
ther August 31; Mr. Harold Scher 
on the death of his brother Hyman 
hi Newark, New f"r?e'" Mrs Irv- 
ing Orenstein on the death of her 
husband. 

A delightful skit entitled "Inside 
Outer Space" was presented at the 
opening meeting of Beth David 
Sisterhood to welcome the new 
members. Mrs. Robert Pearhnan, 
program chairman, and Mrs. Ho- 
ward Silverstein, co-chairman, di- 
rected the cast which included 
Mrs. William Fields, Mrs. Jerry 
Blair, Mrs. Irvin Gorman, Mrs. 
Fred Lolan, Mrs. Jerry Martin, 
Mrs. Jack Safron, Mrs. Cvril Ja- 
cobs, Mrs. Morris Cohen, Mrs Ro- 
bert Pearhnan, Mrs. Howard Sil- 
vestein and Mrs. Sidnev LeBrun. 

The Beth David Mens Club 
honored its past presidents at a 
banquet October 4 at rWh David 
(Please turn to Page 21) 



Ralph J. Golden Insurance Agency 

We Feature the New 
B'nai B'rith Disability Insurance Plan 

ALSO, FIRE - CASUALTY - GROUP - LIFE 
INSURANCE 

108 E. Northwood St. Dial BR 5-3400 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



M0NTALDOS 

Greensboro 




4 




Very This Year; exquisite white mink 
worked with the new far-away neckline, 
and intriguing fool-the-eye sleeves. 
$595.00 plus tax. 

Ah furs labeled as to country of origin of imported furs 




"Serving Greensboro Since 1919" 

Hanes-SiineberarY Funeral Service 

fmesi facilities - Moderate Cost 



Hanes Funeral Home, Inc. 
401 W. Market St. Greensboro, N. C. 



Dial 272-5158 




VSiTslG COMPANY 



317 N. Elm Street 



"We Lease Anything" 
CARS 

TRUCKS 
EQUIPMENT 

Greensboro. N. C. 



18 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



November, 11)64 



Lambeth, President Fred Troxler, Sec'y- 

GREENSBORO'S NEWEST AND MOST MODERN 
WENDOVER AT VIRGINIA STREET — DIAL 273-3401 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Eye Glass Prescriptions Accurately Filled 





206 N. Elm 



OPTICAL CO. 

GREENSBORO, N. c" Dial 273-9286 



Bring Your Cars 
For Expert Repairing To 

KIRK'S SINEATH 
Motor Company 

24-Hour Wrecker Service 

Dial 272-3456 
419 Battleground Ave. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



PHIL R. CARLTON 

Incorporated 

Real Estate — Rents 
Insurance — Bonding 

Carlton Building 
Opposite Courthouse 

Dial 272-8157 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



HODGIN ROOFING & SUPPLY CO. 

923 West Lee Street Telephone 275-8561 

Authorized Dealer for Ruberoid Products — Asphalt Shingles 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



One of the Finer Stores of the Carolinas 
GREENSBORO, N. C 



DIXIE SALES CO. 

Automotive Service 
Carburetor and Speedometer 
Specialists 
327 Battleground 
Dial 273-6964 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Piedmont Office Suppliers 

Dial 274-5161 

Office Supplies 

308 S. Elm Street 
iREENSBORO, N. C. 




"THE 
YEAR 



'ROUND" 



WARREN'S TOYLAND 

LAWNDALE SHOPPING CENTER 

2168 Lawndale Dr. GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 274-3551 



TEMPLE BETH-EL SISTERHOOD 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 

MRS. ARNOLD J. KRIDEL, Correspondent 

On Friday evening, Sept. 1 I our Wald, Allen Brill, Stanley Meyer, 



Congregation enjoyed the Bas 
Mitzvah service of Sarah Lee 
Fuerst. Her chanting, reading and 
helping to conduct the service was 
done in an excellent manner. Con- 
gratulations to Sarah Lee, her 
parents Dr. and Mrs. Herbert 
Fuerst, and her grandparents Mr. 
and Mrs. Jake Rosenbloom and 
Mr. and Mrs. Al Fuerst. 

Congratulations also to Mr. and 
Mrs. Gilbert Shugar of Tarboro 
on the birth of a baby girl, Lori 
Ann. To Mr. and Mrs. Irving 
Margolis of Williamston and Dr. 
and Mrs. Gary Smiley ol Chapel 
Hill on the birth of Karen Beth 
Smiley. 

Welcome home from the Service 
Larry Katzin of Rocky Mount 
and Simon Meyer of Enfield. 

Bon Voyage to Lt. and Mrs. 
joel J. StempiJ who left lor Ger- 
many for the next 20 months. 
Mrs. Stempil is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Lou Wald of Rocky 
Mount. 

Our Succah was decorated with 
the capable assistance of Mrs. Es- 
ther Ostrow and Mrs. Barney Ba- 
ker and the services were enjoyed 
by one and all. 

The regular meeting of the 
Temple Men's Club was held 
September 24th and following the 
regular business, an experiment 
was made with an Open Forum at 
which a number of questions re- 
lating to Jewish life were an- 
swered by Rabbi Israel J. Sarasohn 
. . . The Congregation had its an- 
nual meeting September 8th, at 
which the following slate of offi- 
cers was elected for 1964-1965: 
President, Kenneth Berk; Vice 
President, Marvin Levin; Trea- 
surer, Jack L. Rosenbloom; Secre- 
tary, Jules Kl tiger. Board: Gerald 
Marcus; Harry Kornfeld; Leonard 
Schiff . . . The committees are the 
same as last year. 

A number of our young people 
are at various higher institutions 
of learnnig this fall and oui best 
wishes are conveyed to them for 
happiness and success: Miss Susan 
Klitzner at Stratford College, Dan- 
ville, Va.; Raymond Levy at Guil- 
ford College, Greensboro; Jay Kri- 
del at East Carolina Teachers Col- 
lege, Greenville, N. C; Martin 
Sultan nad Robert Meritt at Oak 
Ridge Military Academy, Greens- 
boro; Stephen Meritt, Richard 



at State College, Chapel Hill: Miss 
Sandra Sultan at U. N.C. College, 
Greensboro, N. C; Miss Marjorie 
Fox at Finch College,, New York; 
Miss Judy Weller has returned to 
Converse College, Spartanburg, 
S. C. . . . Miss Sandra Weller has 
accepted a teaching position near 
Washington, D. C. . . . Miss Ann 
Justa is at school in Washington, 
N. C. 

A cordial welcome is extended to 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Danoff who 
have recently come to make their 
home in Rocky Mount. Dr. Danoff 
is on the faculty of N. C. Wesleyan 
College as instructor in the Eng- 
lish Department, and Mrs. Danoff 
is the assistant librarian at the 
same school . . . Mr. Nachman Ro- 
senbaum is the Rotary Scholarship 
exchange student at the Wes'evan 
College from Panama. . . 



Jacksonville, N. C. 

MRS. JULES SEGERMAN, 
Correspondent 

After an extended absence from 

these issues, Jacksonville will 
again try to tell of their activities, 
if any. At least the members of 
this community are on the move 
which makes for some news. Be- 
fore going any further we all ex- 
tend a hearty Maze] Tov to Jack 
and Edie Peck on the birth of 
their grandson in Cleveland. Ohio. 
The proud "Zaidie" went up for 
the Brith and the "Bubie" went a 
little later to be there for the cel- 
ebration of the Pidyen Haben 
when the baby will be a month 
old, and also to help out daughter 
Margie with the new experience 
of having a baby in the home. 

Congratulations are also due our 
datighter, Susan, who graduated 
from U. N. C. in June. After grad- 
uation Susan toured Europe for 
two months and now that she is 
back, she is about to move to New 
York where she hopes to 20 to 
work. 

Our community extends a warm 
welcome to Mr. Reubin Kessner, 
our new Circuit Riding Educator. 
Mr. Kessner conducted the ser- 
vices here on the Holidays to a 
record-breaking crowd and our 
services have never before been so 
meaningful and enjoyable as this 
year. His cantorial chants and ex- 
cellent sermons made our services 
both beautiful and inspiring. 



jSfove tuber, 1964 



'llic American jnrisii 1 IMES-OUTLOOK 



19 




Four-year-old Nora Andrea is shown back in the arms of her mother 
for the first time since early infancy, after she journeyed from Hungary to 
the John F. Kennedy Airport with United Hias Service assistance. Mrs. 
Albert Speed, President of the worldwide Jewish migration agency's Wo- 
men's Division, greeted the happily reunited mother and child. Later, Nora 
and her mother, Mrs. Marianne Kay, who has been living in Chicago since 
migrating to the United States, had a chance to get to know each other again 
on the plane that brought them home. 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

MRS. DANIEL RETCHIN, Correspondent 



The Wilmington community 
was saddened by the untimely 
death of Julius Levine, who passed 
away September 17th. May the 
l^ord comfort in their bereave- 
ment his wife Mrs. Goldie Ka- 
ininsky Levine, son Albert Levine, 
and daughters Mrs. Stanley Sater 
of Martinsville, Va. and Mrs Ju- 
lian Weinkle of Coral Gables, Fla. 

With the coming of the Fall 
season our organizations are wast- 
ing no time in getting started on 
their varied projects. The first 
meeting of the Ladies' Concordia 
Society of Temple of Israel was 
held at Fisher's Restaurant on Oc- 
tober 7th. It was reported that 
the cook-out held at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kallman 
during the summer was a great 
financial success in raising funds 
for the Temple's Biblical Garden. 
Mrs. Max Kahn and Mrs. Harry 
Burke are Co-chairmen of I his 
project. 

The Wilmington Chapter of 
Hadassah honored its 25-year 
members at an evening reception 
at the Covenant Club on Septem- 
ber 23rd. The guests of honor 
were presented with certificates 
and corsages. Mrs. Richard Zivi 
and Mrs. Harry Burke were intro- 
duced as new members by mem- 
bership chairman Mrs. Dave Zip- 
ser, who also announced that Mrs. 
Robert Berman had just become 
a Life Member of Hadassah. Mrs. 
Ken Alpert, President, introduced 
Mrs. Berman who is presently serv- 
ing as President of the Southern 



Seaboard Region of Hadassah, 
Mrs. Berman presented a vivid 
behind-the-scenes account of her 
recent trip to Los Angeles for the 
National Hadassah Convention. 

Despite the imminent arrival 
ol Hurricane Gladys, a large 1 urn- 
out of the membership of the Sis- 
terhood of B'Nai Israel Synago- 
gue met on Monday, October 5th 
to start the year off on an en- 
couraging note. President Mrs. 
Milton Fleishman announced ma- 
ny exciting plans and projects for 
the year ahead. 

CONGRATULATIONS TO: 
. . . Mr. and Mrs. S. Wahl on the 
birth of twins to their daughter 
and son-in-law Sheila and Larry 
Wilensky of Atlanta, Ga. ... to 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Bluethen- 
thal on the birth of their great- 
grandson ... to Mrs. George Alper 
on her election to the Board of 
the Jewish Children's Service of 
Atlanta ... to Mrs. Justin Ra- 
phael on her election to the presi- 
dency of the Wilmington League 
of Women Voters, and to Justin 
Raphael on assuming the presi- 
dency of the Wilmington Lions 
Club. The Raphael family will 
surely be one of the busiest fami- 
lies in town in the vear ahead. 



Do Your Part! 
Contribute to the North 
Carolina Home for the 
Jewish Aged 



Have a WORLD of fUH! 

Travel With 28th Year 

Unbelievable low Cost 

Europe 

66-80 Days, Incl. Steamer, from 




17-30 Days, Incl. Air, from $1,290 

AROUND the WORLD 

3046 Days, Incl. Air, from $1,930 

MANY TOURS INCLUDE COLLEGE CREDIT 

Also low cost tours to Mexico $196 up, South 
America $937 up, The West from $456, Africa 
from $1767. 



LUCAS TRAVEL AGENCY 

116 A North Greene St. Greensboro, N. C. 

Dial 272-0111 



Symbol ol Ejfpatoic* 
Reliability and InU*rtt 



PINECROFT 
BEAUTY SALON 

A Complete Beauty Service 
2809 Pinecroft Road 

Dial 299-4470 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



NORMA'S 
BEAUTY SALON 

Complete Beauty Care 

292-0682 
2918 High Point Road 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Clendenin, 
Wrenn & Kirkman 

REALTORS 

218 W Gaston Street 

Dial 272-3183 
GREENSBORO, N- C. 



THE BOAR AND 
CASTLE 

TASTY SANDWICHES 
DELICIOUS DRINKS 
CAR SERVICE 

West Market Ext. 
GREENSBORO. N. C. 



"ORCHID SERVICE" 

Hand Cleaning and 
Finishing 

BLUE BIRD 
CLEANERS, Inc. 

E. J. PERRYMAN & SONS 

1613 Madison Avenue 
Friendly Shopping Center 
Phone 292-1400 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



Home Federal Savings & Loan Assn. 

4% Per Annum Current Dividend Rate On Savings 
Main Office: "X^*****^ Plaza Branch 

113 N. Greene St. J^romW^ 1702 Battle 8' round Ave - 
Summit Branch VsJ !&y Friendly Branch 

1201 Summit Ave. ^^W^ 617 Green Valley Rd. 
Four Seasons Branch 
2005 Pinecroft Road 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



20 



The American Jewish. TIMES-OUTLOOK 



November, 1964 



BURLINGTON, N. C. 



THE VISITORS 



FOR EVERYTHING IN 





BURLINGTON, N. C. 



Area Code 919 
584-3811 



CLAUDE A. ALSTON 

BRICK CLEANING SERVICE 

Dial 226-8901 
FREE ESTIMATES 

SOI E. Gilbreath Graham, N. C. 



Madison 
Employment 
Agency 

OFFICE - SALES 
CLERICAL * TYPISTS 
BOOKEEPERS-DOMESTIC 
HELP - NURSES 
BABY SITTERS 

Dial 865-0886 

If No Answer Dial 865-0883 
1179 Gallatin Road 
MADISON, TENN. 



WAYNE'S 
SNACK BAR 

Open 6 A.M. to 12 Midnight 
Featuring Hamburgers 
Chicken Burgers - Cheese 
Burgers - Plate Lunches and 
Short Orders - Soft Drinks 
and Beer 
228-9352 
Dining - Delivery 
Pick-Up Service 
328 Maple Ave. 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



Modern Venetian Blind & Awning Co. 

CUSTOM MADE TO FIT YOUR SPECIFICATIONS 

1311 E. Webb Ave. Burlington, N. C. CA 6-5443 



MEBANE LUMBER CO., INC. 

Appliance Division 




Your GENERAL ELECTRIC Dealer 
WHOLESALE & RETAIL 
"We Service Everything We Sell" 

Open Any Night By Appointment 
Dial LO 3-9271 Mebane, N. C. 



By Martin Silver 

Perceptive observers who have fusal of the Soviet Government to 

consistently taken a skeptical atti- allow baking of matzoh in state 

tude about the value to East- bakeries last year (and presumably 

West Relations of visits by offi- lor the same reasons this year) was 

rials from the Soviet Union to the attributed to Government opposi- 

free societies will probably find tion to any religious practice for 



little reason for optimism in the 
recent tour of this country by a 
group of top Soviet clergymen. 

So great is the role of the Soviet 
Union in world affairs and so dif- 
ferent is their society from that of 
the free world that intense public 
interest in any visiting Soviet dig- 
nitary is inevitable. Yet the record 
shows that from Soviet Premier 
Khrushchev on down, these Soviet 
dignitaries come to the free coun- 



any religious group — which im- 
plied the incredible conclusion 
thai the persecution of the Jews 
was somehow not deserving of spe- 
cial comment or concern. 

In Washington, Archbishop Ni- 
kodim of the Russian Orthodox 
Church — who has consistently 
(harmed his Jewish questioners by 
his fluent command of Hebrew — 
used a variant of this remarkable 
defense. He agreed it was true that 
tries solely in the role of propa- Soviet newspapers denounce syna- 



gandist for the Soviet system. 

The earnest desire of American 
rabbis to meet with and talk to the 
Soviet clergymen was understand- 
able. What is less easy to grasp is 
t lie proposition that, in some fash- 
ion, their disclosures to the cleri- 
cal visitors that American Jews 
know and are concerned about the 
abuses of Soviet Jews might bring 
about an easing of those abuses. 

In Denver, in Buffalo, in Bos- 
ion, in Washington, in New \ork, 
the details of the East West cleri- 
cal confrontations were identical. 
The rabbis spelled out to the visi- 
tors how well they knew the pre- 
cise details of the Kremlin cam- 
paign against Soviet Jewry. In 
Denver, the Soviet churchmen pro- 
mised to convey to Soviet officials 
the American rabbinate's concern 
over the lack of freedom of Soviet 
Jews to practice their religion. 

But the qualifications and the 
tenor of the responses of the visi- 
tors to specific charges were so re- 
vealing as to the value of such pro- 
mises as to make one wonder how 
any credence could be placed in 
them. 

In Denver, for instance, the Rus- 
sians — the pledge having been 
made — then insisted they had "no 
special status" with the Soviet Min- 
istry of Cults, the Kremlin's instru- 
ment for crippling the religious ac- 
tivities of Soviet Jews. In Buffalo, 
the visitors agreed there was lack 
of religious facilities for Soviet 
Jews but the real reason — or so 
they said — was that the younger 
Jews were assimilated and failed to 
"demand" improvements. The re- 



gogues and the Jewish faith but, he 
added in an upside-down kind of 
reassurance, the same newspapers 
say even worse things about the 
Russian Orthodox Church. As for 
the fantastically high proportion 
of Russian Jews, indicted, widely 
publicized, convicted and executed 
(Please turn to Page 32) 



Roanoke, Va. 

(Concluded from Page 7) 

Our heartiest congratulations of 
Mazel Tov are extended to Mr. 
and Mrs. Irving Markowitz, the 
proud parents of a baby girl, Lori 
Ann. 

We record with deep sorrow the 
passing of Katie Cohen and of Kay 
Levin, wife of Artie Levin.. It is 
with deepest measure of sympathy 
that we extend our condolences to 
the bereaved families and kin. We 
also express our sympathy and 
condolences to Mr. Jay Hurd on 
the loss of his beloved Mother. 

Sisterhood's opening meeting 
for the new season was well atten- 
ded. Our president, Mrs. Morton 
Fox, presided. Mrs. Joseph E. 
Brumber, program chairman, en- 
tertained us with a delightful mu- 
sical skit about the national Wo- 
men's League Convention of the 
United Synagogues of America 
which was held in October. Those 
who participated in the skit were 
Mrs. Brumberg, Mrs. Bruce Bren- 
ner, Mrs. Albert Silverstein, Mrs. 
Bernard Katz, Mrs. Michael Co- 
hen, Mrs. Norbert Weckstein, 
Mrs. Ralph Katz, Mrs Harry 
Thames, accompanist and Mrs. 
Malcolm Rosenberg, director. 



November, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



21 




Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller is shown issuing his proclamation 
designating October 7 as United Hias Service Day in New York State, in 
celebration of the worldwide Jewish migration agency's 80th anniversary. 
With him are Murray I. Gurfein, President of United Hias Service (left) 
and Edwin Rosenberg, Chairman of the agency's 80th Anniversary Com- 
mittee. 

J&HOUND GREENSBORO 

(Continued from Page 7) 

Lounge, The speaker for the terhood held their Welcome New- 
evening was Rabbi Israel M. Gold- comer's Dance Saturday October 
man of Chizuk Amun Congrega- 24 at the Beth David Synagogue 
tion in Baltimore, Maryland. Mr. 
Adolph Guyes was Master of Cere- 
monies, and the new officers of 
the Beth David Mens Club were 
installed. 

Belli David Mens Club and Sis- 



Lounge. All newcomers were the 
guests of the Mens Club and Sis- 
terhood. 

Get well wishes to Mrs. Marry 
Chandgie and I. M. Karesh. 

(Please turn to Page 28) 



Richmond, Va. 



Mrs. Hank Wolfe, of Rich- 
mond, Va., won one of the two 
top prizes offered at the fifth an- 
nual festival of the Virginia Poe- 
try Society at the new Fine Arts 
Center in Lynchburg, Va. 

The four-day session, which in- 
cluded a poetry workshop, conclu- 
ded Saturday, October 10. 

Mrs. Wolfe's poem, in free 
verse, entitled "Hot Wind in Au- 
gust" was judged as the best in 
the unpublished category. The 
winning poem in the published di- 
vision, "Moonlight," was composed 
by Carlton Drewry of Roanoke, 
Va. The poems were judged bv 
Charles Wright, a member of the 
University of North Carolina 
faculty. ~H 

Watson Electrical Co. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

106 Stokes Dial CA 6-4441 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



Al amance Book & 
Stationery Co. 

215 Maple St. 
Dial CA 7-2071 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



The $25 awards to the winners 
were donated by William P. Swee- 
ney of Lynchburg and Mrs. Ver- 
non A. Hall of San Antonio, Tex. 

Inspiration for Mrs. Wolfe's 
poem was a painting of a tenement 
scene by Dr. Harry T. Kessler, for- 
mer Philadelphian and now a 
member of the staff at McGuire 
VA Hospital in Richmond. 

Mrs. Wolfe is a graduate of Mrs. 
Ulrich Troubetzkoy's poetry class 
at Richmond Professional Insti- 
tute. She is now taking a course 
in creative writing there. A mem- 
ber of Temple Beth-El in Rich- 
mond, Mrs. Wolfe served in 1951- 
53 as president of the Richmond 
Section of the National Council of 
Jewish Women. 

In attendance at Lynchburg 
burg were a number of Richmon- 
ders, including Miss Nancy Byrd 
Turner, Miss Genevieve Bo^uess, 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald A. Coulson, 
Mr. and Mrs Brodie Herndon and 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Donald DeVilbiss. 

The group was addressed by 
Professors John Pendy Kirbv of 
Randolph-Macon Woman's Col- 
lege and the University of Virgin- 
ia: Lawrence Lee of the University 
(Please turn to Page 34) 



BLALOCK'S A-l CLEANERS 

COMPLETE DRY CLEANING SERVICE 
TUXEDO RENTALS 
220 E. Front Burlington, N. C. CA 6-3366 



PLAZA PONTIAC, INC. 



PONTIAC 

527 N. Church 



TEMPEST 



Sales & Service 
Dial 227-4266 



BURLINGTON, N. C. 



The Friendly "Home Folks" Since 1914 

First Federal Savings 4 Loan Ass'n. 

HOME LOANS — INSURED SAVINGS 

309 E. Davis St. Burlington, N. C. Dial 226-2417 



BARKER'S 
TIRE SERVICE 

"U. S. ROYAL TIRES" 

274 W. Davis St. Dial CA 8-8383 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



MODERN CUSTODIAN 
SERVICE 

House Cleaning & 
Janitor Service 

405 Banks 226-5560 
GRAHAM, N. C. 



Colonial 
Shutter Co. 

Complete Service On 
Custom Shutters Or 

Stock Panels at 
Competitive Prices 

FREE ESTIMATES 

Burlington-Elon College Rd. 
584-4441 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



TEDDY BEAR 
CHILDREN'S NURSERY 

Modem - Clean - Reasonable 

CA 6-6047 
328 W. Holt Burlington, N. C. 



HARRY L LYNCH 

ESSO OIL SERVICE 
Heating Oil 

Dial CA 8-8311 
1609 W. Webb Avenue 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



CLARK 
UPHOLSTERING SHOP 

Quality Craftsmanship 

Dial 227-2193 
204-A N. Cobb Avenue 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



RICHARD'S PHILLIPS 66 
SERVICE STATION 

Try Our Friendly Service 

228-9107 
506 Trollinger 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



HAW RIVER 66 
SERVICE STATION 

MAJOR AND MINOR REPAIRS 

226-1894 
Route 1 Haw River, N. C. 



IRENE'S 
DAY NURSERY 

A Home Away from Home 

805 S. Broad 226-1713 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



BOSTON DRIVE-IN 
CLEANERS & LAUNDRY 

CA 6-5586 
436 N. Church 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



"The Man With The Plan" 

Jennings M. Bryan 
Agency, Inc. 

"Insurance That Protects" 
422 S. Spring Dial CA 7-7458 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



22 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



November, 1964 



FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 




LOCATED AT 220 EASTERN BLVD. 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 

On Highways U. S. 301 — U. S. 13 — 1-95 

Area Code 919 - 433-1113 - TWX 919-484-0286 

133 Units, TV, Radio, Hi-Fi, Air Conditioners, 
Swimming Pool, Telephones, Beauty Rest Mattress, 
Gift Shop, Service Station, Conference Rooms, 
Fine Restaurant and Famous Home's Candies 



E, K. CAMPBELL, JR. 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

The Finest In Home Building 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 
Dial 484-1211 

3206 Kintyre Drive Fayetteville, N. C. 



Wallpaper and Matching Fabrics 
Scenics - Handprints - Grasscloth - Burlaps - Vinyls 

Sales - Installations — Expert Workmanship 

PITTSBURG PAINTS 

Warren Lea Wallpaper & Paint Or, 

Eutaw Shopping Center Phone 484-0634 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



STEWART OLDSMOBILE, 

THERE'S A ROCKET TO FIT YOUR POCKET 
Quality Built — Quality Sold — Quality Service 

485-1141 

929 Bragg Blvd. Fayetteville, N. C. 



DILMAR TIRE COMPANY, INC. 

Complete Firestone Tire Line - Factory Method Retreading 
Complete Brake & Front End Alignment 
Service Master Supply Point of Auto Accessories 

Plenty of Free Parking 
917 Bragg Blvd. Fayetteville, N. C. 485-1109 




Representatives of the three major faiths discuss moral questions aris- 
ing out of current social and civic issues on "Trialogue," a new weekly one- 
hour series over WINS Radio. Permanent panelists are (seated left to 
right) Rev. Dr. Dan Potter, Executive Director of the Protestant Council 
of *be Ci'v of N^w York; Rabbi Marc Tanenbaum, Director of the Interie- 
ligious Affairs Department, American Jewish Committee; and Father Nor- 
man J. O'Connor, Director of Radio-TV Film, Paulist Communications; and 
the Right Rev. Monsignor Timothy J. Flynn, Director of the Bureau of In- 
formation and of Radio-TV Communications of the Archdiocese of New 
Yark, who will be on a future program. 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 

MRS. ALEX WAITMAN, Correspondent 



A Pidyon Haben for little Eric 
Soloman was held in our Center 
on Sept. 13th. His parents Mr. and 
Mrs. Ronnie Soloman and grand- 
parents Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Solo- 
man hosted a cocktail reception 
in his honor, which was enjoyed 
by the entire community. 

An annual event during the 
High Holydays at Beth Isniel is 
the Community Alliyah which is 
given to some deserving person. 
This year the recipient was Alex 
Waitman for his many years of 
dedicated service to Synagogue 
and community affairs. 

Congratulations to Mr. and 



Mrs. Harry Stein upon the mar- 
riage ol their niece Miss Brenda 
Lee Stein daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Isadore Stein of Florence, 
S. C, to Mr. Ronald Mann Tau- 
send of New York City. Also to 
cousins Bernard Stein and family. 
We congratulate Lester Wolft on 
becoming president of the Cape 
Fear Kiwanis Club. 

Happy to report that Mrs. Er- 
win Baer is much improved after a 
short stay at Cape Fear Valley Hos- 
pital and Mrs. Louis Green is re- 
cuperating at home after suigery 
at C. F. V. H. also. 



H. M. COLVIN 

General Contractor 

RESIDENTIAL 
COMMERCIAL 
BUILDER - DEVELOPER 

Repairs and Remodeling 

Also 

Sub Contracting Work 
Work Guaranteed 
FREE ESTIMATES 

T3E1 432-5872 



2110 Murchison Road 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



THE 

MASTER 

EXTERMINATORS 

COMPLETE PEST 
CONTROL 

Call HE 3-3284 

Roaches - Mice - Rats - Ants 
Fleas - Others 

Regular Monthly Visits at a 
Cost of Only Pennies A Day 

Termite Control 

Continuous Renewal Service 
FREE 

INSPECTION & ESTIMATES 

111 E. Russell Street 
Fayetteville, N. C. 



November, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



Complete Auto Service 
DIAL HE 3-2723 

Motor Tune Up 
6 & 12 Volt Motor Analysis 
Precision Valve Grinding 
Complete Motor Overhaul 
Complete Brake Service 
Motor Boring 
Welding 



rilliam S. McNair 

Clinton Hwy. 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Basses' 
Flower Mart 

Floral Decorations For 
Clubs - Parties - Etc. 
Free Delivery in Fayetteville 
& Fort Bragg 

Weddings - Socials 
Hospital Arrangements 
Funeral Designs 

Dial 484-5114 

5110 Bragg Blvd. 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Arrow 
Exterminators 

To Serve You Better We 
Offer Household Protection 

To Cover 
Guaranteed Termite Control 
Tree, Shrub, Lawn Spraying 
Weed Control 
Complete Pest Control 
ARROW EXTERMINATORS 
INC. 

325 Winslow 

Phone 432-5211 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



REAVES SAND 
& GRAVEL COMPANY 

TOP SOIL - FILL DIRT 
HE 2-2854 

Raleigh Road RFD 6 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



PAPPAS 

DRIVE-IN 

B ROASTED 
CHICKEN 

Hot Dogs - Hamburgers 
Sandwiches 
Orders To Go- 
Day or Night 

485-1411 

PICK-UP ORDERS READY 
IN A JIFFY 
1006 Bragg Blvd. 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Our sincere condolences lc; Ha- 
rold Cohen on the passing of his 
mother, Mrs. Katie Cohen oi Roa- 
noke, Va. 

The Youth Alliyah Luncheon, 
sponsored by Hadassah was well 
attended in spite of the torrential 
rains on Oct. 5th. After a delecta- 
ble turkey luncheon, catered by 
Mesdames Jos. Eckstein, A. M. 
Fleishman and Martin Wertheim, 
the group was delighted with an 
address by Rabbi Simcha Kling of 
Greensboro. He spoke on the old 
and the new Israel and displayed 
a knowledge of the land and its 
people with unusual brilliance 
and humor. Mrs. S. L. Elfmon and 
Mrs. Harry Stein were chairmen 
of the affair. 

Heartiest congratulations to Dr. 
Samuel L. Elfmon who was ap- 
pointed to the State Board of 
Mental Health. Dr. Elfmon is a 
fine physician who has crowded 
into his busy schedule a lon^ list 
of accomplishments of which we 
will name a few. Being active in 
civic affairs here he has served 
as president of the Kiwanis Club, 
is a member of the Y. M. C. A. 
board of directors. He came to us 
after receiving his Medical De- 
gree from the Medical College of 
Virginia in 1935. A native of Rich- 
mond, Va., he interned at High- 
smith Hospital before beginning 
a practice which was interrupted 
while he served as Captain in the 
Medical Corps in the European 
theatre. Instructing at Duke Hos- 
pital since 1947, Dr. Elfmon was 
certified in internal medicine in 
1952 and is a consultant at Wo- 
mack Army Hospital, Ft. Bragg 
and the Veterans Facility here. He 
is past president of Cumberland 
of Highsmith Memorial Hospital 
staff, and serves in other capacities 
too numerous to mention. Dr. Elf- 
mon is married to the former Lil- 
lian Shain of Wilmington. They 
have two daughters, Miss Sheila 
Elfmon and Mrs. Joel Fleishman 
of Greensboro. 



Dr. Salo W. Baron was honored 
at a special convocation for the 
Herzl Institute. The noted Jewish 
historian was praised by Dr. 
Emanuel Newmann, chairman of 
the Herzl Foundation, as a man 
who "personifid one of the finest 
and noblest of Jewish traditions: 
dedication to learning and the 
sanctification of Jewish studies. 



WILLIAM R. SHIPMAN 

NEED A GOOD PAINTER? 

INTERIOR FREE RESIDENTIAL 

EXTERIOR ESTIMATES COMMERCIAL 

HE 3-2507 

815 Old Wilmington Road Fayetteville, N. C. 




Rat cliff e Welding Service 

ADD VALUE AND BEAUTY TO YOUR HOME 
with ornamental iron 
Columns — Railings — Grills — Gates 
Lawn Furniture — Fences 

HE 3-1670 3105 Wilmington Rd. Fayetteville, N. C. 



STEVE'S HAMONT GRILL 

Open 7 Days A Week— Hours: 6 A.M. 'til 10 P.M. 
LOCATED AT HAYMOUNT SECTION 

DIAL HIT 4-0261 

1304 Morganton Road Fayetteville, N. C. 



Torch 

PIZZA 

3406 Raeford Road 



B A R - B - Q LASAGNE 

with Torch's BAKED DAILY 

Tasty Bar-B-Qued MAMA'S WAY 
Sauce 

484-7123 

OR 484-7124 

Fayetteville, N. C. 



BRAGG MOVING & STORAGE, INC. 

AGENTS FOR NORTH AMERICAN VAN LINES. INC. 

LOCAL & LONG DISTANCE MOVING 
5223 Raeford Road Fayetteville, N. C. HU 4-7176 



807 Gillespie 



CRYSTAL DRIVE - IN 

BEST IN FOOD AND SERVICE 
Fayetteville, N. C. 



HE 3-9544 



COOLEY'S TIRE COMPANY 

TV Sets — Electric Appliances — Automobile Tires 
485-2208 Recapping 433-0497 

3118 Bragg Blvd. 211 Franklin 

FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



CUMBERLAND SERVICE CO. 

HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING CONTRACTOR 
Sales & Service on All Brands 

2727A Providence Fayetteville, N. C. Dial 433-1408 



SOUTHERN PLUMBING CO. 



NEW 



302 Pelt Drive 



PL OMBING CONTRACTOR 

REMC DELING - REPAIRS - ADDITIONS 
Ai.l Workmanship Guaranteed 



432-8783 



Fayetteville, N. C. 



24 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



November, 1964 



Towel City 
Towel (0. 

"Distributors of 

Cannon Products" 
Towel Sets - Sheets - Robes 
Pillow Cases - Cannon 
Spreads - Hosiery 
Open Mondav thru Saturday 
7 A.M. - 9 P.M. 
Across from Howard 
Johnson's 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 
2 Miles South on US 301 
Phone HE 2-5318 



Gas Appliances 

Bottled Gas 

Over a Decade of 
Dependable Gas Service 

FOR LP-GAS 

Dial 433-1327 

AYCOCK 

Gas Service 

233 Franklin Street 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Luigi's 
Restaurant 

Famous for 
SPAGHETTI AND PIZZA 

475 Hay St. HE 2-2864 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Telephone 
Answering Service 
of Fayetieville, Inc. 

To Get the Answer Call 
Telephone Answering Service 
HU 4-6101 

727 McGilvary 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Charles Pearsall, Mgr. "Complete Pest Control Service" 

CAROLINA EXTERMINATORS 

Small Monthly Terms to Meet Your Budget 

HE 2-4138 Fayetteville, N. C. 



ACME 
TIRE SERVICE 

Recapping - Retreading 
Repairing 
HE 2-4331 
815 Gillespie 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



BOULEVARD 
SUPER MARKET 

Get The Best and Save 
484-5309 
5000 Bragg Blvd. 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



B&E GARAGE 
Complete Auto Service 

484-7465 
3516 Cumberland Road 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



AMERICANA 
MOTOR LODGE 

60 Rooms - Restaurant Adjoining 
HE 2-8191 
Three Miles South on US 301 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



THE 

LOBSTER HOUSE 

MR. BOBBY WARREN 
448 Person 
Fayetteville, N. C. 



BEARD'S 
QUALITY UPHOLSTERY 

Furniture Our Specialty 
HE 2-5675 
112 S. Plymouth 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



BEL-AIRE 
RESTAURANT 

Hospitality & Good Food 
HE 2-8018 
Hwy. 301 South 
FAYETTEVILLE, N .C. 



MARKHAM 
DRUG COMPANY 

FAMOUS FOR SERVICE 
432-5197 
114 Rowan 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Williamston, N. C. 

MRS. IRVING M. MARGOLIS, 
Correspondent 

Williamston welcomes to ou" 
community Mr. and Mrs. Arnold 
Bernstein, formerly of Philadel- 
phia. Mr. Bernstein is an engineer 
with Beaunit Textiles' executive 
training program. Mrs. Bernstein 
is teaching in the local Junior 
High School. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. 1). Pittman has 
returned from an extensive trip 
to South Carolina, Georgia, and 
Florida. 

Mr. and Mrs. Maury Bernstein 
of Miami Beach, Florida, and 
Mrs. Esther Oslrow and Mrs. Ja- 
cob Levy of Rocky Mount visited 
briefly with Mr. and Mrs. Irving 
M. Margolis. 

Mrs. Irving M. Margolis atten- 
ded the Board meeting of the 
North Carolina Association of 
Jewish Women held recently in 
Fayetteville. 

Mrs. Frank J. Margolis left for 
a short stay in New York City. 



Weldon-Roanolce 

Rapids, N, C. 

LOUISE FARBER, 
Correspondent 

Student Rabbi David Waldman 
of the Jewish Theological Semi- 
nary of New York conducted ser- 
vices for the High Holy Days at 
Temple Emanu-El. He was assisted 
by Dr. William Furie, Circuit Rid- 
ing Educator. Visitors for the Ho- 
lidays were, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Kittner and daughter Dee Ann, 
Miss Dorothy Kittner, Miss Millie 
Goldblatt of Washington; Mr. 
and Mrs. David Kittner and chil- 
dren of Philadelphia; Mr. and 
Mrs. Joe Frank and family of 
Portsmouth; Miss Evelyn Joseph- 
son of Baltimore; Dr. and Mrs. 
Herman Farber and sons, Mark 
and Jimmv, of Petersburg; Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry Vatz and family 
of New Bern; Mr. and Mrs. Ben 
Marks of Greensboro; Mrs. Cohen 
of Richmond. Dr. and Mrs. Ben 
Josephson and family of Spring- 
field, N. J. 

Miss Betty Michael Liverman 
is now teaching in Silver Springs, 
Md. Miss Nancv Liverman is a 
student at t^e Universitv of Penn. 
Mr. Steve Bloom is attending the 
Universitv of Richmond. Miss. 
P^trVia Novpv is a student at 
Florida State Coll^ee at Lakeland 
(Please turn to Page 33) 



ABLE PLUMBING 
& PIPE CO., INC. 

Competent - Qualified 

HU 4-8380 
301 Hope Mills Road 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



PEDRO'S 
MEXICAN FOOD 

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FOOD 

509 Hay 485-9780 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



FRED MANINO 
GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

Specializing in Residential 
Construction 

HE 2-6738 
4468 Oakmont Circle 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



GARDNER 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

New Construction and Repairs 

432-5876 

3508 Raleigh Road 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



N. M. BILL 
WELL DRILLING 

Pump Repairs 
Sales & Service 

HE 3-4289 
Route 6, Box 323 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



JACOB'S 
TILE SERVICE 

FLOOR SANDING 
433-1324 
3214 Cumberland Road 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



HAMONT 
BODY WORKS 

COMPLETE BODY REPAIRS 
HU 4-8530 
107 Broadfoot Avenue 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Fayetteville Drug Store 

"Better Drug Service" 

Tv^o Locations 

114 Gillespie St. HE 2-8181 
1201 Hay St. 485-1811 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



PEARSON STREET 
REST HOME 

Home For The Aged 
& Infirm 
429 Person 
432-6823 Fayetteville, N. C. 



November, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 



25 



Charles C. 
McCallum 

Painting & Papering 

Residential & Commercial 
Experienced & Quality 
Work - Insured 
Brush - Rollers - Spray 
Free Estimates 

Dial HU 4-3328 

1702 Bragg Street 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



LEE 
Funeral Home 

SINCE 1939 
DIAL 

HE 3-3127 

If No Answer Dial 

HU 4-4349 
M. C. LEE, Owner 

343 Person 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



A&H 
CLEANERS 

"Make Our Phone Line 
Your Clothes Line" 

Laundry Service 
Pick-Up & Delivery 

Dial 484-4208 

4515 Bragg Blvd. BN. DN. 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



WHISPERING PINES 
CONVALESCENT HOME 

HE 2-5335 

523 Country Club Drive 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



AAA 
Glass Company 

Glass for Every Need 

PLATE GLASS 
GLAZING SPECIALIST 

Dial 433-2811 

430 Rankin Street 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Whiteville, N. C. 

MRS. MARTIN BERNSTEIN 
Correspondent 

Mrs. Sol Mann and Mrs. Si 
Steinberg were hostesses at the 
congregations monthly social held 
October 7, at the Beth Israel Cen- 
ter. 

The congregation celebrated the 
Festival ot Succos with the Succos 
services, September 22. 

A Simhas Torah service, conduc- 
ted by Mr. Reuben Kesner was 
held at the Beth Israel Outer, 
September 29. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Mann spent 
the High Holidays in Williams- 
burg, Virginia, where Mr. Mann 
conducted the services for the 
Beth El Congregation and the stu- 
dents of William and Man Col- 
lege. 

The Irving Mann family atten- 
ded High Holiday services at the 
Beth David Synagogue, Greens- 
boro, North Carolina, where Mr. 
Mann served as Cantor for the Ho- 
liday service. 

U. S. Interior Secretary Stuart 
Udall will visit Israel to continue 
negotiations over the setting up 
of a joint U. S. -Israel desalination 
project utilizing nuclear energy, it 
was announced in Jerusalem by 
Theodor Kollek. director general 
of the Prime Minister's office. 




The State of Israel Bond Organi- 
zation paid tribute to the late Eddie 
Cantor, who was one of its principal 
leaders since its inception thirteen 
years ago. Cantor served as Chair- 
man of Builders of Israel for Israel 
Bonds. In a statement issued by 
Abraham Feinberg, President, and 
Dr. Joseph J. Schwartz, Vice Presi- 
dent, the Israel Bond drive recalled 
Canter's "selfless devotion and vig- 
orus leadership for all humanitarian 
endeavors." 



No one moves as many 
families a year as Allied 




For free estimates, call 

M. M. SMITH STORAGE 
WAREHOUSE 

109 Broadfoot Ave. 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



J. Fairley Dunn 

Nurseries & Garden 
Shop 

Complete Line of Shrubs 
Trees - Garden Tools 
& Supplies 
SEEDS - BULBS 
FERTILIZERS 
Complete Landscape Gardening 
Service 
FOR FREE ESTIMATES 

Dial HU 4-7246 

Located Between Raeford 
Rd. & Bragg Blvd. 
Hwy. 59 Fayetteville, N. C. 



Grace's 
Beauty Salon 

Complete 
Beauty Care 

For Appointments 
Dial 485-1369 

400 Washington Drive 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



JOHNSON'S 
AMERICAN 

COMPLETE AUTO SERVICE 
432-2434 
701 Hillsboro 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 

FRANK'S 

SERVICENTER 

ROAD SERVICE 
24 HOUR SERVICE 

Minor Auto Repairs 
Brake Relining and Adjusting 
Motor Tune-Ups 
— Dial— 

484-1723 

6339 Bragg Blvd. 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



U S CAFE 

AIR CONDITIONED 

We Specialize in 
Steaks and Fried Chicken 

Open 5 A.M. to 12 Midnight 

Dial HE 2-8457 

465 Hay Street 
FAYETTEVILLE. N. C, 



BRAKE SERVICE 

We Specialize in 
Truck & Car Brakes 
Sales & Service 

Dial HE 2-5193 

T & H 
BRAKE SERVICE 

129 Dunn Road 
FAYETTEVILLE. N. C. 



DUNCAN 



SERVICE STATION 

Firestone 
Complete Auto Service 
Dial HU 4-4263 

Specializing In 
Motor Tune Ups & 
Brake Service 
1208 Ft. Bragg Road 
Hamont Hill 
FAYETTEVILLE. N. C, 



TEDDY BEAR 
RESTAURANT 

"Just Good Food" 

484-9179 
2615 Raeford Road 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



JEAN'S 
Beauty Salon 

Two Departments to 
Serve You 
Experienced Hair Stylists 
Budget Department 

JEAN ALLEN 
Owner & Hair Stylist 

Chairman of N. C. 
Hair Fashion Comm. 

Dial 432-5029 

1329 Ramsev Street 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



26 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



November, 1964 



STATESVILLE, N. C. 



HUNT 
n u si 1 


DFN fflMDAMV 




Manufacturing 




Boston Sharpeners and 




Speed Ball Pens 


64 By-Pass 


TR 2-2491 




STATESVILLE, N. C. 



DIXIE SEATING COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 
CHAIRS — ROCKERS — JUVENILE FURNITURE 
Statesville, N. C. 



BOB'S SUNOCO 
SERVICE STATION 

COMPLETE AUTO SERVICE 
Dial 873-9341 
735 Shelton Ave. 
STATESVILLE, N. C. 



JIM'S 

TRANSMISSION SERVICE 

Transmission Specialists 
General Auto Repairs 
872-5076 111 S. Oakland 

STATESVILLE, N. C. 



E. S. JOHNSON 
PAINTING COMPANY 

Interior & Exterior 
Commercial - Residential 
Industrial 
Dial 873-4562 
205 S. Trade Street 
STATESVILLE, N. C. 



M & S 
AUTO BODY WORKS 

Body Repair & Auto Painting 
Dial 873-8742 
1007 Shelton Avenue 
STATESVILLE, N. C. 



POOLE'S 
REFRIGERATION SERVICE 

Commercial & Domestic 

Dial TR 3-6798 
619 Diamond Statesville, N. C. 



SLOANS CLEANERS 

Quality Work at 
Reasonable Prices 
Dial TR 3-6131 
109 Water 
STATESVILLE, N. C. 



Greetings 
from 




SOUTHERN 
SCREW 
(0. 

STATESVILLE, N. C. 



Statesville, N. C. 

MRS. MILTON STEINBERGER, 
Correspondent 

Temple Emanuel welcomed 
their new spiritual leader, Rabbi 
Ivan Balk who is a native of Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., and a student oi the 
Theological Seminary of Ameri- 
can, New York. Rabbi Balk con- 
ducted the High Holiday services 
in a most inspiring manner and 
chanted the traditional melodies 
with a Yom Tov spirit. 

Following the Yom Kippur ser- 
vices a lovely "Break The Fast" 
sponsored by the Ladies Auxiliary 
of the Temple was held in the 
Temple's social center. To com- 
plete the evening a lovely "After 
Yom Kippur" Dinner-Dance was 
held at The Vance Motel Motor 
Lodge in Statesville, sponsored by 
the Salisbury-Statesville Bnai 
B'rith Lodge. Everyone had a 
wonderful time at this gala affair 
-thanks to Sol Walsh of Statesville 
who was chairman of this affair. 

During Succoth Festival, a bea- 
utiful Sua ah was erected by the 
members of the congregation; the 
children completed the artistic job 
by decorating the Succah with 
gifts of fruit which they brought. 
Following the joyous observance 
in the Succah, an Oneg Shabbot 
was held in the social hall; hostess 
for the evening were Mrs. Alfred 
Gordon, Mr. Hy Silberman and 
Mrs. Ellis Gordon. 

Once again we all gathered for 
the festival of Simchas Torah to 
rejoice in this holiday; to watch 
the children as well as grown-ups 
participate in services and sing 
the holiday melodies. Hostess for 
this affair were Mrs. Ben Katz 
Mrs. Milton Steinberger and Mrs. 
Louis Gordon. 

Best of good luck to Miss Gerry 
Katz who is now attending her 
freshman year at N. C. State Col- 
Ige, Raleigh, N. C. And congratu- 
lations to Gerry on getting her 
picture on the front page of "The 
Technician" North Carolina 
State's Student newspaper. Gerry 
was one of the first coeds to enter 
State College this term. The title 
under her picture: "Coeds: They- 
're Cute and They're Here!!" 

Dr. and Mrs. Wallace Hoffman 
attended the 69th annual conven- 
tion and Scientific Seminar of the 
American Osteopathic Association 
October 5th, at Las Vegas, Nev. 



Betty's School 
Of 



BETTY S. PARLIER, 
Instructor 

Tap - Ballet 

Acrobatic - Toe 

All Ages 

333 Hartness Road 
873-4513 
STATESVILLE, N. C. 



MYERS OIL CO, 



(AMERICAN) 

if 

BRAND HEATING OIL 

Dial 873-4388 
Prompt Metered Delivery- 
Residential & Commercial 
Service 
Salisbury Road 
STATESVILLE, N. C. 



Statesville 
Glass & Mirror Co. 

Glass for All Your Building 
Needs - Tub & Shower 

Enclosures 
Awnings & Aluminum 
Canopies 
Picture Frames 

dial 873-3523 

OR 872-3916 
Charlotte Hwy. 
STATESVILLE, N". C. 



Johnson 

Cleaners. Inc. 

Licensed Lustre-Sheen Process 
quality controlled cleaning 
DRAPES PICKED UP 
CLEANED & REHUNG 
16 Years Experience 

Specialists in 
Carpet & Rug 
Cleaning 
"Pick Up & Delivery 
2 Way Radio Controlled" 

FREE 
STORAGE 

LAUNDRY 
SERVICE 

Dial TR 2-5171 

801 Blvd. 
STATESVILLE, N. C. 




November, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



27 




CHARLOTTE, N. I 



Mrs. Golda Meir, Foreign Minister of the State of Israel, and Walter 
Reuther (right). President of the United Automobile Workers Union, play- 
ed leading rcles in an impressive Israel Bond tribute to William L. Mc- 
Fetridge, Vice-President of the AFL-CIO, in one of the greatest events ever 
held by the Jewish community of Chicago. The dinner was the climax of 
the Israel Bond campaign in Chicago. 

Charlotte Temple Israel Sisterhood 

MRS. H. N. FRIEDMAN, Correspondent 



Many children were contest 
prize winners for the best and most 
decorative Sukkoth, they have 
helped their parents to build near 
their homes. 

Consecration services were held 
on Simchas Torah lor those chil- 
dren entering class Aleph of the 
Religious School. Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry L. Schwartz provided the 
refreshments after the services in 
memory of their parents Mr. and 
Mrs. Israel Schwartz. Mr. Harry 
L. Schwartz also took charge of 
building' the Temple Sukkahm 
the decorating was done by some 
ladies of the Sisterhood. , 

Sandwiched in between the 
Holy Days was a Sisterhood 
Hoard Meeting. Mrs. Philys Widis 
presided. Doris thanked all her 
chairmen for their untiring work 
during the Summer months. 

Our daily kindergarten was of- 
ficially approved and listed in the 
1 904-65 Educational Directory in 
the State of North Carolina. The 
good news came in form of a 
letter to Mrs. Alan S. Coldber 
(Ruth), Director of the Temple 
Israel Daily Kindergarten School. 



STFPT,F.'S MOTION 

LANDSCAPING SERVICE 

Complete Landscapinq 
Designs & Planting Plans 
528-5721 
TROUTMAN, N. C. 



One of the projects ol our Tem- 
ple and Sisterhood is Hebrew clas- 
ses for adults which have begun 
this Thursday morning and even- 
ing October 1. Adult education of 
both Temples, in con junction 
with the Temple Israel Men's 
Club, is one more project for 
Sunday mornings. There will be 
speakers and book reports to en- 
joy- 

The following became Bar 
Mitzvah in September, Elliott 
Harold Mann, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Douglas E. Mann; Michael Elliott 
Schreiber, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Samuel Schreiber, and Bernard 
Neal Ackerman, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. George E. Ackerman of 
Fort Mill, S. C. A hearty Mazel 
Tov to the above young men, 
their parents and families. 

Mazel Tov also to Mr. and Mrs. 
Erwin Ganz on the birth of a son, 
and to Mr. and Mrs. Mark M. 
Simmer on the birth of a daugh- 
ter. We wish them all much joy. 

Lynchburg, Va. 

(Concluded from Page 41 
November 10 — Sisterhood Ba- 
zaar — Save White Elephants, 
Bake and Freeze, Sew and Knit. 
Bring your friends! 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Schewel have 
presented to the Synagogue a 
lovely Menorah for use by the 
Religious School Children. The 




SUPER MARKETS, inc. 

FINE FOODS 

Charlotte, Gastonia, Mooresville, Newton, Hickory, Morganton, 
Lincolnton, Kannapolis, Cornelius, Forest City and Kings 
Mountain, North Carolina; Rock Hill and Lancaster, South 
Carolina. 



YOU'LL SAVE MONEY ON YOUR 
ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

AT 

SUMMERS SUPPLY COMPANY 

ttoipoint 

DEALERS 

2919 Randleman Road Dial BR 2-9922 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Thomas Transfer 

AND 

Storage Co. 




Red Carpet Moving Service 
Economical - Reasonable 

Dial 375-5715 
3139 Cullman Ave. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



SETH BUILDERS 
SUPPLY, INC. 

Builder Headquarters 
Complete Remodeling 
Home Improvements and 
Kitchen Cabinets 

— Free Estimates — 

605 E. Charlotte Ave 827-4331 
MT. HOI.LY, N. C. 



RANCH HOUSE 
RESTAURANT 

Specializing in 

Guaranteed 
U. S. Choice 

and Prime 
Western Beef 
Charcoal- 
Broiled 

DIAL 
EX 9-5411 

Wilkinson Boulevard 
U v S. Highway 29 South 
CHARLOTTE, N t C. 




Grant's 
Amoco Service 

Road Service 
Pick Up & Delivery 

Mechanic On Duty 
Minor Repairs 
Motor Tune Ups 
Brake & Muffler Service 

1374 East Morehead 

377-9385 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



28 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



November, 1964 



Crystal Resfauran! 

Home Cooking - Lunches 
Charcoal Broiled Steaks 
Private Dining Room 
Catering to Private Parties 
Seating Capacity 50 
AIR CONDITIONED 
Open 7 A.M. - 10 P.M. 
7 Days A Week 
Dial 375-6139 
315 N. Graham 
Next to Orvin Motel 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



STANDARD 
TRUCKING CO. 

Direct Service to and Between 
All Points in 

• NORTH CAROLINA 

and 

• SOUTH CAROLINA 

General Commodities 

DIAL ED 2-1107 

225 E. 16th 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



THE 

World- Famous 

OPEN KITCHEN 



1318 W. Morehead St. 

Presents an Adventure in 
FINE ITALIAN 
FOOD 
Choice Wines & Beer 
PIZZA 
Dial 375-7449 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 




★ TV SPECIAL * 



*5 



00 



PER DAY 



NO MILEAGE CHARGE 
from 

(9:00 AM to 4:30 PM) 

ASK ABOUT OUR 

WEEKEND SPECIAL 

332-2233 

732 N. TRYON ST. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 




HESeaiFTIONS 
STANLEY 
Drug Stores, Inc. 

DIAL 333-5103 
1949 E. 7th St. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Hunter 
Gulf Service 

ROAD SERVICE 

Minor Repairs 
Brake Service - Tune-Ups 
Front End Alignment 

Balancing 
5913 Wilkinson Blvd. 

399-9103 
Little Rock Rd. & 1-85 

399-1759 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Delmonico 
Restaurant 

Serving Charlotte 
Since 1927 

Facilities for Private 
Parties - Banquets & 
Business Meetings 

334-3093 
301 W. Trade St. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



GEORGE CLINE'S 
RECAPPING CENTER 

333-5137 
2016 W. Morehead 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



CHESAPEAKE 

Paper Stock Co., Inc. 

Dial 333-5488 
700 W. Trade 
CHARLOTTE. N C. 



HO TOY 
RESTAURANT 

Chinese - American Foods 
Dial 377-2858 
1220 Thomas Avenue 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Menorah was presented in honor Sanctuary have been donated by 

of the 50th Wedding Anniversary Mr. and Mrs. Elliot Schewel in 

of Mr. and Mrs. Abe Schewel. memory of Mrs. Kenneth Cooper's 

Two brass plates for use under mother, Mrs. Eugene Levy, who 

the Sabbath Candlesticks in the recently passed away. 

Charlotte Chapter B'nai B'rnth 

MRS. M. R. BERNSTEIN, Correspondent 



The New Year for Temple 
Beth El in Charlotte, N. C, com- 
menced with inspiring High Holy 
Day services conducted by our 
spiritual leader, Rabbi Israel J. 
Gerber. The social season was 
launched at the annual Yom Kip- 
per Night Dance in honor of the 
Temple's new members. We look 
forward to a year of spiritual ful- 
fillment, community service and 
social activities to follow this most 
auspicious beginning of 5725. 

The consecration of our Reli- 
gious School first grade on Sim 
chas Torah was a source of great 
pleasure to the entire membership. 
Following the service, the parents 
of the consecrants entertained the 
congregation at a reception in the 
fellowship hall. Congratulations 
to both parents and children. 

Rabbi Gerber was in New York 
lor several days this month, where 
he atended the Executive Board 
Meeting of the Central Confer- 
ence of American Rabbis of w T hich 
he is a member. He also rendered 
readings in the North Carolina 
Poets and Writers tent at the Arts 
Festival held in Charlotte, Septem- 
ber 24-27. We are proud of the 
high regard and great respect he 
commands in our community at 
large as well as in the Jewish com- 
munity. 

Our Temple buildings continue 
to grow as our congregation in- 
creases and our needs multiply. 
We are delighted with the newest 
addition to our fellowship hall — 
a beautiful stage which, along 
with the air-conditioning plant, 
was installed this summer. Thea- 
trical curtains to enable the pro- 
fessional use of our stage will be 
installed shortly under the auspi- 
ces of the Sisterhood. We look 
forward to frequent performances 
by our adult members as well as 



our children in the years to come. 

The entire Temple joins in 
congratulating Mr. and Mrs. Ho- 
ward Glazier on the engagement 
of their daughter, Barbara. Mazel 
Tov, also, to Mr. and Mrs. David 
Berkwitz, the happy grand-parents. 
Our heartiest congratulations to 
Dr. Mark Perlin on his recent 
marriage. 



Around Greensboro 

(Concluded from Page 21) 
On the night of October 17th, 
Walter }. Bernstein was guest of 
honor at a dinner tendered him by 
his kinsfolks in celebration of his 
75th birthday which occurred on 
October 19th. The event took 
place at Justamere Farm the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Bernstein, 
son and daughter-in-law, who were 
hosts together with Mr. and Mrs. 
Alan Kahn, of Philadelphia, Pa., 
daughter and son-in-law. 

Out of town guests included: 
Mr. Archie I. Thurman, NYC; Mr. 
William A. Thurman, Cambridge, 
Mass.; Dr. and Mrs. William Da- 
mesh ek, Brookline, Mass.; Mrs. 
Edith Pava, Springfield, Mass.: 

Judge and Mrs. Gus H. Pearl- 
man, Charleston, S. C; Elihu B. 
Bernstein, Tampa, Florida; Mr. 
and Mrs. Irving Weisler, Salisbury, 
N. C; Mrs. Louis Backer, Wins- 
ton-Salem, N. C; Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard I. Backer, Winston-Salem, 
N. C; Mr. and Mrs. Alan Kahn, 
Philadelphia, Pa. and children, 
Emily, Jim and Marcia. 

Local guests included: Mr. and 
Mrs. Martin M. Bernstein and 
children, Susan, Rachel, Steve, 
Margaret, David and Sarah: Mr. 
and Mrs. David Bernstein; Mrs. 
Claire Bernstein; Mr. Ned W. 
Cohen; Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence 
M. Cohen. 



MURRAY DISTDiRiiTiHG COMPANY 

Distributors of 

BORDEN'S CHEESE and MRS. FTLRERT'S PRODUCTS 
Charlotte — Greensboro — Raleigh — Wilmington 



November, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



29 




BURLINGTON, N. C 

Mr. and Mrs. Allan Solomon, of 
North Miami Beach, Fla. an- 
nounced the birth of a daughter. 
Mrs. Solomon is the former Betsy 
R. Goldman, daughter of Mrs. Isa- 
dore Goldman and the late Isadore 
Goldman. 



Mas: Bressler, president of the Jewish National Fund, presents the new 
Kennedy Peace Forest certificate to Israel Prime Minister Levi Eshkol, as 
Jacob Tsur (left) World J.N.F. Chairman, looks on. 

Charlefifte Chapter of B'nai B'rith Women 

MRS. STANLEY GREENSPON, Correspondent 

The first meeing of the Wo- forward to another successful and 
men's Chapter of Charlotte B'nai purposeful year. 

B'rith was held in the newly dec- 

orated social hall of Temple Israel 
on October 7 at 12:30 p. m. Re- 
freshments of dessert and coffee 
were served. 

Mrs. Sol Shapiro opened the 
meeting by introducing the new 
officers. Then, she spoke to the 
group of the purposes and goals 
of our chapter and expressed her 
confidence and enthusiasm for the 
coming year. 

Mrs. Norman Mussler intro- 
duced B'nai B'rith's 32 new mem- 
bers and Rae Grosswald presented 
each with a small corsage as she 
welcomed them. 

The highlight of the meeting 
was the play "Fanny Mountain- 
stein" written and directed by 
Mrs. Robert Kurtz. This play, 
through satire and song, very cle- 
verly explained the projects of 
our chapter. Members of the ex- 
cellent cast were Vickie Grosswald, 
Judy Tager, Audrey Madans, Roz 
Herman, Anita Blumenthal, Baila 
Pransky and Suzanne Pliner. Gin- 
ny Holtzman was pianist and Ros- 
lyn Green spon was prop and sce- 
nery manager. 

This first meeting was quite en- 
joyable and B'nai B'rith is looking 



O. C. PTTCTTTE 
CABINET SHOP 

CABINET MAKERS 

Dial 327-2668 
RFD 3 Hickory, N. C. 



Jewish airmen stationed at 
Wheelus Air Base in Libya must 
conceal their religion and are not 
permitted to give their children 
religious instruction, according to 
a charge made by Sen. Jacob K. 
Javits, New York Republican. One 
Jewish airman wrote the Senator 
that the Libyans are so hostile to 
Jews that the servicemen fear for 
the physical safety of their chil- 
dren, that a Sunday School pro- 
gram was cancelled and that even 
the Air Force was catering to the 
Libyan attitudes toward Jews by 
censoring and banning all refer- 
ence to Jews, Judaism or Israel 
on the local U. S. A. F. radio and 
TV stations, which serve only 
American personnel. The Air 
Force admitted the censorship, 
but denied that religious facilities 
were unavailable to Jewish person- 
to the Air Force, was effected to 
preserve "cordial relations with 
the host government anl of pre- 
venting retaliatory actions," which 
"might hamper its operations or 
place its base tenure in jeprady." 



HICKORY -LENOIR, N. (. 



COMPANY 




Ivl U / 1 Lt J C*C v VI ! C / j \J J 




UPHOLSTERED FUStl 


riTUItE 


Home Furnishing; Mart — Rooms 


204-207 


1128 S. Center St. 


Phone 322-9852 


HICKORY, N. C. 






free Inspection & estimates Without Obligation 
Locally DIAL 
Owned & Operated 

SILVER FISH ANTS RATS - MICE ROACHES MOTHS 

DEASON TERMITE & PEST CONTROL 

901 Main Avenue, S.W. Hickory, N. C. 



ATLANTIC COMPANY 
ICE & COAL 

324-7819 

1028 Highland Ave., N. E. 
HICKORY, N. C. 



B & C ROOFING-SIDING CO. 
Contractors 

327-4451 
301 Highland Ave., S.E. 
HICKORY, N. C. 



CITY AUTO & 
RADIATOR SERVICE 

Repaired - Recored - Cleaned 

PL 4-4102 
103 Depot Lenoir, N. C. 



LENOIR 
ROOFING CO. 

Commercial - Residential 
PL 4-9006 
212 W. Harper Avenue 
LENOIR, N. C. 



BOHAN ENGINEERING 
& ELECTRIC CO., INC. 

Service On Anything Electric 
322-8836 
1938 6th Street, N.W. 
HICKORY, N. C. 



BCWAY 
MOTORS, INC. 

Good Clean Used Cars 
345-2397 
241 1st Avenue, S.E. 
HICKORY, N. C. 



HALL'S DINER 

JACK & IDA HALL 

"PREMIUM QUALITY 
FOODS" 

ORDERS TO GO 
Seafood Plates 
Breakfast 
Lunch 
Dinner 
728-9742 
ON 321-A 
WHITNEL, N. C. 



BAR-B-QUE 

Sandwiches of All Kinds 
Short Orders - Dining 
Room - Curb Service 
Take Out Orders 



Red Pi 

ir 



MR. & MRS. C. F. BYRD 
Owners 
754-9542 
Hickory Rd. Lenoir, N. C. 



30 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



November, 1964 



HILL, S» C 



>ee us 



for 



Concrete Work 

of all kinds 

Patios - Floors -Plain or 
Broken Tile 
Steps - Driveways 
Walkways 

No job too large or to small 

Free Estimates 

W. B. Thompson 

Cement Finishing 
Contractor 

DIAL 327-4713 

Day or Night 

Cement finishing experience 
Since 1951 

Fully Insured 

313 Orr Drive 

ROCK HILL, S. C. 



ROBERTS 
PAINT COMPANY 

Painting - Papering 

Decorating 
Telephone 328-1058 

Old York Road 
ROCK HILL, S. C. 



s 

Restaurant 

Steaks — Seafoods 
Country Ham 
Open 6 A.M. 'til Midnight 
Dial 328-9128 

At the City Limits out East 
Main — Lancaster Highway 
ROCK HILL, S. C. 



0. F. JONES & SON 

mm 



Moen Plumbing Fixtures 
REPAIRS OR NEW WORK 

Dial 327-3290 

Guaranteed Workmanship 
Free Estimates 
Licensed and Ponded 

McConnells Hwv. 
ROCK HILL, S. C. 



L D, Rogers, Jr. 

General Contractor 
BUILDING CONTRACTING 
Specializing in 
Home Building 
Farm Buildings 

Additions - Remodeling 
Repairs 
Dial 328-1559 Day or Nights 
Springdale Community 
ROCK HILL, S. C. 



New Homes 
Remodeling 

Repairs 

Add On 

FREE ESTIMATES 
General Contractors 

Dial 328-0039 
Day or Night 

William G. Faiie 

ROCK HILL, S, C. 
1499 Longview Road 



HACK SMITH 
AUTO ALIGNMENT 
SERVICE 

WRECKER SERVICE 
327-7820 
1157 Saluda Street 
ROCK HILL, S. C. 



James M, Turner 

Paint Contractor 

Specialization in 
Paint Mixing 
and 

Color Matching 

Dial 327-9229 

Rock Hill 
1063 Park Ave. Extn. 
ROCK HILL, S. C. 



ATLANTIC 



BUCK'S 



SERVICE 

■ ROAD SERVICE 
'Keeps Your Car on the Go" 
FIRESTONE TIRES 
Tire & Battery Service 
Accessories 
Washing - Greasing 
Polishing 
DIAL 327-2422 
314 Saluda at Johnson Street 
ROCK HILL, S. C. 



Rabbi David Karesh, 86, who 
served the Beth Shalom Synagogue 
for 53 years died on September 
25th. after a lengthy illness. 



COLUMBIA, S. C. 

MRS. BERNARD LADEN, Correspondent 

7th. A luncheon was held al die 
Center and the new members were 
welcomed into the organization. 
A tribute to the late Rabbi Karesh 
was made by Hyman Rubin, may- 
or protem. 

Tryouts for the annual Had- 
assah play were held at the Rice 
Music House. They will present 
"The Thurber Carnival" at Dray- 
ton Hall on November 21st. under 
the direction of Mel Glass. 



Surviving are four sons, Cole- 
man Karesh, professor of law at 
the University of S. C, Joseph 
Karesh, Superior Court fudge, 
and Jacob L. Karesh, both of San 
Francisco and Abraham H. Karesh 
of Santa Clara, California; a 
daughter, Mrs. Ben Bloom of Co- 
lumbia, with whom he made his 
home, several grandchildren and 
great grandchildren. 

Funeral services were held from 
the Beth Shalom Synagogue and 
conducted by Rabbi Murrav Ger- 
shon. Interment was in Hebrew 
Benevolent Cemetery. In compli- 
ance with the late rabbi's request, 
no eulogies were said. 

Active pallbearers were Jack 
Pearlstine, Irwin Kahn, Paul Hern 
Henry Hammer, Michael S. Lavis- 
ky, and Hyman Robin. Honorary 
Pallbearers included Governor 
Donald S. Russell, Rabbi David S. 
Gruber of the Tree of Life Tem- 
ple, Dr. A. E. Cremer. Max Ci- 
tron, Dr. J. H. Young, and offi- 
cers, directors and trustees of the 
Beth Shalom Synagogue. 

The Bar Mitzvah ot Robert 
Stuart Kline, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Morris Kline of Columbia, was 
held on September 12th at the 
Beth Shalom Synagogue. 

Mazel Tov to Mr. and Mrs. Ber- 
nard Fleischman upon the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Lynn 
Daniel, and Freddie William Rich 
of Atlanta, Georgia. 

The Anemone Garden Club 
held a meeting and a plant ex- 
change at the home of Mrs. Ha- 
rold Rittenberg. 

The Daughters of Israel meeting 
which was postponed from Sep- 
tember 30th was held on October 



MARY CARTER 

PAINTS 

BUY ONE 
GET ONE FREE! 

On AW Gallons 
3701 Main Street 
AL 2-3467 
952 Harden < A~r^-* from Sears) 
254-2337 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



Awards will be made early in 
January for Handicapped Colum- 
bian of the Year and Local Em- 
ployer of the Handicapped. This 
is sponsored by the B'Nai B'Rith 
Men and Dr. Harry T. Zankel is 
chairman of the Mayor's Commit- 
tee on Employment of the Handi- 
capped. 

We wish a speedy recovery to 
Mrs. Paul Circus, Nathan Berry, 
Nathan Sanborn, and Mrs. Jack 
Iiddelman. 



5724-5725 



LTJACH 



1964-1965 



Chanukah . Nov. 30 

Purim March 18 

Passover April 17 

Shavuous ... June 6 



Home Cleaners 

ALL TYPES CLEANING 

Rugs 

Upholstered Furniture 
Wall to Wall Carpets 
WALLS & CEILINGS 
MACHINE CLEANED 
Floors Cleaned 
and Polished 

AL 3-5 1 88 

806 Pavillion 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



MERRITT 
RADIATOR SERVICE 

Auto Air Conditioning 
Sales & Service 

Dial 327-2435 
446 N. Trade Rock HiU, S. C. 



November, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



31 



Raleigh Beth Meyer Synagogue 

MRS. OSCAR LEGUM, Correspondent 



Beth Meyer welcomes the fol- 
lowing new members to our Sy- 
nagogue family: Mr. and Mrs. 
Stanley Cohen, Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
mond Mendell, and family; Mr. 
and Mrs. Martin Schwartz and 
family; Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bar- 
ron and family; Mr. and Mrs. 
Milton Stern and family, Dr. and 
Mrs. Martin Welt and son; Mr. 
and Mrs. Milton Bedrick and 
family, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin 
Schwartz and family of Sanford, 
N. C. 

We offer our deepest condolence 
to the Dworsky family upon the 
sudden death of Milton Barnett 
Dworsky on September 9th. 

Our heartiest congratulations 
to Miss Barbara Zimring, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Irving Zim- 
ring upon her graduation from 
the Sinai Hospital (Baltimore, 
Md.) School of Nursing. 

Beth Meyer Sunday Religious 
School has a record enrollment of 
94 children in our school. The 
teaching staff is composed of Gail 
Schoen; Mrs. A. W. Schoen; Bar- 
bara Litwack; Myrna Dworsky; 
Miriam Friedlander; Mrs. I. [. 
Scone; Milton Blick; Mrs. N. f. 
Green Mrs. Martin Litwack and 
Eli Perry with Mrs. Richard S. 
Ruby as superintendent and Mrs. 
Gerald T. Shor as librarian. 

We are happy to report Mr. 
Louis Greenspon is out of the hos- 
pital and is recovering at his 
home. Mr|. and Mrs. Stanley 
Greenspon and son Keith of Char- 



SIGNS 

FOR EVERY PURPOSE 

Silk Screen Printing 
Photographic & Hand Cut 

Neon - Plastic - Gold Leaf 
Posters - Banners 
Displays - Decals 
"Commercial Art Work" 
Day or Night Service 
764-1402 

Waddell 
Sinn Comoanv 



1233 Windsor 



Bristol, Tenn. 



Iotte were recent guests at the 
Gieenspon home. Visiting Mr. 
Will Pizer, who has been ill, has 
oeen his daughters Mrs. Sol Le- 
\ me of Charlotte and Mrs. Leslie 
Pensler of Detroit, Michigan 

The community dinners spon- 
sored by Sisterhood on October 
18th were a very good success, 
both socially and financially. 
There were dinners held in 10 
homes and were well attended. 
Sisterhood committees are hard 
at work now planning and map- 
ping out plans for a gala Thanks- 
giving dance, but more about this 
later!!! 




Ralph I. Goldman has been nam- 
ed executive director of the Israel 
Education Fund of the United Jew- 
ish Appeal, it was anno'inced by 
Joseph Meyerhoff, chairman of the 
board and Charier J. Bensley, pres- 
ident. 

Bristol Cleaners 

and Furriers 

C. D. NEWMAN, Owner 
Save Up to 15% Cash & Carry 
Pick Ur> and Deliverv 
Main Plant 669-4051 

BRANCHES 
19 Piedmont 
Mrs. Mussel White 669-4342 
105 Penn. Avenue 
Miss Cloyd 764-2941 
City Bus Terminal 
Jimmie Sheffield 669-4531 

1233 W. State 
BRISTOL, TENN., VA. 




R. L. Shipley — 
Agency 



17 Sixth St. 



Bristol, Tenn. 




YOU 

Insurance 



BRISTOL, TENNESSEE 



CARPETS 

Mohawk - Monarch 
Columbus 

Expert Installation 
Free Estimates 
For in the Home Service 
Dial 764-4421 

L L Baling 
Carpet Co. 

1230 Seventh Ave. 
BRISTOL, TENN. 



Hoover 
Interiors, Inc. 

Custom Carpet Installations 

Your Certified Gulistan 
Carpet Dealer 
We Also have Carpets by 
Mohawk, Philadelphia, 

Smith & Others 
"We Bring Samples to 
Your Home" 

764-5551 

115 Penn Avenue 
BRISTOL, TENN. 

C. S. Richards 
House Moving 

Three Generations of 
House Movers 

All Types of Houses Moved — 
Bulldozer Service 
Houses - Raised - Moved 
Fast Dependable Service 

Block Leveling 
Conley Richards & C. S. 
"Monk" Richards Owners 

764-8859 

If No Answer Call 764-6287 
108 Auburn Briston, Tenn. 



HATCHER'S 
CLEANERS & FURRIERS 

764-5242 
330 Holston Avenue 
BRISTOL, TENN. 



MINUTE MAN 
SERVICE STATION 




Complete Car Service 

24 HOUR SERVICE 

Road Service 
Pick u Up & Delivery 

Dial 928-2631 

809 S, Roan 
JOHNSON CITY, TENN. 



Bunting's 
Druq Store 

"Bristol's Leading" 

DRUG CENTER 

Convenient Downtown 
Location 
Phone 

764-6442 

— or — 
764-6341 

470 State Street 
BRISTOL, TENN. 



PRESCRIPTION 
SERVICE 

Call For and Delivery 
Service 



764-2178 

MIN 



i| Store 



'Established Over 60 Years" 
8 Sixth Street 
BRISTOL, TENN. 



Troy 
Laundry Co. 

Complete Linen Service 

Professional Cleaning 
Complete 
Fur & Garment Storage 
Pick Up & Delivery 
764-7164 
136 7th 
BRISTOL, TENN. 



L K. POOLE 
COMPANY 

Swimming Pools 

Builders - Chemicals 
Equipment 

Distributors for 
Spartan 
Steel Pools 

FREE ESTIMATES 

764-1776 or 764-3027 

1016 Broad 
BRISTOL, TENN. 



32 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



November, 1964 



CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 



THE VISITORS 



Serving Charleston Since 1929 
MODERN EQUIPMENT MAKES SATISFIED CUSTOMERS 

Bon-Ton Laundry & Dry Cleaning Co. 

744-3431 

For Pick-Up and Delivery 
CLEANING SERVICE 
Dresses - Suits - Coats - Slip Covers - Furs - Sweaters - Gloves 
Blouses - Formals - Drapes - Curtains - Weaving & Mending 
Ties - Jackets - Quilts - Moth-Proofing 
PLANT MACCORKLE AVE. AT 4th AVE. & B. ST. 
SOUTH CHARLESTON 
CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 



BUZZ-BUTTERED STEAKS 

Deliciously Different 
WHOLESALE MEAT PRODUCTS 

HY - GRADE SALES CO. 

P. O. Box 609 Bullitt & Welch Street 

Dial 343-3741 or 342-7101 
CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 



B. C. JENNINGS 

CHIROPRACTOR 

Neurocalometer and X-Ray Service 

Office Hours 
9 A.M. - 12 Noon 2 P.M. -4:30 P.M. 

Evening Hours 
On Mon. - Wed. - Fri. 7 P.M. - 8 P.M. 

Morrison Building 342-5702 
CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 



PARKS GARAGE 



HOBART G. PARKS, Owner 
We Specialize In Imports 

GENERAL REPAIRS 
Overhaul: Engines - Chassis - Transmissions 

4216 MacCorkle Ave. SW 768-2858 
CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 



Since 1919 

QUALITY SERVICE 

LAUNDERFRS & CLEANERS 

RELIABLE — DEPENDABLE — RESPONSIBLE 
ONE HOUR DRY CLEANING — THREE HOUR LAUNDRY 
Ask About Our Convenient Storage B'ox 
CITY WIDE PICK UP & DELIVERY 
Call 346-6522 
SAVE ON CASH & CARRY 
Main Office - 622 Virginia W Charleston, W. Va. 



DANIEL BOONE HOTEL 

CATERING TO THE COMMERCIAL TRAVELER 
Luxurious Rooms 
405 Capital Cor., Washington E. For Reservation Phone 343-6131 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 



(Concluded 

lor alleged economic crimes, lor 
this too the Archbishop had a du- 
biously soothing explanation — 
such developments had nothing to 
do with religion or nationality and 
were strictly on an "individual" ba- 
sis. In New York, the Archbishop 
used another variation of the de- 
fense theme in reply to all points 
raised about the Kremlin's mis- 
treatment of Soviet Jews. To all 
such charges, he insisted that Soviet 
laws permit equality for all reli- 
gions. An appropriate comment 
might well be a reference to 
George Orwell's wierdly perceptive 
forecast of the ethics of totalitari- 
anism that all citizens are equal 
but some are more equal than 
others. 

The key to the whole pathetic 
serio-comic series of exchanges can 
be found in the statement of the 
Russians in Denver — that thev 
have "no special status" with the 
Soviet officials who control the le- 
vers of power in the Soviet system. 
This blunt and shattering truth 
should have dissembled all specula- 
tive hopes that something of sub- 
stance could be gained from dog- 
ged appeals to the Russsian visi- 
tors to do that which in plain lad 
they had no power to do. If life 
is a little easier in the Soviet sys- 
tem for Christian than it is for 
Jew, it may be suggested that this 
is related to the understanding 
by the Soviet church leaders that 
Christianity endures solely bv tol- 
erance of a Soviet leadership 
which can be flexible on tactics 



from Page 20) 

but never on doctrine. Thai doc- 
trine, was, is and will continue to 
be determinedly anti-religious. 

Thus the Soviet clergy came to 
i he United States — in effect — on 
leash, well aware that they could 
not and dare not make any speci- 
fic promises to their American 
hosts and questioners about acting 
lor the oppressed Jews in the So- 
viet Union, and that they would 
have to answer to their Soviet 
masters for any rash admissions or 
commitments about abuses in 
1 heir homeland. 

The rabbis who have sought so 
insistently to confront the Chris- 
tian clergy from the land of offi- 
cial atheism could hardly be 
blamed. But in addition to the 
folk wisdom which Soviet offi- 
c ials — in the style popularized by 
former Premier Khrushchev— are 
so quick to offer as sage comments 
on issues to the day, there is also 
one attributed to the Chinese 
which seems eminently appropriate 
to the matter at hand:"Fool me 
once, shame on you; Fool me twice, 
shame on me." 



USE CHR jST^1A^SEAL^ 
FIGHT < 1964 ^ ° 1964 



ASHMORE 
Optical Co.. Inc. 

Paul A. Burdette, Pres. 

Dispensing Opticians 

PRESCRIPTIONS FTLLED 
CONTACT J.W^S 
GLASSES FITTED 

Lenses Duplicated 

Glasses Repaired 

Personal Attention Given 
to Each Fitting 

Lenses Ground in 
Our Own Laboratory 

344-2366 

If No Answer Call 343-7344 

Medical Arts Building, Lobby 
CHARLESTON, W. VA. 




Chusbnas ° {/leeUrufS 
RESPIRATORY DISEASES 



Empire 1 Hour 
Cleaners 

"Your Professional Cleaners" 
Pick Up & Delivery 
Saturday Service 

1 Hour Cleaners 

Shirt -Service 

3 Locations to Serve You 
Faster 

Kanawha City 

204 35th St. SE - 925-5871 

Oakwood Road Area 

882 Oakwood Rd. - 342-4531 

Downtown Service 

210 Dickinson - 344-1411 

CHARLESTON, W. VA. 



November, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



33 




The: office cf Governor Richard J. Hughes of New Jersey was the scene 
recently of the purchase of §25,000 in State of Israel Bends bv Local 284 
of the Laundry Workers, Cleaners and Dyers Union, AFL-CIO, of Jersey 
City. In welcoming the union purchase, Governor Hughes emphasized that 
"investmen in Israel Bonds is an investment in freedom," symbolizing the 
"rebirth of a nation." Shown in the Executive Offices in Trenton are (left 
to right) Abraham Miller, General Chairman of the Jersey City Committee 
fof Israel Bonds; Governor Hughes. Abraham Solomon, Secretary -Treasurer 
oi' Local 281. and Winiield S. Chasmar, Ch irman of the Hudson County 
Labor Committee for Israel Bonds. 



Weld©iu— H@asi©ke Rapids, N. C. 



(Continued 

Mr. Barry Novey is a senior at 
the University of Richmond. Bar- 
ry Levy is at High Point College. 
Danny Coblenz formerly of Fay- 
etteville is now a resident of Web 
don and attending East Carolina 
College. 

Dr. and Mrs. Filmore Coblenz, 
formerly of Fayetteville, are new 
residents in our community. 

Mrs. Hy Diamond who has been 
a patient at Warrenton Memorial 
Hospital is now recuperating at 
home. Mr. L. Khmer is a patient 
at the Medical College Hospital 
in Richmond. Mrs. Lena Liver- 
man is recovering at home with 



from Page 24) 

a broken ankle. Mrs. Seymour 
Roth, who has been ill in New 
York is expected home very soon. 
Mrs. B. Szabo and Mr. Hy Lien- 
wand of Emporia are improving 
after being patients in the 
Creenville Memorial Hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Josephson are 
visiting Miss Evel)n fosephson and 
Mr. and Mrs. M. Cohen in Balti- 
more. Mrs. S. Abrams, Fred 
Abrams of Richm ond and Mrs. 
Reba Axelman of Washington 
were recent guests of the Morton 
Farbers. Dr. and Mis. Ted Farber 
and children of Wellington are 
visiting Mrs. M. Freid. 



PHONE 342-3113 



FINE DRAPERY 
FINISHING 




A STORE 
IN YOUR 
NEIGHBORHOOD 



Don't Wait ... ! Call 

NU WAY 
CLEANING CO. 

No. 1-1335 Washington E. 
No. 2-1332 Lee St., Drive-in 
No. 3-420 Virginia St. E. 
No. 5-Gateway Shopping 

Center (St. Albans) 
No. 7-3816 MacCorkle Ave. 

S.E. 

CHARLESTON, W. VA. 



Over 26 Years Experience 




Managed by Lewis Mullins 

Manufacturers of New 
Mattresses - Intersprings 

Box Springs 
Free Estimates - Delivery 
Pick-Ups 
We Rebuild Your Old 
Mattresses 
Homes - Hotels - Hospitals 

346-9111 

SUPREME 
Mattress Co. 

Lower Elk Two Mile 
Turn Left at Bottom of 

Airport Hill 
CHARLESTON, W. VA. 



GRAHAM'S GIFT & GLASSWARE 

Large Assortment of Flowers, Fruits and Figuerines 
925-5316 

5310 MacCorkle Ave., S.E. Charleston, W. Va. 



HALL MACHINE CO. 

GENERAL MACHINE WORK 



No Job Too Small or Too Large 
342-8553 



709 Penna. Avenue 



Charleston, West Virginia 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



SCOTT 
SERVICE 




MINOR AUTO REPATR 
TUNE-UPS - BRAKES 
EXHAUST SYSTEMS 

Chestnut & Kan. Trpk. 

768-4041 
CHARLESTON, W. VA. 



EDNA'S 
BEAUTY SALON 

Professional Hair Styling 
342-2551 
1 Arcade Building 
CHARLESTON, W. VA. 



Allied 
Services, Inc. 

All Thermal Insulations 
Protective Coatings 
Piping & Equipment - Cooler 
& Freezer Rooms 
Commercial Industrial & 
Power Plants 
160 Spring 
Phone 343-9521 
CHARLESTON, W. VA. 



Laird Office 
Equipment Co. 

Steel & Aluminum Office 
Furniture - Office 
Equipment & Supplies 
Typewriters - Adding & 
Calculating Machines 

346-5353 

Atlas Building 

CHARLESTON, W. VA. 



AMERICAN 
TREE EXPERT CO. 

Arborist & Tree Surgeon 
346-6868 
1082 Oakhurst Drive 
CHARLESTON, W. VA. 



BAILEY'S 
ESSO SERVICE 

Road Service - Minor Repairs 
984-9916 
Sissonville Road 
SISSONVILLE, W. VA. 



JOE FAZIO'S 
SPAGHETTI HOUSE 

Dine In True Italian 
Atmosphere 

342-9549 
1008 Bullitt 
CHARLESTON, W. VA. 



Evelyn's 

FLOWERS 

925-2158 
If no answer call 925-9604 
Delivery Service 
Always Ample Parking 
"Flowers with a Feminine 
Touch" and Gifts 
For All Occasions 
3708 MacCorkle Ave., S.E. 
Kanawha City 
CHARLESTON, W. VA. 



Roy's Cafeteria 

Known for Famous Food 
For 11 Years 

Quality Food at Reasonable 
Prices - Air Conditioned 
Dining Room 

Open 5 A.M. - 9 P.M. 
7 Days Weekly 
ROY W. WAYBRIGHT, 
Owner 

212 Wash W. 343-1110 
CHARLESTON, W. VA. 



34 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



November, 1964 



CHARLESTON - HUNTINGTON, W. YA. 



Carl Boliek Paint Contractor 

RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL 
INTERIOR - EXTERIOR 

Call For Estimates 522-3952 
109 Oakland Avenue Huntington, W. Va. 



JAMES M. HICKS 

ORNAMENTAL PLASTERING 

Commercial - Industrial 

Acoustical Plaster — Plaster Repairs 
Dry Wall Finishing 

"There Is No Substitute For Quality Plastering" 

135 Roland Pk. Dr. Huntington, W. Va. 522-0220 



R. W, Gallaher 




Building Contractor 

Est. 1946 
523-5347 
New Construction 
Remodeling - Roofing 

399 Lower Ter 
HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 



P. E, Walker 

ROOFING & REPAIR 

Specializing in . . . 

Built Up Roofs - Gutter Work 
& Spouts - Shingles - Chimney 
Repairs - Waterproofing 
Walls & Basements 
Sheet Metal Works 

1924 8th Ave. 525-3424 

HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 



HOMER F. LAMBERT 

BUILDING CONTRACTOR 
Commercial - Residential 
522-8182 
81 N. Edgemont 
HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 



MODERN CLEANERS 
& SHOE REPAIR 

Complete Cleaning Service 
MR. RUSSELL DABNEY 
1402 4th Avenue 
Charleston, W. Va. 



HOPKINS ELECTRIC 
& SUPPLY CO., INC. 

Machine Work - Metallizing 
346-0873 
620 Columbia Ave. 
CHARLESTON, W. VA. 



Russell Ball 
Painting & 
Decorating Co. 

Commercial - Residential 

Paper Hanging - Plastering 

Dry Wall Taroe Joining 
Ask About Our Insurance 
Protection 
523-5717 
503 Wilson Place G 
HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 



Jack W. Davis 

General Contractor 

Industrial and Commercial 
Construction 

Complete 
General Contracting Service 

P.O. Box 2203 529-4166 

338 5th Ave. R.R. 

HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 



Advertising Index 



PAGE 

AAA Home Cleaners . ... 30 

Mary Carter Paint Store 30 

First Federal Saving & 

Loan Association Inside front cover 

Giant Foods - 8 

Hopkin for Congress Committee — 9 

Johnson Democratic Headquarters 

Back cover 

Madison Employment Agency 21 

Mebane Co. 6 

Milner Hotels - - 9 

Piedmont Air Lines -_- — - 14 

Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. — 8 

Republican Party of Virginia 

Inside front cover 

Dave E. Satterfield, III 

Inside front cover 

Sealtest Foods _ — — 10 

Security Federal Savings & 

Loan Association — — 10 

Steeles Modern Landscaping Service .._ 27 
Viceroy Cigarettes Inside back cover 



PAGK 



14 
15 

-15 
_15 
. 11-13: 
15 



VIRGINIA 

Danville 

Lynchburg _ 

Newport News 

Portsmouth 

Richmond 

Roanoke — — 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Burlington — 20-21 

Charlotte 27-28 

Fayetteville _ _ 22-25 

Greensboro 17-19 1 

Hickory 29 

Lenoir 29 

Statesville .29 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Rock Hill 30 

Bristol 31 

Charleston _ 32-34 

WEST VIRGINIA 
Huntington 34 



Educational School at Temple 
Emanu-El with Harry Kittner as 
chairman has begun with much en- 
thusiasm. Hebrew is being taught 
to children and adults b\ Dr. 
William Eurie. Dr. Kurie lectures 
to adult groups in Emporia and 
Weldon bi-monthly and super- 
vises the curriculum for all the 
children and adult classes. 



RICHMOND, VA. 

(Concluded from Page 21) 
of Pittsburgh and Lawrence G. 
Nelson of Sweet Briar College. 

The next meeting of the Virgin- 
ia Poetry Society is scheduled on 
Saturday, November II, at Nor- 
folk, Va. Dr. Roberta I). Cornelius 
of Lynchburg is the VPA presi- 
dent. The society is an affiliate of 
the Academy of American Poets. 



SPRING HTLL 
PASTRY SHOP 

Cakes - Pies - Rolls 
768-7397 
600 Chestnut 
CHARLESTON, W. VA. 



MONTGOMERY 
AUTO TRIM SHOP 

AUTO - TRUCK 
346-6206 
506 Florida 
Charleston, W. Va. 



HALL AGF.NCY, 
REALTOR 

RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL 

INSURANCE 
619 6th Ave. 727-2111 
St. Albans, W. Va. 



ROBERT L. PAINTER 

Interior & Exterior Painting 
Residential - Commercial 
346-7322 
1200 Rosalie Drive 
Charleston, W. Va. 




Dr. Morton J. SobeJ has been ap- 
pointed Assistant National Execu- 
tive Director and National Program 
and Membership Director of the 
Jewish War Veterans of the U.S.A., 
it has been announced by Monroe 
R. Sheinberg, National Executive 
Director. 



Plastering & Painting 




J. Chester Hicks 

522-4241 

1018 - 9th W. 
HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 



MARTIN 
Transfer (o. 

Your Best Move is U. S. 
Prompt - Courteous - Reliable 
"50 State Service" 

WELL EQUIPPED VANS 
LOW RATES 

529-4511 

LOCAL AND LONG 
DISTANCE MOVING 

1307 18th Street 
HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 



Happy Ghanukah 

from 

Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation 

Makers of 

Viceroy G garettes 



not too strong... not too light... 
VICEROY'S got the Deep-Weave Filter 
...for the taste that's ri g ht! 

BROWN & WILLIAMSON TOBACCO CORPORATION 



VIRGINIA 
GO FORWARD 

WITH 






JOHNSON and BYRD 

VIRGINIA, A DEMOCRATIC STATE, MUST 
SUPPORT OUR DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATES 



ON NOVEMBER 3RD VOTE FOR JOHNSON AND BYRD 



CfranS^ of 



c. 



Sidney S. Kellam 

Campaign Manager 

Garland M. Harwood, Jr. 

Office Manager 



v 



IRGINIA DEMOCRATIC CAMPAIGN HEADQUARTERS 

ROOM 370 HOTEL RICHMOND 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 





Joan Scarborough, off Norfolk, Va. 9 A Senior At Stern College* 
For Women, In New York City, Lights The Menorah Candlas 

'December J 964 - Ckamkak 5725 



A Beautiful Place For Savings 




The Georgg'^Wdshington 



Plantation style homes . . . built today by Lesco 

Move into the luxury of plantation living with a new Colonial 
Style Home by Lesco. Homes by Lesco are designed to give 
you the ultimate in comfort, convenience, and efficiency at a 
minimum cost. See coupon below. 



FREE! Color brochure on the all new 1964 
Lesco Homes, just fill out this coupon 
and mail today to - Lesco Homes, P. O. 
Box 751, Martinsville, Virginia. 



N 



ame 



Add 



ress. 




ilON Of lESTEt BIOS . 



THE SIGN OF HAPPY MOTORING 




SEE YOUR ESSO DEALER 



A beautiful place for savings. Not only because of our 
beautiful new building, but because consistantly good earn- 
ings, insured safety for your account and the maximum in 
personal service and convenience. 

FIRST 
FEDERAL 

SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 
OF RICHMOND 



Downtown on Broad at Third 
Hull at Ssventeenth 
T^ghland Springs 



Patterson at Westview 
Lakeside at Dumbarton 
John H. Randolph, Jr., President 




\mmn 



MAKE YOUR 
FIRST STOP 



a illllll 

liiinii 
i ■■)■■( 

l|lis|liillli|ill|| 

Hiiiliiiliiiliii' l 




- ' L I 1 *t ~~~ 




Hotel Roanoke 

AND MOTOR INN 

Roanoke, Virginia 

Headquarters for Virginia's scenic and 
historic Southwest. Just minutes to Blue 
Ridge Parkway, Shenandoah Valley, Natural 
Bridge and Dixie Caverns. 
A 425-room, air-conditioned version of an 
Old English Inn featuring motel conven- 
ience with hotel luxury and service. 
In the heart of downtown Roanoke at the 
intersection of Routes 11-220 and 460. 
RATES FROM $7.00 




VOLUME XXIV • DECEMBER 1964 



NUMBER 4 



V 



EDITORIALS 



Chester A. Brown, Editor 



The Miracle of Hanukka 

Guest Editorial by Rabbi Michael Hecht, 
Temple Israel, Charlotte, N. C. 

The events leading to the observance of Hanukka were 
decisive in the history of the world. To the casual observer in 
the second century B.C.E. it would have appeared merely that 
one of the minor provinces of the mighty Seleucid Empire, 
Judaea by name, had managed to assert its independence. This 
was remarkable enough, but surely not very important. How 
was the observer to know that the defiant little Jewish people 
was to remain on the scene until the present day? How was he 
to know that two other great religions would someday be 
erected on foundations laid by the insignificant people that 
rebelled against Emperor Antiochus? 

But surely the Jews knew the importance of the battle 
they were waging. Otherwise they would not have fought. The 
battle was not only against oppression from the outside, but 
also against spiritual weakening from within. Antiochus IV. 
who ruled his Hellenistic empire from Syria, wanted all his 
subjects to have the benefits of Greek civilization. He wanted 
the youth to speak Greek, worship Greek gods, play Greek 
games, and appreciate Greek art. In this he was successful 
enough in Judaea, as elsewhere. Many leading citizens were 
shedding the last vestiges of their Jewishness to take on the 
glitter of Greek civilization. Judaism seemed about to disap 
pear, as did the native cultures of the surrounding nations. 

Then a miracle took place. The common people rose up, 
fought a long war, and won. After the first great victory they 
cleansed the Temple in Jerusalem of impurities caused by 
pagan worship and dedicated it anew. Hanukka means "dedi- 
cation." 

What was the miracle? Was it that the Jews won the fighi? 
I think it was rather that they chose to fight. The dispassionate 
scholar can explain the political facts that caused their vie 
tory; but the historian is hard pressed to explain what it was in 
the first place that made the Jews resist their own spiritual 
death. 

What made the Jews fight was their firm belief in the 
truth of their religion, the beauty of their heritage, and the 
strength of their cause. They beEeved in God and in His 
Torah. 

In the Second World War France fell whimpering before 
the Nazis, while England rose up to fight. One can begin to 
explain why England should have resisted what seemed in- 
evitable; but how shall one explain the resistance of the Jewish 
people to so many "inevitable" facts so many times in so many 
centuries? The story of Hanukka is not a one-time event. The 
choice has repeatedly confronted the Jewish people: to be or 
not to be. 

It has never been convenient to be Jewish. The easy path 
has been to assimilate and disappear. Surely many Jews took 
this path. The miracle has been that so many did not, that so 



many Jews believed strongly in their heritage despite oppres- 
sion and threats, and despite blandishments and enticements. 
The miracle of Jewish history has been the will to survive, to 
create, to live by the light of Torah. 

In surviving and creating the Jew has not been afraid to 
take unto himself contributions from other civilizations. Many 
of the most worthy accomplishments of Greek civilization be- 
came part of Judaism. But while learning from others, the Jew 
was not willing to lose his identity, the identity given him by 
the Torah. 

The miracle goes on. There have always been — and 
there are today — people for whom spiritual matters mean 
nothing, for whom the sacred values of the Jewish experience 
are irrelevant, and who, therefore, when given the opportun- 
ity, become estranged from their people. But there are today 
many who affirm the meaning of Jewish existence, who see 
their heritage as a vital one, for whom religious values are real 
and enduring, for whom Jewish rootedness is a powerful force. 
This is a troubled age, when the ties that bind us one to 
another and to our heritage are being broken. This is a time 
when many are filled with despair at man's deeds, when right 
and wrong are no longer clear concept, when morality is in 
question. But there are those who are true to the valid insights 
of Judaism and who will, by living Jewish lives and providing 
education for themselves and their children, be an inspiration 
to generations yet unborn. 

The Hanukka flames are small and flickering, but they 
have burned for over two thousand years. They will continue 
to burn in token of the miracle of the human spirit that we 
call Judaism. 

The New Challenge 

With the launching of its newest program, the Israel Edu- 
cation Fund, the United Jewish Appeal has added another 
brilliant dimension to its history of dedicated service to the 
growth and development of Israel. 

Immigration and absorption have been and continue to 
be the lodestones of UJA's remarkable career of aid to Israel, 
the two dimensions upon which the young democracy was 
founded and has grown. 

Now, education — particularly secondary education — 
becomes the third dimension — the new challenge to the Jews 
of America who hold Israel's future dear. 

The Israel Education Fund has been created as an in- 
strument through which all of Israel's children may receive 
training and education. Its five-year plan will provide Israel's 
villages and new development towns, where the relatively dis- 
advantaged Asian and African population is heaviest, with the 
schools, libraries, youth centers, and pre-kindergarten classes 
they need so desperately. It will provide scholarships to train 
the teachers who will staff those schools — and to give youngs- 
ters the means to attend them. 

(Please turn to Page 31) 



The American Jewish Times -Outlook, published monthly at 530 Southeastern Building. Greensboro. N. C. Chester A. Brown. Editor; David Bernstein, General Mmi|«; 
Nathan Kessler, Manager. Virginia Office; Florence Byers. Virginia News Editor; Broad Grace Arcade. Richmond. Virginia. Member Seven Arts Feature Syndicate, Inc. 13.00 
per vear payable In advance. Secpna-Class Postage paid at Greensboro, N. C. The views expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the publishers, but may be 
published in the interest of freedom of the press. The American Jewish Times-Outlook is owned and edited solely as an independent enterprise and is not a Jewish com- 
munity undertaking 



4 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



December, 1964 



PLAIN TATvK segal 



CHANUKAH 

A young friend of mine writes 
to me: "Please tell us all about 
Chanukah. (He's still young 
enough to be a second-year stu- 
dent . . . which he is.) 

"Oh, sir," he goes on to say, "I 
myself have known all about Cha- 




ALFRED SEGAL 

nukah since I was a small, kid but 
there are so many other voung 
ones who don't know the meaning 
of Chanukah. So, please, sir, report 
in your column on Chanukah to- 
ward the Jewish education of fel- 
low-students of mine in the uni- 
versity of our city." 

After I had received his letter 1 
called up this lad and said to him: 
"Please, write a column for me 
about Chanukah. It'll be inspiring 
for Jewish parents to hear from 
a young Jew who knows all about 
Chanukah." 

"Thanks! Thanks!" he ex- 
claimed, and a week later 1 re- 
ceived this essay about Chanukah 
from him . . . and I thank him 
for writing this column for me .... 
toward Chanukah. 

"Yes, Chanukah," he writes, 
"Chanukah is a sacred day which 
has to do with religious freedom. 
Jt icelehrates the first occasion in 
which a deprived people were re- 
turned to the service of God . . . 
we Jewish people, that is . . we 
Jews who far, far back there had 
been deprived of our religious 
rights. You might say that Chanu- 
kah commemorates the first Fourth 
of July in the world." 



He goes on to say this first holy 
day for freedom in the world ob- 
serves a Jewish occasion which oc- 
curred in the year 168-165 before 
the Christian era. 

"Yes," the young man reports, 
"our Temple in Jerusalem in that 
era, had been defiled by the 
iieathen Syrians, and it was our 
Maccabees who by military cour- 
age brought Jerusalem back to re- 
ligious freedom in the world . . . 
and our One God was reestab- 
lished. And this occasion keeps on 
being celebrated by us each year 
. . . even the several thousands of 
years later in the holy days called 
Chanukah. Oh, Mr. Segal, there's 
no occasion of other religion-, that 
keeps on being remembered that 
long. Yes, we celebrate it with 
lights in our houses. My mother 
lights up our living room with 
an additional candle, each oi the 
eight evenings of Chanukah.' 

And this bright young man goes 
on to ask me: "Do you remember, 
Mr. Segal, how the Temple in Je- 
rusalem was rededicated after the 
heathens had been driven out? Do 
you remember?" . . . And he goes 
on to report to all of those of us 
who don't remember. 

"Yes," he says, "when the Tem- 
ple was rededicated only a very 
small jar of the Temple's hob ') 
was found in it, and there wa 01 
ly enough of oil to light up in 
the Temple for eight days in a 
candlestick until more holy oil 
could be obtained. Yes, and that's 
why we observe Chanukah with 
lighted candle in our living rooms 
each evening through eight days 
. . . each evening an additional 
candle until there are eight can- 
dles lighted in our house. 

"And each evening of Chanu- 
kah time my mother stands before 
these candles saying a prayer her 
hands sacredly on her forhead. My 
father himself stands before the 
candles and speaks a blessing: 
'Blessed art Thou, O Lord our 
God, King of the Universe who has 
sanctified us by Thy command- 
ments and command us to kindle 
the light of Chanukah. Blessed art 
Thou O Lord our God, who 
wroughtest miracles for our fathers 
in days of old at this season . . . 
We kindle these lights on account 



Editorials _ _ 3 

Plain Talk — Alfred Segal Z_ 4 

Menasseh — The Philosopher — Harry E. Wedeck 5 

Joey Gets A Chanukah Lesson — A. Letz 

The Menorah Points The Way — Dov Peretz Elkins 

Chanukah — The Season of Giving — Trude Dub 

Hille! In North Carolina — Rabbi Joseph H. Levine 

Prosolytes In Judaism — Dr. H. Rabinowicz 

People In The Limelight — Pearl Evans _ 

Teaching The Blind — Robert Appel . _. 

Meet A Beauty — Ben G. Frank 



Broadway Observation Deck — B. M. Conning .... 
Three Signs of Freedom — Rabbi Samuel Umen 



10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
16 
18 
22 
25 
28 



Virginia 



Richmond — Temple Beth Ahabah ._ 

Lynchburg 

Roanoke — Mrs. Joseph Yosafat 

Norfolk — Mrs. William Schwartz 

Newport News — Mrs. Martha B. Shapiro 



9 
17 
20 
24 
27 



North Carolina 



Whiteville — ■ Mrs. Martin Bernstein , 6 

Around Greensboro — Mrs. William R. Fields ' 35 

Rocky Mount — Mrs. Arnold J. Kridel 36 

Wilmington — Mrs. Daniel Retchin 37 

Charlotte Temple Israel — Mrs. H. N. Friedman 38 

Winston-Salem — Mrs. Stanley Tulman , 39 

Weldon-Roanoke Rapids — Louise Farber . 40 

Salisbury — ■ Mrs. Morton Lerner . 41 

Kinston — Mrs. Sol Sechter _.. _ 41 

Charlotte Temple Beth El — Mrs. M. R. Bernstein 42 

Charlotte B'nai B'rith Women — Mrs. Stanley Greenspon 43 

Lumberton — Mrs. George Silverton 44 

Fayetteville — Mrs. Alex Waitman 46 

Raleigh Beth Meyer Synagogue — Mrs. Oscar Legum 48 



South Carolina 



Columbia — Mrs. Bernard Laden 
Charleston 



21 
31 



Tennessee 



Knoxville 



49 



of the miracles, the deliverances 
and the wonders which Thou didst 
work for our fathers. During all 
the eight days of Chanukah these 
lights are sacred, and we are only 
to look at them in order that we 
may give thanks unto Thy name 
lor Thy miracles, Thy deliveran- 
ces and Thy wonders.'" 

(Yes, yes I owe this entire col- 
umn to this young man whose pa- 
rents, besides themselves being of 
Godly feeling, have been bringing 
their boy up toward such under- 
standing. I'm handing on their 
noble example to all parents.) 

And the young man goes on to 
say: "At the Chanukah service be- 
fore the candle lights, my father 
recites one of the Psalms . . . 'Son,' 



he says to me, 'listen carefully to 
this' and he reads Psalm 30. say- 
ing: 'J will extol Thee, O Lord; 
for Thou hast drawn me up and 
hast not made my foes to rejoice 
over me . . . Sing praise unto the 
Lord, O, ye, His loving ones, and 
give thanks to His holy name. For 
His anger is but for the moment; 
His favor is for a lifetime . . . 
Hear, O Lord, and be gracious un- 
to me; Lord, be Thou my helper. 
Thou hast turned for me my 
mourning into dancing; Thou 
hast loosed my sack-cloth and gir- 
ded me with gladness: to the end 
that my glory may sing praise 
to Thee, and not be silent. O 
Lord, my God, I will give thanks 
unto Thee Forever.'" 



December, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



Menasseh, 



The Philosopher 




By Harry E. Wedeck 



HARRY E. WEDECK 



They called him, in those dis- 
tant days, Menasseh the Philoso- 
pher. Actually, there was no real 
justification for such a designa- 
tion. In appearance, in tact, Me- 
nasseh was far from the figure and 
the ways of the traditional gaunt, 
hungry, humble philosophical 
spirit. "Pah!" he would blurt out, 
loudly, after services on a Sabbath 
afternoon, as the elders left the 
little white washed synagogue and 
tramped across the yellowing fields 
to their log huts. 

"Pah! Paris! What is there to 
Paris? Pah! 

"You've been to Paris?" a hum- 
ble questioner would intrude. 

"Of course. Why not? Where 
have I not been? Paris. Vienna. 
Hamburg. Nothing. Nothing at 
all. A few this and a little that . . . 
So what? What difference does 
that make? A big city. A smali city. 
A wide street. A narrow street. 
Clothes are different. But men. 
men are the same. Always. Every- 
where. In Odessa and Warsaw and 
Tiflis.' 

"Ah!" 

"True! True!" The elders nod- 
ded and murmured in acquies- 
cence. 

Reb Menasseh the Philosopher 
had traveled the world. He knew. 
He had traversed the globe and 
beheld the glory of cities: and yet 
he saw the simple essence of them. 

And he was, in their little 
town, quietly and contentedly 
eating his days away and becoming 
a legend among the townsfolk. 

"How long has Menasseh the 
Philosopher been with us" they 
asked. 

"Twenty years?" 

"Nonsense. I remember. It was 
just after the big fire in the timber 



yard. That must be at least twenty 
five years." 

"What are you talking about, 
Reb Ezekiel? It's more than thirty 
years. I can remember ..." 

So the elders themselves dis- 
cussed the legends, and Menasseh 
went on flourishing. In appear- 
ance, he was huge and burly and 
bearded. When he ate stuffed mill/ 
you could hear him smacking his 
lips with relish and calling for 
more horseradish and more black 
bread. 

As was becoming for the repu- 
tation of a philosopher, Menasseh 
dined ou( al least three or four 
times a week. His thin, scrawm 
crumpled wife saw little of him, 
and when he did appear at his 
own table, he would look with dis- 
dain at the small portion of meat 
and the thin vegetable soup. 

His eyebrows went up bushily. 
That meant: Is that all? Milka 
spread her hands humbly to the 
walls. That meant: I tried my best, 
but what could I do? You don't 
bring in any money. Except the lit- 
tle you make in donations and so 
on. 

Menasseh clutched his beard. 
That meant: Silence! And poor 
Milka fell silent.. 

As a philosopher, but of no 
known sect, no distinctive school, 
Menasseh had his own idiosyncra- 
tic way. His methods of argument 
and reasoning were thunderous. 
He puffed and waved hands. He 
spluttered out Bah! and Pah! until 
the questioner or the consultant, 
who came possibly to dispute, dis- 
appeared in a cloud of tumult and 
exclamations that overwhelmed 
him into acceptance. 

There was the occasion when 
Zalman, after Sabbath services, in- 
vited him home. 



Zalman was a quiet, still figure, 
always close to the wall, like a 
shape in a frieze. When he spoke, 
it was with a kind of apology for 
living, for daring to voice himself. 

"Reb Menasseh," he whispered, 
in a faint, barely audible tone. 

"Well? Well?," the Philosopher 
booked and clamored. 

"I thought. Maybe. Well. You 
know." 

"Well, Reb Zalman, well? Out 
with it. Well?" 

"I thought. Maybe. Who knows? 
A man like you. Always busy. It 
couldn't do any harm anyway. 
Well." Then, in a sudden gush ol 
courage, "Could you dine with us 
Rel) Menasseh?" 

Menasseh the Philosopher had 
been waiting for this invitation 
for weeks. He knew that Reb Zal- 
man's wife cooked with abundance 
and generosity . . . roast chickens 
. . . warm fresh bread . . tzimmis 
. . . lockshen soup . . . kreplach 
. . . knedel . . . sweet and sour 
tongue . . . compote, stiff with gin- 
ger and hazel nuts . . . endless 
glasses of tea and three slices of 
lemon floating in the glass . . . 

"Well," Menasseh the Philso- 
pher came down to the humble 
earth. "I really have another in- 
vitation for today . . . from Isaac 
the timber merchant . . . the big 
timber merchant, you know . . . 
but, well, doesn't it say," and his 
huge hirsute and spatulated thumb 
went up into the air, and his voice 
took on a sing-song recitative, 
"doesn't it say in the Talmud that 
if a poor man and a rich man in- 
vite you, go to the poor man, be- 
cause your mitzvah will be the 
greater." 

"Reb Menasseh, I am not a poor 
man." 



"Pah!" Reb Menasseh the Philo- 
sopher sputtered, and went joy- 
fully with Reb Zalman. 

When he ate, that afternoon,, 
his jaws worked like piston rods, 
rhythmic and unending, as he 
sputtered odd scraps of wisdom to 
the hungry Zalman. 

"Bah! These ignorami! Pah! Ep- 
icureans! Sons of the earth! What 
do they know? What does anyone 
know?" 

He bent over the table, thrust 
his bearded face before Zalman. 
"What do I know? Tell me, what 
do even I know?" 

"Nonsense, Reb Menesseh," Zal- 
man refuted, with vast spirit. "If 
not you, who can know? You have 
traveled. You have seen. Hamburg 
and Vienna . . . Warsaw . . . Riga 
. . . Odessa . . . Ah!" 

Clorified, Menasseh the Philoso- 
pher helped himself to a fat slice 
of stuffed miltz, and playing with 
it for a brief moment, rammed it 
into his capacious maw. 

But glory is a earthly thing, and 
fate peers round the corner, hid- 
den perhaps, but always on the- 
alert for human arrogance. 

Menasseh's turn came. And his. 
downfall was due to a triviality. 
To a trip made by R^b Zalman, in 
fact. 

There was a deal in grain, and' 
Reb Zalman heard of it. So many- 
sacks . . . such and such a price. He 
counted his little hoard of money 
one night. 

"Malka," he announced, "I'm go- 
ing to buv the two hundred sacks. 
We have enough money." 

"Yes, Zalman." 

"I'll take the wagon and when 
I get into town I'll arrange for the 
transportation." 

(Please turn to Page 50) 




WHITEVILLE, N. C. 

MRS. MARTIN BERNSTEIN, Correspondent 




HYMAN KRAMER, GARY KRAMER and REUBEN KESNER 



Gary Neal Kramer, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Hyman Kramer of 
Whiteville, N. C, celebrated his 
Bar Mitzvah on October 24, 1964 
at the Beth Israel Center. This was 
a milestone in the life of the Jew- 
ish Community of Whiteville, as 
it was the first Bar Mitzvah to be 
held in the town's Synagogue since 
its dedication April 10. 1960. 

As Gary was called to the Torah 
by Circuit Rider Reuben Kesner, 
the prayer shawl was placed on 
his shoulders by his lather as pic- 
tured above. He received his Bar 
Mitzvah charge and certificate 
from Dr. Wm. B. Furie, director 
of the Circuit Riding Rabbi Pro- 
gram of North Carolina. 

Greetings were extended to the 
overflow congregation by the pres- 
ident, Mr. Abie Moscow, and the 
Sisterhood president, Mrs. Char- 
lotte Moscow and Mr. I. D. Blu- 
menthal, chairman of the NCAJM 
and gifts were presented in the 
name NCAJM, the Congregation 
and the Sisterhood. 

The Bar Mitzvah conducted the 
Friday Evening Service and de- 



livered an address on Saturday 
Evening at the Synagogue-C inter. 



5TATESVILLE, N. C. 

MRS. MILTON STEINBERGER 
Correspondent 

Fall activity is now in full swing 
and the ladies of the Temple are 
busy with their fund-raising acti- 
vities and we are looking forward 
to a year of great success. 

Our first big affair "Gypsy Ca- 
baret Party" was held at the 
Temple's Social Center on Novem- 
ber 8th, dinner by our StateEville 
prize cooks was served Gypsy 
Style and Decor. The highlight of 
the evening was entertainment 
by the famous Hootenanny "Sasa- 
Ira Boys" and the mystery "Lady 
In Red" the famous fortune teller. 
Mrs. Norman Steinberger and 
Mrs. Ellis Gordon were in charge 
of the entertainment and Mrs. Joe 
Jay and Mrs. Elliott Gohen were 
in charge of the dinner. They were 
assisted by the following commit- 
tee: Mrs. Hy Sliberman, Mrs. Lou- 
is Gordon, Mrs. Bill Kasten, Mrs. 
Alfred Gordon and Mrs. Kalman 
Gordon. 



We are greaty pleased with the 
progress of our Religious School 
and the interest of the pupils is at 
a high level. Our efficient teach- 
ers are to be credited with the 
line work they are doing. Mrs. 
Leonard Polk, superintendent is 
doing a fine job and is assisted by 
the following teachers: Sunday 
School Teachers are: Mrs. Nat 
Lipshitz, Miss Meredith Ludwig 
and Miss Marth Lipshitz. Hebrew 
School Teachers: Mrs. Ellis Gor- 
don, Mrs. Howard Adler and Mrs. 
Ben Katz. Mr. Sol Ludwig has 
charge of the confirmation class. 

Mrs. Ben Katz, vice-president of 
The Seaboard Branch of the Na- 
tional Women's League of the 



United Synagogue of America, 
attended the Biennial National 
Convention in Chicago, October 
25th and 29th. 

It is with regret that we say 
good-bye to our dear Air. Bernard 
Walsh who is retiring and moving 
to New York to make his future 
home. We are looking forward 
to his visits here in Statesville as 
he still maintains his business 
here. We wish him the very best 
of Good Luck and may he enjoy 
Good Health. 



Do Your Part! 
Contribute to the North 
Carolina Home for the 
Jewish Aged 



Greensboro Auditorium 
And Coliseum 

MAIL ORDERS 
ACCEPTED FOR ALL EVENTS! 

Make checks payable to Greensboro Coliseum and mail to 
Coliseum, 1921 W. Lee St., Greensboro, N. C. Specify per- 
formance date and enclose stamped, self -addressed envelope 
for prompt return of tickets. 



December, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



7 




Richmond, Va. 



William B. Thalheimer, Jr. pro- 
minent business man and a lead 
er in religious, philanthropic and 
civic affairs, received the Dis 
tinguished Community Service 
Award, at the Richmond Jewish 
Community Council's 29th An- 
nual Meeting held on November 
I at Oak Hill Country Club. 

Reeve Marks who had been si- 
milarly honored in 1963 made the 
presentation. 

Mr. Marks described the Award 
winner as "symbolizing the new 
generation of leaders who have 
accepted the responsibility oi lea 
dership. His abilities, vision, gen- 
erosity and genuinely human 
qualities have become synony- 
mous with scores of philanthropic, 
civic and religious endeavors." 

Mr. Thalhimer, President and 
Genera] Manager of Thalhimer 
Bros. Inc., is a Past President ol 
Temple Beth Ahabah, Jewish 
Community Center, Richmond 
Area Community Chest and the 
Retail Merchants' Association of 
Richmond. 

He has been an active leader 
of the RJCC, having served on the 
Executive Committee and Board 
of Directors for many years. Cur- 
rently, he is Chairman of the 
Council's Endowment Fund which 
owes its existence to his foresight 
and stimulation. In 1963, he was 
the Big Gifts Chairman. 

East year, he served as Chair- 
man of Radio Free Europe and 
as Chairman of the United Negro 
College Fund. 

He is Co-Chairman of the Rich- 
mond Chapter, National Confer- 
nece of Christians and Jews and 
serves as a Board member of the 
Central National Bank, Associa- 



ted Merchandising Corporation of 
New York, National Retail Mer- 
chants Association — also Vice- 
President Elect, The National To- 
bacco Festival, Inc., Richmond 
Retail Merchants Association; 
Richmond Area Heart Associa- 
tion. Richmond Symphony, Inc., 
Richmond Chamber of Commerce, 
American Cancer Society — Rich- 
mond Chapter, Lakeside Park, 
Inc. Hebrew Cemetery Company, 
Central Richmond Association, 
Jewish Community Center, Virgi- 
nia State Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Thalhimer also serves as a 
member of the Advisory Board 
for the Richmond Professional 
Institute. University of Richmond 
and the Richmond Baseball Club. 
He is also on the Board of Trus- 
tees for the Richmond Memorial 
Hospital and Reep Virginia Beau- 
tiful, Inc. 

The Distinguished Community 
Service Award is the highest honor 
which the Jewish Community can 
bestow on an individual. 




KEEVE MARKS and WILLIAM B. THALHEIMER, JR. 



THE NO. 1 NAME IN 



MILK 




COTTAGE 
CHEESE 




ICE CREAM 





TRADE MARK 



8 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



December, 1964 



RICHMOND, VIRGIN 



re-closable 
end label 

SEALS - 
RE-SEALS 

and 
RE-SEALS 




"The Freshest Thing In Town" 



American Maid 

NOLDE'S 

B R EAD and CAK ES 

At your Dealer's 




FEAST OF LICzHTS 

* Chanukah Greetings 

— from — 



PLEASANTS HARDWARE 

SINCE 1915 

"Most Anything" General Hardware 

INDUSTRIAL BUILDERS 

614 N. Lombardy At Broad Street 

New Expanded Store with Entrances on Lombardy Street 
Phone 359-5066 Richmond, Virginia 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



® Chanukah 
* Greetings 
FEAST OF LIGHTS 



RUCKER AND RICHARDSON 

• REALTORS 

Real Estate and Insurance — Mortgage Loans 
118 North Eighth Street 
RICHMOND, VA. 



The award reads as follows: 
TO 

WILLIAM B. THALHIMER. [R. 
FROM 

THE RICHMOND JEWISH 
COMMUNITY COUNCIL 
NOVEMBER 1, 1964 
DISTINGUISHED 
COMMUNITY SERVICE 

In appreciation for his unceas- 
ing- and dedicated service to our 
community, its vital institutions 
and to humanity. He symbolizes 
a new generation of leaders who 
are committed to building a bet- 
ler community for all in accor- 
dance with our heritage. 



A Past President of the Jewish 
Community Center, Temple Beth 
Ahabah and the Richmond Area 
Community Chest, he has exer- 
cised a leadership marked bv vi- 
gor, wisdom and insight in an al- 
most endless variety of community 
endeavors encompassing religious, 
philanthropic, civic and commer- 
cial activities which have en- 
hanced the prestige and well-being 
of our community. 

His distinguished service and 
zeal in the promotion of the com- 
munity's general welfare will al- 
ways inspire those who are dedi- 
cated to fostering the highest 
ideals of judaism. 



RICHMOND, VA. 
Temple Beth Ahabah 



Our annua] Neighborhood 
Thanksgiving Service was held 
Thursday, November 26. This was 
our 19th consecutive affair and 
we met at Honover Ave. Christian 
Church, where we met originally 
in 1946. Our Rabbi, Dr. Goldburg, 
Dr. Newell of St. John's and Rev. 
Mr. Boynton of Hanover were the 
founders of this meaningful 
friendly interfaith service. 
Through the years a spirit of bro 
therhood and community loyalty 
has been developed. Thousands of 
dollars in offerings have been con- 
tributed to hospitals and various 
charitable institutions. Thanksgiv- 
ing in Richmond has taken on a 
greater significance through this 
mutual sendee of prayer and song. 
The following churches and syna- 
gogues with their ministers and 
members participated: 

Beth Ahabah Synagogue — Ariel 
L. Goldburg; Boulevard Metho- 
disi Church — Richard M. Robert- 
son: First Congregational Chris- 
tian Church — Joseph A. Talley: 
H a n o v e r Avenue Christian 
Church — Robert E. Jarman; 
Park Avenue Methodist Church — 
Norman G. Preston, Jr.; St. John's 
United Church of Christ — Rich- 



ard A. Creek; Temple Beth El Sy- 
nagogue — Jacob Milgrom. 

Teen Topics 

The entire region o I 
M. A. F. T. Y. met in Washing- 
ton. 1). C. on November 6, 7, 8 
lor its annual Fall Conclave. Cul- 
tural, religious and social events 
look place during this week-end. 

A second Junior Hollywood 
Luncheon was held in November. 
A cartoon and a movie were 
shown and lunch served to the 
children of the Religious School. 

The Ways and Means Commit- 
tee is planning to put on a hit 
play sometime in January. More 
details will appear later. 

Plans for M. A. F. T. Y.'s Spring 
Convention are well underway 
but housing for the delegates is 
still needed. If you can house one 
or more of these teens, please call 
Martha Greenberg. The dates of 
this convention are April 23, 24 
and 25. 

The first window in our newlv 
refurnished synagogue was dedi- 
cated Friday night, November 6th, 
to the loving memory of Lily 
Schwarzchild Reutlinger. This 



LUKHARD'S 
SUPER MARKETS 



• BROAD ST. AT HORSEPEN ROAD 

• 5418 LAKESIDE AVENUE 



• 5710 GROVE AVE. 

• 1229 BELL EV HE AVE. 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 
8811 Foresthill Ave. Bon Air, Va. 



December, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 



3 



window has been given through a Commandments, ll will serve as a 

generous contribution by Mr. everlasting memorial to a sweet 

Henry Schwarzschild, the brother and lovely person, who was ardent 

of Mrs. Reutlinger. This is a in her faith and loyal to her syna 

magnificent window of the Ten gogue, Beth Ahabah. 

RICHMOND LEADERS HONORED 

Two of Richmond's outstanding 
Jewish leaders will be among those 
receiving citations from the Na- 
tional Conference of Christians 
and Jews at a dinner of the Rich- 
mond Chapter to be held on De- 
cember 9 in the Grand Ballroom 
of the John Marshall Hotel. 

Dr. Ariel Goldberg, spiritual 
leader of Congregation Beth Aha- 
ba and William B. Thalheimer Jr. 
will receive recognition for "exem- 
plifying the ideals of the Brother- 
hood of Man under the Father- 
hood of God." 

Rabbi Goldburg received his 
college training at the University 
of Cincinnati, Hebrew Union Col- 
lege, University of Chicago, Har- 
vard University and Oxford Uni- 
versity. He holds the Doctor of 
Divinity degree from Morris Har- 
vey College, The Doctor of He- 
brew Letters degree from Hebrew 
Union College — Jewish Institute 
of Religion. 

After ordination as a rabbi Dr. 
Goldburg served a Charleston. 




Window Cleaning 
Contractors 

for 

• OFFICE BUILDINGS 

• INDUSTRIAL PLANTS 

• NEW CONSTRUCTION 

• SHOWROOMS 

• BANKS 

• OFFICES 

Also Brick and Stone Cleaning 

DIAL 

MI 4-7265 

Insured Service 

CUT RATE 
Window (leaning 

F. W. BUCKLEY, Manager 
First and Byrd Sts. Richmond 



DR. ARIEL GOLDBERG 

West Virginia congregation for 
Hi years, then came to Congrega- 
tion Beth Ahabah in Richmond in 
1945. He is a member of the board 
of the Hebrew Union College — 
Jewish Institute of Religion, and 
has served on numerous rabinical 
boards. 

Rabbi Goldburg was active in 
civic affairs in West Virginia and 
has continued the leadership in 
Richmond. He is a member of 
the board and former Vice Presi- 
dent of the Richmond area Com- 
munity Fund and the Boy Scouts, 
is a past chairman of the Rich- 
mond U. S. O., is former Chair- 
man of the Richmond Welfare Ad- 
visory Board and has been active 
in the Richmond Ministerial As- 
sociation, the Richmond Jewish 
Community Center, the Richmond 
Jewish Community Council, the 
Richmond Rotary Club and the 
Forum Club. 



The Stephen S. Wise Award of 
the American Jewish Congress for 
"advancing human freedom" was 
presented to Ambassador Adlai E. 
Stevenson, head of the U. S. dele- 
gation to the UN. On accepting 
the awrad from Dr. Joachim 
Prinz, AJC president, Mr. Steven- 
son criticized the Soviet Union 
for practicing discrimination 
against Jews. Awards for strength- 
ening Jewish lif ewere presented 
to Joseph, Michal and Samuel 
Daroff of Philadelphia. 



SOUTHERN BANK Offers You 

GconomonEv 

A UNIQUE NEW SAVINGS PLAN 



Now you can purchase ECONO- 
MONEY Savings Certificates at 
a discount just like U. S. Savings Bonds. 
Southern adds a steady, guaranteed 
interest to build the certificates up to 
full value at maturity. 



4% 



PLUS 



The easiest way to save — you buy 
Southern ECONOMONEY in de- 

lominations of $50, $100, $250, $500 
it $1,000 and for maturities from one 
o five years. Your money is insured 
by the Federal Deposit Insurance Cor- 
poration up to $10,000 just like any 
bank deposit at Southern. 

IYour 4% interest is guaranteed 
. and automatically added to your 
ECONOMONEY savings, compound- 
ed semi-annually. On a five year cer- 
tificate, this results in an effective 
4.38% return annually on your initial 
deposit when held to maturity! 



2 No State or Federal income 
• tax has to be paid on ECON- 
OMONEY until you actually redeem 
your certificates, the same as for U. S. 
Savings Bonds! 

3 You have the option to cash in 
• ECONOMONEY on the yearly 
anniversary dates should you have need 
for your savings before maturity, and 
there is no loss of interest for this 
early redemption! 

4 Upon authorization, your South- 
• ern Banker can transfer amounts 
regularly from your checking account 
to ECONOMONEY certificates— an 
automatic, insured savings plan at 
guaranteed interest rates. 

5 ECONOMONEY is available 
• to all savers, including indi- 
viduals, corporations, partnerships, pen- 
sion and profit sharing plans, clubs, 
charitable organizations, etc. 



Come in or write for full details — 

You are always welcome - — 

fmthern Bank and Trust Company 

Richmond, Virginia — Since 1916 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 





PRESCRIPTION 
SERVICE 

PROMPT DELIVERY 
IN WEST RICHMOND 



WESTWOOD 

Westwood Shopping Center 
5805 Patterson Ave. 

Dial AT 8-1933 



LAFAYETTE 

1011 Lafayette Street 

Dial EL 5-1777 



CRESTVIEW 

Crestview Shopping Center 
6516 Horsepen Road 

Dial AT 8-2831 



BEVERLY HILLS 

Beverly Hills Shopping Center 
Patterson Ave. at Ridge Road 

Dial AT 2-4231 



SUBURBAN 

Suburban Shopping Center 
2369 Staples Mill Road 

Dial EL 8-4929 



LO 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



December, 1964 



When everything must he — Just So 




t cl«*Mrt and laundtrm 



FASHION CLEANERS — CUSTOM LAUNDERERS 

10,000 Square Feet of Free Parking 
Drive-In Car Service 

4501 W. Broad Street 2 Stratford Hills 

1102 Ridge Road RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



JOEY GETS A CHANUKAH LESSON 



MORGAN OIL & SUPPLY COMPANY 

First & Stockton Streets Richmond, Va. 

Home Heating Consultants 

CITIES (§) SERVICE 

WE WELCOME THE OPPORTUNITY TO SERVE YOU 



OFFICE PHONE 
BE 2-5651 



NIGHTS & HOLIDAYS 
BR 2-2144 EL 3-3039 



BRIDAL PORTRAITS 

AND CANDIDS ARE " 
OUR SPECIALTY 



phone EL 8-4826 
WENDELL B POWELL STUDIO 



1201 (iROV E AVENUE — RICHMOND, VA. 



ASSEY 

EANS 

UILDERS' 

ETTER 

SUPPLY CORP. 
ERVICE 



READY MIXED CONCRETE 

READY TO SERVE YOU" 

Call Elgin 5-7891 

3712 W. BROAD 
RICHMOND, VA. 



ASBESTOS SIDING — BEACH SAND — BRICKS — CEMENT — 
CINDER BLOCKS — CORRUGATED PIPE — DOORS AND WINDOWS 

— DRAIN TILE — FLAGSTONE — GLASS BLOCKS — GLASS WOOL 

— HARDWARE TOOLS — INSULATION — LATH — LUMBER — 
PLYWOOD — MASONRY MATERIALS — PAINTS AND VARNISHES 

— PLASTERING PRODUCTS — ROOFING — SAND & GRAVEL — 
STEEL SCAFFOLDS — STEEL WINDOWS — TERRA COTTA PIPE 

— WATERPROOFING PRODUCTS — ZONOLITE 



■ A ARROW 

Rent - Alls 

RICHMOND'S RENTAL DEPARTMENT STORE 
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



2367 Staples Mill Road 
5065 Forest Hill Avenue 



EL 9-2408 
232-782 1 



WE RENT MOST ANYTHING 
Party Banquet Needs — Hospital Equipment 



By A. Letz 



"When do I get my Chanukah 
present?'" said little Joey. 

"What's the matter with him," 
asked Mr. Farber. "Is that all Cha- 
nukah means to him, hist a pre- 
sent?" 

"He's very irritable," said Mrs. 
Farber, "I think he had a fight 
with the boy up the street — you 
know the Robins boy. He's bigger 
than Joey and Joey ran from him.'' 

"Oh, I see," said Mr. Farber, 
"Joey come here!" 

"What do you want, Pop?" said 
Joey. 

"Come here," said Mr. Farber. 

"When do I get my Chanukah 
present?" asked Joey. 

"Chanukah present, Chanukah 
present," repeated Mr. Farber, 
"Chanukah should mean more 
than that. Look at the little Cha- 
nukah candle." 

"What's to look at. It's a little 
candle, that's all," said Joey. 

"There is more to it than that," 
-•aid Mr. Farber. "Do you know, 
the rabbis pointed out, that all 
t he darkness of the world cannot 
extinguish the light of a single 
little candle. It should make you 
realize that because a thing is lit- 
tle, it should not be discounted. 
And the rabbis also pointed out 
that one little candle can light 
another little candle and a third 
and a fourth. As long as there is 
one little candle, there is always 
hope in whatever you are doing. 
You will find, Joey, that as you 
grow up, that is a very important 
lesson to learn." 

"Pop, what is Chanukah really 
about," asked Joey, who seemed 
to bearin to lose his restlessness. 

"That's my boy," said Mr. Far- 
br. " I will tell you. Really it's 
a simple story. Did you ever meet 
a big bully who tried to ride 
rough over everyone? Well, two 
thousand years ago, there was a 
man like that. A Syrian named 



Antiochus. He was a big fellow 
and he thought he was much big- 
ger than he really was and he be- 
gan bullying around and he was 
quite successful. He scared a lot 
of people and soon he was ruler 
not only of Syria but most neigh- 
boring countries. He became ru- 
ler of Judaea, where the Jews 
lived. He determined to stamp 
out Judaism. He made the prac- 
tice of the Jewish faith unlawful. 
He set up pigs on altars and com- 
manded Jews to worship them. 
When some Jews would not do as 
he commanded, he determined not 
only to stamp out the religion but 
the Jews themselves . . . Then one 
little candle was lit in the little 
town of Modin and, a family 
called the Maccabeans rose in re- 
volt, one candle lights another 
and soon all over Judaea, they 
were fighting Antiochus. 

"Antiochus had a powerful or- 
ganized army with the latest wea- 
pons, but the Jews had one advan- 
tage. They were fed up with the 
bully and put up a more courage- 
ous fight and courage and alert- 
ness can overcome other disadvan- 
tages, and well — thev soon put 
Antiochus to rout. And so, Joey 
..." But as Mr. Farber was fin- 
ishing his sentence, Joey was al- 
ready at the door. 

"Where are you going, Joey?" 
asked Mr. Farber. 

"I got business up the street." 
There was a smile in his eyes. 



Israel's water desalination pro- 
grams, in which the U. S. govern- 
ment is vitally interested, was one 
of the chief items on the agenda 
of h eseventh annual Conference 
on Science and Technology in Is- 
rael and the Middle East. The na- 
tional meeting was under the aegis 
of the American Technion Societv. 



POLLARD and BAGBY 

INCORPORATED 
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 
IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 
1009 E. Main St. Dial MI 3-9011 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



December, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



11 



THE MENORAH POINTS THE WAY 



By Dov Peretz Elkins 

Judaism has been described 4 as 
a religion of symbolism. The me- 
zuza on the door represents — that 
is, symbolizes— the presenc e of God 
in a Jewish home and a respect 
for the Jewish way of life. The 
esrog and lulav reminds us of the 
renewal of nature, granted 
through God's ever renewing crea- 
tion of his world. The fringes on 
the Talis bring to mind all ol the 
commandments of the Torah. 

Thus, the religious rite in the 
Jewish religion is an action which 
stands for something, which 
represents a human value, 
helping us to become better hu- 
man beings. 

What then is the symbolism of 
the Chanukah Menorah? Many 
answers can be given. The one I 
like the best grows out of the story 
recounted in the Talmud of a de- 
bate about the Chanukiah (as the 
Menorah is known in Israel) be- 
tween the School of Hillel and the 
School of Shammai. The disciples 
of Shammai suggested that 011 t he- 
first night of Chanukah eight can- 
dles be lighted and on each succes- 
sive night one less candle. But the 
disciples of Hillel argued that 
this would be backwards. They 
insisted that on the first night, one 
candle be lighted, and an addi- 
tional one on each succeeding 
evening. 

We might venture to say that 
the method suggested by the 
School of Hillel was given prefer- 



THE 



Davenport 



INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Established 1848 



ence by the rabbis because of its 
inherent symbolic meaning. That 
meaning is that light should be 
increased in the world, and not 
diminished. furthermore, that 
light JS spread in the world as one 
generation follows another. 

What is light? Light in Judaism 
is nothing more or less than know- 
ledge. Light is Torah, and Torah 
is light. From the Bible down to 
our own times, light in the Jewish 
religion has symbolized Torah — 
knowledge, inspiration, righteous- 
ness. The Hebrews were to be a 
light unto the nations, spreading 
God's divine word. In the Dead 
Sea Scrolls, the righteous are called 
"sons of light,'' and the wicked are 
termed "sons of darkness." In our 
synagogues today, over the holy 
ark, is found the Ner Tamid, the 
everlasting light symbolizing God's 
eternal presence. 

Thus, by increasing the light in 
the Chanukah Menorah each 
night, we are making an affirma- 
tive declaration about the world 
in which we live. We are saying 
to ourselves to our families with 
whom we light candles, and to 
the peoples of the world who wit- 
ness our annual holiday, that light 
is increasing in the world, that 
knowledge of the Lord should and 
is reaching out to illuminate more 
and more of the dark corners of 
our civilization. 

We are saying that little by lit- 
tle, our lives are becoming easier 
and belter more meaningful and 
interesting. We are affirming that 
we have faith in man. and in his 
(Please Turn to Page 53) 



Managers 




Brokers 



Dependable Insurance 
Coverage 

1111 East Main St. 
Telephone MI 8-1671 
RICHMOND, VA. 

Loss Adjusting - Fire 
Protection & Casualty 
Engineering 
Insurance Surveys 
Special Service 




Dr. Maurice L. Perlzweig, direct- 
or of the World Jewish Congress 
Department of International Affairs 
sent a message of congratulation to 
the International Labor Organization 
cn the occasion of that bodies' 45th 
anniversary. 



Serving Fashion Conscious Women 
For Over A Quarter Of A Century 



s 



RICHMOND, VA. 

FIVE FASHION STORES 

Downtown # Willow Lawn # Azalea Mall 

9 Village Shopping Center # Southside Plaza 



CoRLEYS 



TELEVISION 

RENTAL 

SERVICE 



Richmond, Va 

214 E. Grace Street 
Phone MI 4-2331 



Norfolk, Va. 

3510-12 Colley Ave. 
Phone 622-9256 



11" and 14" Portable ...$4.00 Per Week 

16" and 17" Portable $5.00 Per Week 

19" Portable $6.00 Per Week 

Remote Control TV . $8.00 Per Week 

Earphones .^..__$2.00 Per Week 

Television Stand ...$2.00 Per Week 



Jacobsen 

THE COMPLETE LINE OF , 
ALL-SEASON ALL-PURPOSE TRACTORS 




§11111 



















Model 100C Shown with 36 inch roiarv mower attachme- 



OLD DOMINION 
Tractor and Equipment Co., Inc. 

2001 Westmoreland St. Phone 353-2757 

RICHMOND 30, VIRGINIA 



12 



EANES and CO. 

Plumbing - Heating 

PROMPT SERVICE 
FAIR CHARGES 

DIAL EL 3-4170 

Night Calls: MI 8-7538 

Specializing in All Kinds of 
Repair Work 



1305 W. Main Street 
RICHMOND, VA. 



THOMAS G. 

POWELL 

Successors to 
Marvin F. Pollard, Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

Orthopedic and Surgical 
Appliances, Artificial Limbs 

Dial MI 3-8656 
414 W. Broad Street 
RICHMOND; VA. 



• Feast of Lights 

• Chanukah 
Greetings .... 

DIXIE 

WHEEL CO. 

916 North Boulevard 
RICHMOND, VA. 

• WHEELS # RIMS 

• DRUMS # BRAKES 

Automotive Parts 



t Chanukah Greetings 
The Feast of Lights" 

m 



Charles E. Brauer 
Company, Inc. 

Wholesale Confectioners 
Dial MI 3-2503 
19 S. 14th St., Richmond, Va. 



The American Jewish TIMES OUTLOOK 

CHANUKAH - THE SEASON OF GIVING 

By Trude Dub 



December, 1964 



Perhaps nothing shows more 
how a person is thought of by 
1 heir family or friends, than a 
present. The gift need not be ex- 
pensive to prove your worth, but 
ii must show that some care has 
been spent on thinking out what 
would give pleasure. This can in- 
clude a present bought with a 
child's pocket money as much as 
a successful husband's pearl neck- 
lace or diamond ring. 

When we were courting, my hus- 
band, then a young student, 
bought me as his first Chanuka 
present some Dutch chocolates in 
a silvery metal box, with four red 
roses painted on top. I still have 
the box although we have been 
married for over 30 years. It now 
contains all sorts of souvenirs, like 
pressed roses from my husband's 
anniversary bouquets, felt needle- 
cases made and embroidered for 
me by my elder daughter when 
she was at school and some jewel- 
ery' the children bought for me at 
bazaars. 

1 would not part with these 
treasures for anything in the 
world. Take that huge gilt brooch, 
studded with red and white glass 
that my younger daughter gave 
me when she was six. I can still 
see her big blue eyes filled with 
pride as she handed it to me with 
—"some diamonds for you. Mum- 
my.' 

There is also a handkerchief 
from a dear friend of mine who 
was left almost destitute when her 
husband died. She embroiderd a 
corner with coloured silks and en- 
closed a card saying — "This is 
all I can afford but each stitch 
was sewn with love." 



Of course, a gift expresses not 
only the feeling of one person for 
another, it also discloses the per- 
sonality of the donor. 

f know a woman who gives a 
drum or trumpet to chidren of 
parents whom she dislikes in the 
hope that — "Maybe it will drive 
them all crazy!" Or another one, 
now a past friend, who, one Cha- 
nuka, sent me a jar of stemmed 
ginger with these words: "Every- 
body complains that giving pre- 
sents is a burden but nobody has 
the courage to stop. Next year, 
we shall give presents only to the 
family whilst to friends we shall 
send cards to say how much we 
love them." I did not mind so 
much the ginger burning in my 
throat, or the stopping of the pre- 
sents but the loving bit — that 
masterpiece of hypocrisy — really 
enraged me. As I said — this lady 
now belongs to my past friends. 

It is true that over the years 
presents can create a bit of a prob- 
lem. We know some people who 
have moved a long time ago to 
another town and w r e have not set 
eyes on them since. But when Cha- 
nuka comes round, I know there 
will be a gramophone record token 
from them and they know they 
will get a book token from me. I 
would not tell them for the world 
that I haven't got a gramophone 
and wouldn't be a bit surprised if 
they didn't have a library but at 
least it shows we are still in each 
other's thoughts. 

We also know what to expect 
from each other. It is far worse 
with people who spring a surprise 
on you every time. You sent them 
(Please turn to Page 51) 



7 CHEVRQ 



fir 



MARTIN 

SALES CORPORATION 

214 Cowardin Avenue 
Richmond's Largest Chevrolet Dealer 

• SALES • SERVICE 

Service Department Open 7:30 A.M. to Midnight 
Monday — Thru — Friday 



EAGLE TRITPLEX 

BURIAL 
VAULTS 

Manufacturerd by 

JOSEPH L. 
BURRUSS 

4001 Mechanicsville Pike 
RICHMOND, VA. 

Phone MI 8-1022 



f 



Serving . . . 

Readers of thi? 
magazine for 87 years . . . 

Joseph W. Bliley 

FUNERAL HOME 

Conveniently Located 
Third & Marshall Streets 
Richmond, Virginia 

I AMPLE PRIVATE 
PARKING SPACE 



Safety • Responsibility 

Red Top 

Cabs 

PHONE NUMBER 

EL 8-671 1 

AH Cabs Equipped with 
2-Way Radio System 

National Cab Co. 

RICHMOND, VA. 



Grove Avenue 
Pharmacy 

4911 Grove Ave. 
RICHMOND, VA. 

For Fast Delivery 
DIAL 5-3405 

• Prescriptions 

• DRUGS 



December, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



13 



HILLEL IN NORTH CAROLINA 



RABBI JOSEPH H. 

Many interesting and varied 
program activities were planned 
and executed during the month of 
November, many of them so ar- 
ranged as to bring Jewish students 
from different schools into more 
frequent contact with one another. 

On November 8th, the Duke 
Hillel group hosted the girls from 
UNC — Greensboro at a combined 
Hillel brunch. A noted faculty 
speaker from the University Reli- 
gion Department presented a sti- 
mulating address. 

On November 13th, the Judea 
Reform Congregation of Durham 
and Chapel Hill hosted our Hillel 
students at a special "Hillel 
Night" worship service and pro- 
gram. A panel of students attend- 
ing Duke University who are ac- 
tive in our Hillel program con- 
ducted the service and led a dis- 
cussion on a recent article which 
appeared in the Hadassah maga- 
zine entitled: "Young Jewish In- 
tellectuals Speak Out". The panel 
included Harvey Alper, Peg Er- 
langer, Al Martin and Jerry Kro- 
nenfeld. 

Our North Carolina State stu- 
dents are actively at work in plan- 
ning special cultural and educa- 
tional programs featuring faculty 
speakers. The steering committee 
of the Hillel Foundation there 
consists of Dennis Kronenfeld of 
Hendersonville, N. C, Norman 
Smith of Waco, Texas, Richard 
Lerner and Gerry Katz of States- 
ville. N. C. 



LEVINE, Director 



'The Feast of Lights" 

• Chanukah 

• Greetings 

SCHNEIDER'S 
Transfer Co. 

4th and Maury St. 
RICHMOND, VA. 
Phone BE 2-1271 




RABBI JOSEPH H. LEVINE 

The students in Chapel Hill 
have had many new and exciting 
programs; ranging from a pro- 
gram on Leonard Berstein's new 
opus "The Kaddish Shympho- 
ny" to a program commemorating 
the First Anniversary of the 
death of President John F. Ken- 
nedy. 

Last but certainly not least, the 
girls at the Greensboro Hillel 
chapter are enjoying one of their 
most active Hillel programs ever 
developed on that campus due in 
no small measure to the very en- 
ergetic and capable leadership of 
their president, Linda Stein of 
Durham. The girls have been 
holding "Hillel Night" services at 
Temple Emanuel and Beth David 
Synagogues, are planning a Cha- 
nukah party, and holding a num- 
ber of study group sessions as 
well as programs with faculty 
speakers. 

At this time of the year, we 
generally express our appreciation, 
and would like to do so once 
again to the many parents who 
have generously contributed to 
our annual Hillel Parents Appeal 
Drive. 



Abba Eban, Israel's Deputy 
Prime Minister, in a televised in- 
terview stated that he found lit- 
tel support for Arab policies in 
the Middle East and found little 
or no objection to Israel's Jordan 
River irrigation project in Latin 
America. Mr. Eban met with Pre- 
sident Raul Leoni and was a guest 
of the Venezuelan Parliament. 



EVEREADY 
OIL SUPPLY CO. 

123 S. Belvidere Street 
Phone 648-0197 Richmond, Va. 



FUEL OIL 



HEATING 



COOLING 




3? 



HORTENSE WOLF 



FRANKLIN WOLF 
MARSHALL WOLF 




FEAST OF LIGHTS 



Chanukah 



SIMS AND LEVIN 



1 103 E. Main Street 

# SALES # RENTALS 

Mortgage Loans 

RICHMOND, VA. 



Dial 643-6779 
INSURANCE 

Simon Levin 




Dot's Pastry Shop 

3136 W. Cary Street 
RICHMOND, VA. 
DIAL EL 8-2011 

Baker of Fancy Pastries 





OfJ^erd the ^inedt 

MILK 



RICHMOND'S 
MOST MODERN DAIRY 



And other 

Dairy Products 



DIAL RICH. 

EL 5-1745 

Milk Available In Famous Pure-Pak 
Prompt. Courteous p aper bartons From Your Favorite Dealer ~ 

Delivery U -SS . 

1600 ROSENEATH ROAD 



8 



14 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



December, 1964 



CRUISING IS FUN! 

Why Not Try It This Winter? 

Sail with your own group — or alone — you'll 
meet new people — make new friends, and en- 
joy the finest vacation ever. Join in a full 
program of activities or just relax on sun- 
bathed decks. Living at its best while visiting 
fascinating ports of call. 

CARIBBEAN — MEDITERRANEAN 
AFRICA — AROUND THE WORLD 

See us now for details and reservations 

PLAN NOW FOR EUROPE IN 1965 

C. O. ALLEY TRAVEL AGENCY 

708 E. Grace RICHMOND, VA. Dial 643-0126 




THE LIBERTY PRESS 

Rush Printing — - - Photo Offset 
• Specializing in Wedding: and Bar Mitzvah Invitations 

Norman L. Williams, Jr. 

1402 E. Main St. RICHMOND 19, VA. Dial MI 3-1103 



24-HOUR TRUCK SERVICE 

MAINTENANCE LEASE OPERATING 

ESI e\«*$"?s***!" 



SALES 
107 W. Canal Street 



PHONE MI 3-9173 

Richmond. Va. 




"EVERLASTING BEAUTY IN MONUMENTS' 

HENWOOD & WILSON 

Designers and Manufacturers of 
GRANITE and MARBLE MONUMENTS— MEMORIALS 

413-415 S. Cherry St. DIAL MI 8-7340 Richmond, Va. 




FLORSHEIM SHOES 

912 E. Main St. RICHMOND, VA. 



• CHANUKAH 

• GREETINGS 

■il'lliJiliilliniHi,;,!.;:, :!■;;;, iMiu.^r,; M.Mn'' -:;,::,„ 

'The Feast of Lights" 

CONCRETE 

Surfacing Corp. 

1730 Kelley Road 
RICHMOND, VA. 
EL 5-0000 



WESTHAMPTON 
FLORIST . . . 



320 Libbie Avenue 
RICHMOND, VA. 

Specializing in 
Artistic Weddings, 
Decorations of All Types 

Dial AT 2-2460 



Mr. & Mrs. 
F. N. Hickernell 



PROSELYTES IN JUDAISM 

By Dr. H. Rabinowicz 



It is interesting 10 trace the tra- 
ditional attitude to this problem 
throughout the ages. Our Sages 
tell us that in the Bible times as 
soon as Abraham arrived at a de- 
sirable location he would pitch 
two tents, one lor Sarah and one 
lor himself; then he would pro- 
ceed at once to make proselytes 
and to bring them under the wings 
of the Shechinah. Thus he induced 
men to proclaim the name of God. 
His example was followed by his 
descendants. Jacob, his grandson, 
declared that the only worthwhile 
portion of his life was that in 
which he was concerned with the 
making of proselytes. So it hap- 
pened that when the children of 
Israel left Egypt they were ac- 
companied by a "mixed multitude" 
of non-Israelite strangers. 

Diverse, detailed and humane 
are the laws regarding the strang- 
ers. "And if a stranger sojourn 
with thee in your land, ye shall 
not do him wrong. The stranger 
that sojournetli with you shall be 
unto you as the home-born among 
you, and thou shah love him as 
thyself." Even the children of the 
F.domites and Egyptians could en- 
ter the congregation in the third 
generation; and though the men 
of the Moabites were forever ex- 
cluded from the Covenant, Ruth 
the ancestress of David was wel- 
comed into the fold. Numerous, 
too, were the proselytes in the 
time of king Hezekiah and in the 
days of Queen Esther. 

The prophets of Israel were not 
particulansts. They preached a 
universal faith. Although Jonah 
betrayed reluctance to save the 
heathens, Isaiah looked forward 
to the time "when the sons of the 
stranger that join themselves unto 
the Lord . . . even them will I 
bring to my holy mountain . . . 
for ray house shall be called a 
house of prayer for all peoples." 
'The mountain of the Lord's 
house shall be established as the 
top of the mountains, and shall 
be exalted above the hills; and all 
nations shall flow unto it. And 
many peoples shall go and say: 
'Come ye, and let us go to the 
mountain of the Lord, to the house 
of the God of Jacob; and he will 
teach us of His ways and we walk 
in His paths. For out of Zion shall 



Chanukah Greeting s 

Hudgins Drug Co. 
Dial MI 8-8397 

7 West Grar.e Street 
RICHMOND, VA. 



Highland Park 
Pharmacy 

2929 Second Avenue 

Dial MI 3-1847 
RICHMOND, VA. 



go forth the Law, and the word 
of the Lord from Jerusalem.'" 

These sentiments were echoed 
by the later prophets, Zechariah 
and Malachi and the vision still 
lives in Jewish liturgy. Thrice 
daily it is proclaimed in the Syna- 
gogue that "the Lord shall be 
king over all the earth; in that day 
shall the Lord be one and his 
Name one." 

During the period of the Second 
Commonwealth, John Hyrcanus, 
and later Aristobulus, resorted to 
force of arms in order to compel 
(he Idumeans and Itureans to em- 
brace Judaism: events notable as 
the only two instances of militant 
|udaism in history. Compulsion 
was normally unnecessary. Joseph- 
1 is relates that many Greeks and 
heathens adopted the observance 
of the Jewish Sabbath and festi- 
vals and the Jewish dietary laws. 
Among illustrious converts were 
Oueen Helena of Adiabene and 
her sons Izates and Monobazus; 
Flavius Clemens, cousin of the 
Emperor Domitian; and Acquila 
who translated the Bible into 
Greek. Legend has it that the de- 
scendants of Sisera, Nebuzradan, 
Raman and the Roman Emperor 
Nero all eventually "saw the light" 
and embraced Judaism. Outstand- 
ing Talmudists, such as Shemayah 
and Avtalyon. Rabbi Akiba, Rab- 
bi Judah ben Germin and Rabbi 
Yfeir were said to be descended 
from proselytes. Hence Rabbi 
Meir's maxim: "Even a Gentile 
who studies the Torah is equal 
10 a high priest." 

Converts were generally held in 
high esteem: a prayer was inserted 
in the Amidah for them: "Tow- 



December, 1964 



The American Jewish 



TIMES-OUTLOOK 



15 




Mrs. Levi Eshkol, wife of the Prime Minister of the State of Israel, 
was welcomed at Kennedy Airport in New York as she arrived for a ten-day 
tour of five major American cities in behalf of the Israel Bond drive. 



ards the proselytes of righteous- 
ness . . . may thy tender mercies 
be stirred." They were on the 
whole treated as equals and suffer- 
ed few legal disabilities. "An in- 
jury to a proselyte is an injury to 
God." "The Holy One blessed be 
He greatly loves the proselyte." 
And according to the Palestianian 
teacher Rabbi Eleazar ben Pedat, 
"Israel was dispersed for the di- 
vine purpose of winning prosely- 
tes." 

The missionary activities of the 
early Christians were aimed at dis- 
crediting the Torah as a "dispen- 
sation of wrath" introduced "for 
the sake of transgressions" and on 
disparaging the Mosaic Code as 
"transitory, subordinate and in- 
termediate." The repercussions of 
Bar Kochba's revolt and the Had- 
rianic persecutions led to a radi- 
cal reorientation of the rabbis to- 
wards proselytes. Views were ex- 
pressed that "proselytes are as 
burdensome to Isarel as leprosy," 
that "proselytes would not be ac- 
cepted in the days of the Messiah," 
and that "evils are predicted to 
those who accept Gerim" because 
"they are corrupt, apt to become 
backsliders and that they keep the 
practices of their fathers." 

The rabbis categorically reject- 



Richmond 
Glass Shop, Inc. 

Distributors for 

• LUMINALL PAINTS 

• Finest-in-Finishes 

• Glass for Furniture Tops 

• Safety Glass for 
AUTOMOBILES 

814 West Broad Street 
Tel. MI 3-7394 



ed the view of Philo that a pro- 
selyte is one "who abandons poly- 
theism and adopts the worship of 
One God." They stressed that "a 
proselyte who acknowledges the 
whole Torah save one command- 
ment is not accepted." Rabbi [ose 
ben Judah, a Tanna of the second 
century, asserts that the proselyte 
must observe "all the precepts of 
the Scribes, even the least of 
them." Genuine love of Judaism 
was the only qualification for ad- 
mission. "Both a man who becomes 
a proselyte for the sake of a wo- 
man and a woman who becomes 
a proselyte lor the sake of a man; 
similarly a man who becomes a 
proselyte for the sake of the table 
of Kings (i.e. in order to become 
a king) or for the sake of joining 
Solomon's servants (i.e. in order 
to acquire an important post in 
the Kingdom) — all these are not 
true proselytes." Thus, while 
Christianity was immersing re- 
luctant multitudes in the baptis- 
mal fonts, and Islam was conquer- 
ing many countries "with fire and 
sword" the Mother religion was 
rigidly catechising prospective pro- 
selyte. "What reason have you for 
desiring to become a proselyte? 
Jews at the present time are op- 

(Please turn to Page 47) 




Sally Bell's 
Kitchen 

708 W. Grace St. 
Richmond, Va. 
Dial MI 4-2838 

Delicacies for the Home, 
Picnics, and Parties 

• Parking Facilities 

• For Our Customers 



DeJARNETTE & PAUL 

INSURANCE — SURETY BONDS 
Phone MI 3-8456 Agency Est. 1899 307 West Main 

Customer Parking- 
Ed. T. DeJarnette ^0P^ James L. Lipsey 

Jas. A. Paul YOUR/ M ndepenitnt Jas. A. Paul, Jr. 

iMSuraJJl /AGENT 

J. Robert Bond Mtivt y tom / mf Carter E. Talman, Jr. 

T. Elwood Waters, Associate 



osb 




1S76 



TRANSFER ^STORAGE Dial 

2910 N BOULEVARD e/ Richmond 30. Va. EL 5" 

Conveniently Located Across From Parker Field 7471 

CRATING - - PACKING 

Local And World Wide 

MOVING — LOCAL — LONG DISTANCE 
AGENT: REPUBLIC VAN & STORAGE CO., INC. 




• GREETINGS 

• CHANUKAH 

FEAST OF LIGHTS 



KANE 



Est. 1931 
Dial MI 9-0541 



PLUMBING - HEATING - AIR-CONDITIONING 
STOKERS - OIL BURNERS - KITCHEN EQUIPMENT 
403 E. Laburnum Ave. RICHMOND 22, VA. 




JONES 
Motor Car Co. 



2923 West Broad — Richmond, Va. 



Sales and Service 



Cadillac:= 
Olds mobile: 



High Grade Used Cars 




16 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



December, 1964 



UNWANTED HAIR? 
Electrolysis Is The Answer 

WRITE OR CALL FOR FREE BOOKLET 

MARIAM MINASIAN, Eledrologist 

115 Freeman Road Richmond, Va. 

Opening Evenings by Appointment 

Phone 353-6444 



PEOPLE IN THE LIMELIGHT 




An Eloquent 
Remembrance 

FLOWERS 
MI 4-2321 




304 North 6th St. 

Our Only Location In Richmond 



Seasons Greetings 



f 



rom 



YELLOW CAB 

• Safety 

• Courtesy 

• Responsibility 

Richmond Owned and 
Operated 

Get There On Time! 
Safe! 

DIAL EL 5-4321 



TATE and HILL 

ELECTRIC CO. 

ELECTRIC 
CONTRACTORS 

9 W. 21st Richmond, Va. 
• 

FREE ESTIMATES 

• Industrial-Commercial 

• Industrial Controls 

• Lighting Fixtures 

• Electric Heat 

PHONE 233-9289 




6L fan FRS 6/uwpr«> 



OTHER SUBURBAN STORES: 

3345 W. Cary Street 
5608 Patterson Avenue 
401 Ridge Road 
5071 Forest Hill Avenue 



Plant: 2920 West Broad 
Dial 353-1281 
City Wide Delivery Service 



• Malvern and Broad Sts. 

RICHMOND, VA. 
Bradley's Willow Lawn Store 
Open 7 'till 9— Saturday 'til 6 



By Pearl Evans 



"The audience forgets the last 
performance, and you .ire only as 
good as what you are doing at the 
moment. Your reputation depends 
upon every phrase!" 

This appraisal, and unrelenting 
dedication to music and audience, 
best explains the man and thril- 
ling voice of world-famous fan 
Peerce. 

Born on the Lower East-Side of 
New York City to Russian emi- 
grant parents, he first started sing- 
ing as a choir-boy in the synagogue 
and playing violin with the 
school orchestra. Later he atten- 
ded Columbia University, but 
quit alter deciding against becom- 
ing a doctor much to his parent's 
disappointment. 

He was first discovered by the 
famed "Roxy" oi Radio City Mu- 
sic Hall and then by the eminent 
conductor Arturo Toscanini, who 
heard him singing over N. B. C. 
He made his Metropolitan Opera 
House debut in 1941 after years 
of study and preparation. Since 
then, he has sung throughout the 
world; appearing in concerts, reci- 
tals, on TV and records. 

"Learn — then worry about a 
career" is Mr. Peerce's philosophy. 
"A career is not for a day or a 
week. Those who are overnight 
sensations usually find that the 
career that comes fast — goes as 
fast!" 

And he advises aspiring sing- 
ers: "First make sure that you 
have the voice. Then get a back- 
ground in music. Singing, itself, 
without musical embellishments is 
difficult. Be a literate singer in 
stead of an illiterate singer. (Stage 
fright is created by a singer's lack 
of technioue: which, in turn, cre- 
ates a lack of security.) 

"Don't expect miracles to hap- 
pen in a short time. Get experi- 
ence and suffer; and appraise 
more: and with patience, develop- 



and study, one may bring some- 
thing into accomplishment. 

"Strive for perfection — a ze- 
nith. For when you have no place 
to go — you go backwards! 

"You must love what you are 
doing and like facing an audience. 
For me, singing is both vocation 
and avocation. J find great relaxa- 
tion in doing what I'm doing."' 

To which Mr. Peerce's wife 
added, "There is a fury with 
themselves (singers), and usually 
being on stage is an expression 
of this kind of release. But, truth- 
fully, Jan has 'something'; and he 
enjoys preforming as much as the 
audience enjoys his perform- 
ance." 

"On or off stage," his life is un- 
doubtedly a contented one. For 
(Please turn to Page 32) 



Henry Kahnan, prominent Jew- 
ish philantropist, has made a gift 
of $1,000,000 to the Albert Ein- 
stein College of Medicine of Ye- 
shiva Universiyt for the establish- 
ment of an institute of research in 
cancer. The new institute will be 
named alter Mr. Kalman. 




Rabbi Maurice N. Eisendrath, 
long identified as executive head 
of the Union of American Hebrew 
Congregations, was the speaker at 
the convention of Temple Sister- 
hoods, District No. 3, held at the 
Motel Roosevelt in New York City. 



SKELTON BROS. OIL CORP. 



3012 MECHANICSVILLE PIKr. 

• HEATING OILS 

• HEATING EQUIPMENT 



RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 

> GASOLINE 



Phone 643-9087 
24 Hours Daily 




MOTOR OIL 



AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT 



SERVING THE METROPOLIS RICHMOND AREA AND THE 9 ADJOINING COUNTIES 
WITH THE FINEST IN PETROLEUM PRODUCTS AND HEATING SERVICES 



December, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



17 



LYNCHBURG, VA. 
AGUDATH SHOLOM CONGREGATION 



Hadassah 

The opening meeting ol the 
season was held at the Temple on 
Septemher 22. Hostesses were Bar 
bara Lee Buchanan, Mary Ber 
man, Estelle Berman and Selma 
Navis. Mrs. Shari Latker, I'resi 
dent, presided. 

Two new members were wel- 
comed: Mrs. Richard Bernstein 
and Mrs. Marvin Berger. The 
Program Vice-President. Ruth 
Sybil Greil, has planned inleresl- 
ing and educational programs for 
every meeting ol the season. 

Mrs. Jane Belkin, Fund Raising 
Chairman, announced that the 
major projects this year will be a 
Youth Aliyah Luncheon lor the 
Religious School Children: a fash- 
ion show, a radio program, a me- 
morial lea and three luncheons. 

Mrs. Kenneth Cooper. Pledge 
Co-Chairman with Faye Adler, 
explained that in January, all 
members pledged $18.00 or more 
will be invited to a "Chai" lunch- 
eon, which is a new project started 
last year. 




OPEN AN ACCOUNT 
.... AND 

SAVE BY MAIL! 

.... the easiest way we 
know to earn 4% quarterly, 
compounded semi-annually. 
No one has ever lost a pen- 
ney in an account insured 
by the F.S.L.I.C. 

Save by the 15th — 
Earn from the 1st. 
Save before you spend — 
by mail. 



THE CO-OPERATIVE 
BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

HOME OFFICE 

1001 Church Street, Lynchburg, Va. 

BRANCH OFFICES 

2015 Wards Rd. - U.S. 29 North 



Anne Hcrwitz and Edith Craf- 
Lon were Co-Chairmen of the Joint 
Sisterhood-Hadasah rummage sale. 
A total of $2fi(i was taken lor this 
three-chn sale, to be equally divi- 
ded between the two organiza- 
lions. 

The second meeting of the sea- 
son was a luncheon meeting at 
the home of Gwen Gorchof, held 
Tuesday, October 20. 

The president, Shari Latker. 
and Alice King, who is a Regional 
Vice-President, went to a Region- 
al Board meeting in Washington, 
and will make arrangements lor 
a leadership training course for 
Lynchburg and several surround 
ing communities. 

Sisterhood News 
Sisterhood has been very busy. 
An institute for Sunday School 
teachers and a District Board 
meeting were held here. From all 
we hear the Institute was attended 
by all our teachers and some from 
Roanoke and Staunton. This day- 
long seminar gave us many new 
ideas to mull over and studv. 

Sisterhood Sabbath and Family 
Sen ices were held on November 
20th — it was a family affair. 
Interfaith Thanksgiving Service 

A joint Thanksgiving service 
was held at 0:00 A. M. Thanks- 
giving Day morning at the Peak- 
land Baptist Church on Peakland 
Place. This joint service is now 
a Lynchburg institution since it 
was started by Rabbi Fischofl 
seven years ago. 

Each year, the First Christian 
Church, Peakland Baptist Church 
and Agudath Sholom Congrega- 
tion members join in worship on 
Thanksgiving Day, rotating the 
place of worship among the 
three. At each service, the minis- 
ters of each group participate in 
the service, with one giving the 
principal sermon. This year our 
Rabbi Fischoff was the preacher, 
while Rev. Garnett Day of First 
Christian and Rev. Arthur Brown 
of Peakland Baptist also participa- 
ted. Following the service, there 
was a coffee hour and fellowship. 

Members, as well as ministers, of 
other churches in the city also at- 
tended this service to make it a 
truly interfaith service. 



BUY THAT 
ISRAEL BOND 
NOW! 



LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 




'Lynchburg's Downtown Hotel Of Distinction" 
Group and Convention Facilities 



JAMES B. MERRILL 
Executive Vice-President 



8th and Church Streets 
Lynchburg - , Virginia 



Always Buy and Serve The Finest 

Wettom 



QUALITY 

CHEKD , 




FINER 
DAIRY PRODUCTS m 

Milks - Ice Cream - Butter - Cottage Cheese - Sour Cream 
Fresh Cream - Dips - Fruit Drinks 

LYNCHBURG - WESTOVER DAIRIES, INC. 

2801 Fort Avenue Dial 847-4476 Lynchburg, Virginia 



EXCLUSIVELY 




For Complete Eye Care: 
Consult Your EYE PHYSICIAN 
Then See Your GUILD OPTICIAN 

A. G. Jefferson 

Ground Floor Allied Arts Bldg. Lynchburg, Va. 



o 
p 

T 
I 

C 
A 
L 




CHANUKAH GREETINGS 

Feast of Lights 



C. W. HANCOCK AND SON 

General Building Contractors 
Allied Arts Bldg. Lynchburg, Va. 



L. D. JOHNSON'S SONS 

Roof Repairing a Specialty 
1407 W. Cary St RICHMOND, VA. Dial EL 5-2911 



18 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



December, 1964 




SAVE- --AND MAKE IT A HABIT! 



Current Dividend Rate per annum 



LYNCHBURG FEDERAL 
Saving and Loan Association 

Home Office 615 Church St. Dial VI 5-4551 

Miller Park Branch 1990 Fort Ave. Dial VI 5-6091 

Brookville Branch 7114 Timberlake Rd. Dial CE 9-5210 
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



YOU OWE YOURSELF ONE NIGHT 
FOR SELF-IMPROVEMENT 

Complete Business Education for Men and Women 
Four 12-week quarters each year, day or night 

PHILLIPS BUSINESS COLLEGE 



1112 CHURCH STREET 



LYNCHBURG, VA. 



FUEL OIL FOR HOMES AND INDUSTRY 

LYNCHBURG 
OIL COMPANY, Incorporated 



VI 7-8.8.75 



2459 Campbell Avenue 



Patterson 

DRUG Co., Inc. 

Lynchburg — Danville — Martinsville 
Altaviita - — Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Roanoke, Va. 



ANDERSON'S 

Ptggfy Wiggly 

SUPER MARKETS 

Lynchburg, Va. Danville, Va. 

Alta-Vista, Va. 



TEACHING THE BLIND 

By Robert Appel 



The Jewish religious school lias 
become the key used to unlock the 
door to public schools for blind 
children who otherwise might 
have no choice but to get their 
secular education at segregated 
residential schools ior the blind. 

There is much discussion and 
debate nowadays about school in- 
tegration. The kind which moti- 
vates the program of the Jewish 
Braille Institution of America is 
to get the Jewish blind child inte- 
grated into the general commu- 
nity as well as into the religious 
congregation. 

Teach the blind Jewish child 
Braille, says Dr. Jacob Freid the 
Institute's executive director. Pro- 
vide him (and her) with English 
and Hebrew Braille texts for at- 
tendance at religious schools with 
sighted children. Put a Hebrew- 
English Braille prayerbook in his 
hands and he becomes part of the 
congregation. Give him a Hagga- 
dah in Braille and he becomes 
a fully-participant member of the 
family Seder Service at the Pass- 
over table. 

How have these theories worked 
in practice? One answer is that 
some 80 per cent of Jewish blind 
children in the United States and 
Canada are estimated bv Dr. Freid 
to be currently integrated in their 
own religious schools with sighted 
children as a result of this pro- 
gram. 

Thirteen years ago, the Institute 
started its efforts to make it pos- 
sible for any Jewish blind girl or 
boys to get a Jewish education in 
his or her synagogue school along 
with sighted children, not apart 
from them. 

A key element in the program 
was the creation of the needed 
Braille texts and related classroom 
materials. With the aid of interest- 
ed Jewish women's groups, a 
corps of volunteer English and 
Hebrew Braille transcribers was 
developed throughout the United 
States and Canada. The volunteers 
are needed to prepare the English 
and Hebrew texts and other mate- 
rials required by the religious 
school chosen by the child and his 
family, whether Reform, Conser- 
vative or Orthodox. The Institute 
then provides the particular ma- 
terials needed by each child. 



Since the program was started, 
more than 300 Jewish blind chil- 
dren have received a complete 
Jewish education in their own 
local religious schools. Currently 
there are 134 children in the pro- 
gram in the two countries. In ad- 
dition, Dr. Freid reports, the In- 
stitute is helping to provide a reli- 
gious education for more than 65 
other blind Jewish children in 
residential homes lor the blind 
in various American cities. 

How man) of the known blind 
Jewish children does the program 
reach? Dr. Freid estimates that, 
1 10111 data from two studies, there 
are about 50 Jewish blind children 
in the United States and Canada 
who, for one reason or another , do 
not lake part in any of the Insti- 
tute's programs lor them. Happi- 
1\. the scope oi the problem of 
blind children is diminishing. 
Most child blindness in the past 
occurred shortly after birth in 
frail, premature infants who re- 
quired prolonged incubation dur- 
ing which they breathed oxygen. 
Over exposure to oxygen — more 
than 18 days — can result in retro- 
lentil fibroplasia — destruction of 
the retinal walls and blindness. 
With the discovery of the tragic 
results of such overexposure, treat- 
ment of such infants has been 
modified and the incidents of 
blindness from this cause have 
dropped sharply. 

The scope of the volunteer con- 
tribution to this program religious 
education is indicated in the 
statistic that during the 1963-64 
school year, more than 400 special 
books and religious texts were pre- 
pared in Braille for Jewish chil- 



Brown Morrison 
Company 

Fine Printing . . - 

Office Supplies 

LYNCHBURG, VA. 



Marvin Moseley 

• Plumbing 

• Heating 

• Contractor 

Ralph Moseley 

1816 Park Avenue 
LYNCHBURG, VA. 

• Contractor 

• Insulation 



December, 1964 



The American Jewish. 1 1MES-OUTLOOK 



19 




Walter Artzt of New York has contributed $500,000 to the Israel Edu- 
cation Fund for provision of scholarships to deserving students and teacher- 
training programs for secondary schools, according to Ralph I. Goldman, 
executive director of thz Fund which was recently initiated by the United 
Jewish Appeal. The announcement followed dedication ceremonies of the 
Walter Artzt High School in Tel Aviv-Jaffa, first of 72 to be built and 
equipped in Israel through a five-yca: capital fund program assessed by the 
IEF at $127.6 millions. 



dren in synagogue and temple 
religious schools. During that pe- 
riod, 32 children were 
Hebrew Braille. 



taught 



The nexi step of The Braille 
Institute was to induce local 
Boards of Education to accept 
blind children for admission to 
normal public school classes. The 
basis for that action was the record 
of such children in demonstrating 
their ability not only to keep up 
with sighted puplis in Jewish re- 
ligious schools but also in many 
cases to do better than the average 
sighted pupil. Because of their 
handicap, blind children, particu- 
larly if they are given effective 
guidance and encouragement, of- 
ten display a drive to accomplish 
which is lacking in sighted chil- 
dren. Most of the blind children 
in Jewish religious school, for ex- 
ample, continue their religious 
education through high school. 
Almost all of those going to col- 
lege become affiliated with Hillel. 




FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Lynchburg, Va, 



The Jewish Braille Institute, 
pioneering in the effort to inte- 
grate blind children in normal 
public school classes, assembled 
impressive evidence of successful 
religious school integration by 
blind children in a living educa- 
tional laboratory — the normal 
sighted classroom in a religious 
setting. Parents of such children 
were encouraged to present to 
local Boards of Education proof 
of the ability of their children to 
be educated with sighted children 
in a normal classroom situation. 
The residt has been the opening 
of many school systems in cities 
and states to blind children who 
formerly were forced into segre- 
gated residential schools for the 
blind. 

Communities throughout the 
United States are now affording 
blind children an integrated edu- 
cation in public schools. The num- 
ber of Jewish bli"<d chlidren now 
attending these public schools is 
nearly 100. Among the cities where 
they are accepted in the public 
school are Philadelphia, Minnea- 
polis, Tacoma, Los Angeles, Buffa- 
lo, Ramsey, N. H . Des Moines and 
others. 

It is not only th l Jewish blind 
children who hav? benefitted from 
this trail blazing effort by the In- 
stitute, says Dr. Eried. Hundreds 
of non-Jewish blind children also 
are being accepted as the practice 
of this unique and vital form of 
school integration continues to 
spread from city to city and from 
state to state. 

BUY THAT 
ISRAEL BOND 



Central Virginia s own 
full-service bank 



FIDELITY 



ATIONAL BANK 

Altavista — Amherst — Brookneal — Brookville 
Lynchburg — Madison Heights — Rustburg 



FOR EXCELLENCE IN SERVICE 



• WAITRESSES 

UNIFORMS 



• NURSES 



TECHNICIANS 
MAIDS 



FROM 

DUT1-DUDS, INC., Manufacturers 
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Available in Retail Outlets Nationally 



CHANUKAH 
GREETINGS 



' The Feast 
of Lights" 




STROTHER DRUG CO., Inc. 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 

Established 1853 

# LYNCHBURG 

# RICHMOND 

# VIRGINIA 



FEAST OF LIGHTS 
GREETINGS 



EASTERN ELECTRIC CO. 

WHOLESALE ONLY 
1100 COMMERCE ST. LYNCHBURG, VA 

RADIO - TV 
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 



^ 



20 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



December, 1964 



E, VIRGINIA 



REX ALL 



TWO 

DOWNTOWN 

DRUG STORE! 

Roanoke, Va. 



Turner Drug Co., Inc. 

101 Market Square 

Phone DI 5-8134 



Pafse! Drug Co., 

129 Salem Avenue, S. W. 
Phone DI 5-8129 




SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

CHURCH AT FIRST, S W • rtOANOKE, 1/A. • Diamond 5-153$ 

Branch Office : Cross Roads Mall 
Telephone DI 5-1535 ROANOKE. VA 



SALE 



R. R. QUICK, Ownc 



REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 
SALES— RENTALS - LOANS 






■1 'I 3-807 S 


Quick. 


Realtors 


L,&i|2,W*tt Catnpbell AVe., Roanoke, Va. .... | 



Roanoke Ready-Mix Concrete Corp. 

Buy Concrete the Clean Way 
NO FUSS — NO MUSS — IT COSTS NO MORE 



S. Jeff erson St. 



ROANOKE, VA. 



Phone DI 4-6617 




Samuel D. Leidesdorf (right), 82-year-old communal and philanthropic 
leader, receives the American Jewish Committee's 1964 Herbert H. Lehman 
Human Relations Award. Making the presentation at a dinner, held at the 
Hotel Plaza, is Jacob Blaustein, industralist of Baltimore and Honorary 
President of the American Jewish Committee. Mr. Leidesdorf was cited for 
"a half century of dedicated services to human rights and human relations 
causes." U.S. Senator Robert F. Kennedy was the principal speaker at the 
dinner. 

, Va. Beth Israel 

MRS. JOSEPH YOSAFAT, Correspondent 



The month of October was high- 
lighted by the annual joint lunch- 
eon meeting of Beth Israel and 
Temple Emanuel Sisterhoods. 
The meeting, held this year at 
Temple Emanuel, was presided 
over by Mrs. Morton Fox, presi- 
dent of the Synagogue sisterhood, 
and Mrs. Robert Berbert, Temple 
sisterhood president. Alter a love 
1\ luncheon we were entertained 
by a delightful musical skit which 
humorously pointed out thai sis- 
terhood problems are universal, 
even with sisterhoods on Mars! 
Those gals whose talents made 
the skit possible were Mrs. Je- 
rome Barr, Mrs. Joseph Brumberg, 
Mrs. Marc Froot, Mrs. Myron 
Glassner, Mrs. Murray Goldstein. 
Mrs. Sidney Katz, Mrs. Albert 
Lippman, Mrs. Roll Manko, Mrs. 
Malcolm Rosenberg, Mrs. Morton 
Rosenberg, Mrs. Jerome Weiner. 
and Mrs. Joseph Yosafat. It was a 
delightful afternoon. 

The members of Beth Israel 
Congregation were honored this 
month to have Rabbi Simeha 
Kling of Greensboro, North Caro- 



lina, to speak to us on the tcpic: 
"What is Conservative Judaism?" 
Rabbi Kling's informative address 
was followed by a question and 
answer period. Afterward the la- 
dies of the sisterhood provided 
a lovely Oneg Shabbat. 

Mrs. Joseph E. Brumberg, elec- 
ted Board Member to Seaboard 
Branch, represented I»eth Israel 
Sisterhood at the Biennial Nation- 
al Women's League Convention of 
the United Synagogue of America, 
held at the Sheraton-Chicago Ho- 
tel. Chicago, Illinois, from Octo- 
ber 25-29. We are all anxious to 
hear her enthusiastic report at 
our next sisterhood meeting. 



Your Best Clothes Deserve The Best Cleaning • * * * 


★ ★ ★ ★ * 




AND • • • 






FOR THE 
BEST 




DRY CLEANING and DYEING 

502 irmST.KI.VK ROANOKE. VIRGINIA 


CLEANING 
DIAL DI 3-2465 







Eleven accused Nazis went on 
trial in Dusseldorf on charges of 
torturing and putting to deatii 
700,000 Jews in Treblinka. The 
trial is expected to last six weeks. 
An attorney for five of the defen- 
dants, in an opening statement, de- 
clared that since Hitler believed 
he was fulfilling a "sacred mission" 
in destroying European lewry — 
saving Germans from destruction 
at the hands of the Jews — that 
neither Hitler nor the defendants 
were acting maliciously, that they 
were merely obeying the law of 
the land and that they were there- 
fore wihtout guilt. The attorney 
was denounced by Heinz Galinski, 
head of West Berlin's Jewish com- 
munity and the Social Democra- 
tic Party demanded an investiga- 
tion by the West German Bar 
Association. 



December, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



21 



COLUMBIA, S. C. 

MRS. BERNARD LADEN, Correspondent 



The following officers of the 
Beth Shalom Congregation were 
recently elected: President, Irwin 
Kahn; 1st Vice President, Dr. Nor- 
man Sollod; 2nd Vice President I. 
L. Eskenazi, Treasurer; Harold 
Kline; Secretary, Donald Katz; Fi- 
ancial Secretary, Sol Silver. The 
trustees are Jacob Freed, Meyer 
Klire Stern, Bernard Kahn, 

Sol Silver, M. B. Kahn, Bernard 
Kline, Leonard Bog^n and Henry 
Hammer, Ex-officio. 

Mazel Tov to Air. and Mrs. 
Alan Gould upon the Bar Mirzvah 
o! their son, David on October 
10th. Also to Mr. and Mrs. Meyer 
Bluestein on the Bar Mitzvah of 
their son on October 24th. and to 
Mr. and Mrs. Sol Lonrie upon the 
Bar Mitzvah of their son Barry 
Jay on November 7th. 

The November Hadatsah meet- 
ing was held at the Center on the 
11th. A skit, "It Happened at the 
Medical Center", was presented by 
H. M. O. Chairman, Mrs. Melton 
Kligman. The cast included Mrs. 
Bernard Fleishman and Mrs. San- 
ford Aroneck. 

An excerpt from the forthcom- 
ing annual Hadassah Play, "A 
Thurber Comedy", directed by 
Mel Glass was given at the meet- 
ing also. The play was presented 
at Drayion Hall, Universitv of 
S. C. on November 21st. 

The B'Nai B'Rith Men officers 
elected for the year are: Donald 
Katz, President; Frank Bruck, 
President-elect, 1st Vice President, 
George Golson; 2nd Vice Presi- 
dent, Dr. Samuel Litman; Secre- 
tary, Mike Picow: Financial Sec- 
retary, I eon Ritter: Treasurer, 
Felix Goldberg: Trustees. Rabbi 
David S. Gruber, David Baker, 
Jules Bank, Melton Kligman, Hy- 

The Roanoke Newspapers 

Sell This 
$865 Million 

Market 




A 17-COUNTY MARKET WITH: 

560,510 Population 
$865,761,000 Buying Income 

THE ROANOKE TIMES 



man Rubin, David Wallace, Hy- 
man Simon. 

The B'Nai B'Rith Women had 
another very successful year ai 
the Fair. At their October meeting 
held at the center, they had a 
White Elephant Sale. Donald La- 
Belle was auctioneer. 

The Daughters of Israel Donor 
Luncheon was held on Wednes- 
day, November 18th at the Cen- 
ter. Mrs. Ruth Gottlieb Moore 
presented a talk and showed 
slides on "Life of An American 
Housewife in Pakistan". 
TEENAGE NEWS: Steven Cre- 
mer, son of Dr. and Mrs. Al Cre- 
mer was elected president oi the 
freshman class at the Universily of 
S. C. He was also recently elected 
freshman cheer leader . . . Mark 
Coplan, son of Mr. and Mrs Ed- 
win Coplan, has been elected pre- 
sident of the freshman class at 
Duke University. Joel Gottlieb, 
son of Mrs. Ruth Gottlieb Moore, 
has been selected to appear in 
Who's Who in American Colleges 
and Universities. Stephen Savitz 
presided over the S. C. Association 
of Student Councils held at Flora 
High School from October 12- 
14th. Mayor Pro Tern Rubin wel- 
comed the group when they con 
vened at the chamber of the 
House of Representatives. 

Mrs. Sam Wengrow was jgain 
a ribbon winner at the Fair for 
the best decorated Anniversan 
cake, birthday, cake and novelty 
cake. 

Norman Arnold was presented 
with a sterling silver award from 
the Calvert Distillers for 
outstanding sales accomplishment 
on behalf of the Ben Arnold Com- 
pany .... The 1964 United Fund 
Campaign went over the top un- 
der the leadership of Irwin Kahn 
.... Bernard Levine was elected 
president and Meyer Love secre- 
tary of the Richland Mall Asso- 
ciation . . . Dr. Joseph A. Klein 
was the speaker at the meeting of 
the Central District Dental So- 
ciety which operates the Town 
Theatre. 

The Center's Annual Cultural 
Film Festival began with "Girl 
With A Suitcase" shown on Octo- 
ber 25th. The Second Film "Sum- 
merskin" was shown on November 
15th. 

The Anemone Garden Club 
met at the home of Mrs. Marvin 




TAKE IT EASY 

Discover how much 
time you can save 
for lazy living by 
paying bills with 
First National 
checks! 

I 



FIRST 
NATIONAL 
EXCHANGE 

BANK 



OFFICES IN BEDFORD • BLACKSBURG • BRISTOL • LEBANON 
MARION • RICHLANDS • ROANOKE • SALEM • WYTHEVILLE 

MEM8ER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 





• FUEL OIL FOR HOME 
AND INDUSTRY 



Day and Night 
Delivery 



2677 ROANOKE AVE. S.W. 



DIAL Diamond 5-8866 

ROANOKE, VA. 



• FEAST OF LIGHTS 

CHANUKAH GREETINGS I 



The Caldwell Sites Co. 

Roanoke, Va. Winchester, Va. 

Caldwell-Sites' complete stock of all office equipment and 
supplies is "better-brand" merchandise — the best there is. 
We welcome the opportunity to serve you. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLuUK 



December, 1964 



more and more selective women 



are wearing 

SHOES 



® 



. . . for with Natural Bridge they've 
discovered they can have their slender, 
ultra-feminine styles and comfort, too. 
The secret is in the Natural Bridge 
natural fit . . . the gentle caress that's 
purposely put into every pair. 




NATURAL BRIDGE, 

Division of Craddock-Terry Shoe Corporation, Lynchburg, Virginia 




Roanoke s> 
Leading 
Funeral Director 
EconomLal- 
DependaW 

i 

! 

JOHN M. 



OAKEYnc 

*^unenaf 7 <Senoice 
PHONE Diamond 3-4451 



CHANUKAH 
GREETINGS 



Best 
In 

Television 
and 
Radio 

CBS in Roanoke 

WDBJ 

960KC 
and 

WDBJ- TV 

(Ch. 7) 



VIRGINIA-CRAFTS 

INCORPORATED 
Keysville, Va. 



For The Best In 

CHENILLE BATH MAT SETS 
AND SCATTER RUGS 



CROWN COLONY CHENILLES 

7 New York Sales Office 

WALTER AND ROSEN 
295 Fifth Avenue 
Murray Hill 6-6424 



Berry. Mrs. Bernard Lapidus pre- 
sented a reading "Highlights of 
Medicine in Hadassah" at the 
combined Daughters of Israel — 
Hadassah Study Group. 

Mrs. Helen Mendel, superinten- 
dent of the Ceramics Art Depart- 
ment of the Fair, announced the 
following winners: Miss Barbara 
Lapidus, lor sculpture. In the jun- 
ior group, Judy Fischman, Debbie 
Levine, Honorary mention was 
given to Joe Rosen. 



The Beth Shalom Adult Edu- 
cation Group met at the Sunday 
School on the evening of Novem- 
ber 1st. Rabbi Murray Gevshon 
conducted "A Guide To Jewish 
Behavior". We had a good turn- 
out and are looking forward to 
the next meeting., 

Mazol Tovs to Mr. and Mrs. 
George Stein on the marriage of 
their daughter Susan, and to Mr. 
Mrs. Murray Riebman upon the 
birth of a son. 

(Please turn to Page 29) 



Meet A 

By Ben 

NEW YORK - A 21-year-old 
beauty queen, now Miss Greater 
New York, soon will walk out onto 
a stage, graciously lift the spark- 
ling crown from her head and 
place it on a new Miss Greater 
Gotham-town. 

The ceremony certainly will 
have all the traj^pings of the end 
of a modern beauty contest: The 
bright lights, the whistles and ap- 
plause, the popping flash bulbs, 
Che quick-witted and inspiring 
master of ceremonies, the eager 
reporters waiting to pounce for 
breathless quotes and the "there- 
she-is" ballad. 

Occasionally, however, a queen, 
who has a more-than-average story 
to tell and a desire to fulfill steps 
into th? spotlight. 

Miss Aliza Erber, Miss Greater 
New York, 1963-1964, survived 
World War II when most Euro- 
pean Jewish infants did not. And 
cne of the dramatic parts this 
native of Holland and resident of 
Israel in her youth would like to 
perform is that of Anne Frank in 
"Diary of A Young Girl." 

Miss Erber was born in 1913 
the year Nazi crematoriums were 
working full-blast in what was to 
end in the destruction of six mil- 
lion Jews. 



Beauty 

G. Frank 

The Erbers, like the Dutch fami- 
ly Frank, thought of one thing: 
survival. The family had agreed to 
split up. Bert Erber, Miss Erber's 
father, had escaped to Palestine 
and there joined the British Army. 
Desperate, Mrs. Erber hid her 
child with nuns in a convent out- 
side her home town of Almelo, 
Holland. The mother was taken in 
by friends. 

In 1944, the Allied Armies 
moved into Holland. Mrs. Erber, 
risking death, made her way into 
the sector of the Netherlands still 
occupied by the Germans and re- 
covered her daughter. After the 
war, the whole family was reunited 
in Palestine. 

Long before Miss Erber, now 
a junior at Hunter College, Bronx 
campus, was chosen queen of 12 
million Greater New Yorkers dur- 
ing the preliminaries for the Miss 
Universe contest, she paid a visit 
to the Amsterdam hideout of the 
girl whose diary has stirred mil- 
lions. 

"I went there because in a way 
my famliy hid out also, though we 
were fortunate," said the dark 
brown haired, green-eyed Bronx 
resident. She recalls after seeing 
th? dingy attic of the warehouse 



NOW 

A.. 




Telephone: MI 3-2831 



Sheraton - Monroe 
ISAotor Inn 

Franklin and Belvidere 
RICHMOND, VA. 

Teletype: 703-649-3960 



December, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



23 



office building, her admiration for 
the Dutch girl increased. 

"It's quite a shame anything 
like this had to happen," she de- 
clared. 

"Coming out of the budding, 
I was angry — angry that this hap- 
pened. I detest wars," added the 
5 foot, 4 inch, 110 pound student 
who is majoring in speech therapy 
and minoring in drama. 

It was in Holon, Israel, that 
Miss Erber began at age 1 1 what 
she hoped eventually would blos- 
som into a stage career. She was 
chosen for the lead part in an In- 
dependence Day biblical produc- 
tion. She soon joined B'matenu, 
the children's section of Habimah. 
When she was 15, she became a 
finalist in an Israel film company 
screening contest. The aspiring 
actress said the most embarrassing 
moment in her life occurred in 
1959 when she had to tell the mo- 
vie makers the family was leaving 
Israel. The Erbers were going to 
America. 

"In Israel," commented Miss 
Erber, "it was very hard to make 
a living." Her father, a captain 
in the Israel Army, was constantly 
in the service and this worried 
Mrs. Erber, according to Miss Er 
br. The latter added that her 
parents could not afford to send 
her and her sister to college in 
Israel. 

How does a new arrival to 
American shores get to be a queen? 

In Miss Erber's case, a boy she 
was dating at the time mailed 
her picture to the Miss Greater 
New York queen-seekers. At first, 
?he said, she was angry with her 
fromer beau because she wanted 
to be an actress and she did not 



MICK 

• OR • 

MACK 

STORES 

Are the Fine Food 
Stores in Roanoke 



want to achieve this "by going 
around and showing her figure." 

A beauty contest, of course, is 
quite an experience for any girl 
to go through, she pointed out. It 
includes, "shivering; in balliing 
suits; going to bed at 10 p.m. dur- 
ing contest time," and ol course 
remarks like, "She may be beauti- 
ful, but she probably has nothing 
in her head.'" 

Most of the girls in the contest 
were models, she noted, "ft was 
difficult to communicate with 
them," said the B-average student 
who added when she saw these 
model-types at the start of the pa- 
geant, she said to herself: "Forget 
it!" But the contest had its g kxI 
side, she said. "I met all kinds of 
interesting people." 

Crowned at New York's famous 
Latin Quarter, her year as queen 
had been spent cutting ribbons at 
supermarkets, waving to crowds 
from atop the back s°:it of conver- 
tibles and presenting trophies to 
victorious sportsmen. 

(Plea-e turn to Page 29) 



Always there with your help 



SUPPORT YOUR RED CROSS 
BLOOD PROGRAM 




The Jewish Community mourns 
the passing of James G. McDonald, 
at the age of 77. Mr. McDonald, as 
the first head of the diplomatic mis- 
sion to Israel from the United States, 
gave inumerable evidences of his 
friendship for the Jewish people. 




VACATION 




AUTOMOBILE 



HOME 




APPLIANCES 



It's Wiser To Save First 
But Bf Borrow You Must 
See Mountain Trust 

Successful saving means you can buy many good things 
in life and ar the same time enjoy a feeling of financial 
security. 

But remember, if borrow you must MTB will be happy to 
l^nd you money for cny worthwhile purpose. 



SOLID AND FRIENDLY AS THE MOUNTAINS OF VIRGINIA 




AEMB E ft FEDERAL DEFOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 




Product Of 

RAINBO BREAD GO. Roanoke, Virginia 



* Chanukah 

FEAST OF LIGHTS 



GREETINGS 



Ideal Laundry 
& Dry Cleaners, Inc. 

ROANOKE, VA. 
"A Name in Quality Service Since 1906" 

COMPLETE SERVICE 
LUX LAUNDRY 
STA-NU DRY CLEANING MIRZA RUG CLEANING 

LINEN RENTAL SERVICE 
UNIFORM RENTAL SERVICE 



2 1 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



December, 1964 



NORFOLK - PORTSMOUTH, VA. 



• FEAST OF LIGHTS 

CHANUKAH GREETINGS 



W. D. SAMS 

& Son, Inc. 

424 W. 21st Street Norfolk, Va. 

PLUMBING — HEATING — AIR-CONDITIONING 
RESIDENTIAL — COMMERCIAL — INDUSTRIAL 



H. D. OLIVER 

Established 1875 




FUNERAL DIRECTOR 
Colonial and Shirley Avenues Dial Norfolk MA 2-7353 

NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 



CAFFEE'S BAKERY 

Portsmouth's Leading Bakery and Pas'.ry Shop 
COMPLETE LINE OF FANCY BAKED GOODS 



425 County St. 



PORTSMOUTH, VA. 

Portsmouth, EX 7-0753 



CITY STEAM LAUNDRY 

and DRY CLEANING 

Special 24-Hour Service On Men's Shirts — Cash and Carry 
614 Middle Street Portsmouth, Va. 

FX 7 1-Day Cleaning Service — Cash and Carry 

3 Da .. s Cleaning Service— Call For and Deliver 




MEDLIN'S 
MEMORIALS 

3800 King St. 

Portsmouth, Va. 
Phone EX 3-2621 

* Monuments 

* Cemetery Lettering 

* Craftsmanship 

* Garden Furniture 



BRENNAN 

Jlfuueral JMmuc 



Directors and Embalmers 

EXport 7-3851 

711 Washington St. 
PORTSMOUTH, VA. 



NORFOLK, VA. 

MRS. WILLIAM SCHWARTZ, Correspondent 
The New Center Building Fund El Temple, B'nai 



Campaign with Joseph Eichel- 
baum and Martin Sherman, Co- 
Chairmen is going "full speed 
ahead" to raise the necessary sum 
of money to complete purchase 
of the Norfolk Academy campus 
and remodelling of some of the 
structures on it. Projected plans 
for the new Norfolk Jewish Com- 
munity Center have stirred and 
excited the entire Jewish Com- 
munity. The Jewish Community 
Council held their annual meeting 
on November 8th at the Academy 
site to enable members of the 
community to view the future 
home of the Jewish Community 
Center and the Jewish Community 
Council. 

Mrs. Raymond M. Fuoss, world 
traveler and teacher, was the guest 
speaker at the Norfolk Chapter 
of Hadassah donor luncheon on 
November 10th. She has been a 
member of the National Advisory 
Committee of the American Chris- 
tian Association for Israel. Donor 
funds go to the Hadassah Med- 
ical Organization. The new Ha- 
dassah-Hebrew University Medical 
Center at Kiryat Hadassah in Je 
rusalem consolidates Hadassah's 
medical facilities in a modern 
building complex. 

At a recent State-wide meeting 
on fund-raising, held in Wil- 
liamsburg, Va., forty people dis- 
cussed ways and means of dni-y- 
a more effective job within Lheir 
communities in behalf of Jewish 
organizations, including the U i- 
ted Jewish Appeal, which benefit 
from community-wide campaigns. 

The Annual Veterans Day 
Dance of Old Dominion Post No. 
158 Jewish War Veterans and the 
Ladies Auxiliary was held on No- 
vember 14th. On November 11th. 
the Post and Auxiliary participa- 
ted in the annual memorial obser- 
vance. Mrs. Rose Schorr, National 
President of JWVA was guest of 
honor at weekend proceedings 
which included a State Depart- 
ment Seminar on Sunday. 

The annual Chanukah Carnival 
sponsored by the Men's Club and 
Sisterhood of B'nai Israel Syna- 
gogue will be held Sunday, Decem- 
ber 6th and promises many new 
attractions for young and old. 

The Jewish Community Lecture 
Series sponsored jointly by Beth 



Israel Syna- 
gogue, Chef Sholom Temple, 
Temple Israel and the Jewish 
Community center started the 
1964-65 season highlighted by the 
personal appearance of Dr. loyce 
Brothers. The popular Psycholo- 
gist attracted a huge audience 
with her timely topic, "The Prob- 
lems of Jewish Intermarriage." 

Area Sisterhoods were pleased to 
welcome Mrs. Pearl Krauss to the 
Tidewater scene who has earned 
for herself the affection of sister- 
hood women everywhere through 
her record of outstanding service 
to National Women's League as 
a member of the National Com- 
mittee Torah Fund. 

BUY THAT 
ISRAEL BOND 
NOW! 




Rabbi Emanuel S. Goldsmith of 
Halifax, Nova Scotia, has been named 
Associate Director of Program and 
Publications of the B'nai B'rith 
Youth Organization, announced 
David M. Blumberg, Nashville, 
Tenn., chairman of the B'nai R'rith 
Youth Commission. 



luircftftiFiuture 



i: 

Flowers 



SUNDAY 
SCHOOL CHAIRS 

REQUEST 




KEE llATAI.Uti 

SCHOOL EQUIPMENT CO., Inc 
327 W. Main, Richmond, Va. 



MELVIN W. F.STES 

^^BUY AT TMt^ 

£sso 



Servicenter 
NOW LOCATED 



2301 W. B road St. 
Phone EL 5-9715 

RICHMOND, VA. 



December, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



25 



Broadway Observation Deck 

By B. M. Conning 



Fiddler On The Roof, 

starring Zero Mostel is a solid and 
resounding smash hit. Adapted 
Irom the Sholom Aleichem "Tev- 
ye" stories by Joseph Stein with 
music by Jerry Bock and lyrics 
by Sheldon Harnick under the 
super direction of Jerome Rob- 
bins, it makes for an enchanted 
night at the theatre. Read every 
synonym for magic. Read ever)' 
synonym for wonderful. Apply 
those terms to Fiddler On The 
Roof and you might obtain a 
whit of an idea of how sensational 
this presentation is. Mr. Mostel 
gives one of the greatest and most 
endearing portrayals seen on 
Broadway within memory. His 
Tevye is touching, funny, darling 
and heroic. Producer Harold 
Prince and his talented cohorts 
have succeeded in maintaining 
the tenderness and compassion of 
the simple tales of Sholom Alei- 
chem. No small feat this consider- 
ing the magnification indigenous 
to the metaphorphosis from shorl 
stories to a full-blown Broadway 
musical. Everything about the 
production is just right. There is 
no conventional overture. There is 
no smash razzamatazz finale. Pre- 
ponderance of critical appraisal 
was highly favorable. Kerr called 
it a "near-miss," an opinion I do 
not share. Other reservations were 
so minor that one can easily for- 
get them. Although it was writ- 
ten in the Jewish ethos, Fiddler 
On The Roof, is of interest to 
all theatre-goers — regardless of 
creed. The little man on the roof 
playing the fiddle is going to sil 
there thru many seasons to come. 
It is a must-see! L'Chaim! 

Ira Wallach's new play Ab- 
sence Of A Cello, is great 
fun. Produced by Michael Ellis 
and astutely directed by James 



Hammerstein in an excellent set- 
ting by William Ritman, the pla\ 
might turn out to be a bread- 
winner. Mr. Wallach writes with 
dash and verve. He casts an ex- 
tremely critical eye at the coipora- 
tion image. He shatters the golden 
calf of Big Business with the stone 
tablets of literate satire. The even- 
ing abounds in intelligent humor. 
The work is impudent, bright, 
stimulating and absorbing yet 
underneath all of this is the crys- 
tal clear honesty of the play- 
wright. There is a message in 
this funfest but it never gets in 
the way of a cheerful evening. 
The cast simply couldn't be bet- 
ter. Fred Clark, Ruth White, Ruth 
McDevitt, Mala Powers, Charles 
Grodin, Murray Hamilton and 
Lee Kurty all perform felicitously. 

The David Merrick-Gerry Ral 
fles production of Oh Wh; t A 
Lovely . War the first British 
import of the new season is a bra- 
vura attraction. I found it to be 
provocative, shrewd and highly 
entertaining. History has been 
converted into a harlinquinade 
underscoring die utter senseless- 
ness of war. Oh What A Love- 
ly War is not a conventional 
musical. It is surrealist and sardo- 
nic. The creation of a musical 
based on the imbecilic blunders 
of World War I is a colossal feat. 
That she accomplished it with 
brightness, delightful informality, 
humore and inventiveness reflects 
great credit on director Joan Lit- 
tlewood. Oh What A Lovely 
War isn't everybody's fish and 
chips but I hope it will stay with 
us for a long, long time. With 
David Merrick guiding its destiny 
I suspect that it will. 

We have had the Peking Man; 
the Piltdown Man; the Rhodesian 
Man; the Neaderthal Man; the 



"Nothing To Sell But Fast Service' 



• OVERNITE 
Transportation Co. 



RICHMOND, Va. 



1100 Ninth St. Road 



Norfolk, Va. 



BRACELETS 



Crafted by Kirk, America's 
Oldest Silversmiths, these love- 
ly bracelets are of substantial 
weight and unusually fine fin- 
ish. Repousse' is the original 
Kirk flower and foliage design. 
The plain is ideally suited to 
our fine engraving. Both are 
wonderful gifts for any occa- 
sion. 

D. P. PAUL (0. 

Jewelers - Silversmiths 

Repousse' Bracelet $6.75 

Plain Bracelet 6.00 231 Granby St. Norfolk 10, Va. 

Federal Tax Included 




'The Place to Save" 
'The Place to Borrow" 



NORFOLK FEDERAL 
Savings & Loan Association 

239 Main St. NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 

7420 Granby St. NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 

600 Court St. PORTSMOUTH, VIRGINIA 

1 05 Janaf Shopping Center NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 
2C08 Cromwell Drive NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 



Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



BE 3-9611 



CHANUKAH 
GREETINGS 



FROM 




VIRGINIA PILOT 
ASSOCIATION 

NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 



G. ALVIN MASSENBURG 



President 



26 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



December, 1964 



NEWPORT NEWS - HAMPTON 
ALEXANDRIA - PHOEBUS, VA. 



The 1965 BUICK 



Buick's finest . . . 
Buick's smartest . 
Buick's liveliest . 
Buick's sweetest . 
Buick's thriftiest . 



the Electra 225 
. the LeSabre 
. the Wildcat 
. . the Skylark 
. . the Special 



OPEL— Europe's most distinguished ECONOMY Car 

TEMPLE MOTOR COMPANY 

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA 



KI D-1265 



Est. 1860 



JAMES HENRY BEACH and SONS 

Sheet Metal Work 



210 King Street 



ALEXANDRIA, VA. 



DyDee Wash 



NORFOLK DIAL 
MADISON 5-0243 



424 CATALPHA AVE. 
HAMPTON, VA. 
CHestnut 4-2041 

As a member of the National Institute of Diaper Service, our diapers 
are under "National Laboratory Control" — periodically checked 
by chemists — bacteriologists — to maintain 100 per cent safety. 

Only this diaper service ... no other . . . brings you Baby Talk. 




COAL FUEL OIL 

PRINTED METER DELIVERIES 
PHONE CH 4-8484 NEWPORT NEWS, VA 




FRITO-LAY, INC. 

1827 N. Hamilton Street 
RICHMOND, VA. 
Manufacturers of 
Lay's Potato Chips 
Fritos — Corn-Chips 



SKILLED NURSING CARE 

AGED * 
INVALIDS 



24 Hours Daily Professional Supervision 




CHRONICALLY ILL 



• Nutritious Food by Trained Dietitian 

• Automatic Litter-size Hydraulic Elevator 

• Sprinkler System Throughout Building 

• Trained Staff of Nurses and Orderlies 

Bernard Maslan, Administrator 




Terrace Hill 
Nursing Home 

21 12 Monteiro Ave., 
Richmond, Va. Ml 3-2777 



Cro-Magnon Man; the Boskop 
Man; the Wadjak Man; the Tal- 
gain Man and it now appears that 
we are in the Age of the Saul 
Bellow Man. Mr. Bellow, who 
received volcanic praise from the 
literan savants from his recently 
published novel "Herzog" ven- 
tured into the theatre with his 
new play The Last Analysis. 
The centra] character of the pi a) 
Philip Bummidge (born Bumnio- 
vich) and Moses Elkanah Hjrzog 
(he protagonist of the novel are 
one and ihe same man. Both arc 
trying to find themselves. Both 
are seeking the road to salvation. 
Both are Saul Bellow talking to 
himself. The Lsat Analysis 
concerns itself with a has-been neu- 
roitc comedian (Sam Levene) who 
is so "gone" on amateur sell- 
analysis that he spends his last 
$30,000 to present on closed tele- 
vision an enactment of hi.^ life 
from l he present backward to his 
foetal state. This is piped in to 
a meeting of the American Psy- 
chiatric Association. The piece is 
truncated and diffused. It is ab- 
stract in the extreme, failing to 
create any emphathy one is al- 
ways on the outside looking in. 
It is a psyhcoanalytic Alice-in- 
Wonderland. Saul Bellow, power 
that he is in the world of letters 
has not yet mastered the craft of 
playwriting. His dialogue is too 
often of the printed page not of 
the stage. 

There are great moments of 
hilarity and wildness; there are 
times of intense symbolism (the 
depiction of Bumniidge in his 
mother's womb is fantastic inven- 
tion); there are periods of un- 
adulterated caricature and there 
are flashes of deep emotion. Put 
these all together, mix well, blend 
carefully and you have witches 
brew of — what? It is quite possi- 
ble that The Last Analysis 
might become "the thing to see" 
for a short time but it won't sur- 
vive for very long. As I left the 
theatre a line from one of Ann;: 
Russell's spoofing songs kept run- 
ning through my mind — "Bats in 
the belfrv! Bats in the belfry! 
Heigho Sigmund Freud." 

That incredible impresario Sol 
Hurok in addition to bringing us 
concert attractions and ballet has 
now invaded the precincts of 
Broadway with the 2nd British 
jrnn^n of the current season. 
Cambridge Circus. Togeth- 



er with David Black and in asso- 
ciation with Jay Julien and Andre 
Goulston, Mr. Hurok has presen- 
ted a beautifully wrapped gift 
package to the Main Stem. CAM- 
BRIDGE CIRCUS with a cast of 
five ramarkajbly talented males 
and one comely female is a re- 
freshing and inescapably engaging 
revue. It is not quite up to Be- 
yond The Fringe that Alex- 
ander Cohen brought us several 
vais hack but 'twill serve — and 
serve well. Paced far more slowly 
than the usual American entertain- 
ment of this type, it nevertheless 
abounds in keen humor and hands 
out laughs — belly laughs — with- 
out stinting. 



Do Your Part ! 
Contribute to the NorMi 
Carolina Home for the 
Jewish Aged 




The establishment of the Nation- 
al Association of Orthodox Syna- 
gogue Administrators by the Union 
of Orthodox Jewish Congregations 
of America has been announced by 
Moses I. Feuerstein of Brookline, 
Mass., national president of the 
UOJCA. 



TARRANT 
PRESCRIPTION 
DRUGGISTS 

MOTORCYCLE DELIVERY 

Fousr.ee r.nd Brosd 
MI 3-3469 Richmond. Va. 



Dividend-Paying Fire 
and Auto Insurance 
Phone King 9-0744 

Julian T. Burke, Inc. 

218 King Street 
ALEXANDRIA, VA. 



December, 1964 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



27 



Newport News, Ve 

MRS. MARTHA B. SHAPIRO, Correspondent 




Joar. Caloa, Director of the Nc'icnal Council of Senior Citizens, pre- 
senting a charter of membership in the National Council to Kenneth Arch, 
president of the local group. Left to right: Mrs. Mae Markowitz, Financial 
Secretary; Samuel. Mirmelstein, 3rd Vice-President; Mrs. Rose Garfinkel, 
1st Vice-President; Jrs. Belle Ruben, 2nd Vice-President; Mr. Caloa; Mr. 
Arch; Mrs. Harry Marks, Treasurer; Mrs. Jenny Weger, Recording Secretary. 



The Jewish Community Center 
Film Classics Cluh begins its Six- 
teenth Series on January 30, 1965. 
Mrs. Marvin Mazur, chairman- 
and her committee have selected 
six outstanding lilms, opening 
with "Mexican Bus Ride", a Spa 
nish film and winner of the 
Grand Prix at Cannes. On Feb 
ruary 13, "La Belle Americaine". 
a French comedy will he pr?;en 
ted, followed by "The Savag 
Eye" (American) on Februar\ 27 
The remaining films are: March 
97 _ "The Bicycle Thief" (Itali- 
an), April 24 — "My Six Convicts 
(American); May 8 — "Beaut) 
And The Devil" (French). All ar? 
award winning films. A coffee 
hour and discussion follow each 
showing. 

Leonard and Jay Gordon, Co 
chairmen of the Jewish Communi- 
tv Center Golf Tournament, have 
lined up the matches and the 
1964-65 tournament is now in 



CHANUKAH 
GREETINGS 



The Feast of Lights' 

HOTEL LANGLEY 

AND 

COFFEE SHOP 

HAMPTON, VIRGINIA 



progress. An awards banquet will 
be held ai the completion o! the 
tournament. 

The 1964-65 Men's Bowling 
League of the Jewish Community 
Center has been organized. Any- 
one interested in joining a team 
may call the Center or );uk Gold- 
berg, chairman. 

Two active young peoples 
groups arc the A. Z. \. lor boys 
and the B. H. (.. for girls. The 
meetings arc held on Sunday af- 
ternoons at 2:30 p. in., with Ted 
Baer as advisor for the A. '/.. A. 
and Mrs. Charles Braslow and 
Mrs. Rosalie Stein, advisors to the 
B. B. G. Come and join these 
groups al the Jewish Coinnuinil) 
Center. 

Heartiest congratulations to the 
following on their recent bar 
mitzvahs: 

Jimmy Lee, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Martin Lee; David Dorn, son of 
Mr. and Mss. Samuel Dorn: Jay 
Epstein, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jack 
Epstein: Neil Rosenbaum, son o! 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Rosenbaum. 



4- USE 

T CHRISTMAS 
| SEALS 




SI - # 

%k Mj 












FIGHT TUBERCULOSIS 
and Other Respiratory Disea 


ses 



Hampton-Phoebus-Newport News, Va. 




FEAST OF LIGHTS 

• CHANUKAH \ 
• GREETINGS 

FROM 

The Entire Personnel 0! 



WGH 

Saving the 
Hampton Roods